This Website By Laurence Goff of Newark Cemetery Notts UK

20150709_152626Our Historic Newark Cemetery

Newark 

London Road

Nottinghamshire

 NG24 1SQ

 Open All Year Round 

April – September 8am – 8pm

October -March 8am – 6pm

 

We will Remember them

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Taken by Laurence Goff (LG)

Flying over Newark Cemetery 


Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

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 Newark Cemetery 1856

Thursday 30th October 1856

The Church of England portion of the new Cemetery was consecrated by the Bishop of Lincoln. Soon after the ceremony took place, the very first burial was made for the family of W.N. Nicholson, Ironmonger, Market Place, Newark. Their three year old son Charles John.

On 23rd February 1856

At 10 O’clock the members of the Corporation and Burial Board together with Ministers of Churches from the area. The Town Mayor Henry Sutton, Chief Constable, Waterton, with the battle-axe and the Police, W.Newton the Clerk to the Board, Town Crier with Two Mace-bearers, 12 scholars from the Grammar School and other officials assembled at the Town Hall. The procession crossed the Market Place and went by Bridge Street, Carter Gate and Beaumont Street to the New Cemetery site. The corner-stone of the new buildings was laid by Joseph Branston Esq.

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  October – March 8am – 6pm

Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm

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The Canada goose was visiting Newark Cemetery 

Locating a grave have a look at this Map, walking up the Main Drive numbers start low and high at the other end of  cemetery. Please note Left  E side stand for East and Right  W side for West . The graves are numbered from A the next one will be B, C, D, E, and so on going outward on either side East or West. All new tombstone are black with the information on the back has  E for East then the letter for the row then the number, looking something like this E B 100 or West side W E 200.

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Laurence Goff

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  October – March 8am – 6pm

Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm

Laurence Goff

Newark resident Laurence Goff visiting Newark Cemetery

Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856

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 My blogging principles are that to strive to be accurate. I promptly correct any inaccuracy or error with a visible edit and update. I attribute and link to sources on the website wherever possible. My direct contact details are displayed on every page of the site. I do not receive payment or services for any reviews or editorial on this website. The views expressed are solely my own, and do not reflect the views of Newark Town Council.

This memorial website is Laurence Goff personal views, I have put it together and does not represent Newark Town Council . It dedicated to the thousands of  people who resting place going back to 1856.

 A number of Royal Air Force stations within and round Newark from which several Polish squadrons operated. The highest concentration of commemorations can be particularly found in Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire.  Our local cemetery with nearly 400 Polish that died during the 2nd world war from 1940 -1947 and are buried in special plot on the east side of Newark Cemetery. Many  of the  Polish Airman after the war stayed in the UK married and choose to be buried or their ashes remains put in Newark Cemetery near Polish war graves.

 SAM_7764Taken by LG  – War Memorial to the Fallen

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Memorial to the fallen near the Main Gate at Newark Cemetery, It is location on London Road, Newark, Notts.

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William Pride name was added 96 later on war memorial on 11th September 2014

The name of a first world war soldier from Newark, has finally been added to a war memorial after two years of campaigning.
Sapper William Pride’s name was engraved onto the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery yesterday, which by coincidence was the the 96th anniversary his death.

Sapper Pride, who served with the Royal Engineers, committed suicide in 1918 at a military camp in Kent while the balance of his mind was disturbed by his experiences of combat.

He had served with the Water Transport Corps ferrying wounded soldiers from the frontline in Mesopotamia, now Iraq, while under constant shell-fire.

His name was omitted from the town’s roll of honour after the war because of the stigma attached to suicide at the time.

It was sadly a familiar story replicated up and down the country as soldiers, seamen and airmen who took their own lives or were shot for cowardice were refused inclusion on war memorials.

Many would have had what we now understand to be post-traumatic stress disorder.

The wrong was finally righted yesterday when the name of Sapper William Pride was engraved on one of the memorial’s granite monuments.

Sapper Pride had already been recognised as a casualty of war by the Commonwealth War Grave Commission and honoured with one of its headstones on his grave which is in Newark Cemetery.

Pete Stevens of Balderton, who works for the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, discovered the omission and launched a campaign backed by the Advertiser and Sapper Pride’s descendants.

After strong lobbying, Newark Town Council, who own the cemetery, agreed in July to change the criteria for inclusion on the war memorial which meant Sapper Pride’s name could finally be added.

The work was carried out on Thursday. It was done by Mark Gill, the workshop manager at E. Gill and Sons of Newark and letter cutter Roger Smeeton.

A stencil was placed on the memorial and the name was then sandblasted near the bottom of the final column of first world war names.

Mr Gill said: “It was a shame it was not put on originally but I am pleased that the criteria has changed so it could be added.”

Sapper Pride’s great grandaughter Cherilyn Pride of Southend Avenue, Newark, visited the cemetery just after the work had been completed. She said it was wonderful to see his name finally on the memorial.

“Pete Stevens really got the ball rolling and the Advertiser has been a great help,” she said.

“I always hoped that his name would be added and I am very pleased that it has been. I feel it is important that people see the names of the brave men who sacrificed so much.”

Mr Stevens said it had taken a long time to sort the matter out.

“In the end we have done what we set out to achieve,” he said.

“It is right and fitting that Sapper Pride’s name is on the memorial.”http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Sapper-William-Prides-name-added-to-Newark-w

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Friends of Newark Cemetery

Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery  by appointment for groups

 Contact the Chairman Laurence Goff  01636-681878  mobile 07794613879 or leave a message at Newark Town Hall 01636-0333 or by Email: 

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk  

 

We  need to found more Volunteers to welcome visits to Newark Cemetery by  showing around our exhibition, serving refreshments giving tours or help 

We will help you locate a grave for visits.

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Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish Airmen

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Their Sacrifice during the dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth and Polish who also join up with the RAF

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Commonwealth and Polish War Graves, Newark On Trent, Nottinghamshire  24 1SQ

Time to emphasized the heroism, bravery, valour and determination for  our freedom. Lest We Forget, Britain honoured its war dead. Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish Sacrifice. The dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth that join up with the RAF that were killed and there resting place is Newark Cemetery 4 RAAF- Australian, 44 British Servicemen, 17 RCAF- Canadian, 3 RNZAF- New Zealand and 397 Polish Airmen and other servicemen.

Newark Cemetery can boast of having lot’s of impressive people that are buried in our Cemetery since 1856. An array of famous inhabitants that are buried in Newark

Laurence Goff Chairman Friends Of Newark Cemetery and Newark resident 

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Laurencegoff

Newark 

Laurence Goff Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery

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Laurencegoff 

Visiting Commonwealth and Polish War Grave – Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire

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Many British Commonwealth helped thanks to  Royal Australian Air Force (4 killed), British, Royal Canadian Air Force (17 killed), Royal New Zealand Air Force (3 killed) and Polish Air Force some (nearly 400 killed) They are Buried in Newark-On-Trent Cemetery 2nd World War at Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire. Let us all Remember the many Airmen that were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force during the Battle to save Europe 1939-1945.  Paying a fitting Tribute to our brave fighters for their contribution. 17,000 Polish pilots and ground crew members had formed 14 squadron in RAF and 2,000 were killed of which over 400  from 1940 – 1947 are buried in Newark Cemetery.

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Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm,  October – March 8am-6pm

Location:  Newark-on-Trent

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski

 Poland’s war heroes

Lest We Forget

 4th July 2013 marked the 70th anniversary of his death

Buried in Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July 1943 until 13th September 1993

 I believe we should Remember him, RIP

 

Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish their Sacrifice 

 The dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth and Polish who also join up with the RAF

 Many were killed who resting place is Newark Cemetery 4 RAAF – Australian, 44 British Servicemen, 17 RCAF – Canadian, 3 RNZAF – New Zealand and 397 Polish Airmen together with other servicemen

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves, Newark On Trent NG24 1SQ

Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish

Their Sacrifice 

General Wladyslaw Sikorski

Our remembrance for Poland’s War hero

Lest We Forget

 4th July 1943 – 2013

Buried in Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July 1943 until 13th September 1993

Let’s mark the 70th anniversary of his death

General Sikorski was one of the great Polish heroes. After the German invasion of Poland, he became the Prime Minister of a new Polish Government in exile, and also Commander in Chief of the Polish Armed Forces, which fought with the Allies by land, sea and air throughout the Second World War. But he also personally directed Poland’s internal resistance movement against the German occupying army in Poland itself. He was thus Political leader, military leader and resistance leader, all at the same time. He was the personal embodiment of the whole Polish Nation’s fight for survival as a free nation and as a people, and liberation from the terrible oppression to which they had become subject. It is little wonder then that this man was so loved and respected by his people, and that they continue to revere and honour his memory to this day. As British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill said in his tribute to General Sikorski in the House of Commons, ‘he was truly the symbol and embodiment of that spirit which has borne the Polish nation through the centuries.’ General Sikorski was also very active in World politics at that time, attending many political conferences with the allies and was, indeed, one of the Architects of the United Nations. Churchill described his death as ‘a most grievous loss to the cause of the United Nations.’ And so it was as Commander in Chief of the Free Polish Forces that General Sikorski left England on 24th May 1943 onboard an RAF Liberator Aircraft bound for Cairo to visit Polish Troops fighting with the Allies in North Africa. On his return from Cairo, his Liberator aircraft touched down at Gibraltar, just as it had done on the way out to Cairo. General Sikorski was accompanied by his daughter Zofia, who was also Chief of the Polish Womens Auxiliary. The Party also included the Polish military Chief Of Staff and Chief of Operations, and their support staff. They arrived at Gibraltar on Saturday 3rd July at 6.37p.m. Their aircraft, the same Liberator, took off from Gibraltar airport at 11p.m. the next day, Sunday 4th July on the final leg of General Sikorskis return journey from Cairo to London. The aeroplane crashed seconds after take-off, just off the eastern end of the runway. General Sikorski, his daughter and all his party perished. General Sikorski’s body lay in State for several days at the Cathedral of St Mary the Crowned on Main Street, until a Polish warship could reach Gibraltar to take it to the UK for burial. On arrival at the Cathedral entrance the street was crowded with Gibraltarian men (their wives, children and parents had been evacuated from Gibraltar during the war) who wanted to show their respect to this courageous Polish hero. The then Bishop of Gibraltar celebrated a requiem mass in the Cathedral before the mortal remains of General Sikorski and his party were transferred to the Polish destroyer ‘Orkan’. General Sikorski was buried in Newark Cemetery in England. His grave became a shrine to free Poles throughout the world whose view was that the General’s remains should never be returned to Poland while the country was under foreign domination. It was therefore not until the fall of the Berlin Wall and the liberation of Eastern Europe from Soviet domination that, in September 1993, his remains were disinterred and flown to Warsaw to be re-interred in a special crypt in Wawel Cathedral which lies inside the walls of the ancient castle, traditional burial place of Polish Kings.

  Remember him

 RIP

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/friends-of-newark-cemetery-fonc/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/04/13/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

The Act Of Commemoration, Honouring The Memory As Our Fitting Tribute To Them

 The Valiant Contribution made by the Commonwealth and Polish Airmen for protection of our country freedom.The Newark Town Council  particularly proud to be the custodian of the Memorial to General Wladyslaw Sikorski

 Newark Cemetery can boast of having lot’s of impressive people that are buried in our Cemetery since 1856. An array of famous inhabitants that are buried in Newark.

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Chapel Interpretation Centre (East side turn left at the Main Arch)

{Location walk from the parking lot to the main Arch turn left red side door}

Organised by

The Friends of Newark Cemetery

 The Chapel  Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery, will  open  by appointment for groups for our exhibition – tours  on 7 days a week during the Summer Months

Please give plenty of notice

{Location walk from the parking lot to the main Arch turn left red side door}

Chapel Interpretation Centre {Former Non Conformist Chapel} 

 (East side turn left at the Main Arch)

Laurencegoff

Friends Of Newark Cemetery

Opening of The Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery

 September Heritage Day  2014 – Annual Air Bridge Memorial Service

28th September 2014 Polish and Commonwealth  2pm from the main gate off London Road NG24 1SQ

Friends Of Newark Cemetery

  

25th October 2015 Sunday All Souls Day Polish and Commonwealth event 3pm from the main gate of London Road

Friends Of Newark Cemetery

Opening of The Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery

 Any other times and dates by appointment

The Friends of Newark Cemetery,

Also we will provide help

In finding a specific grave location and are

Offering a general tour of the Cemetery.

A highlight within the Centre Will be a

Display of history of Newark Cemetery

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Laurence Goff and Pete Stevens

Photo Project from the First World War by Pete Stevens, with over 150 Photographs from

the Newark & Balderton Memorial to the Fallen

 

Volunteers are welcome

For more information

Laurence Goff

Chairman

Friends of Newark Cemetery

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

 Newark Town Hall/Market Place

Newark-on-Trent NG24 1DU

01636-681878 (home)

07794613879 {Mobile}

The Friends of Newark Cemetery  will open The Chapel  Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery,  on weekend  or by appointment for groups.  Historical  walks or  help by locating  families/casualties both in Newark Cemetery.  Friends of Newark Cemetery Volunteers will give assistance members of the public with display of history of well know people that are buried here.

 Come and see what you will find

At Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery.

We will have volunteers on site from Friends of Newark Cemetery

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 We are happy to welcome groups visiting Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for  160 years since 1856. This memorial website is my personal views, I have put it together and do not represent Newark Town Council . It dedicated to the thousands of  people who resting place is at Newark Cemetery for all to see and view. Having a means of further promoting Newark cemetery, and encouraging interested people to join the tribute. This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately, the content here is solely the responsibility of

Newark resident Laurence Goff

Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery

Newark Cemetery can boast of having lot’s of impressive benefactors  since 1856. An array of  names and servicemen going back to 1914 to the present day who resting place is located in Newark-On-Trent.

Amongst the many well-known local people that are buried in Newark Cemetery include  among the many graves are Memorials to some of Newark’s greatest benefactors and people who have helped shape Newark

Thursday 30th October 1856. The Church of England portion of the new Cemetery was consecrated by the Bishop of Lincoln. Soon after the ceremony took place, the very first burial was made for the family of W.N. Nicholson, Ironmonger, Market Place, Newark. Their three year old son Charles John.

On 23rd February 1856 . At 10 O’clock the members of the Corporation and Burial Board together with Ministers of Churches from the area. The Town Mayor Henry Sutton, Chief Constable, Waterton, with the battle-axe and the Police, W.Newton the Clerk to the Board, Town Crier with Two Mace-bearers, 12 scholars from the Grammar School and other officials assembled at the Town Hall. The procession crossed the Market Place and went by Bridge Street, Carter Gate and Beaumont Street to the New Cemetery site. The corner-stone of the new buildings was laid by Joseph Branston Esq.

Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire since 1856

Newark Cemetery at first glance appear to possess anything of particular historical significance, since I have found out that is not the case.

 Friends Of Newark Cemetery next meeting is on Wednesday  20th January 2016  Newark Town Hall at 2.00pm in the Pickin Room

Family history and research day which was held last April was a great success so will be doing tours and locating graves for visits. We are grateful to Newark Town Council and James Radley  who opened Newark cemetery records system so families can have the plot numbers and location of the grave  there would like to found. 

Pete Stevens of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, who lives in Balderton, has made it a project to try to produce a photo of every one that died in wars.

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 The  War Memorial To The Fallen

457 WWI –  WW11 144 were killed from Newark

Newark Town Hall, Market Place, Newark, Nottinghamshire, NG24 1DU.

 20150709_152626Laurence Goff At Newark Cemetery

History and sacrifice come alive in Newark cemetery

Pete Stevens of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, who lives in Balderton, has made it a project to try to produce a photo of every one of the 457 WWI fallen who came from Newark. 144 of those from WWII. Photos found so far are displayed in the Interpretation Centre.
Some 30 fatalities from the Ransome and Marles bombing in 1941 are buried here, including John Henry Green, a roof spotter in the Home Guard who had the misfortune, aged 55, to be up there when the bombs rained down, and Edward Beale. I located his grave when far-flung family members travelled to Newark to see it for the first time.

There are of course 397 Polish war graves here from WWII (the figure of 422 given in the cemetery leaflet includes fatalities from 1947) – and General Sikorski was buried here during his country’s occupation, his remains being finally repatriated in 1993.

Given the prospect of a sunny summer’s day, most folk would contemplate a trip to the seaside rather than visit the local cemetery, but having just spent two fascinating hours in Newark Cemetery I’m starting to appreciate its attractions, writes Graham Keal.

These even include a donkey, though he’s not giving rides and he (or she) is there in photographic form only. Newark town councillor and chair of the Friends of Newark Cemetery Laurence Goff showed me round and shared his increasing knowledge about the cemetery its residents. And he told me about the donkey, whose photograph he’s pictured holding:

“He used to live in the cemetery many years ago and pulled the cart with the coffins. I’m still trying to find out what his name was,” said Laurence.

Apart from the donkey photo there were many more reasons to visit, especially on this Saturday’s next Open Day (July 14 2012) – peace and quiet, flowers and the freshly mown grass, the chaffinch perched perkily on a nearby gravestone while we reviewed the final home of Newark’s local notables, and the chance to quietly appreciate for a moment the sacrifice made by so many young men in wars spanning centuries.

The Victorian chapel now converted into the cemetery’s Interpretation Centre holds a wealth of information, photographic displays and leaflets detailing everything from the sobering number of soldiers and servicemen – English, Polish, Canadians, Australians and New Zealanders – laid to rest here to the most famous residents and the native fauna and flora. Apart from the chaffinch, you might see a spotted flycatcher, gold crests, field fares and tree creepers as well as the more common blackbirds, sparrows and wood pigeons – plus squirrels and hedgehogs.

Laurence has become thoroughly absorbed in the cemetery’s history since becoming a founder member of the Friends of Newark Cemetery in 2005. He has been Chairman of the Friends for three years: “It’s been fascinating to find out about the people here. I didn’t know when I started that I would get so heavily involved, but once you’ve taken that first step, you have to find out the next chapter.”

He gets enquiries from all over the world about long-lost graves of family members – his website at https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com has had 32,700 hits. Last year a lady from Australia came in search of the grave of Hilda Scaife, who died in 1923, aged 39.

Her gravestone reads “She kept her honour bright” but the grave took some finding, not least because it was smothered in ivy. Laurence later cleared the ivy and tidied the area before emailing a picture of Hilda’s grave, brightness restored, to her relative.

Local notables buried here include war hero Sam Derry, whose daring undercover work in The Vatican during WWII was immortalised in his gripping book The Rome Escape Line, about his work with Monsignor Hugh O’Flaherty, sustaining escaped PoWs and smuggling them back to Britain. Their exploits were also recorded in the film The Scarlet and the Black, starring Gregory Peck. Sam even appeared on This Is Your Life.

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/05/22/lieutenant-colonel-sam-derry-of-newark-on-trent/

 

Balderton’s distinguished actor Sir Donald Wolfit is not buried here, but his older brother Philip Woolfitt is (Sir Donald changed the spelling for his stage name). Philip was a casualty of WWI, aged just 19. He joined up after travelling to Canada and served in the Canadian infantry.

Cornelius Brown, who died in 1907 after writing the definitive history of Newark in two huge volumes and editing the Newark Advertiser for 33 years, lies here as do renowned artist William H. Cubley, Joseph Gilstrap, whose son founded Newark’s first free library in 1883, countless Quibells and 48 Blatherwicks, both families having made great contributions to the town’s history and civic life.

  • Further Open Days at the Cemetery Interpretation Centre are planned for,  2014.  Newark Heritage Open day. Laurence can also open the centre for groups or visitors  by arrangement. Call him on 01636 681878 leave a message or 07794613879 email:

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

“Loved In Life, Honoured In Death, Cherished In Our Memory, Amen”

  Newark Cemetery 1856

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  October – March 8am – 6pm

Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm

 

Locating a grave have a look at this Map, walking up the Main Drive numbers start low and high at the other end of  cemetery. Please note E side stand for East and W side for West . The graves are numbered from A the next one will be B, C, D, E, and so on going outward on either side East or West. All new tombstone are black with the information on the back has  E for East then the letter for the row then the number, looking something like this E B 100 or West side W E 200.

We Will Remember  Them At Newark Cemetery

LG

 War Memorial to the Fallen of Newark commemorating, by name, those local military personnel who lost their lives in conflict going back to the first World War of 1914

Memorial To The Fallen located off London Road at Newark Cemetery

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Behind the Remembrance Poppy

This is the story of how the red field poppy came to be known as an internationally recognized symbol of Remembrance.

 

From its association with poppies flowering in the spring of 1915 on the battlefields of Belgium, France and Gallipoli this vivid red flower has become synonymous with great loss of life in war.

Pete Stevens exhibition at

Chapel Interpretation Centre, Newark Cemetery

Video http://youtu.be/11ipWE1C6qo

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

Pete Stevens his project has been launched to match photographs to all the names on the Newark and Balderton war memorials There are 603 names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen at Newark Cemetery, of whom 456 are first world war casualties. Another 144 are from the second world war, one died in West Africa in 1961, one in Malaya in 1952 and one in Afghanistan in 2007 There are 45 names from the first world war on the memorial in St Giles’ Church, Balderton, and a further 13 from the second world war.

I am grateful to the Newark Advertiser http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

Memorial project in need of help

A project to match photographs to names on Newark and Balderton war memorials is almost a third of the way through, but more help is needed to see it completed.

The aim was to trace pictures of those who fell in battle from the first world war to the present day. We held commemorations marking the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of the first world war.

 So far, more than 150 pictures have been submitted thanks to appeals in the Advertiser.

Many have come from relatives, while others are from the newspaper’s archives.

 There are, however, 604 names on Newark’s Memorial to the Fallen in the London Road cemetery, of which 457 are first world war casualties.

Another 144 are from the second world war, one died in West Africa in 1961, one in Malaya in 1952.

 Afghanistan in 2007.

There are 45 names on the memorial in St Giles’ Church, Balderton, from the first world war, and 13 from the second world war.

Mr Pete Stevens, a Commonwealth War Graves Commission stonemason, of Coleman Avenue, Balderton, is behind the project.

Mr Stevens said: “I am very pleased with the response we have had so far but we need people to speak to family members and delve into their lofts and cupboards for the pictures of their relatives so we can see this through.

 “It would be wonderful to be able to have a complete, publicly-available record of what each of these men looked like, both for their families and future generations of residents of Newark and Balderton.”

 Among those whose pictures have been submitted already is Lance-corporal Charles Edgar Harrison of the 1st/8th Battalion Sherwood Foresters. He was killed aged 36 on May 10, 1915.

 He was married to Eleanor A. Harrison, of Bethulie, Farndon Road, Newark, and is buried in Dud Corner Cemetery, Loos Par-de-Calais, France

 

 Another casualty from the same regiment, 25 years later in the second world war, is Private Richard Scott, of 8th Battalion the Sherwood Foresters, who died on April 27, 1940 aged 21.

He was the son of Penelope Scott, of Bowbridge Road, Newark, and is buried in Lillehammer Northern Civil Cemetery in Norway where he was killed during an ill-fated effort to prevent Norway falling into Nazi hands.

 If you have a photograph of anyone featured on either memorial, send it to Mr Stevens at Petejstevens@hotmail.co.uk or drop it in at the Advertiser offices on Appletongate, Newark, with details of who it is and as much information about them as possible.


http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Memorial-project-in-need-of-help

SAM_6077

Medals awarded to Newark’s only Victoria Cross Recipient

Laurence Goff Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery

01636-681878 (Home)

 Laurence Goff

Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery

Their Sacrifice 

during the dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth and Polish who also join up with the RAF

 

The Valiant Contribution made by the Commonwealth and Polish Airmen for protection of our country freedom.The Newark Town Council  particularly proud to be the custodian of the Memorial to General Wladyslaw Sikorski

Newark Cemetery can boast of having lot’s of impressive people that are buried in our Cemetery since 1856. An array of famous inhabitants that are buried in Newark.

  

Chapel Interpretation Centre Newark Cemetery

 Memorial plaque located up high on the wall of  The Natwest Bank,  Stodman Street, Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

It is dedicated to the thousands of airmen from the Commonwealth,  Polish  and other Nations who served  the nearby airfield near Newark.  Also 55,573 brave young airmen died in the skies over Europe, many  have no graves. We will Remember them.

  Donated by Mr & Mrs Tony Wilkinson

Newark Town Mayor Councillor Tony Roberts Before The Official Opening of the Chapel Interpretation Centre On Saturday, 11th September 2010, at 11am.

Chapel Interpretation Centre, Will Be Used By Friends Of Newark Cemetery

Laurence Goff Friends of Newark Cemetery ( FoNC ) Chairman has put this website together.

Newark Cemetery can boast of having lot’s of impressive people that are buried in our Cemetery since 1856. An array of famous and impressive inhabitants that are buried in Newark.

Amongst the many well-known local people that are buried in Newark Cemetery include  among the many graves are Memorials to some of Newark’s greatest benefactors and people who have helped shape Newark

Thursday 30th October 1856. The Church of England portion of the new Cemetery was consecrated by the Bishop of Lincoln. Soon after the ceremony took place, the very first burial was made for the family of W.N. Nicholson, Ironmonger, Market Place, Newark. Their three year old son Charles John.

On 23rd February 1856 . At 10 O’clock the members of the Corporation and Burial Board together with Ministers of Churches from the area. The Town Mayor Henry Sutton, Chief Constable, Waterton, with the battle-axe and the Police, W.Newton the Clerk to the Board, Town Crier with Two Mace-bearers, 12 scholars from the Grammar School and other officials assembled at the Town Hall. The procession crossed the Market Place and went by Bridge Street, Carter Gate and Beaumont Street to the New Cemetery site. The corner-stone of the new buildings was laid by Joseph Branston Esq.

 It now also has a Memorial to the Fallen of Newark-On–Trent commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914.

Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire,  On 28th April 2007, Richard Todd OBE, officially unveiled the Memorial to the Fallen with The Lord-Lieutenant of Nottinghamshire, Sir Andrew Buchanan

Lord Lieutenant of Nottinghamshire, Sir Andrew Buchanan visiting Newark

The Lord-Lieutenant of a County is the permanent local representative of Her Majesty The Queen in that County. The current Lord-Lieutenant of Nottinghamshire is Sir Andrew Buchanan, Bt.

We will remember them

Let us all Remember the many Airmen that were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force during the Battle of Britain and pay tribute to these brave fighters for their contribution. 17,000 Polish pilots and ground crew members had formed 14 squadron in RAF

and 2,000 were killed of which 424 are buried in Newark Cemetery.

 General Sikorski was buried in the Polish pilots’ cemetery in Newark-On-Trent, Great Britain on Friday 16th July 1943.

General Sikorski 13-14 September 1993 Mass at Newark Parish Church,

Nottinghamshire England

50 years late on 14th September 1993, his ashes left Newark and were brought to Poland and laid to rest in Wawel Cathedral, the burial place for the most distinguished men and women of Poland on 17th September 1993.

4 ARAF- Australian, 44 British Servicemen, 17 CRAF- Canadian and 3 RNZAF- New Zealand were also killed during the 2nd World War and are buried in Newark Cemetery for all to see. If it hadn’t been for the courageous Air Force we would have struggled and things could have turned out differently. These airmen helped us win the war for Freedom. Not enough credit is given to the Polish pilots who went out of their way to help us in the dark days of the 2nd World war. They never let us down to gain Freedom for us and should not be forgotten as our heroes of World War II. This memorial website is dedicated to the thousands of men and women from the 2nd World War.

 A Memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and unveiled on 14th July 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander in Chief of the Polish Forces and war-time Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski (aged 62) in 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s It contains a memorial to Poland’s exiled war leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski, who died when the aeroplane he was travelling in crashed over Gibraltar. General Sikorski was buried at Newark in July, 1943, and it was his dying wish that his body should be returned to Poland when it was a free country. His remains were returned on  14th September 1993. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for RAF burials and this is now the war graves for people to see across the UK  and the World.  Former Airmen choosing to be buried since staying  in England after the 2nd World War. Newark Cemetery also contains  graves from the 1st world war  scattered around the  Cemetery.

A Memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and unveiled on 14th July 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander in Chief of the Polish Forces and war-time Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski (aged 62) in 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s It contains a memorial to Poland’s exiled war leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski, who died when the aeroplane he was travelling in crashed over Gibraltar. General Sikorski was buried at Newark in July, 1943, and it was his dying wish that his body should be returned to Poland when it was a free country. His remains were returned on  14th Sept 1993. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for RAF burials and this is now the war graves for people to see across the UK  and the World.  Former Airmen choosing to be buried since staying  in England after the 2nd World War. Newark Cemetery also contains  graves from the 1st world war  scattered around the  Cemetery.

NEWARK – ON – TRENT CEMETERY WAR GRAVES

9 min – 13 Jul 2009 – Uploaded by laurencegoff
NEWARK CEMETERY, NOTTINGHAMSHIRE UK During the 2nd Warld War there were a number of RAF stations within a few …
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Newark Cemetery UK our first snow for many years which looks lovely. The Main Arch with two former Chapels at each end 1856.

Friends of NewarkCemetery ( FoNC )

The inaugural meeting took place on Monday 12th December 2005 at the Town Hall.
The initial Steering Committee comprised:

A local historian, An ecologist from Notts County Council

The ethos behind the group is:

  • To offer suggestions to Newark Town Council on ways to improve the service and facilities of the Cemetery.

  • To provide input in the Cemetery Regulations

  • To help identify problems with vandalism and other activities detrimental to the well-being of the Cemetery: and to work with the council to seek solutions to these problems.

  • To play an active part in assisting the Town Council with practical tasks such as litter collection, painting seats, benches, organising open days etc.

  • To provide a welcoming presence and a source of help and information at the Cemetery during opening hours and to act as guides to visitors to the Cemetery.

FONC instigated and organised the 150th Anniversary of the Cemetery. The event took place on the 7th October 2006 and was opened by the Mayor of Newark. There were displays from Bereavement Groups and the War Graves Commission. There were historical trails and wildlife displays. FONC hope to hold a yearly Open Day to include both Historical and Wildlife Trails.

Waitrose Supermarket, Newark green token collection for the Month of January 2011

Friends of Newark Cemetery are very grateful to Waitrose Supermarket, Newark one of three boxes has been dedicated to our group when customers can choose Friends of Newark Cemetery with green token.

The money collected will go towards a number of worthy causes that the Friends are assisting with in the Cemetery. Such as:-

Better signage to enable visitors to find the graves of their relatives and notable residents of the town.

Exhibitions and the development of “interactive” days using the resources available in the recently refurbished Cemetery Chapel.

Grave searches.

History trails.

Wildlife and natural habitat studies.

To forge stronger, mutually beneficial links with other Friends groups, voluntary groups, schools etc in the town.

The Friends already provide a permanent floral tribute on the Memorial to the fallen.

 We are now on the 3rd reprint of the “Comfort Book” A small publication of poems and verses distributed to the bereaved through a number of outlets in the town.

Friends of Newark Cemetery ( FoNC )

Since 2005

Friends of Newark Cemetery (FoNC) have planted over 4000 Spring bulbs around the Chapel, cleaned memorials and benches and have organised nature and historical tours of the Cemetery.

FoNC are currently running these initiatives:

On each 2nd April – October, from 1oam – 4pm, a service is offered to those mourning loved ones and to other visitors to the Cemetery.  Services include bereavement support, help with family history, grave location, history of the Cemetery etc.  If you would like to take advantage of these services or if you would like to help provide these services, please contact the Town Council or Cemetery.

A Comfort Book has being produced, containing poems, quotations and scriptural passages, designed to provide comfort and support to bereaving families.   Any financial contributions towards the cost of printing would be appreciated.

On 28th April 2007, Richard Todd OBE, officially unveiled the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery on London Road.  FoNC has decided to see that the memorial has a display of fresh flowers throughout the year.  This is planned to start in November; other local organisations, associated with the armed forces, have pledged their support to this initiative.

Anyone is welcome to become a Friend of Newark Cemetery volunteer; please contact the 

Or Friends of Newark Cemetery member Laurence Goff   

for Membership details.

Newark Cemetery is located on London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1FQ

Following the Burial Act of the early 1830’s the Cemetery Committee of Newark Town Council began the search for a piece of land for a cemetery by printing & distributing 200 Handbills “Wanted, in the neighbourhood of Newark, about 5 acres of land suitable for a burial ground.”

There have now been 36,000 burials within the cemetery with some Common Graves from the previous two centuries having up to 5 burials in each plot. 

The Cemetery lies close to the Town Centre on London Road and was not just conceived and built as a memorial and resting place but also as a park for the people of the town.

The cemetery is also important internationally as it contains the PolishWarCemetery and was the historical burial place of General Sikorski ( the wartime leader of Poland ) whose body has now been retuned to Poland, but whose memorial remains.

The Cemetery currently has both areas for burials and a Garden of Remembrance for cremated remains.

It now also has a Memorial to the Fallen of Newark commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914.

NEWARK CEMETERY UK

Eventually 9 acres of land were purchased from the Earl of Winchlesea and the Committee set up an open competition and invited designs in the forms of drawings and specifications for roads, paths and laying out and planting a new burial ground containing 6.5 acres, enclosing the ground, building a lodge with entrance gates, building two chapels either separate or attached, with complete fitting and accommodation for not fewer than 50 persons, the total cost not to exceed the sum of £2000.

The design chosen was by Messers Bellamy & Hardy, Architects of Lincoln and their design was constructed in 1856 by the General Contractor, Mr Whitworth of Newark.

There have now been  over 36,000 burials within Newark cemetery with some Common Graves from the previous two centuries having up to 5 burials in each plot.

The Cemetery lies close to the Newark Town Centre on London Road and was not just conceived and built as a memorial and resting place but also as a park for the people of the town.

The cemetery is also important internationally as it contains the PolishWarCemetery and was the historical burial place of General Sikorski ( the wartime leader of Poland ) whose body has now been retuned to Poland, but whose memorial remains.

The Cemetery currently has both areas for burials and a Garden of Remembrance for cremated remains.

It now also has a Memorial to the Fallen of Newark commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914.

Polish War Cemetery and was the historical burial place of General Sikorski ( the wartime leader of Poland )

1943-1993.

LAURENCE GOFF AT NEWARK-ON-TRENT 

9 min – 20 Sep 2009 – Uploaded by laurencegoff
Newark Cemetery in remembrance of the casualties during the 1st and 2nd World War. Newark Cemetery has airmen from around 
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Newark-On-Trent Cemetery Nottinghamshire …

Friends of Newark Cemetery

Newark Cemetery Airbridge Tribute with Dakota 

1 min – 27 Sep 2009 – Uploaded by laurencegoff
Dakota DC3 Flying over 
Newark Cemetery twice in this video at start of the Airbridge service held near the British Commonwealth …
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NEWARK TOWN CEMETERY NOTTS

NEWARK TOWN CEMETERY NOTTS

4 min – 4 Jan 2010 – Uploaded by laurencegoff
Newark Cemetery Notts UK cllrlaurencegoffnewark@yahoo.co.uknewarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com http://www.facebook.com
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 Campaign for bomb victims

We now have a public memorial in Newark to commemorative the bombing of the Ransome and Marles plant during the Second World War. Newark Town Council have a publicly accessible memorial to the victims to remember the 41

Centenary of famous figure’s death

http://www.thisisnottingham.co.uk/news/Centenary-famous-figure-s-death/article-1852827-detail/article.html

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/03/08/ransome-and-marles-former-factory-workers-will-be-remembered-with-a-permanent-memorial-in-newark-on-trent-in-2011/

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We should be grateful to the people around Newark that worked at Ransome & Marles Ball Bearings Factory which provided components to all three Armed Forces.

Photos by laurencegoff

Photo by laurencegoff

Photo by laurencegoff

Photo by laurencegoff

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

I am grateful to Newark Advertiser for the old newspaper pictures and stories.

Bert Emerson Ransome and Marles factory worker 

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

BBC News – Newark ball bearing factory raid remembered

10 Mar 2011 … On 7 March 1941 thousands of workers at the Ransome and Marles factory in … Bert Emerson helped rescue other survivors of the bombing …

www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-nottinghamshire-12693943 –

 www.newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2016/01/03/newark-remembers-the-air-raid-on-ransome-and-marles-ball-bearings-factory/


http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk
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Ransome and Marles Ball and Roller Bearing Factory, 7th March 1941

Newark in the Second World War  records the events surrounding the bombing of the Ransome and Marles bearing factory at Newark-on-Trent. On Friday 7th March 1941 the most well known of all the raids on [Newark-On-Trent] took place when Ransome and Marles factory was bombed. The type of work carried out at the factory made it an obvious target for the Germans. The raid commenced at about 1.40pm. Many workers were returning from their lunch break when the alert sounded at 1.35pm. A few minutes later a single Heinkel III bomber – flying so low that those on the ground could see its markings – approached from the south, following the railway line. As it neared Ransome and Marles it was fired on from several different points but still managed to drop four high explosive bombs. Two of these landed in the works, one on the road at the side of the factory and the other on an air raid shelter adjacent to Stanley Street. The plane also machine-gunned the site before circling, passing over the factory again and dropping another bomb. Fortunately this one did not explode. According to German reports the aircraft flew over for a third time in order to take photographs. The Raiders Passed siren was sounded and rescue parties went immediately into action. Various ambulances transported casualties to hospital and the Home Guard helped to close the roads around the works. The First Aid posts and the Womens Voluntary Service canteen were also kept busy. At 2.24pm the alert sounded again. Another enemy aircraft approached and dropped five more bombs but only one exploded. This was near the road and caused more damage and casualties, many of those hurt being rescue workers. Raiders Passed was sounded again at 2.51pm. As a result of the raid 29 men and 12 women were killed. One young woman was never found and presumed dead. Amongst those killed, were a young woman who had planned to get married the following weekend and a man who had recently been discharged from the army. Sixty-five people were admitted to Newark Hospital and 100 more were treated at the works own underground hospital. The official German communiqué of the raid stated that A daring low level attack took place on an armament factory at Newark causing heavy damage in the workshops. The bombers were under the command of Lietenant Knaut and Lieutenant Randolf. Local papers were severely restricted in what they could report. The day after the raid the Newark Herald reported that A single German plane came out of the low-lying clouds yesterday and dropped a number of bombs on an East Midlands town. An hour later the same or another raider dropped more bombs in the same locality. There were a number of casualties, some being fatal. The official report from which much of this information comes was not made public until the end of the war. The day became known locally as Black Friday. After the raid the two paired Lewis guns which were mounted in sand-bagged positions on Clay Lane Bridge were replaced by a Bofors 40mm anti-aircraft gun mounted on a proper gun platform. Fortunately the factory was not attacked again.

We will Remember them

Photo by laurencegoff

Chris Grant visiting his father grave on the 70th Anniversary when Ransome and Marles Ball Bearing Factory was bombed 7th March 1941

We are grateful for Ransome and Marles Ball Bearing factory who Played their part during the 2nd world war.  The workers who were pushed to the limit as they turned out the components that kept the war machine running. The Ransome and Marles bearings factory in Newark was among them and, as such, was a prized target for the enemy. Seventy years ago, on March 7, 1941, it was hit in a daytime raid by the Luftwaffe that left 41 dead and 165 injured. The terrible loss of life is marked at the company’s Northern Road site with a plaque on a tree but, until this week, there was no public memorial to those who were killed. Now their names are on a memorial, unveiled in Newark Town Hall on Monday, 7th March 2011 for all to see in years to come.

On Saturday 5th March 2011 relatives of those killed were in Newark Market Place as former town mayor Mr Chris Grant, whose father Robert was among the dead, read the full roll of honour.“Today is the beginning of a weekend of closure for me,” he said. The younger generation has also been involved with pupils from Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Primary School marking the occasion in Newark Cemetery on Monday 7th March 2011. One ten-year-old  said it was important to remember what happened. He’s right, and the memorial will ensure that is the case. For the families of those killed it is fitting that there is finally public recognition of the sacrifice that was made.

We will Remember them

https://newarkcemeteryuk.files.wordpress.com/2011/03/100_3084.jpg

 
The sacrifice this Cross at Newark-On-Trent Cemetery, we will remember themOLD CROSS by friendsofnewarkcemetery.ON A LOVELY WALK IN NOVEMBER AT NEWARK CEMETERY UK by friendsofnewarkcemetery.
WILLIAM QUIBELL by friendsofnewarkcemetery.Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire by you.

The many people that are buried to all and see. You must not be forgotten, are you prepare to  follow in my foot steps to help save guard our Newark Cemetery.

CORNELIUS BROWN Former  History of Newark  writer, The Advertiser Editor for 33 years  CORNELIUS BROWN was born at Lowdham, Nottinghamshire, on March 5th, 1852. He chose the profession of journalism, and early in life entered the office of The Nottingham Daily Guardian.Here he came under the influence of men well known in the world of letters, and in daily contact with such literary mentors and friends, he possessed undoubted advantages, which his studious and observant nature enabled him to turn to good account. Antiquarian and historical subjects possessed an attraction for him, and he started in the Guardian a column of “Notes and Queries,” which he subsequently edited under the happy alliterative title, “Notes about Notts.” In 1874 Mr. Brown was appointed Editor of The Newark Advertiser, which he conducted up to the time of his death with marked ability and erudition. Of his literary work, besides special articles contributed to various journals, the following were issued in book form “Notes about Notts.” (1874), “The Annals of Newark” (1879), “The Worthies of Notts.” (1882), “An Appreciative Life of the Earl of Beaconsfield,” “True Stories of the Reign of Queen Victoria” (1886), “A History of Nottinghamshire” (1891), and “A History of Newark” in two volumes (1905 and 1907). This last self-imposed task occupied all his spare time and energy for fifteen long years, and in his own words: “Newark is worthy of the book, and if the book prove worthy of the town

History of Newark Cemetery first open on  Thurdsay the 30th November 1856

Newark former Chapel built 1858, I was closed in 1977 and will be open real soon as anInterpretation centre for Friends of Newark Cemetery,  Becher Tidd Pratt Newark Mayor seven times

Former Newark Mayor during the 2nd World War, Newark Advertiser Editor 1930-1967

I have enjoyed my walk about around Newark Cemetery taking these photos for all to see. William Harold Cubley former Newark Mayor

Cyril Parlby MBE JP, Former Newark town Mayor during the 2nd World War and Newark Advertiser for 37 years

 
105_2974 by laurencegoffView of newark cemetery UK 100_1119 by laurencegoff

Tribute has been paid by  Newark cemetery from London Road War Memorial to the Fallen of residents of Newark. Commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1st 2nd World War and one killed in Afghanistan.

Thomas Earp who departed this life on 17th February 1910

Thomas Earp former Newark Mayor and MP died 17th February 1910. Which is coming up to 100 years since he died. A former MP and Newark Town Mayor 3 times. Mr Thomas Earp, entered Parliament on 31 January 1874 — General election; Left Parliament on 18 Nov 1885.

Click on

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2010/02/17/thomas-earp-who-departed-this-life-into-the-next-former-town-mayor-and-newark-mp-died-100-years/

 

Airman from British Commonwealth and 397 Airman are buried from the 2nd World War and more since choose to be buried in Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire, England. Visiting Newark Cemetery in 1941 and the many Polish Airman during the 2nd World War. General Sikorski the wartime leader of the Polish Government in exile met his death in an air crash at Gibraltar on the evening of 4th July 1943 and was buried in Newark Nottinghamshire. General Sikorski was buried in the Polish part of cemetery in Newark -On-Trent on 16th July, 1943.

 50 years later moved on the 13th – 14th September 1993, his ashes were brought back to Poland. Each year British and Polish servicemen honoured at Newark service, candles are lit to honour the fallen on the last Sunday in October starting at 3pm from the main gate of Newark Cemetery UK. War veterans and civic dignitaries attended a service on Sunday to honour the Polish servicemen who died during the 2nd World War. Lighting of candles were lit on each of the Polish graves at Newark Cemetery. During the service, conducted in both Polish and English, to mark All Souls Day.

17th February  2010

EXACTLY 100 years ago Thomas Earp, one of the most important figures in Newark’s history, died aged 79. He lived in a grand place called White House.

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/WWI-soldier-should-be-on-memorial-

WWI soldier ‘should be on memorial’

 Thursday Nov 22, 2012

A decision not to allow the name of a first world war soldier to be added to Newark’s war memorial has been branded a scandal.

Mr Pete Stevens at the grave of William Pride, marked by a Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone.

Mr Pete Stevens, who works for the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, says William Pride’s name should be on the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery.

William, a Royal Engineers sapper, who lived in Newark, committed suicide following frontline service.

His Army record and the coroner’s report show he took his own life “whilst of unsound mind.”

Mr Stevens has been told William does not fit the criteria for inclusion on the memorial.

Mr Stevens said the Commonwealth War Graves Commission had categorised William as a casualty of war with one of its headstones, so his name should be added.

William operated hospital barges that were under constant attack as they transported casualties.

Mr Stevens believes the stigma that would have been attached to William’s suicide was why his name wasn’t included on the 1921 town Roll of Honour.

It was common to omit from war memorials the names of those who took their own lives or were shot for cowardice when they were actually shell-shocked or battle-fatigued — the condition is now recognised as post-traumatic stress disorder.

William’s name was not on the list agreed by Newark Town Council and the Royal British Legion in 2007 when plans for the Memorial to the Fallen were being considered.

“The scandal is not his suicide but the refusal to add him to the Memorial to the Fallen and right that wrong,” said Mr Stevens, of Balderton.

He discovered the omission of William Pride from the memorial by chance during research on another project.

“One can only imagine the noise, the smell and the constant cries of the wounded and the toll this would have taken on a man,” he said.

“I feel it was these horrors and the worsening of William’s disability that drove him to take his own life.

“No one understood post-traumatic stress disorder back then but we do now.

“The Government pardoned those shot for not going over the top and their names have been added to their local memorials, so why not William Pride? We must demonstrate we have moved on.”

Mr Geoff Meakin, from the Newark branch of the Royal British Legion, said: “Mr Pride doesn’t fit the criteria to go on the memorial so will not be added.

“You have to have lived or been living in the old borough of Newark and to have fallen in battle — that’s the difficulty.

“His suicide does not come into it.

“I sympathise and it’s often a contentious issue.

“If you relax the criteria for one, it opens the floodgates. These are the criteria and we

must stick to them.”

Mr Stevens said there were 29 graves in Newark Cemetery of men whose names were on the memorial who did not die in battle but from wounds or other effects of their service.

“There is one man whose name appears who died in the sanatorium at Radcliffe in 1925,” said Mr Stevenson

William Pride was an engine driver and fireman with the Trent Navigation Company.

He lived on Bowbridge Road, Newark, with his wife and five children when he was called up for service on September 18, 1916 at the age 40.

He was enlisted into the Water Transport Corps of the Royal Engineers and, 19 days later he was on his way to Mesopotamia where he operated hospital barges ferrying wounded soldiers away from the front.

The barges operated under constant shell-fire.

William developed arthritis in both knees that got so bad he was invalided to India, arriving back in England on June 6, 1918.

He was sent to a camp in Kent and placed on light duties. He was found on September 11, 1918 with his throat cut and a razor in his hand.

Comrades reported he had been depressed.

We are grateful to have a great  lovely kept local cemetery and grounds. Many thanks to Newark Town Council  and Commonwealth War Graves Commission caring staff.

CWGC – Homepage

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission – the cemeteries, work memorials, horticulture, architecture and records of CWGC and the commemoration

Click on  for location of Cemetery Newark-on-Trent

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

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My Website principles are that I strive to be accurate. I promptly correct any inaccuracy or error with a visible edit and update. I attribute and link to sources on the web wherever possible. My direct contact details are displayed on every page of the site. I do not receive payment or services for any reviews or editorial. And this is a personal website of Laurence Goff. The views expressed are solely my own, and do not reflect the views of Newark Town Council who are responsible for the cemetery

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Contact Newark Town Council

For all general queries please call our main Reception on 01636 680333 or email post@newark.gov.uk. You can also contact us by post: Newark Town Hall, Market Place, Newark, Notts, NG24 1DU or fax 01636 680350

http://newark.gov.uk/cemetery/cemetery-history-of.html

Laurence Goff — Blogs, Pictures, and more on WordPress

This memorial website is my personal views, I have put it together and do not represent Newark Town Council . It dedicated to the thousands of  people since 1856.  Many are happy to have a resting place at Newark Cemetery for all to see and view. Having a means of further promoting Newark cemetery, and encouraging interested people to join and learn about cemetery for 160 years. This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately, the content here is solely the responsibility of

Laurence Goff   Friends of Newark Cemetery Volunteer 

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

Click on  for location of Cemetery Newark-on-Trent

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Deceased Online

http://www.deceasedonline.com/

 Deceased Online – research burial and cremation records.  and memorials; Cemeterymaps showing grave locations; Other occupants in the same grave.

http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=friendsofnewarkcemetery

It Will Never Be The Same If You Become A Volunteer at Newark Cemetery. Perhaps the biggest difference that you will make is in you. Volunteering is a life-changing experience. It will provide you with a new outlook and lease on life. You will understand better than most people how you fit into the family history of who is buried in Newark Cemetery since 1856. Make no mistake about it, this is an experience that you won’t want to miss.

“I had the most unbelievable experience for the last nine years. It not hard work but hugely rewarding for me. I met so many great people and learnt so much about the Cemetery environment. An experience I will never forget and recommend to everyone.”

Contact

Laurence Goff  

Newark Cemetery Volunteer 

 

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