The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire, Laurence Goff uplifting visit

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

The National Arboretum in Staffordshire honours the fallen and recognises  service, sacrifice around the world

A time to remember – they will never be forgotten

“We reflect 
on times past and to remember 
them, always we will hold them in our hearts”

It is a spirtual uplifting place and emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance run by The Royal British Legion

Laurencegoff

The Royal British Legion flag will fly all around, we will Remember them 

Remembrance for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

The 4th of August 2014 is the 100th anniversary of the declaration of the 1st World War 

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

The Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British Legion

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire, You Will Have An Uplifting Day

img047

SAM_3727

SAM_3778

44 went from Newark

SAM_3725

 

SAM_3782

The Rain did not put them off

SAM_3784

Friends Of Newark Cemetery

Organized a Coach Trip, from Newark

to The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

  44  people were taken by Travel Wright Ltd,  Newark, Nottinghamshire

An uplifting visit 

Honours The Fallen All Year Round

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

SAM_0071

Friends Of Newark Cemetery

 Coach Trip

From Newark  to The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

 Wednesday 28th May 2014

 Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

img043

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

The Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British Legion

 

 

 

SAM_3756SAM_3760img045

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

You Will Experience A Wonderful  Place, An Awe-Inspiring Day

The Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British Legionimg041

The Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British Legionimg040

 

100_0325

Laurencegoff

Memorial  

There are over 300 memorials the special centrepiece in my heart and mind is the memorial the “Shot at Dawn” over three hundred men who were shot as cowards, but many we would now recognise as suffering from post traumatic stress disorder.

 

The memorial was modelled and portrays a likeness of a young British soldier 

of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliess

Private Herbert Burden age 17 

 he was blindfolded

 and tied to a stake ready to be shot by a firing squad

He like many who lied about his age to enlist in the armed

 forces and was later shot for desertion. It is surrounded by a

 semicircle of stakes on which are listed the names of every

 soldier executed in this fashion. These include:

 

 Conceived as a place of national remembrance not only for the fallen, but also for those who have served the nation. 

 
 100_0324

Laurencegoff

This being the centrepiece is a statue of a young man  Private Herbert Francis Burden

of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliess who was the first to be shot a dawn.

21st July 1915 aged 17

http://youtu.be/d7FFW40AZxA

The National Arboretum Croxall Road, in the village of Alrewas, Staffordshire UK

 

This being special to me is a statue of a young man ­ age 17 Private Herbert Burden of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliess who was the first to be shot. He was blindfolded and strapped to a post, surrounded by 306 other posts, each with the name, age and ­regiment of a man who was executed.

306 Listed

  • Private John Abigail, 8/Norfolk Regiment

  • Private George Ainley, 1st/4th Battalion, Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

  • Private James Archibald, 17th Battalion, Royal Scots

  • Lance Serjeant H. Ashton, 11th Battalion, Cameronians

  • Private William Baker, 26th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers

  • Rifleman R. L Barker, 6th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers

  • Private Joseph Bateman, 2/South Staffs Regiment

  • Sapper Robert Bell, 123 Field Company, Royal Engineers

  • Private J. Bennett, 1st Battalion, Hampshire Regiment

  • Private D. J. Blakemore, 8th Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment

  • Private Albert Botfield, 9th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment

  • Private William Bowerman, 1/East Surrey Regiment

  • Private Thomas Brigham, 1/10th Battalion, Manchester Regiment

  • Private C. Britton, 1/5th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment

  • Private F. Broadrick, 11th Battalion, Warwickshire Regiment

  • Private A. Brown, 10th Battalion, Black Watch

  • Private Archibald Browne, 2nd Battalion, Essex Regiment

  • Private Herbert Francis Burden, 1st Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers

  • Private Robert Burton, 6th Battalion, South Lancashire Regiment

  • Private J. Byers, 1st Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers

  • Private Herbert H. Chase, 2nd Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers

  • Rifleman F. W. Cheeseman, 18th Kings Royal Rifle Corps

  • Private G. E. Collins, 1st Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment

  • Private J. Crampton, 9th Battalion, Yorks & Lancs Regiment

  • Rifleman James Crozier. 9th Battalion, The Royal Irish Rifles

  • Private J. J. Daly, 1st Battalion, Connaught Rangers

  • Private Edward Delargy, 1st/8th Battalion, Royal Scots

  • Private Thomas Docherty, 2nd Battalion, King’s Own Scottish Borderers

  • Rifleman Thomas Donovan, 16th Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps

  • Private Walter Dossett, 1st/4th Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment

  • Private Thomas Downey, 6th Leinster Regiment

  • Private Thomas Downing, 6th South Lancashire Regiment

  • Sub Lieutenant Edwin Dyett, Nelson Battalion, Royal Naval Division

  • Private A. Evans, 1st Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers

  • Private Alfred E. Eveleigh, 1st Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment)

  • Private G. Everill, 1st Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment

  • Private Harry Farr, 1st Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment

  • Private Ernest Fellows, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Lance Corporal J. S. V. Fox, 1st Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment, attached 3rd Division Cyclists’ Company

  • Private A. Frafra, Gold Coast Regiment

  • Private Evan Fraser, 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots

  • Private J. W. Fryer, 12th Battalion, Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment

  • Private Robert Gawler, 1st Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment)

  • Private D. Gibson of 12th Battalion, Royal Scots

  • Lance Corporal Peter Goggins, 19th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry

  • Private F. C. Gore, 7th Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment)

  • Private Thomas Harris, 1st Battalion, Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent Regiment)

  • Private Bert Hartells, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private T. Hawkins, 7th Battalion, Royal West Surrey Regiment (Queen’s)

  • Private Thomas Highgate, 1st Battalion, Royal West Kent Regiment

  • Lance Corporal James Holland, 10th Cheshire Regiment

  • Private R. Hope, 1st Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

  • Private Thomas Hope, 2nd Battalion, Leinster Regiment

  • Private H. Hughes, 1st/5th Battalion, Yorks and Lancs Regiment

  • Private William Hunt, 18/Manchester Regiment

  • Private William Hunter, 1/Loyal North Lancashire Regiment

  • Private J. J. Hyde, King’s Royal Rifle Corps

  • Private Albert Ingham, 18/Manchester Regiment (Attd. 90th Coy. MGC)

  • Corporal Frederick Ives, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private W. Jones, 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers

  • Private C. La Liberte, 3rd Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force

  • Driver Alexander Lamb, 21st Battery, 2nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery

  • Private Ernest Lawrence, 2nd Battalion, Devonshire Regiment

  • Private F. Loader, 1/22nd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers

  • Private Alfred Longshaw, 18/Manchester Regiment[2][8]

  • Lance Corporal Allassan Mamprusi, Gold Coast Regiment

  • Rifleman Samuel McBride, 2nd Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles

  • Private Charles McColl, 1st/4th Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment

  • Private John McFarlane, 4th Battalion, King’s Liverpool Regiment

  • Private B. McGeehan, 1/8th Battalion, King’s Liverpool Regiment

  • Private J. S. Michael, 10th Battalion, Cameronians

  • Private L. Mitchell, 8th Battalion, Yorks and Lancs Regiment

  • Private Thomas Lionel Moles, 54th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force

  • Private H. Morris, 6th Battalion, British West Indies Regiment

  • Private Joseph Nisbet, 1st Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment

  • Private A. Parry, 2nd Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment

  • Private Louis Phillips, 6th Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry

  • Private Albert Henry Pitts, 2nd Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment

  • Second Lieutenant Eric Skeffington Poole, 11th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment

  • Corporal George Povey, 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment

  • Private Albert Rickman, 1st Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

  • Sergeant John Robins, 5th Wiltshire Regiment

  • Private John Robinson, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private George Ernest Roe, 2nd Battalion, King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

  • Private William Scotton, 4th Battalion, Middlesex Regiment

  • Private J. Seymour, 2nd Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

  • Private W. H. Simmonds, 23rd Battalion, Middlesex Regiment

  • Rifleman F. N. Slade, 2/6th Battalion, London Regiment

  • Private James Smith, 17th Battalion, The King’s (Liverpool Regiment)

  • Private W. Smith, 3/5th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers

  • Private Victor Manson Spencer, 1st Battalion, Otago Regiment of the New Zealand Division

  • Private J. Steadman, Machine Gun Corps

  • Private R. Stevenson, 1/4th Battalion, Loyal North Lancashire Regiment

  • Private Stanley Stewart, 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers

  • Private Alfred Thompson, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private R. T. Tite, 13th Battallion, Royal Sussex Regiment

  • Private Frederick Turner, 6th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers

  • Private William J. Turpie, 2nd Battalion, East Surrey Regiment

  • Sergeant J. T. Wall, 3rd attalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private G. Watkins, 13th Battalion, Welsh Regiment

  • Private A. H. Westwood, East Surrey Regiment

  • Private J. H. Wilson, 4th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force

  • Private W. Wycherley, 2nd Manchester Regiment

  • Private R. Young, 11th Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shot_at_Dawn_Memorial

During World War One, around 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers were shot for desertion or cowardice, most of them were sentenced after a short trial at which no real opportunity for defence was allowed, this would have been sad for many families. At last it is recognised that several of them were under age when they volunteered and that many of them suffering from shell shock or post traumatic stress disorder,
Andy Decomyn’s statue shot at dawn is modelled on Private Herbert Francis Burden, of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, who was shot at dawn at Ypres on 21st July 1915,aged 17.

The names of Herbert Francis Burden and those others who suffered the fate of being shot at dawn are listed on the stakes arranged in the form of a greek theatre around the statue, symbolising the tragedy that these events signify, many of the posts say Age unknown and this is because many young men lied about their age in order to enlist, some of them had no representation at court-martial because most of the officers had been killed when they went over the top, first (the average life expectancy of an officer on the front line was 10 weeks) We know of these 306 soldiers, sadly to this day we do not know the total figure because between 80pc and 90pc of those sentenced to die had their sentences commuted and were probably sent to jail or hard labour.

Each year many visitors ask about the location of the Shot at Dawn Memorial in the Arboretum, it seems appropriate that it should be on the eastern edge where dawn strikes, the six trees facing the posts represent the firing squad, all aiming for the medal around the statue’s neck and none of them knowing who had the fatal bullet, it must have been very traumatic for them too, having to shoot one of their own. The Campaign For a Pardon
After the 75 year Secrecy Act was lifted, Members of the Shot at Dawn Organisation started Campaigning for a Pardon.

The campaign commenced in 1992 and was led by Janet Booth who sought a pardon for her grandfather, Private Harry Farr, janet’s grandmother had lived with the shame and stigma of her husband being shot for cowardice in 1916. She believed he was wrongly convicted and actually suffering from shellshock. Harry Farr’s family took the Ministry of Defence to the high court and won, in 2006 a posthumous pardon was granted for Private Harry Farr and the other men that were Shot at Dawn.

The Shot at Dawn Memorial is a British Monument at the National Memorial Arboretum near Alrewas, in StaffordshireUK. It memorialises the 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers executed after courts-martial for cowardice or desertion during World War I.

The mass pardon of 306 British Empire soldiers executed for certain offences during the Great War was enacted in section 359 of the Armed Forces Act 2006, which came into effect on royal assent on 8th November 2006.

Britain finally honours Polish war effort with first official Arboretum Memorial

A section of the Polish Memorial, it commemorates the memory of the Polish men and women who gave their lives in the Second World War.  National Memorial Arboretum, 2011.Seventy years after start of second wold war, memorial and book commemorates 500,000 Poles who fought under UK command. They showed extraordinary bravery, many giving their lives as the ultimate sacrifice for our Freedom. The Arboretum, near Lichfield, Staffordshire, contained some 130 war memorials.

 

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

Two minutes

Two minutes isn’t much to give, To those who fought and died, And not forgetting loved ones, Who Till this day have cried.

100_0253

Laurencegoff

To Flanders fields where poppies grow, Our thoughts return to long ago, And in remembrance they still live, Two minutes isn’t much to give

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

100_0259

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum,  Croxall Road, Alrewas, Staffordshire, DE13 7AR 

Part of The Royal British Legion family of charities 

www.thenma.org.uk

www.justgiving.com/thenma

100_0333

Laurencegoff

28th May Arboretum poster 1

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

Open All Year Round 9am – 5pm Only Closed on Christmas Day

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

 

  

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire  is a great place to spend the day any time of the year. They honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance.

There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces. Many civilian organisation and voluntary bodies who have played a big part in serving their country at home and around the world. I enjoyed taking lot’s of photos which I’m  happy to share with you. I also took the time for lovely walks around the many trails exploring the outdoors.

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

Honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world. I am sharing my photos with you, it was a wonderful day.

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

  

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

Laurencegoff

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

100_0343

Laurencegoff

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

100_0239

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

100_0366

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

info@thenma.org.uk

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

Laurencegoff

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

100_0244

Laurencegoff

Laurencegoff

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

Laurencegoff

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

Laurencegoff

http://www.thenma.org.uk

Laurencegoff

100_0271

100_0357

100_0258

Laurencegoff

General Sikorski Cap

http://www.thenma.org.uk

100_0311

100_0312

Laurencegoff

Polish armoured Forces 

The National Memorial Arboretum honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world.

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

Laurencegoff

Polish armoured Forces, Staffordshire

100_0272

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

 
100_0280
Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

info@thenma.org.uk

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

100_0281

Laurencegoff 

Brave Polish that come over during the 2nd world war. We are grateful for you helping

out at our time of need

100_0311

Laurencegoff

Thanks to the Polish during 2nd world war

100_0302
Laurencegoff

Polish Memorial, we will Remember Them

100_0273

Laurencegoff100_0299

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

 100_0304

Laurencegoff

Laurence Goff uplifting visit

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

100_0325

Laurencegoff

All 306 soldiers of the First World War who were shot at dawn for cowardice or desertion have be granted posthumous pardons 90 years later

Shot at Dawn

During the First World War some 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers were shot for desertion or cowardice; the real cause for their offences was often a psychological reaction to the stresses of war which today would be diagnosed as post-traumatic stress syndrome or combat stress reactionShot at Dawn is modelled on Private Herbert Burden, of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, who was shot at Ypres in 1915 aged 17.

The Shot at Dawn Memorial is a British Monument at the National Memorial Arboretum near Alrewas, in Staffordshire

Laurencgoff

During the First  World War 306 who were shot now have a trees planted with the person name put on a metal plate.  The British Monument at the National Memorial Arboretum near Alrewas, in Staffordshire.

The National Memorial Arboretum honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world.

100_0249

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire, Laurence Goff uplifting visit

100_0254

Laurencegoff

100_0270

Laurencegoff

100_0251

 

100_0322http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/britain_wwone/shot_at_dawn_01.shtml

 laurencegoff4newark@yahoo.co.uk

 

100_0336

Laurencegoff100_0260

Laurencegoff

100_0345

Laurencegoff

100_0242

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

100_0332

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

 100_0331

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

SAM_1251

Laurence Goff an introduction to the National Memorial Arboretum, Memorials

 

Laurencegoff

Remembrance for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

100_0351

Laurencegoff 100_0352

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

100_0354

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

 100_0355
100_0356

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

 

100_0345

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

100_0349

Laurencegoff

100_0243

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire, The Royal British Legion Flags

100_0239

 

In the face of these Child, we will Remember them, The Royal British Legion

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

 

Laurencegoff

 The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

Laurencegoff Amateur Photographer

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

The National Memorial Arboretum honours the fallen all year round

www.thenma.org.uk/

100_0269

National Memorial Arboretum Croxall Road Alrewas Staffordshire DE13 7AR

100_0263

Laurencegoff

How to get there by Road 

M1 (southbound) – exit at Junction 28 and take the A38 south bypassing Derby and Burton to the A513 Tamworth then local directions. M1 (northbound) – exit onto M6 north then after Corley Services follow signs for M6 (Toll) & M42 then leave at next junction (Junction 9 M42 ) signposted A 446, then follow A446 Lichfield to A38 Lichfield, then A38 Derby to A513 Tamworth then local directions. M6 (southbound) – exit Junction 15 follow A50 Derby then A38 Lichfield to A 513 Tamworth then local directions. M6 (northbound) South of Birmingham – follow signs for M6 (Toll) & M42 then leave at next junction (Junction 9 M42 ) signposted A 446, then follow A446 Lichfield to A38 Lichfield, then A38 Derby to A513 Tamworth then local directions. M6 (northbound) & M6 North of Birmingham – leave M6 at Junction 11, follow A5 then A38 Derby until A513 Tamworth then local directions. M54 (eastbound) – leave at Junction 1 and take A460 Cannock passing over M6 continue towards continue then follow A5 (Tamworth), then A38 Derby until A513 Tamworth then local directions.

Local directions: from A38 at Alrewas follow Brown Signs to the National Memorial Arboretum following A513 towards Tamworth after about half a mile turn left at the roundabout following the road round to the Arboretum entrance.

For sat nav, AA Route Finder or RAC Route Finder users the post code is DE13 7AR. Streetmap.

 

 ONLINE HELP

Use our online knowledge base to find the help you need, when you need it.

Or call 0808 802 8080 (free from UK landlines and main mobile networks) from 8am to 8pm, 7 days each week (closed Christmas Day, reduced hours on Boxing Day and New Year’s Day)

The phrase ‘When you go home tell them of us’ is from the epitaph carved on the memorial of the 2nd British Division in the Kohima cemetery for the Allied war dead. The full inscription on the epitaph reads, (When You Go Home, Tell Them Of Us And Say, For Their Tomorrow, We Gave Our Today). The verse is said to have been inspired by the epitaph written by Simonides to honour the Greek who fell at the Battle of Thermopylae in 480 BC and is attributed to

John Maxwell Edmond

Don’t tell me that you understand, don’t tell me that you know, Don’t tell me that I will survive, how I will surely grow

Don’t tell me this is just a test, that I am truly blessed, That I am chosen for this task, apart from all the rest. Don’t come at me with answers that can only come from me, Don’t tell me how my grief will pass, that I will soon be free. Don’t stand in pious judgment of the bonds I must untie, Don’t tell me how to suffer, don’t tell me how to cry. My life is filled with selfishness, my pain is all I see,But I need you, I need your love, unconditionally. Accept me in my ups and downs, I need someone to share, Just hold my hand and let me cry, and say,”My friend, I really do care.”

 “At the going down of the Sun and in the morning, we shall remember them.”

100_0250

100_0334

The Royal British Legion

 

Disclaimer

 In the public interest

I accept no responsibility for the accuracy of the information contained on this website, which is a non profit project designed soley by

Laurence Goff

   14 The Osiers

Newark On Trent

 Nottinghamshire NG24 4TP

01636-681878 leave message on Answering Machine

07794613879 

Honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world. I have enjoyed and happy to sharing my photos with you, it was a wonderful day. I also took the time to see the many Memorial lovely walks around the trails exploring the outdoors.

 The photos I took  freely on an uplifting and spiritually visit, National Arboretum Staffordshire. They are my opinions expressed  and are entirely my own. Please Note  they also do not represent the views of The British Legion or others.

This photos were all taken by Laurencegoff Amateur Photographer

RAIL INDUSTRY MEMORIAL

On the top of the plinth is a black granite replica Class 8 Freight Locomotive.
The rear panel has an etching montage showing life on the railways through the ages.

 

QUAKER SERVICE MEMORIAL

Dedicated: 20 April 2013

Commemorates: Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) wartime service.  

The Quaker Service Memorial Trust commissioned the memorial to honour the vital humanitarian role undertaken by members of the Friends Ambulance Unit (FAU), an independent body enabling conscientious objectors to undertake wartime civilian service, and the Friends Relief Service (FRS), the official relief body of the Religious Society of Friends, which worked at home and in mainland Europe to help civilians in distress.

Designed by Staffordshire sculptor and Quaker, Rosemary Barnett, it features six texts carved onto four stone benches. The seats are arranged in an open circle – as are many Quaker meetings for worship – symbolic of unity and equality.

GCHQ

Dedicated: 13 July 2012

Commemorates: GCHQ

The memorial is a sphere of rose coloured granite; and the plaque to anonymous code breakers at the National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire reads: “To commemorate all British and Allied personnel whose work with Signals Intelligence and Communications Security has supported HMG in war and peace since 1914”. The sphere was sculpted by the artist Nick Johnson.

The memorial features two pieces of code; a line of Morse code G C C S representing the “Government Code and Cypher School” the forerunner of GCHQ, and a line of binary code representing the numbers 7 3 8 17, the position of the letters G C H Q in the alphabet.BASRA MEMORIAL WALL

Dedicated: 11 March 2010

Commemorates: The 178 UK Service personnel and one MOD civilian who lost their lives on combat operations in Iraq. It also lists members of Coalition Forces who were killed while under UK command during six years of conflict.

The original memorial was built in Basra in 2006 and stood outside the front of the Headquarters of the Multi-National Division (South East). Following the end of operations, the Basra Memorial Wall was brought back to the UK and rebuilt. The original wall was built, dismantled, and reconstructed at the Arboretum by British soldiers from 37th Armoured Engineer Squadron in a personal gesture to commemorate their fallen comrades.

The brass plaques on this memorial are the originals placed on the wall when it was in situ in Basra, Iraq.

 

ROYAL AIR FORCE ASSOCIATION REMEMBRANCE GARDEN

Dedicated: 28 September 2009

Commemorates: All those who have served in the RAF and Commonwealth air.

Inspiration for the garden comes from the RAF Association’s dedication, the last line of which is “we will remember them”. The central feature is the RAF Association emblem – a magnificent stainless steel eagle sitting on top of a globe. The eagle is made up of over 1,000 hand-forged feathers and is surrounded by a segmented RAF roundel, which is separated into four quarters to depict the RAF Association at the heart of RAF welfare. The RAF Association provides friendship, help and support for any members of the RAF past and present, and their families. It is the largest single-service membership organisation in the UK, with around 74,000 members and almost 500 branches.

 

POLISH ARMED FORCES WAR MEMORIAL

Dedicated: 19 September 2009

Commemorates: The Polish men and women who gave their lives in World War II. Designed as a tribute to the fallen and also as an educational aid for visitors not familiar with the history of the allied Polish Forces

ARMED FORCES MEMORIAL

Dedicated: 12 October 2007

Commemorates:  The men and women of our Armed and Merchant Services who have lost their lives in conflict, as a result of terrorist action or on training exercises since the end of WW2. Unlike the World War memorials in towns and villages across the Nation, there is nowhere else that records over 16,000 names of those who have been killed on duty in recent times.

Dedicated in the presence of Her Majesty The Queen on 12 October 2007, the Armed Forces Memorial is a nationally significant focus for Remembrance, providing recognition and thanks for those who have given their lives in the service of the country.

The Memorial is a stunning piece of architecture designed by Liam O’Connor, inspired by the ancient landscapes of prehistoric Britain and the classical forms of ancient Rome.

 

THE FAR EAST PRISONERS OF WAR MEMORIAL BUILDING

Dedicated: 15 August 2005

Commemorates: The 55,000 Far East Prisoners of War from World War II. It not
only remembers those who died, but also encompasses the whole story of events during this unprecedented chapter in British history. The memorial roll contains the name and rank of all British Servicemen taken prisoner during the South East Asia conflict and embraces the story of their treatment and the thousands who died as well. The building houses an exhibition which reveals clearly the life and experiences of these prisoners, aided by archive video footage and interviews. It was opened on the 60th Anniversary of VJ Day, the end of World War II in the Pacific.

Close by is the original lychgate from the cemetery at Changi Jail in Singapore, built by prisoners as a memorial to their comrades who died.

THE MERCHANT NAVY CONVOY

Dedicated: 1 October 2003

Commemorates: Over 46,000 British merchant seafarers and fishermen lost in conflict during the 20th Century, including two World Wars, Falklands, Kuwait, Vietnam, Iran, Iraq and others.

31,908 seafarers perished in World War II, proportionately more than any of the Armed Services. 2,535 trees represent the British vessels lost at that time.

 

 

SHOT AT DAWN MEMORIAL

Unveiled: 21 June 2001

Commemorates: 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers who were shot for desertion or cowardice during World War I. Most were sentenced after a short trial at which no real opportunity for defence was allowed. Today it’s recognised that many of them were underage and suffering from shell-shock. Andy Decomyn’s statue is modelled on Private Herbert Burden, of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, who was shot at Ypres in 1915 aged 17. In 2006 a posthumous pardon was granted.

STILLBIRTH AND NEONATAL DEATH CHARITY MEMORIAL

Dedicated: June 2001

SANDS was founded in 1978 by a small group of bereaved parents devastated by the death of their babies and by a complete lack of acknowledgement and understanding of the significance and impact of their loss. It aims to support anyone affected by the death of a baby; to work with health professionals to improve the quality of care and services provided to bereaved parents and families and to promote changes that could help to reduce the loss of babies’ lives.

THE CHILDREN’S WOODLAND

Dedicated: 2001

Commemorates: Sponsored by the Midlands Co-operative Society Limited and planted with 2,640 native British trees, the Children’s Woodland was designed to combine arboriculture and wildlife education with Remembrance.

Individual trees have been sponsored by families and schools and dedicated to babies and children who have passed away. In the nearby shelter are large child-sized wooden figures of the characters from ‘The Wind in the Willows’ by Kenneth Grahame. They were carved by the Essex Woodcarvers under the supervision of Peter Benson of the British Woodcarvers Association.

The children’s activity area and picnic area was funded by Staffordshire Aggregates Levy Grant Scheme (SALGS). It is a purpose-built wooden environment for children aged between 7-13 years.

MILLENNIUM CHAPEL OF PEACE AND FORGIVENESS

Dedicated: 2 November 2000

The Chapel represents a desire for, and is dedicated to, peace and forgiveness. It is also a celebration of the beginning of the third Millennium. It is the only place within the UK where the Act of Remembrance is observed every day of the year. Visitors to the Chapel and surrounding areas are invited to stop and observe the Silence at 11am to remember those who have lost their lives in conflict.

The Chapel’s wood construction is supported on twelve trunks of Douglas fir, each one representing one of the twelve apostles on whose witness the early church was built. Douglas fir was selected to pay tribute to David Douglas, the great plantsman, the 200th anniversary of whose birth coincided with the beginning of work on the Chapel. Each pillar has a carving by Jim Heath of one of the apostles.

National Memorial Arboretum

More than 50,000 trees, form a living tribute to Britain’s fallen heroes at the National Memorial Arboretum.

The brainchild of Commander David Childs, a retired naval officer, the site was opened in 2001 using donations and Lottery funding. It encompasses 300 separate memorials paying tribute to the Armed Forces, the emergency services and voluntary organisations.

1. The centrepiece of the memorial arboretum is the Portland stone Armed Forces Memorial which honours the UK’s 16,000 servicemen and women who have lost their lives since the end of the Second World War.

2. Bordered by a hedge, the Brotherhood of Greek Veterans Chapel honours those who fought in Greece from 1940 to 1945.

3. The Polar Bear memorial is dedicated to the 49th (West Riding) Infantry Division, which fought the Germans in Norway in 1940 and was then stationed in Iceland.

4. The marquees, which stage more than 200 events a year, are to be replaced by a pavilion.

5. The Millennium Chapel of Peace and Forgiveness, the only place in the UK where  the Act of Remembrance is observed every day.

6. The Leonard Cheshire Amphitheatre is dedicated to the highly decorated RAF pilot who devoted his life to charity.

7. White alabaster stone marks the memorial to the Fauld explosion, which killed 68 in 1944 when a munitions dump in Staffordshire blew up.

8. Dwarf fruit trees, which can be picked at wheelchair height, mark out the British Limbless ex-Servicemen’s Association Garden.

9. The Y Group Memorial remembers women from the Auxiliary Territorial Service, the Women’s Royal Air Force and the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force.

10. Among the latest additions to the site is the 165ft-long RAF Remembrance Garden, which honours those who   have served in the RAF and Commonwealth air forces. The garden layout is based on the RAF roundel.

11. This striking V-shaped monument is dedicated to members of the Soroptimist International women’s organisation, which aims to promote world peace.

  • Donations to the arboretum appeal can be made via http://www.thenma.org.uk or by sending cheques, payable to the NMA Future Foundations Appeal, to: The NMA Future Foundations Appeal Office, 1 Fitzgerald Road, Mortlake, London SW14 8HA.

The National Memorial Arboretum is the UK’s year-round Centre of Remembrance; a spiritually uplifting place which honours the fallen, recognises service and sacrifice, and fosters pride in our country.  The Arboretum is part of The Royal British Legion family of charities.

Sited in the heart of the Nation, with 50,000 maturing trees and over 250 significant memorials, it is a beautiful and lasting tribute to those who serve their country or who have died in conflict.  Over 200 special events are held annually.  The Act of Remembrance, including a Silence, is observed daily in the Millennium Chapel at 11am.

The Arboretum is home to the iconic Armed Forces Memorial which commemorates those who have been killed on duty, or as a result of terrorism, from the end of the Second World War to the present day.

For enquiries call 01283 792333.

100_3500 

Laurencegoff

Lest We Forget, Britain honoured its war dead. Tribute to British Commonwealth and Polish Sacrifice.They departed this life into the next. Though they are hidden in the shadow of Death.Their lives for others in the love of serving our Country and Newark-On-Trent that never dies. Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856

http://www.deceasedonline.com/

 Newark Town Council

Newark Town Hall, Market Place, Newark, Nottinghamshire, NG24 1DU.

Nearly 40,000 burial records are available, with a mixture of register scans and computerised records.

Newark Cemetery – Added 7 June 2010

Burials numbered 1 to 37,141 dated 31 December 1856 to 4 March 1997, are available as burial register scans. Subsequent data is only available as full computerised records. Initially, records have been added up to no 39,673 dated 26 March 2010.

SAM_0262

Laurencegoff

This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately, the content here is solely the responsibility of Laurence Goff. As a fitting tribute to the people who resting place is at Newark cemetery. The views expressed our solely my own and do not reflect  Newark Town Council.

I have been walking around Newark cemetery since  2004. In 2005 we set up a group Friends Of Newark Cemetery, I have been Chairman since 2010. I had an opportunity to have a blog for the last six years and I have had  Many kind words which I really enjoy and appreciate from people that have contacted me. It has intrigues me, something that makes me want to look into who is buried and history going back to 1856, which has been fascinating.

It Will Never Be The Same If You Become A Volunteer at Newark Cemetery. Perhaps the biggest difference that you will make is in you. Volunteering is a life-changing experience. It will provide you with a new outlook and lease on life. You will understand better than most people how you fit into the family history of who is buried in Newark Cemetery since 1856. Make no mistake about it, this is an experience that you won’t want to miss.

“I had the most unbelievable experience for the last nine years. It not hard work but hugely rewarding for me. I met so many great people and learnt so much about the Cemetery environment. An experience I will never forget and recommend to everyone.”

Friends of Newark Cemetery public meeting is being held at Newark Town Hall (Pickin Room).  17th February 2016 arrive for a cuppa at 1:45pm before the  meeting at 2pm.

  

Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery will only open by appointment for groups on weekends .

 by Contact the Chairman Laurence Goff  01636-681878 or 07794613879 or leave a message at Newark Town Hall 01636-0333 or by Email: friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk  

We  need to found more Volunteers to welcome visits to Newark Cemetery by  showing around our exhibition, serving refreshments giving tours or help locate a grave for visits.

 

http://www.youtube.com/user/laurencegoff

www.facebook.com/laurencegoffnewark

www.flickr.com/photos/friendsofnewarkcemetery

http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=newark%20cemetery%20

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/

https://twitter.com/laurencegoff

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s