George William “Willie” Hall memory of an inspirational sporting-hero that came from Newark, Nottinghamshire

 Willie Hall Legendary footballer The Best Player Who Came From Newark. He Got Selected For England’s Football Team in 1930s. A Few Years Late Would Scores England’s 5 Fastest Ever Hat – Trick Goals, TO This Day. Can We Believe One Of England’s Best Players Of All Times.

SAM_0165Willie Hall Played England Football Team 1930s. He Scores 5 Goals For England He The Fastest Ever Hat-Trick Legendary Footballer Player Must Liv

SAM_2159Willie Hall memory  Lives On in Newark.

George William Hall was known to everyone as Willie and was born in 1912 in Newark, Nottinghamshire.  He had played as a schoolboy international for England and had begun his professional career with Notts County, then in the Third Division (South) in 1930.  After 35 games and 8 goals in just over two years with the club, in which they won promotion to the Second Division, he had done enough to bring himself to the attention of bigger clubs.  He was signed by Tottenham Hotspur, who were pushing for promotion from the Second Division, in December 1932 for a fee of £2600 plus another £500 if he won an England cap.  Signed as a replacement for George Greenfield who had broken a leg, the 20 year-old Hall was immediately picked for the first team, making his debut ironically away to Notts County.  Spurs lost that game 3-0 but would finish runners-up at the end of the season to win promotion.

Spurs returned to the top flight in style and were lying second when Hall was selected to make his debut for England in a 4-1 win against France at White Hart Lane in 6 December 1933.  Although he played well enough he wasn’t selected again until 1937, although he did appear for an FA XI against an Anglo-Scot XI in 1935 to celebrate the silver jubilee of King George V.   Hindering his call up for further caps was an injury received in 1934 at Maine Road when, after a heavy tackle, he required surgery on his knee.  This left him sidelined for a number of months, and when he returned to the first team towards the end of the 1934/35 season Spurs had struggled and were bottom of the table and were to be relegated back to the second tier.   Out of the top division the selectors overlooked him, but his form was such that even though he was still playing in the Second Division he was called up to win his second cap in a 5-1 win over Northern Ireland in Belfast on 23 October 1937.  He scored one of the goals in this game and was picked for the next international against Wales on 17 November in which he scored the second goal in a 2-1 victory at Middlesbrough’s Ayresome Park.

On 6 November 1938 he was selected for his seventh England cap for the game in which he was going to write his name in the record books by scoring five times in a magical thirty-minute period either side of the half-time break.  Tommy Lawton had opened the scoring in the eighth minute but it was nearly half an hour before the team scored again and Willie Hall started on his rampage.  The first of his goals came in the 36th minute followed by two more in the 38th and 40th minutes which gave Hall the record of the fastest international hat-trick by an England player, a feat timed officially at 3 minutes 30 seconds and yet to be bettered.  It took him 10 minutes of the second half for him to get his fourth, quickly followed by the fifth another 10 minutes later.  Stanley Matthews rounded off the afternoon with England’s seventh in the 75th minute.

Willie Hall was a skilful dribbler of the ball but not renowned as a goalscorer and the five he scored for England was more than half the total he got for Spurs all that season, but he had not only scored the fastest hat-trick for England that day but also equalled Steve Bloomer’s 1896 record for the most goals in an international game by an English player.   It was a game that was to leave Hall immensely proud and Stanley Matthews, who himself had a rewarding afternoon having been credited with assists for all of Willie Hall’s goals, later wrote in his autobiography The Way It Was, “Willie was full of emotion back in the dressing room and cried unashamedly as each of his team-mates in turn congratulated him on his outstanding performance and his England goalscoring match record.”

Hall was to win a total of 10 caps, scoring a highly creditable nine goals and was a regular selection up until the intervention of the Second World War in 1939, with his final game being against Yugoslavia on 18 May 1939.  During the war he was rejected by the army on health grounds caused by injuries suffered from playing football, and he served in the London Police reserve.  He continued to turn out for Spurs in war-time games and was made captain of the team, playing 136 times and scoring 10 goals.  He also appeared in three war-time internationals. In 1944 he retired from playing after a serious ankle injury and took over the management of Clapton Orient, as Leyton Orient were then called.

His tenure was to be short-lived though due to complications suffered after a thrombosis had affected his legs and by the time football had resumed in 1946 Hall sadly had had both his legs amputated.  Tommy Lawton mirrored the public’s mood in his book My Twenty Years of Soccer, when he wrote, “What a tragedy it was that Willie should lose both his precious legs, the legs that had thrilled us all in football for many a year.”  Notts County and Spurs both held testimonials for him, with over 30,000 turning out to White Hart Lane on 7 May 1946 to see a Spurs XI take on an FA XI.

After a period coaching and managing in the non-league with Chelmsford and Chingford he left the game and became a publican.   A measure of his fame and the regard that he was held in for how he had dealt with his disability was that in 1959, some 13 year after the end of his career, he was the subject of the This Is Your Life TV programme and presented with the famous red book by Eamonn Andrews.  Inscribed inside were the words  “Willie Hall – football genius and true gentleman, your brand of unique courage has inspired all who have known you.  Your kindness and humour have brought solace into the lives of all you have met.  This book is intended as our tribute and token of appreciation.”

Willie Hall passed away on 22 May 1967 aged 55 and a trophy, the Willie Hall Memorial Trophy, was inaugurated for teams in Newark to compete for, and is still played for today, and a plaque was unveiled earlier this year at the primary school in Lovers’ Lane, Newark where Hall began his tentative steps towards football immortality.  When looking back at his career perhaps there are no more fitting words than those written by Stanley Matthews when he wrote, “He was the most unassuming of men, modest to a fault. His unselfish play and great contribution to a game was never truly appreciated by the sports writers of the day.”

 

100_9602George William “Willie” Hall
Born in Newark, Nottinghamshire on Tuesday 12th March 1912 – Died on Monday 26th May 1967SAM_0163

Willie Hall Played England Football Team 1930s. He Scores England’s Fastest Ever Hat-Trick legendary footballer
George William “Willie” Hall

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsSAM_0164

George William “Willie” Hall

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Willie Hall Played England Football Team 1930s. He Scores England’s Fastest Ever Hat-Trick legendary footballer

Willie died in his home town of Newark On Monday 26th May 1967, his thanksgiving service at Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene was followed by cremation, and the ashes later interred at Newark Cemetery in his Parents grave. Tribute has been paid, locally to a man of great bravery and talent. Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Willie Hall Played England Football Team 1930s. He Scores England’s Fastest Ever Hat-Trick legendary footballer

 

SAM_2145Willie Hall (left) Scored 5 of the 7 goals against Northern Ireland on 16th November 1938

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

A time to remember – that you will never forget

SAM_0889Laurencegoff

Our sporting-hero, his last legacy will live on and be remembered

SAM_2188Willie Attended Lovers Lane Primary School Newark

As a young schoolboy an international, and was a member of the Ransome & Marles

side which won the Notts Alliance title in 1929-30

Played Notts County Football Team 1930 – 1932SAM_2181

Played Football For Tottenham Hotspur 1932 for many years

SAM_2573Willie Died in Newark on Monday 26th May 1967

 
His Resting Place

Cremation, and the ashes later interred at Newark Cemetery at his and parents grave

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The Willie Hall Memorial Trophy is played each year since 1967

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George  William “Willie” Hall Played Football For Tottenham Hotspur At Age 20.

Amongst the many well-known local people that are buried in Newark Cemetery include  among the many graves are Memorials to some of Newark’s greatest benefactors and people who have helped shape Newark

SAM_2168Willie Hall Scores England’s Fastest Ever Hat-Trick legendary footballer

His famous ‘hat trick’ (still unbeaten) was achieved in the game with Northern Ireland, when he scored all five goals. A date to remember, 16th November 1938 and was played at Old Trafford.  It still has never yet been beaten.

Dreams do come true if you believe in yourself

Let’s help others achieve their dreams 

 Honouring His Memory As A Fitting Tribute To Him

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Willie Hall, 1950 by Lilian Iris ‘Betty’ Hall

 He was Newark’s football genius and true gentleman, and he won his own battles always helping other people to win theirsSAM_7723

George William “Willie” Hall a Newark true local and national Football Legend, his memory needs to live on. He was born on Tuesday 12th March 1912, to John William Hall and Elizabeth (née Hopkinson). at 12 Tenter Buildings this house on Appleton Gate, Newark once was originally the largest Victorian back to back yard in town with 82 houses.

A true local and national Football Legend, let’s start inspiring the young people of today.

George William “Willie” Hall memory of an inspirational sporting-hero that came from Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

A schoolboy international, and was a member of the Ransome & Marles side which won the Notts Alliance title in 1929-30. His brothers, Cyril and Harry, were also footballers.

Notts County football team back in 1932. He went on to play for Tottenham Hotspur in 1932 and the England national team during the 1930s. He was a versatile inside forward and skillful dribbler. In his later career he played a full-back.

Dreams do come true.  When he was called to for England, this was a joy of his life.

  • Position whilst with England: Inside Forward

  • Clubs whilst with England: Tottenham Hotspur

  • Scored 5 goals against Northern Ireland on 16th November 1938.

    His hat-trick coming inside 4 minutes (which is still an intenational record).

On This Weekend In Football: Willie Hall Scores England’s Fastest Ever Hat-Trick

by Stuart Moriarty-Patten

16th November 1938

Willie Hall takes under four minutes to score England’s fastest ever international hat-trick

 

One of the Premier League’s biggest clubs is to honour Newark’s most famous footballing son.

Willie Hall

Willie Hall

Tottenham Hotspur are taking back the original Willie Hall Cup they donated to the Newark Alliance league almost 50 years ago.

It was presented in memory of Willie Hall, scorer of the fastest international hat-trick of all time.

Spurs, with the approval of the Newark Alliance, want to exhibit the trophy in a museum at the club’s proposed new stadium.

Mr Dennis Rawle, from the Alliance, said: “Willie Hall is the most prestigious player from our area and that is why his memorial trophy is still played for by every team in the Newark Alliance to this day.

“He is the best player Newark has produced.

“In return for us giving them the trophy back, I’m hoping someone from Tottenham can come and present the Willie Hall Cup to the winners of the 2017 competition, which will mark both the cup’s and Alliance’s 50th anniversary.”

Hall wrote his name into the history books when he scored a 3½-minute hat-trick for England against Northern Ireland at Old Trafford on November 16, 1938.

In total he scored five in England’s 7-0 win.

In 1967, the year Willie Hall died, Tottenham donated a trophy to the newly-formed Newark Alliance.

It was presented to the winners of the league’s main cup competition.

The Willie Hall Memorial Trophy was presented for more than 40 years before being replaced with a newer trophy.

Representatives of the Alli-ance will travel to London to present the original trophy to Tottenham.

Mr Andy Porter, a Spurs historian, said: “We will be extremely proud to display the original trophy in our lounges and, when we move to the new ground, the planned museum.

“We were one of the clubs and organisations that made a donation back in 1968 to keep his memory alive.

“His five-goal haul against Northern Ireland in 1938 makes him unique among the England players listed on our international honours board.

Members of the Newark Alliance committee with the Willie Hall Memorial Trophy. They are, left to right, back row, Mr Dennis Rawle and Mr Keith Arnold. Front, Mr Paul Samuels and Mr Simon Roberts. 100314JT8-8

Members of the Newark Alliance committee with the Willie Hall Memorial Trophy. They are, left to right, back row, Mr Dennis Rawle and Mr Keith Arnold. Front, Mr Paul Samuels and Mr Simon Roberts. 100314JT8-8

“He was one of the most prominent players of his era.

“To students of Spurs’ history he was a star of our 1930s team.”

Willie Hall’s nephew, Mr Mick Gill, of Newark, said handing back the cup was appropriate.

Willie Hall was a schoolboy international and a member of the Ransome and Marles side that won the Notts Alliance title in 1929-30.

Notts County signed him in 1930 when he was 18 and after 35 appearances and eight goals, he moved to Tottenham in 1932.

He was capped ten times by England.

Football legend Tommy Lawton once said: “Willie Hall was a ball player of the highest class.

“He could make a football do the most alarming tricks.”

Poor health ended Willie Hall’s playing career in 1945.

After his enforced retirement he became the first Spurs player to be awarded a benefit match.

The game on May 7, 1946 attracted a crowd of 30,220 and raised more than £3,000 for him.

After being a publican in London, Willie Hall returned to Newark in 1954 to be near his sister.

He had to have the lower parts of both his legs amputated because of thrombosis.

He died from a heart attack in 1967 six days after seeing his beloved Spurs beat Chelsea 2-1 in the FA Cup.

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Up-for-the-cup

 

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George William “Willie” Hall, Tottenham Hotspur football team captain

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  • Tottenham Hotspur Football Club, commonly referred to as Spurs, is an English football

    club located in Tottenham, London, that plays in the Premier League.

    The club’s home stadium is White Hart Lane.

 

Willie Hall Scores England’s Fastest Ever Hat-Trick legendary footballer

His famous ‘hat trick’ (still unbeaten) was achieved in the game with Northern Ireland, when he scored all five goals. A date to remember, 16th November 1938 and was played at Old Trafford.  It still has never yet been beaten.

Dreams do come true if you believe in yourself

SAM_2176
Laurencegoff

Willie attended Lovers’ Lane Primary School, Newark , Nottinghamshire which was nearby, that where his interest in football started together with his other brothers and friends.

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http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

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Laurencegoff 

N.A.L.H.S. Plaque Dedication to George William “Willie” Hall

located at Lovers’ Lane Primary School, Newark 

Memory of an inspirational sporting-hero, this plaque was unveiled by the town’s mayor, Councillor Bryan Richardson, on Tuesday 23rd July 2013

A dedication to a Newark-born footballer in a plaque erected at Lovers’ Lane School

By ROGER PEACOCK

17th August 2013

http://www.ournottinghamshire.org.uk/page_id__1121_path__0p31p38p50p.aspx

SAM_2188Laurencegoff

Can you see the plaque on the wall of Lovers’ Lane School Playground? 

During the Second World War Willie continue to play in friendly matches for Spurs whilst also being a member of the London Police Reserve.

Sadly ill-health brought an end to his playing career in 1944 and 1945  he suffered the amputation of both lower parts of his legs. He continued his association with the game as a Vice-president of the Spurs Supporters Club and in coaching roles at Clapton Orient and other clubs. Testimonial games were played at both Tottenham and Notts County grounds in 1946. From 1954 he became a publican. 

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Willie’s Hall fame was enhanced on 16th February 1959, when he was chosen as the subject of This is your life by B.B.C. Television host Eamonn Andrews.

 

SAM_2169

Born on 12th March 1912 in Newark, Nottinghamshire, England.

 When George Greenfield, the Tottenham inside forward broke his leg with the team on a good run in the Second Division, manager Percy Smith had to find someone to come in to cover and he went out and picked up Willie Hall from Notts. County.  The 20 year old cost £2,500 and was regarded as a good purchase, as the youngster fitted in straight away and helped the side to promotion to the top flight.  So well did Hall do in the Tottenham team that he caught the eye of the England selection committee and was selected to play for his country against France in December 1933 at home at White Hart Lane, which cost Tottenham another £500 in what was an early condition of a transfer fee.

Originally a schoolboy prodigy, Willie made the Notts. County first team at the end of the 1930-31 season and stayed with his club until 1932, when he made his Spurs debut.  Playing between the defence and the attack, Hall used his dribbling skills and his willingness to chase 

chase back to join the two parts of the team together.  His partnership with Willie Evans saw him regularly release the Welshman down the wing and create openings. 

It was only a year after joining Tottenham that Hall first won an England cap and that debut in 1933 was added to with nine further caps, scoring nine goal sin the process, including five against Northern Ireland at Old Trafford on 16th November 1938, which included the fastest hat-trick for England, coming in 3½ minutes and all five came in 30 minutes.  His scoring record was outstanding, but when the war came, it interrupted his international career, as well as his club career.  He could not join the forces, because he had sustained injuries while playing football which ruled him out of signing up to go to war, but Willie still managed to play a total of 136 war-time games, hitting 10 goals for Tottenham, while he served in the local London police reserve.

Spurs played well in the 1932-33 and ended the season as runners-up to gain promotion to the First Division and followed that up with another good season in gaining third place in the top flight in 1933-34.  However, in a match at Maine Road, three Manchester City players crunched Hall in a tackle and he required surgery on a cartilage tear, which kept him out for five months and the rest of the season was a struggle, with Willie just coming back for the tail-end of the campaign and despite his return signalling an upturn in fortunes, the team finished rock bottom, being relegated back to Division 2.

Willie dropped deeper in the side to fill in at full-back and he was selected for England in three war-time internationals against Wales.  During World War Two, Willie also played as a guest at Brighton and Hove Albion.

 

Sadly, he suffered from ill health and had to retire from playing and in 1945 suffered amputations of both legs.  Such was his service to Tottenham respected, the club held a testimonial game against an FA XI at White Hart Lane on 7th May 1946, with a 30,220 crowd paying to see the match and providing £3,000 for Hall’s needs.  There was also another game staged for him in Nottingham to help him out.

Although handicapped by no longer having the full use of his lower limbs, he continued to play a part in the game with coaching stints at Clapton Orient, Chelmsford City and Chingford Town.

He was so popular with the fans that he was appointed as the Vice-President of the Spurs Supporters Club when it was first formed and after his retirement, Hall took over the Archers pub in Osborne Street, London EC1.

Perhaps he was a trend-setter of his day, as Hall was one of the first footballers to be feature don the TV programme “This Is Your Life.”

SAM_2591

Laurencegoff

 New Family Grave January 2014

 Willie Hall died in his home town of Newark, Nottinghamshire on Monday, 22nd May 1967.

Hall’s prominence in the game in the Nottingham area was also recognised by a “Willie Hall Memorial Trophy” being contested among local sides in the area every year since his death. 

Memory Will Live On

On This Weekend In Football: Willie Hall Scores England’s Fastest Ever Hat-Trick

WILLIE’S PLACE IN HALL OF FAME

  • THURSDAY, 13 NOVEMBER, 2003
  • FA Header Image

SUNDAY’S MATCH AT OLD TRAFFORD IS THE 65TH ANNIVERSARY OF A TRULY REMARKABLE ACH

http://www.thefa.com/england/News/2003/73734

Sunday’s match at Old Trafford is the 65th anniversary of a truly remarkable achievement – Willie Hall scored what is still the quickest ever international hat-trick…

English football history is littered with great players who did their country a great service but whose achievements, having come in an era before mass media coverage of football, are now consigned only to faint memory and the record books.

George William Hall, better known as Willie, was one such player. Between 1933 and 1939, Hall won ten caps for England, scoring nine goals – a strike rate that any modern day forward would be proud to have.

Having signed for Tottenham Hotspur from Notts County in December 1932 for a then-massive £2,500, Hall made his England debut against France in December 1933 at, appropriately enough, Spurs’ White Hart Lane.

Five years and five further caps later came Hall’s great moment. In a Home Championship match between England and Northern Ireland at Old Trafford on 16 November 1938 – exactly 65 years ago this Sunday – Hall scored three goals in three and a half minutes to register what is still the fastest ever hat-trick in international football.

His goals came after 36, 38 and 40 minutes and followed up Tommy Lawton’s header on eight minutes. An inspired Hall then struck twice more after the break before Stanley Matthews finished things off with a goal fifteen minutes from time.

Not only is that hat-trick still a world record but Hall’s five goals also equalled Steve Bloomer’s 1896 record of the most goals in a match by a single player for the Three Lions. Malcolm Macdonald would become the third player to achieve five in a game 37 years later.

Hall ‘s career all but ended with the outbreak of the Second World War but in total he made 34 League appearances for Notts County, scoring seven times and 205 appearances for Tottenham, knocking in 27 goals.

George ‘Willie’ Hall died in the town of his birth, Newark, in May 1967.

England: V Woodley, W Morris, E Hapgood (c), C Willingham, S Cullis, J Mercer, S Matthews, G Hall, T Lawton, J Stephenson, J Smith

Northern Ireland: Twoomey, Hayes, Cook, Brolly, McMillen, Browne, Cochrane, Stevenson, Baird, Doherty, Brown

Goals: Lawton (8), Hall, (36, 38, 40, 55, 65), Matthews (75)

Referee: Peter Craigmoyle (Scotland)  Attendance: 40,000

Hall made his name at Notts County and, in the matchday programme for their FA Cup First Round tie against Shildon, the Magpies ran a great article all about the life and times of the player. For more, check out nottscountyfc.co.uk

 NALHS Plaque to Willie Hall – Our Nottinghamshire

http://www.ournottinghamshire.org.uk › … › Newark and Sherwood › Newark

 

4 Sep 2013 – ‘NALHS Plaque to Willie Hall‘ by ROGER PEACOCK from Our  George William Hall was born in a humble home at 12 Tenter Buildings;

 Willie Hall – Newark’s forgotten hero and England record holder NEWARK-born Willie Hall was a national hero – but hardly anyone remembers the talented inside forward these days. Hall was not a noted goalscorer. Yet he earned his place in the history of the game after scoring a record five goals in a row in a 30-minute spell, either side of half-time, for England against Northern Ireland at Old Trafford on November 16, 1938. Hall, who formed a lethal partnership with Sir Stanley Matthews, struck three times in only three-and-a-half-minutes. It was the fastest hat-trick in international football. George William Hall was born in Newark in March 1912 and was educated at Lover’s Lane School in Newark. A schoolboy international, he was a member of the Ransome & Marles side which won the Notts Alliance title in 1929-30. His brothers, Cyril and Harry, were also footballers. Hall signed for Notts County in 1930, at the age of 18. But Spurs snapped him up two years later (after 35 appearances and eight goals) for a fee of £2,600, plus another £500 if he won an England cap. Rejected for Army service on health grounds, he served with the London Police Reserve instead. Hall turned out for Spurs during the Second World War and went on to captain the side. He made his international debut in a 4-1 win against France in December 1933 and was capped ten times. He played against the Rest of Europe and also played in three wartime internationals against Wales. An ankle injury ended his career in 1944 and he took over as manager at Clapton Orient. At the time he was the youngest manager in the Football League. He also had spells at Chelmsford City and Chingford Town. Hall later suffered from ill health. He had a thrombosis and had both legs amputated after a series of failed operations. Testimonial games were held for him in London and Nottingham in 1946. Nottingham Forest manager Billy Walker put out a Combined XI against an FA XI on September 18. The Combined XI featured three Forest players – Billy Baxter, Bob McCall and Tom Johnston – along with Leon Leuty, who was a member of Derby County’s 1946 FA Cup-winning team. Leuty cost Notts County a record £20,000 when they signed him from Bradford in 1950. An engineer at Rolls-Royce, he captained the side until his untimely death, from leukaemia, at the age of 35. Johnston and Baxter also went on to play for Notts County. Johnston scored 92 goals in 286 games, while Baxter made 153 appearances before joining Grantham Town in 1954. When he retired in 1952, McCall was appointed groundsman at the City Ground and also coached the A team. The FA XI featured some of the greats – Frank Swift, Billy Wright, Len Shackleton, Stan Cullis, Tom Finney and Raich Carter. Albert Stubbins opened the scoring in the 25th minute but the Combined side hit back in the second half with two goals in five minutes from Shackleton and Edwards. Wilf Mannion got a deserved equaliser four minutes from time. Combined XI: Middleton (Chesterfield), McCall (Nottingham Forest), Cater (West Ham), Baxter (Nottingham Forest), Leuty (Derby County), Blenkinsop (Grimsby), Hancocks (Wolves), Shackleton (Bradford), Edwards (Aston Villa), Rowley (Manchester United), Johnston (Nottingham Forest). FA XI: Swift (Manchester City), Scott (Arsenal), Hardwick (Middlesbrough), Wright (Wolves) Cullis (Wolves), Forrest (Bolton), Finney (Preston), Mannion (Middlesbrough), Stubbins (Liverpool), Carter (Derby County), Mullen (Wolves). Hall opened a sports shop with Spurs team-mate Vic Buckingham and in 1954, he became a publican. His life story was featured on television by Eamonn Andrews on ‘This is Your Life’. Hall died in 1967, aged 55, after suffering a heart attack at his sister’s house in Newark, just days after watching his old side Spurs beat Chelsea in the FA Cup final. Read more: http://www.nottinghampost.com/Willie-Hall-ndash-Newark-s-forgotten-hero-England/story-15188137-detail/story.html#ixzz3fsfAYszs Follow us: @Nottingham_Post on Twitter | NottinghamPostOnline on Facebook Read more: http://www.nottinghampost.com/Willie-Hall-ndash-Newark-s-forgotten-hero-England/story-15188137-detail/story.html#ixzz3fsey9VBq Follow us: @Nottingham_Post on Twitter | NottinghamPostOnline on Facebook

Willie Hall spent more time with his sister back in Newark, with new skills in fishing, and nostalgic sharing with old friends. He was happy person, on 20th May 1967, having watched Tottenham beat Chelsea 2:1 in the F.A. Cup. Sadly Willie died of a heart attack six days later on Monday 26th May 1967. 

100_9601

Laurencegoff

A  thanksgiving service took place at  Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene Church was followed by cremation, and the ashes later interred at Newark Cemetery at his  and parents grave. Our bid farewell and fond memory will live on for years to come.

SAM_2605

Laurencegoff
SAM_2593Laurencegoff

Willie Hall New Family Grave January 2014

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 Laurencegoff

His  ashes later interred at Newark cemetery at his parents grave, plot number West 220 row S on the

West side, turn right at memorial Cross. William name is on his parents grave. 

 It reads: Also Her Beloved Son George William Hall Died 22nd May

1967 Aged 55 Years Reunited.

SAM_2601

A new tombstone has now been made by his family, that’s good news.  It  looks nice which is now in placed at Newark Cemetery for all to see. 

 Our sporting-hero will always be remembered in Newark his lasting legacy.

 SAM_2600

Laurencegoff

Willie Sister Family Grave Together As One

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

 George William “Willie” Hall

Parents Grave located at Newark Cemetery

His ashes later interred at his parents grave

A old gravestone, a new stone with all three names together with his family

SAM_2197

Laurencegoff

Willie Hall ashes were interred at his parents grave

George William Hall
Born 12 March 1912 at 12 Tenter Buildings, Appletongate, Newark, Nottinghamshire[registered in Newark, June 1912]To John William and Elizabeth (née Hopkinson). With eleven older brothers and sisters (twelve, if the the tragic death of a child is to be included)

 

 Willie Hall together with his parents have a new gravestone a restoration project has finished.

Willie Hall ashes were interred at his parents grave

A new photo will be posted of

Headstone and Memorial to Willie Hall  and his parents

 Honouring His Memory As

A Fitting Tribute To Willie Hall who came from Newark

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DISPLAY CARDS

WILLIE HALL
This display shows the cards that Willie Hall has been featured on. Click on the Card Set name to display all cards in that set. Click on the large front or back card images to display this player’s career details.
Zoom
TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR  Second Division
Zoom

Card manufacturer: Churchman

Age when this set was released: 26

Card set Association Footballers Series 1

Published in 1938

Card number 17 from a set of 50
Zoom
TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR  Second Division
Zoom

Card manufacturer: Churchman

Age when this set was released: 27

Card set Association Footballers Series 2

Published in 1939

Card number 18 from a set of 50
Zoom
TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR  Second Division
Zoom

Card manufacturer: Wills Cigarettes

Age when this set was released: 27

Card set Association Footballers

Published in 1939

Card number 23 from a set of 50
Zoom
TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR  Second Division
Zoom

Card manufacturer: R & J Hill

Age when this set was released: 27

Card set Famous Footballers Series 1

Published in 1939

Card number 28 from a set of 50

 

Locating a grave have a look at this Map, walking up the Main Drive numbers start low and high at the other end of  cemetery. Please note E side stand for East and W side for West . The graves are numbered from A the next one will be B, C, D, E, and so on going outward on either side East or West. All new tombstone are black with the information on the back has  E for East then the letter for the row then the number, looking something like this E B 100 or West side W E

100_3701

Laurencegoff

Click on  for location of Cemetery Newark-on-Trent

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

The Villa hit ten past RHP Social Reserves to book a place in the quarter-finals of the Willie Hall Cup

appier times... Lowdham are pictured with the Willie Hall Trophy after their penalty shoot-out win in May.

Lowdham United, who won the Willie Hall Trophy for the third time in their history in May and also gained promotion to the Newark Alliance Senior Division, have withdrawn from the league because of a lack of players.

Formed in 1992, the club have also won two Pat Jepson Memorial Trophy Finals and the Notts Junior Cup in the last ten years, but this season they have struggled to field a team because of summer departures, and their last league outing ended in a 20-0 defeat at the hands of reigning champions Farndon United.

The Alliance has already seen five clubs pull out in the close season, with Barkestone-le-Vale, EBS Shelford, Coddington Reserves, Crown FC and Zenith joining the withdrawals of Senior Division BG Hawtonville and Division One side Balderton Athletic during the last campaign, but the Willie Hall holders are the most high-profile of those deciding to call it a day.

Read more Oct 09, 2009

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/sport/Now-the-Willie-Hall-winners-bite-the-dust

The crowd at Rubys Avenue enjoyed an exciting Willie Hall Cup tie between Fernwood and Fiskerton, which ended with a home win on penalties. Fernwood’s Simon Jack (wearing red and black) is pictured tackling Shannon Bird.

http://www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/sport/Ten-goal-Villa-breeze-into-last-eight

Super-sub Johnson seals cup win

1:54pm Wed May 01, 2013

Premier Division leaders Wheatsheaf United secured silverware for a second successive season as they came from behind to beat RHP Social 2-1 to lift the Sam Arnold Memorial Trophy.

Substitute Matt Johnson heads the winning goal to secure the Sam Arnold Memorial Trophy for Wheatsheaf United. (280413DM5-5)

Substitute Matt Johnson heads the winning goal to secure the Sam Arnold Memorial Trophy for Wheatsheaf United. (280413DM5-5)

Second-half goals from Marlon Waites and Matthew Johnson saw the Sheaf — Willie Hall Cup winners last season — turn the game around after Stuart Bennett had put RHP in front in the first-half. 

The result will bring back memories of RHP’s Sam Arnold final defeat last season, when they lost 2-1 to Coddington, while Wheatsheaf more than avenged their Willie Hall semi-final defeat to RHP earlier this year.

Ricky Brewer, who had been booked not long before, teed up Bennett for the opener on 22 minutes when he crossed for the target man to convert from six yards into the top left corner. 

RHP took their lead into the break, prompting Wheatsheaf boss Jonathan Nussey to shuffle his pack, Paddy Ryan replacing Lewis Cracknell. 

The first 20 minutes of the second-half saw little action until Nussey brought Johnson on for William Pycroft, a move that changed the game. 

Three minutes later, Johnson crossed for the prolific Waites, who made no mistake from three yards out to level the scores. 

Johnson put the Southwell side in front 15 minutes before the end when he firmly headed home from Jonathan Upton’s fine cross from the left wing. 

RHP manager Lee Julian brought on Alex Hales and Ben Porter as the Greens desperately sought to fight back, but Wheatsheaf held on to clinch their first trophy of the season. 

Nussey said: “It’s the first time we have won the Sam Arnold and it feels really good. 

Wheatsheaf celebrate with the cup. (280413DM5-14)

Wheatsheaf celebrate with the cup. (280413DM5-14)

“We have put the pressure on RHP now, they’ve lost two cup-finals, and it will give us a good feeling when we play them in the league again. 

“We have got a great chance of pulling off our first double in history now, so now we want to make sure we win the league as well.”

RHP Social will play Wheatsheaf United in the league on May 19, the last weekend of the season.  Wed May 01, 2013

http://www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/sport/Super-sub-Johnson-seals-cup-win

WILLIE HALL CUP is played each year

The Willie Hall Memorial Trophy is still played for each year having been inaugurated in 1967, the year he died, by the Newark Football Alliance.

 Simon Roberts

General Secretary

Newark Football Alliance

Email: simonroberts@newarkfootballalliance.co.uk

Website: www.newarkfootballalliance.co.uk 

Newark Town Council who have possibility of Newark Cemetery.

Town Hall/Market Place, Newark-on-Trent NG24 1DU

Phone: 01636 680333

http://newark.gov.uk

post@newark.gov.uk

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Newark Cemetery, London Road, 

Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  October – March 8am – 6pm

Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm

Newark Town Council

Newark Town Hall, Market Place, Newark, Nottinghamshire, NG24 1DU.

My Website principles are that I strive to be accurate. I promptly correct any inaccuracy or error with a visible edit and update. I attribute and link to sources on the web wherever possible. My direct contact details are displayed on every page of the site. I do not receive payment or services for any reviews or editorial. And this is a personal website of Laurence Goff. The views expressed do not reflect  Newark Town Council who are responsible for the cemetery.

 If you would like to help in anyway on this project or have any information, photos to post on the website please contact me.

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/12/31/george-william-willie-hall-memory-of-an-inspirational-sporting-hero-that-came-from-newark-on-trent-nottinghamshire/

Laurence Goff personal website which I’ve put together and does not represent Newark Town Council. Its dedicated to the thousands of  people since 1856 as a means of further promoting Newark cemetery, and encouraging interested people to join the tribute to Willie Hall.

Contact: Friends Of Newark Cemetery Laurence Goff Chairman C/o Newark Town Hall, Market Place, Newark, Notts, NG24 1DU 01636-680333 (Town Hall)Friends of Newark Cemetery Laurence Goff Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery UK

01636-681878 (Home) Please leave a message on answering machine 07794613879 (Mobile) /

http://www.facebook.com/laurencegoffnewark laurencegoff4newark@yahoo.co.uk friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk http://www.newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/
http://www.youtube.com/user/laurencegoff
http://www.twitter.com/laurencegoff
http://www.friendsofnewarkcemeteryuk.weebly.com

 

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