RAF Northholt Remembering The 2165 Polish Airmen Who Died And Their Sacrifice During The 2nd World War

Polish War Memorial Commemoration Ceremony of Homage to Fallen Polish AirmanSAM_6583

The Polish Air Force in Great Britain was formed in 1940, Royal Air Force station Northolt, which was the main base for the Polish fighter squadrons during the Battle of Britain.

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This page is dedicated to the million victims of 2nd World War. We should always remember the immense grief and loss this war brought to us and the world.

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Great BritainPoland Together As One

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RAF Northholt Remembering The 2165 Polish Airmen Who Died And Their Sacrifice During The 2nd World WarSAM_6527

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polish20emblem2.jpg Polish Flag image by PolishAmericans

The Amazing Spitfire Flying For Our Freedom

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Laurence Goff

Chairman: Friends Of Newark Cemetery

Visiting RAF NorthholtSAM_0071

By Laurencegoff

Polish War Memorial, Northolt

This commemorates the 2165 Polish airmen who lost their lives during the 2nd World War fighting alongside the  Allies. RAF Northolt was the main base for the Polish fighter squadrons. The memorial is by the Western Avenue/West End Road roundabout, outside the airfield.

    

After Poland fell to the enemy, thousands of Polish pilots, soldiers, and sailors escaped to England. Devoted to liberating their homeland, some would form the RAF’s 303 squadron, known as the Kosciuszko Squadron, after the elite unit in which many had flown back home. Their thrilling exploits and fearless flying made them celebrities in Britain, where they were “adopted” by socialites and seduced by countless women, even as they yearned for news from home. During the Battle of Britain, they downed more German aircraft than any other squadron, but in a stunning twist at the war’s end, the Allies rewarded their valor by abandoning Poland to Joseph Stalin. This moving, fascinating book uncovers a crucial forgotten chapter in World War II–and Polish–history. To the Polish volunteers who were to fly and fight so brilliantly and tenaciously throughout the Battle of Britain, the United Kingdom was justifiably known as ‘Last Hope Island’.

Many of them lost their lives, many achieved glory. This book is a tremendous account of their contribution in those hectic days before the RAF began to take the offensive across the Channel. Summer of 1940 and the Battle of Britain — the darkest days during WWII. Great Britain stood alone, fighting for its life against the powerful German war machine. The celebrated squadron of Polish fighter pilots whose superb skill in the air helped save us during its most desperate hours. They not only played a crucial role in the Battle of Britian in 1940, but they also contributed significantly to the Allied war effort.

The Prime Minister at the time Winston Churchill speaking about the Battle of Britain in 1940 said, “Never was so much owed by so many to so few.” By the beginning of 1941 there was a fully fledged Polish Air Force operating alongside the RAF. With 14 Squadrons it was larger than any other of the Air Force from en-occupied Europe that had joined the Allies. Over 17,000 men and women passed through the ranks of the Polish Air Force while it was stationed in the UK. They shot down 745 enemy aircraft, with a further 175 unconfirmed. They dropped thousands of bombs and laid hundreds of mines, flying 102,486 sorties notching up a total of 290,895 operation flying hours. They achieved this at a cost of 1,973 killed and 1,388 wounded. They received 342 British gallantry awards. A Question of Honour is the gripping, little-known story of the refugee Polish pilots who joined the RAF and played an essential role in saving Britain from the enemy, only to be betrayed by the Allies after the war. Second World War, the story of millions of young men and women who gave everything for freedom and in the final victory were let down.

According to Sir Archibald Sinclair Britains wartime air force Minister, ‘without the Poles our shortage of trained pilots would have made it impossible to defeat the German air force and to win the Battle of Britain’. We owe them a great deal and the way they were treated after the war was and is disgraceful. Without their contribution we could not have won the Battle of Britian and our future would have very different, we owe them a debt of gratitude that can never be repaid except to say that they will be Forever Remembered and Never Forgotten for Time Shall Not Wither and Fade Their Names and Deeds, R.I.P. True and Brave Heroes.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

   

In Memory Of The Brave Polish Men And Women That Gave Their Lives For Your Freedom

And Ours During The 2nd World War

 The dark days of the 2nd World War from the British, Commonwealth and Polish Airmen who also joined up with the RAF

SAM_0065By Laurencegoff

The Polish Air Force Memorial Committee was established in 2011 as a partnership between the former Polish Air Force Association and RAF Northolt. The Polish War Memorial  is situated adjacent to the roundabout on the A40 at its junction with the A4180

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

   

By Laurencegoff

 

By Laurencegoff

  

SAM_0122By Laurencegoff

Let’s continue commemorating the achievements of the Polish Air Force for the benefit of future generations in years to come. Without their contribution we could not have won the Battle of Britian and our future would have very different, we owe them a debt of gratitude that can never be repaid except to say that they will be Forever Remembered and Never Forgotten for Time Shall Not Wither and Fade Their Names and Deeds, R.I.P. True and Brave Heroes.

By Laurencegoff

By Laurencegoff

By Laurencegoff

By Laurencegoff

Polish airmen  in service to the RAF

By Laurencegoff

By Laurencegoff

Forthcoming Events

2016

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Air bridge Warsaw Uprising 1944 Memorial Service London Road Newark Cemetery NG24 1SQ at 2pm, on Sunday – 25th Sept 2016.

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

 The Chapel Interpretation Centre Sunday 25th September  2016 -12noon until 1.30pm. An exhibition of old news stories photos and pictures of interest to the Polish serviceman during 2nd World War.

The Memorial Service will leaving from the Main Gate off London Road at 2pm.

All Souls’ The Chapel Interpretation Centre Sunday 30th October 2016, 1pm until 2.30pm 5pm – 9pm. An exhibition of old news stories, photos and pictures of interest to the Polish serviceman during 2nd World War.

The Memorial Service will leaving from the Main Gate off London Road at 3pm

The Chapel Interpretation Centre will close after the All Souls event, it will only open by appointment for groups.

Friends Of Newark Cemetery 2016

The Chapel Interpretation Centre will open on the 1st Sunday each Month April – October 2016  2 – 4pm. It can open by appointment for groups other times and dates by contacting the Friends group chairman Laurence Goff, Please give plenty of notice.

Friends Of Newark Cemetery next meeting _ Wednesday 27th July 2016, 2pm – Newark Town Hall in the Pickin Room arrive for a cuppa 1.45pm. The public are most welcome.

 

Air Bridge The Chapel Interpretation Centre will open Sunday 25th r 2016, 12 noon until 1.30pm. An exhibition will be on display

All Souls The Chapel Interpretation Centre will open Sunday 25th October 2016,
12 noon until 2.30pm. An exhibition of old news stories, photos and pictures of interest to the Polish serviceman during 2nd World War.

The Chapel Interpretation Centre will close for the winter after the All Souls event. It will only open by appointment for groups during the winter but will reopen for the summer season starting in April 2017.

 Polish airmen in service to the RAF

By Laurencegoff

By Laurencegoff

By Laurencegoff

By Laurencegoff

Polish War Memorial Commemoration Fly Past to Fallen Polish Airman

http://youtu.be/UhNs7ZbCe0U

War Memorial RAF Northolt, Ruislip, Greater London, England

http://youtu.be/MvVVxmYX1eg

By Laurencegoff

By Laurencegoff

By Laurencegoff

By Laurencegoff

A total of 145 Polish fighter pilots served in the RAF during the Battle of Britain, which was the largest non-British contribution.  Around 13% of frontline squadrons were Polish Airmen. 303 Squadron was one of the most successful of all RAF units in shooting down German aircraft attempting to bomb Britain into surrender. Even though they were equipped with Hurricanes rather than the more glamorous spitfires, they tore into the huge German formation with malice and bravery. The polish pilots were regarded as fearless.   The Kosciusko 303 Squadron orignally formed by two Americans one of them called Merian C Cooper during the Russian/Polish War of 1919/1920 that’s why it has the stars and stripes on it. 303 Squadron was the highest scoring squadron in the RAF. The Battle of Britain We owe them a great deal and the way they were treated after the war was and is disgraceful. Without their contribution we could not have won the Battle of Britian and our future would have very different, we owe them a debt of gratitude that can never be repaid except to say that they will be Forever Remembered and Never Forgotten for Time Shall Not Wither and Fade Their Names and Deeds, R.I.P. True and Brave Heroes

By Laurencegoff
By Laurencegoff

By Laurencegoff

By Laurencegoff

Remembering The 2165 Polish Airmen And Their Sacrifice During The 2nd World War http://t.co/U3wxki3cgH

Photos were taken By Laurence Goff from polish Social And Cultural Association Ltd

http://www.posk.orgadmin@posk.org 020 8742 6411

ADRES:

238-246 King Street

LONDON W6 0RF

Najbliższa stacja metra Ravenscourt Park na District Line.

tel: (0044) 20 8741 0474

e-mail: library@polishlibrary.co.uk    librarian@polishlibrary.co.uk   periodicals@polishlibrary.co.uk

Polish Flyboys over Britain 1940

On a June day, Churchill had risen to declare: ‘The battle of France is over. I expect that the battle of Britain is about to begin. We shall fight on the beaches. We shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills. We shall never surrender.” The courage and character that Churchill pledged for Britain had already been demonstrated by Poland. It was the first country to experience the terror of the Nazi Blitzkrieg, the first to fight back, the first to say – and mean – “We shall never surrender”. Poland fell in October 1939, but its government and military refused then, and refused for the rest of the war, to capitulate. In a remarkable odyssey, scores of thousands of Polish pilots, soldiers, and sailors escaped Poland – some on foot; some in cars, trucks, and buses; some in airplanes; some in ships and submarines. They made their various ways first to France, thence to Britain to continue the fight. For the first full year of the war, Poland, whose government-in-exile operated from London, was Britain’s most important declared ally.

Polish pilots were ferocious fighters. With their homeland in enemy hands and news of Nazi and Soviet atrocities in the occupied Poland reaching them on almost daily basis, unsure of the fate of their close ones, they took their hate into the air with them.

The English girls loved the Poles, the newspapers raved about their exploits, and King George VI visited them at their Northolt base and signed his name in the squadron diary. The Polish pilots – who had been groomed in the old school style by their officer corps back home – were very much a hit with the ladies, with their fearless spirit and hand-kissing gallantry. Such was their appeal to the natives that even British airmen pretended to be Poles in order to chat up the girls. As one hoity-toity head mistress admonished in a speech to parting pupils: “And remember, keep away from gin and Polish airmen!”

The Polish daring came naturally to them as did their propensity to disobey orders. However, the latter quality proved to be a distinct advantage in the heat of battle.

By the end of the war, around 19,400 Poles were serving in the RAF. Over 120 of them were decorated. Among those awarded medals were Witold Urbanowicz, who shot down 15 German aircraft. Jan Zumbach, 8 aircraft; Zdzisław Henneberg, 8 aircraft; Mirosław Ferić, 7 aircraft, and Ludwik Paszkiewicz was awarded post-humously for 6 aircraft shot down. The top scoring pilot of any nationality, was Jozef Frantisek, from Czechoslovakia, nicknamed “the Czech”. He so admired the Polish pilots that he refused to fly with anyone else. The First Commander of the 303rd Squadron, Major Zdzisław Krasnodębski was decorated for his bravery on September 6, 1940. When his plane was hit and in flames, he continued to fly his mission shooting down enemy aircraft. With his hands on fire, he landed the plane, and never released his grip on the controls.

From 1940 to 1945 the Polish squadrons and the Polish pilots serving in British units achieved 621 confirmed kills, and together with campaigns of 1939 and France – 900 confirmed and 189 probable.

In the first week of the Battle of Britain, the Polish airmen scored an amazing number of hits, but British Command would not believe it, even though it was confirmed by the British squadron leader. Still not convinced, Stanley Vincent, the Station Commander, followed the Kościuszko Squadron on an air raid, and he was amazed by what he saw. The Polish aces attacked the German planes from a vertical trajectory “with near suicidal impetus”. German formations quickly scattered making it easy for the Poles to pick them off one by one. After the combat he said: “The air was full of burning aircraft, parachutes and pieces of disintegrating wings. It was also so rapid that is was staggering”. Vincent tried to fight, but every time he wanted to attack the Germans, a Polish pilot anticipated him. So he did not manage to fight in this battle. After the landing he said to the Intelligence officer: “My God, they are really doing it!”

One young Polish pilot looked on in silence while the parade passed. Then he turned to walk away. An old woman standing next to him looked at him quizzically. “Why are you crying, young man?” she asked.

Homework:
http://www.polishgreatness.com/kosciu…
http://www.ww2.pl/300,,301,,302,,303,…
http://avstop.com/history/aroundthewo…
http://www.polishsquadronsremembered….
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_V…
http://www.lynneolson.com/question_of…

 

Spitfire Flying Over Northholt Polish Memorial

  • by Laurence Goff
  • It is situated beside the A40/A4180 roundabout junction near RAF Northolt in South Ruislip in the London Borough of Hillingdon.

Newark-On-Trent Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

ttp://youtu.be/gKmfH4DUiec 

Newark On Trent Cemetery, Nottinghamshire War Graves. During the 2nd World War.

Tribute To The Polish Airmen And Their Sacrifice 

By Laurencegoff

 RAF Northolt is a Royal Air Force station in South Ruislip, 2 miles from Uxbridge in the London

Borough of Hillingdon, West London. RAF Northolt switchboard 020 8845 2300

http://www.northolt.bizImages for raf northolt

http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/yourpaintings/paintings/1-squadron-hurricanes-raf-northolt-andover-42738

 

I have No official connection with RAF Northolt and the opinions expressed herein are entirely of

 Laurence Goff

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By Laurencegoff

Spitfire Flying For Our Freedom

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By Laurencegoff

Newark Cemetery Annual Air Bridge

The monument, located up the Main Drive to the over end on Newark Cemetery

Sunday 25th September, 2016 arrival at 1.45pm, Guests and Standard Bearers assemble at Newark Cemetery, Main Gates on London Road, Newark. “tremendously important”

We should be grateful to the brave Polish — pilots, mechanics and ground staff — served in the Polish air force during the 2nd world war in Britain. In the summer of 1940, General Wladyslaw Sikorski — the head of Poland’s Government in Exile in London — we should be grateful when he  signed an agreement to form a Polish Air Force in Britain. A Polish Air Force in the UK, with two fighter squadrons – 302 and 303 – composed of Polish pilots and ground crews, with British commanding officers.

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By Laurencegoff

Newark Cemetery Commonwealth And Polish War Graves

Newark

NG24 1SQ

 Open all year round 

April – September 8am-8pm

October – March 8am-6pm

Laurence Goff Commemorate our wartime links with Poland 1939 – 1945

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Laurencegoff

Poland’s War hero,  Lest We Forget

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F/Lt. Z Krasnodebski

http://aircrewremembered.com/wojtowicz-stefan.html

polish20emblem2.jpg Polish Flag image by PolishAmericans

 

  •  The Polish War Memorial is just inside Newark boundaries, an important enough to merit this website. Following the fall of Poland to German and Soviet forces in 1939, many Poles left their homeland to continue the fight from other countries. By the summer of 1940 Britain was facing the axis powers alone, but with the help of men from other European countries. Not the least of these were the Poles. Among the RAF squadrons at Northolt, there were a number of Polish squadrons based there in 1940-1943.

    During the Battle of Britain in the late summer of 1940, the 303rd (Warsaw) squadron saw service at Northolt, flying Hurricane fighter aircraft. They were replaced in October by the 302nd (Poznan) squadron after the Battle of Britain had been won. Others serving from the aerodrome were the 306th, 308th, 305th, 315th and 317th squadron. Some of them returned to the airfield for another tour of duty here. Thirty Polish airmen, a fifth of their number, were killed in the Battle of Britain, and of these, five had been flying from Northolt.

Newark on Trent marked The Battle Of Britain our personal contribution to the National Memorial to the Few in memory of the aircrew who took to the skies to defend these shores in the summer and early autumn of 1940. We also remember The 2165 Polish Airmen who lost their lives during the 2nd World War, flighting alongside the Allies

Flying over Newark On Trent for our Freedom

Many were killed who resting place is Newark Cemetery 4 RAAF – Australian, 44 British Servicemen, 17 RCAF – Canadian, 3 RNZAF – New Zealand and 397 Polish Airmen together with other servicemen

Laurencegoff

General Sikorski Cap

http://www.thenma.org.uk

Laurencegoff

Polish armoured Forces 

The National Memorial Arboretum honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world.

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

Laurencegoff

Polish armoured Forces, Staffordshire

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Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

info@thenma.org.uk

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

Friends Of Newark Cemetery

Coach Trip 

From Newark  to The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

 Wednesday 28th May 2014

  Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

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Laurencegoff

Polish Memorial, we will Remember Them

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Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire, Laurence Goff uplifting visit

  

Northholt Remembering The 2165 Polish Airmen Who Died And Their Sacrifice During The 2nd World War

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/09/10/remembering-the-2165-polish-airmen-and-their-sacrifice-during-the-2nd-world-war/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/09/11/we-must-not-forget-those-of-the-commonwealth-and-polish-airmen-they-fought-for-freedom-against-the-enemy-and-didnt-flinch-2/

 https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/04/17/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

 https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2014/01/23/the-national-memorial-arboretum-staffordshire-laurence-goff-uplifting-visit/

 https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

 Honouring The Memory As Our Fitting Tribute To Them

Laurencegoff

General Wladyslaw Sikorski Newark Cemetery-fonc/General-Sikorski-Prime-Minister-of-Poland-London-Based-Government-In-Exile/

We will Remember him

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/102974365

  

Disclaimer

 In the public interest

I accept no responsibility for the accuracy of the information contained on this website, which is a non profit project designed soley by

Laurence Goff.  

The opinions expressed  are entirely my own, and do not represent the views of Newark Town Council who have possibility of Newark Cemetery.

Newark Town Council, Town Hall/Market Place, Newark-on-Trent NG24 1DU

Phone: 01636 680333

http://newark.gov.uk

post@newark.gov.uk

 Friends of Newark Cemetery

 Laurence Goff

Friends Of Newark Cemetery

01636-681878 {My Home Phone}

Mobile 07794613879

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

Click on  for location of Cemetery Newark-on-Trent

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Giant flag

Laurence Goff  Chairman

Friends Of Newark Cemetery

Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish their Sacrifice 

 The dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth and Polish who also join up with the RAF

 Laurence Goff Friends Of Newark Cemetery
01636-681878 {My Home Phone} Mobile 07794613879
 

One thought on “RAF Northholt Remembering The 2165 Polish Airmen Who Died And Their Sacrifice During The 2nd World War

  1. Thank you very, very much. Very tru and very moving comment. Poles have always fought and wii always fight For your freedom and ours, because freedom we have in blood.
    Best regards from Poland

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