General Sikorski was Laid to Rest in Newark Cemetery From 16th July 1943 until 13th September 1993

Newark Cemetery

For over 150 years since 1856

Our beautiful and historic

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Open all year round

April – September 8am – 8pm

October – March 8am – 6pm

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Buried in Newark Cemetery on Friday

16th July 1943

Monday 13th September 1993, his remains were disinterred from Newark Cemetery after 50 years

On the same day his coffin stayed overnight, on 13 – 14 September 1993

 at 

Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene

Tuesday 14th September 1993 a farewell high Mass before returning home to Poland on the same day.

  Remember him

 RIP

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Pics Laurence Goff

The Consul General of the Republic of Poland Lukasz Lutostanski Manchester ( General Sikorski Memorial Plaque, his coffin was at the foot of The Altar.

Remembrance for Poland’s War hero

4 lipca 1943 r. z lotniska w Gibraltarze wystartował “Liberator” z generałem Sikorskim na pokładzie. Po chwili samolot runął do morza. Wszyscy oprócz głównego pilota zginęli, w tym córka generała Zofia Leśniowska, której ciała nigdy nie znaleziono. Przyczyny katastrofy samolotu nie zostały jednoznacznie i precyzyjnie wyjaśnione. Ciało premiera i naczelnego wodza spoczywa w Krakowie na Wawelu.

 
 Laurencegoff

Newark Cemetery NG24 1SQ

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ZUZANNA SAWICKA CAMP LEADER OF KOLONIA “POD POLSKIM DEBEM” 2014, FENTON

VISITING NEWARK CEMETERY

WELCOME TO NEWARK-ON-TRENT CEMETERY LONDON ROAD, NEWARK, NOTTINGHAMSHIRE NG24 1SQ

FORTHCOMING EVENTS

FRIENDS OF NEWARK CEMETERY NEXT MEETING 2PM AT NEWARK TOWN HALL IN THE PICKIN ROOM ARRIVE FOR A CUPPA 1.45PM, 16th September 2015.

BATTLE OF BRITAIN SUNDAY 7TH SEPTEMBER 11am Newark Parish Church

AIR BRIDGE THE CHAPEL INTERPRETATION CENTRE SUNDAY 27TH SEPTEMBER 12 NOON UNTIL 1.40PM. AN EXHIBITION OF OLD NEWS STORIES PHOTOS AND PICTURES OF INTEREST TO THE POLISH SERVICEMAN DURING 2ND WORLD WAR. THE MEMORIAL SERVICE WILL LEAVING FROM THE MAIN GATE OFF LONDON ROAD AT 2PM.

ALL SOULS THE CHAPEL INTERPRETATION CENTRE SUNDAY 26TH OCTOBER 12 NOON UNTIL 2.40PM.

AN EXHIBITION OF OLD NEWS STORIES, PHOTOS AND PICTURES OF INTEREST TO THE POLISH SERVICEMAN DURING 2ND WORLD WAR.

THE MEMORIAL SERVICE WILL LEAVING FROM THE MAIN GATE OFF LONDON ROAD AT 3PM

British Commonwealth and Polish war Grave during the wars from 1939-1947 at Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire

Many links were bonded during Britain’s darkest hour. When Poland was invaded by Germany Polish pilots came to the UK and formed fighter squadrons that would operate during the Battle of Britain. RAF Winthorpe near Newark was established in 1940. It was a satellite station for RAF Swinderby over the border in Lincolnshire. Two Polish air squadrons, 300 and 301, were based at Winthorpe, near Newark, Nottinghamshire.

Polish President Wladyslaw Raczkiewicz Grave in Newark Cemetery, Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

Polish President August Zaleski died in 1972 age 88 Buried in Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

Stanislaw Ostrowski

Who is buried at Newark was the President of the Polish Government in exile and one of many distinguished Poles who stood shoulder to shoulder with the Allies in the Second world war. Exiled from his native city of Lwow, where he was previously Mayor at the time of the invasion, he came to the UK and worked alongside many polish nationaLs exiled here to keep hopes alive for Poland.He was a medical man who vaLued education. His service to his country included his involvement with Posk – the cultural home in West London for exiled Poles. Historians far more authorative than me can give you the histoiry. Fittingly his burial place is Newark Cemetry alongside fallen comrades who served in the Polish Air Force.  Given the annual commemoration on All Souls Day in the cemetry and the importance of remembering all who fought for our freedom today.

Polish President Stanislaw Ostrowski, died age 92 in 1982 buried at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

Za wolnosc nasza i wasza / For our freedom and yours

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General Sikorski Cap

http://www.thenma.org.uk

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Polish armoured Forces 

The National Memorial Arboretum honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world.

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

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Polish armoured Forces, Staffordshire

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The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

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The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

info@thenma.org.uk

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

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Brave Polish that come over during the 2nd world war. We are grateful for you helping

out at our time of need

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Thanks to the Polish during 2nd world war

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Polish Memorial, we will Remember Them

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The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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Laurence Goff uplifting visit

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire

DE13 7AR

01283 792333

www.thenma.org.uk

 The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire, an uplifting visit for all ages

Honours the fallen all year round

       

 

Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish their Sacrifice 

 The dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth and Polish who also join up with the RAF

 Many were killed who resting place is Newark Cemetery 4 RAAF – Australian, 44 British Servicemen, 17 RCAF

– Canadian, 3 RNZAF – 

New Zealand and 397 Polish Serviceman – Airmen

   

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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Memorial plaque is located on Stodman Street up high on wall of Natwest Bank Newark On Trent Nottinghamshire

      

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Young Polish  Boy together with his family that came over from Nottingham attending Air Bridge Memorial Service at Newark Cemetery

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Annual All Souls Day Memorial Service held at Newark Cemetery

 

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Annual All Souls’ Day at Newark Cemetery

The next event will be held at Newark Cemetery Sunday 25th October 2015  starting from the main gate on London Road, Newark at 3pm to the Polish war graves service.

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Annual All Souls Day Memorial service at Newark Cemetery

 

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Laurencegoff 

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  • A Memorial Cross to the Polish airmen that are buried here during the 2nd World War was erected in the plot and unveiled on 15th July 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Commander in Chief of the Polish Forces and war-time Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski (aged 62) on the 4th July 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s It contains a memorial to Poland’s exiled war leader, General  Sikorski who died when the aeroplane he was travelling in crashed over Gibraltar on the 4th July 1943.


  • Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

     

    Today the Royal Air Force Museum launches a national photography competition as part of its calendar of activities to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Britain. Accordingly, it is inviting members of the public to submit photographs taken at various Battle of Britain events that will be taking place around the country this summer. Entries should be made via the Museum’s website, www.rafmuseum.org.

      

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All Souls Ceremony of homage and remembrance, organised by th Polish Air Force Association. This will be held at the War Graves of the Newark Cemetery  the next date will be Sunday 25th October  2015 at 3pm. The Procession will start from the main gate on London Road Newark to the war memorial.

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Newark resting place with burials of Polish Airmen, this is now the war graves plot,  Commonwealth and Polish burials were made from 1940 – 1947.

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Polish War Graves

The highest concentration of commemorations can be particularly found in Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire.  Our local cemetery with nearly 400 Polish Airmen that died, and are buried in special plot on the East side. You can park for free at the Main Gate parking lot at Newark Cemetery, It is location on London Road – Elm Avenue,

Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

      

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Annual Air Bridge at Newark Cemetery the next date is 27th September 2015 at 2pm

Dakota is a military transport aircraft that flew for our freedom over Newark Cemetery

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Photos by Laurencegoff

The Annual Air Bridge Memorial service held on the 4th Sunday in September at Newark Cemetery 2pm

Polish Mansfield

Polish Forces Living History Group Simon Elmer

Polish Mansfield 2

Polish Forces Living History Group Simon Elmer

Polish Mansfield 3

Polish Forces Living History Group Simon Elmer

 

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/01/07/newark-cemetery-nottinghamshire-in-picture/

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General Sikorski was Laid to Rest in Newark Cemetery From 16th July 1943 until 13th September 1993

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General Sikorski remains are returning home to Poland 14th September 1993

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Lukasz Lutostański Polish Consul General in Manchester

A service of remembrance was held in Newark Cemetery today to mark the 70th anniversary of the death of Polish wartime leader General Wladyslaw Sikorski.

Newark Cemetery 4th July  2013

The Consul General of the Republic of Poland Lukasz Lutostanski at 

4th Jul 2013 – Uploaded by Laurence Goff

The Consul General of the Republic of Poland Lukasz Lutostanski (Spoken in English – Polish)

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Father Krzysztof Kawczynski from the Polish Church, Nottingham and Father Michael O’Donoghue from Holy Trinity RC Church Newark Town. A service of remembrance was held in Newark Cemetery to mark the 70th anniversary of the death of Polish wartime leader.

 

General Wladyslaw Sikorski Service Of Remembrance

Ceremony at Newark Cemetery

 Marking the 70th anniversary of his death

Remembrance for Poland’s War hero

We Can’t Forget Him

4th July 2013 ceremony at Newark Cemetery

 Marking the 70th anniversary of his death

Remembrance for Poland’s War hero

We Can’t Forget Him

 

SAM_0473                              4th July 2013  a ceremony at Newark Cemetery  took place. This  marked the of 70th Anniversary of General Wladystaw Sikorski death

 

 Remembering the Sad death of General Sikorski at age 62

On this date 4th July 1943 which is a significant date to remember the sad death of General Wladyslaw Sikorski Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Prime Minister death 70 years ago. He dies when his plane crashes less than a mile from take off from Gibraltar. The General was buried in Newark-On-Trent  Cemetery on 16th July 1943 until 13th September 1993, when he was exhumed. The next day after a Holy Mass service which was held at Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene.

Re-turned home to Poland after 50 years.

July 4th 2013 will mark the 70th anniversary of his death,  we will Remember him.  

Buried in Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July 1943

Monday 13th September 1993, his remains were disinterred from Newark Cemetery after 50 years

 On the same day his coffin stayed overnight on 13th-14th September 1993

 at 

Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene

Tuesday 14th September a farewell high Mass before returning home to Poland on the same day.

  Remember him

General Sikorski was one of the great Polish heroes 

After the German invasion of Poland, he became the Prime Minister of a new Polish Government in exile, and also Commander in Chief of the Polish Armed Forces, which fought with the Allies by land, sea and air throughout the Second World War.  He was thus Political, military and resistance leader, during the war. He was the personal embodiment of the whole Polish Nation’s fight for survival as a free nation and as a people, and liberation from the terrible oppression to which they had become subject. It is little wonder then that this man was so loved and respected by his people, and that they continue to revere and honour his memory to this day. As British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill said in his tribute to General Sikorski in the House of Commons, ‘he was truly the symbol and embodiment of that spirit which has borne the Polish nation through the centuries.’ General Sikorski was also very active in World politics at that time, attending many political conferences with the allies and was, indeed, one of the Architects of the United Nations. Churchill described his death as ‘a most grievous loss to the cause of the United Nations.’ And so it was as Commander in Chief of the Free Polish Forces that General Sikorski left England on 24th May 1943 onboard an RAF Liberator Aircraft bound for Cairo to visit Polish Troops fighting with the Allies in North Africa. On his return from Cairo, his Liberator aircraft touched down at Gibraltar, just as it had done on the way out to Cairo. General Sikorski was accompanied by his daughter Zofia, who was also Chief of the Polish Womens Auxiliary. The Party also included the Polish military Chief Of Staff and Chief of Operations, and their support staff. They arrived at Gibraltar on Saturday 3rd July at 6.37p.m. Their aircraft, the same Liberator, took off from Gibraltar airport at 11p.m. the next day, Sunday 4th July 1943 on the final leg of General Sikorskis return journey from Cairo to London. The aeroplane crashed seconds after take-off,  just off the eastern end of the runway. General Sikorski, his daughter and all his party perished. General Sikorski’s body lay in State for several days at the Cathedral of St Mary the Crowned on Main Street, until a Polish warship could reach Gibraltar to take it to the UK for burial. On arrival at the Cathedral entrance the street was crowded with Gibraltarian men (their wives, children and parents had been evacuated from Gibraltar during the war) who wanted to show their respect to this courageous Polish hero. The then Bishop of Gibraltar celebrated a requiem mass in the Cathedral before the mortal remains of General Sikorski and his party were transferred to the Polish destroyer ‘Orkan’. General Sikorski was buried in Newark Cemetery in England. His grave became a shrine to free Poles throughout the world whose view was that the General’s remains should never be returned to Poland while the country was under foreign domination. It was therefore not until the fall of the Berlin Wall and the liberation of Eastern Europe from Soviet domination not until Monday 13th September 1993, his remains were disinterred and the next day after a farewell Mass was flown home to Warsaw to be re-interred in a special crypt in Wawel Cathedral which lies inside the walls of the ancient castle, traditional burial place of Polish Kings. 

1881 – 1943

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Laurencegoff 

 Friends Of Newark Cemetery Volunteer Councillor Laurence Goff Visiting Newark Cemetery  My blogging principles are that to strive to be accurate. I promptly correct any inaccuracy or error with a visible edit and update. I attribute and link to sources on the web wherever possible. My direct contact details are displayed on every page of the site. I do not receive payment or services for any reviews or editorial. And this is a personal blog. The views expressed are solely my own, and do not reflect the views of Newark Town Council. This memorial website is Laurence Goff personal views, I have put it together and does not represent Newark Town Council . It dedicated to the thousands of  people who resting place going back to 1856. A number of Royal Air Force stations within and round Newark from which several Polish squadrons operated. The highest concentration of commemorations can be particularly found in Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire.  Our local cemetery with nearly 400 Polish that died during the 2nd world war from 1940 -1947 and are buried in special plot on the east side of Newark Cemetery. Many  of the  Polish Airman after the war stayed in the UK married and choose to be buried or their ashes remains put in Newark Cemetery near Polish war graves.   You can park for free at the Main Gate parking lot at Newark Cemetery, It is location on London Road, Newark, Notts. 4ebf7-ukandpolish    

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We should be grateful

In the summer of 1940, General Wladyslaw Sikorski — the head of Poland’s Government in Exile in London — signed an agreement to form a Polish Air Force in Britain. Thousands of Polish airmen, soldiers and sailors — to Britain, where they made up the largest foreign military force in the country. 17,000 Poles — pilots, mechanics and ground staff — served in the Polish air force in Britain at the time. 

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After Poland fell to the enemy, thousands of Polish pilots, soldiers, and sailors escaped to England. Devoted to liberating their homeland, some would form the RAF’s 303 squadron, known as the Kosciuszko Squadron, after the elite unit in which many had flown back home. Their thrilling exploits and fearless flying made them celebrities in Britain, where they were “adopted” by socialites and seduced by countless women, even as they yearned for news from home. During the Battle of Britain, they downed more German aircraft than any other squadron, but in a stunning twist at the war’s end, the Allies rewarded their valor by abandoning Poland to Joseph Stalin.

This moving, fascinating book uncovers a crucial forgotten chapter in World War II–and Polish–history. To the Polish volunteers who were to fly and fight so brilliantly and tenaciously throughout the Battle of Britain, the United Kingdom was justifiably known as ‘Last Hope Island’. Many of them lost their lives, many achieved glory. This book is a tremendous account of their contribution in those hectic days before the RAF began to take the offensive across the Channel. Summer of 1940 and the Battle of Britain — the darkest days during WWII. Great Britain stood alone, fighting for its life against the powerful German war machine. The celebrated squadron of Polish fighter pilots whose superb skill in the air helped save us during its most desperate hours. They not only played a crucial role in the Battle of Britian in 1940, but they also contributed significantly to the Allied war effort.

The Prime Minister at the time Winston Churchill speaking about the Battle of Britain in 1940 said, “Never was so much owed by so many to so few.” By the beginning of 1941 there was a fully fledged Polish Air Force operating alongside the RAF. With 14 Squadrons it was larger than any other of the Air Force from en-occupied Europe that had joined the Allies. Over 17,000 men and women passed through the ranks of the Polish Air Force while it was stationed in the UK. They shot down 745 enemy aircraft, with a further 175 unconfirmed. They dropped thousands of bombs and laid hundreds of mines, flying 102,486 sorties notching up a total of 290,895 operation flying hours. They achieved this at a cost of 1,973 killed and 1,388 wounded. They received 342 British gallantry awards. A Question of Honour is the gripping, little-known story of the refugee Polish pilots who joined the RAF and played an essential role in saving Britain from the enemy, only to be betrayed by the Allies after the war. Second World War, the story of millions of young men and women who gave everything for freedom and in the final victory were let down.

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Nearly 400 Polish Airman and service men are buried from the 2nd World War in Newark cemetery.

Many airmen married lived around Newark and their last resting place is also in Newark-On-Trent  Nottinghamshire, England.

RAF Lindholm, 24 April 1942. Gen Siskorski visiting the squadron

  

Left: The Polish Air Force’s colors. In its lower part embroidered is  sentence:“Love demands sacrifice”The other side contains the ancient Polish watchwords: “For God, Honor and Country”.

General Wladyslaw Sikorski  1881 – 1943

Newark Cemetery will mark the 70th anniversary of his death

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Our Remembrance for Poland’s War hero

Lest We Forget

4th July 1943 – 2013

Buried in Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July 1943

Monday 13th September 1993, his remains were disinterred from Newark Cemetery after 50 years

On the same day his coffin stayed overnight,on 13-14 September 1993

 at 

Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene

Tuesday 14th September a farewell high Mass before returning home to Poland .

  Remember him

 RIP

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ł Władysław Sikorski w połowie 1943 roku obserwował pogarszającą się pozycję swojego rządu a tym samym sprawy polskiej. Musiał także dochodzić do wniosku, że sojusznicy zachodni marginalizują rolę Polski i niekoniecznie staną w obronie jej interesów, gdyż na Związku Radzieckim spoczywał olbrzymi ciężar działań wojennych. Premier opowiadał się podobnie jak inni członkowie rządu za nienaruszalnością polskiej granicy wschodniej i nie był skłonny do ustępstw terytorialnych na rzecz ZSRR. Podejmowane przez niego działania, w tym wyjazd na przełomie 1942/1943 roku do Stanów Zjednoczonych i spotkanie z prezydentem Rooseveltem również nie przyczyniło się do wsparcia rządu polskiego.

W maju 1943 roku rozpoczęła się podróż inspekcyjna naczelnego wodza generała Władysława Sikorskiego na Bliski Wschód. Jej celem było przede wszystkim wytłumaczenie polityki rządu i uspokojenie wrzenia w korpusie oficerskim, związanego z brakiem zdecydowanego przeciwdziałania polityce ZSRR na forum międzynarodowym. Dokonana inspekcja w ocenie generała i jego otoczenia przyniosła pozytywne rezultaty i załagodziła konflikty wśród kadry oficerskiej.

W drodze powrotnej premier i naczelny wódz generał Władysław Sikorski w dniu 3 lipca 1943 roku wylądował na lotnisku w Gibraltarze, skąd miał udać się do Wielkiej Brytanii. 4 lipca 1943 roku samolot B – 24 Liberator, którym leciał generał uległ katastrofie. Zginęli wszyscy podróżujący nim pasażerowie i część załogi. Jedyną osobą, która ocalała był pilot. Okoliczności katastrofy budzą wątpliwości do dzisiaj i dają powód do wysuwania różnych hipotez dotyczących śmierci generała.

Zwłoki generała przewieziono na pokładzie polskiego niszczyciela z Gibraltaru do Wielkiej Brytanii. Po kilkudniowych uroczystościach żałobnych pogrzeb generała Władysława Sikorskiego odbył się w dniu 16 VII 1943 roku na cmentarzu polskich lotników wojskowych w Newark.

W dniu 17 XI 1993 roku prochy generał sprowadzono do Polski i pochowano je w krypcie św. Leonarda na Wawelu.

Poland first to fight -  Polsk propaganda WW2

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag    Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

From the Main Gate on London Road, Newark Nottinghamshire Ng24 1sQ

 

Sikorski Close Newark NG24 1FD www.maps.google.co.uk

 Flying over Newark-On-Trent by Laurence Goff 

Tribute to British Commonwealth and Polish Sacrifice

 My lasting Tribute time to emphasized the heroism, bravery, valour and determination for freedom. Lest We Forget.Time to emphasized the heroism, bravery, valour and determination for  our freedom. Lest We Forget, Britain honoured its war dead.

 

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The Friends of Newark Cemetery  will open The Chapel  Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery,  on weekend  April – October  by appointment for groups.  Historical  walks or  help by locating  families/casualties both in Newark Cemetery.  Friends of Newark Cemetery Volunteers will give assistance members of the public with display of history of well know people that are buried here

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{Location walk from the parking lot to the main Arch turn left red side door}

Chapel Interpretation Centre (East side turn left at the Main Arch and enter at the red door)

Organised by the Friends of Newark Cemetery

 The Chapel  Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery, will  open on weekend Month April – October or by appointment for groups on Monday and Tuesday am – pm and weekends afternoon and pm. Please give plenty of notice.

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Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

 

 

We should be grateful, thanks to the Polish who were first to fight during the 2nd World War

Bibliography Their aicraft Records Movies Links

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski  1881 – 1943

General Wladyslaw Sikorski  

Sikorski Lying in state

 

 70th anniversary of his death

Remembrance for Poland’s War hero

Lest We Forget

4th July 1943 – 2013

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Buried in Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July 1943

Monday 13th September 1993, his remains were disinterred from Newark Cemetery after 50 years

On the same day his coffin stayed overnight,on 13-14 September 1993

 at 

Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene

Tuesday 14th September a farewell high Mass before returning home to Poland on the same day.

  Remember him

 RIP

4 lipca 1943 r. z lotniska w Gibraltarze wystartował “Liberator” z generałem Sikorskim na pokładzie. Po chwili samolot runął do morza. Wszyscy oprócz głównego pilota zginęli, w tym córka generała Zofia Leśniowska, której ciała nigdy nie znaleziono. Przyczyny katastrofy samolotu nie zostały jednoznacznie i precyzyjnie wyjaśnione. Ciało premiera i naczelnego wodza spoczywa w Krakowie na Wawelu.

This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately, the content here is solely the responsibility of Laurence Goff. As a fitting tribute to the people who resting place is at Newark cemetery. The views expressed our solely my own and do not reflect  Newark Town Council.

I have been walking around Newark cemetery since I was first  elected onto Newark Town Council in 2004. In 2005 we set up a group Friends Of Newark Cemetery, I have been Chairman for the last three years. I had an opportunity to have a blog for the last four years and I have had 33,500 visit across the UK, and the World. Many kind words which I really enjoy and appreciate from people that have contacted me. It has intrigues me, something that makes me want to look into who is buried and history going back to 1856, which has been fascinating.

The new chapel Interpretation centre is being used by Friends of Newark  Cemetery. This lovely building at the East side cemetery former chapel, at the present time will open for visitors by appointment. 

The centre contains an exhibition of the history of Newark cemetery, Commonwealth, Polish during the World War II and Ransome and Marles.

Let’s further promote our Newark Cemetery and encouraging interested people to join the tribute. Together as a fitting tribute who resting place is at Newark Cemetery. Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years.

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Today the Royal Air Force Museum launches a national photography competition as part of its calendar of activities to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Britain. Accordingly, it is inviting members of the public to submit photographs taken at various Battle of Britain events that will be taking place around the country this summer. Entries should be made via the Museum’s website, www.rafmuseum.org.

This memorial website is Laurence Goff personal views, I have put it together and do not represent Newark Town Council . It dedicated to the thousands of  people since 1856.  I am happy to show you around Newark Cemetery for all to see and view. Having a means of further promoting Newark cemetery, and encouraging interested people to join the tribute.

 Laurence Goff

01636-681878 (Home)

07794613879

  Friends of Newark Cemetery Volunteer

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A memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski on 4th July 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s remains were returned to Poland on 14th September 1993, after being buried for 50 years at Newark Cemetery. You can still view a memorial to him at Newark.

 Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag
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Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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Laurencegoff

 

 General Sikorski was Laid to Rest in Newark Cemetery From 16th July 1943

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski  1881 – 1943

 We will mark the 70th anniversary of his death

Remembrance for Poland’s War hero

Lest We Forget

4th July 1943 – 2013

Buried in Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July 1943

Monday 13th September 1993, his remains were disinterred from Newark Cemetery after 50 years

On the same day his coffin stayed overnight,on 13-14 September 1993

 at 

Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene

Tuesday 14th September a farewell high Mass before returning home to Poland on the same day.

  Remember him

 RIP

4 lipca 1943 r. z lotniska w Gibraltarze wystartował “Liberator” z generałem Sikorskim na pokładzie. Po chwili samolot runął do morza. Wszyscy oprócz głównego pilota zginęli, w tym córka generała Zofia Leśniowska, której ciała nigdy nie znaleziono. Przyczyny katastrofy samolotu nie zostały jednoznacznie i precyzyjnie wyjaśnione. Ciało premiera i naczelnego wodza spoczywa w Krakowie na Wawelu.

 

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Generał Władysław Sikorski w połowie 1943 roku obserwował pogarszającą się pozycję swojego rządu a tym samym sprawy polskiej. Musiał także dochodzić do wniosku, że sojusznicy zachodni marginalizują rolę Polski i niekoniecznie staną w obronie jej interesów, gdyż na Związku Radzieckim spoczywał olbrzymi ciężar działań wojennych. Premier opowiadał się podobnie jak inni członkowie rządu za nienaruszalnością polskiej granicy wschodniej i nie był skłonny do ustępstw terytorialnych na rzecz ZSRR. Podejmowane przez niego działania, w tym wyjazd na przełomie 1942/1943 roku do Stanów Zjednoczonych i spotkanie z prezydentem Rooseveltem również nie przyczyniło się do wsparcia rządu polskiego.

W maju 1943 roku rozpoczęła się podróż inspekcyjna naczelnego wodza generała Władysława Sikorskiego na Bliski Wschód. Jej celem było przede wszystkim wytłumaczenie polityki rządu i uspokojenie wrzenia w korpusie oficerskim, związanego z brakiem zdecydowanego przeciwdziałania polityce ZSRR na forum międzynarodowym. Dokonana inspekcja w ocenie generała i jego otoczenia przyniosła pozytywne rezultaty i załagodziła konflikty wśród kadry oficerskiej.

W drodze powrotnej premier i naczelny wódz generał Władysław Sikorski w dniu 3 lipca 1943 roku wylądował na lotnisku w Gibraltarze, skąd miał udać się do Wielkiej Brytanii. 4 lipca 1943 roku samolot B – 24 Liberator, którym leciał generał uległ katastrofie. Zginęli wszyscy podróżujący nim pasażerowie i część załogi. Jedyną osobą, która ocalała był pilot. Okoliczności katastrofy budzą wątpliwości do dzisiaj i dają powód do wysuwania różnych hipotez dotyczących śmierci generała.

Zwłoki generała przewieziono na pokładzie polskiego niszczyciela z Gibraltaru do Wielkiej Brytanii. Po kilkudniowych uroczystościach żałobnych pogrzeb generała Władysława Sikorskiego odbył się w dniu 16 VII 1943 roku na cmentarzu polskich lotników wojskowych w Newark.

W dniu 17 XI 1993 roku prochy generał sprowadzono do Polski i pochowano je w krypcie św. Leonarda na Wawelu.

The body of the General was laid to rest in the newly established Polish Cemetery at Newark, Nottinghamshire.  The pilot, Flt. Lt. Edward Prchal of the Czechoslovakian Air Force, was the only survivor. The body of General Sikorski’s daughter, Zofia, Chief of the Polish Women’s Auxiliary, was never found.

His cap and uniform, recovered from the sea at the site of the crash, is displayed in the Sikorski Museum, in the Polish Institute at 20, Princess Gate, London.

 

General Wladyslaw Sikorski  1881 – 1943

Newark Cemetery will mark the 70th anniversary of his death

Our Remembrance for Poland’s War hero

Lest We Forget

4th July 1943 – 2013

Buried in Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July 1943

Monday 13th September 1993, his remains were disinterred from Newark Cemetery after 50 years

On the same day his coffin stayed overnight,on 13-14 September 1993

 at 

Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene

Tuesday 14th September a farewell high Mass before returning home to Poland on the same day.

  Remember him

 RIP

Lukasz Lutostański Polish Consul General in Manchester and  Father Krzysztof Kawczynski from the Polish Church, Nottingham

Battle of Britain Forgotten Heroes.2,944 pilots took part in the historic Battle of Britain, of whom 497 lost their lives. Amongst them there were 145 Polish pilots, of whom 32 were killed. The RAF and allied pilots shot down 1,733 German aircraft and the Luftwaffe shot down 915 British fighters. 203 German aircraft were shot by the Polish pilots. In September, during the highest intensity of German attacks, 13% of Polish pilots in frontline squadrons were Poles, and in October, because of the RAF loses, the proportion went up to 20%. According to Air Chief Marshall Hugh Dowding, AOC Fighter Command of RAF: () all (Polish) squadrons swung into the fight with a dash and enthusiasm which is beyond praise. () The first Polish squadron (303) () during the course of one month shot down more Germans than any other British unit in the same period. Other Poles () were used () in British squadrons, but () they were probably most efficient employed in their own national units.” The changed attitude of the British towards the Polish pilots The commander of the Northolt RAF station, W/Cdr Stanley Vincent, like many of the RAF high rank officers, doubted the scores reported by the Polish pilots from the 303 squadron. He did not believe that the Poles obeyed the regulations. He wanted to see personally what was true. One day he flew together with the 303 squadron and observed the fight against the German bombers. After the combat he said: Suddenly the sky became full of firing aircraft, parachutes and parts of broken wings”. Vincent tried to fight, but every time he wanted to attack the Germans, a Polish pilot anticipated him. So he did not manage to fight in this battle. After the landing he said to the Intelligence officer: My God, they are really doing it!”. 

After the Battle of Britain, new Polish squadrons were formed. The aircraft with the Polish Air Force signs were seen all over the occupied Europe, fighting against Luftwaffe and taking part in bombing raids over Germany. In North Africa, the famous Polish Fighting Team (the so-called Skalski’s Circus”) was formed. The Polish pilots entered the combat in Italy and covered the landing in Normandy. When the World War Two was over, the Polish Air Force numbered 15 squadrons: seven day fighter squadrons (302, 303, 306, 308, 315, 316 and 317), one night fighter squadron (307), four bomber ones (300, 301, 304 and 305), one army cooperation squadron (later fighter reconnaissance squadron, then bomber fighter, later fighter – 309), one fighter reconnaissance squadron (318) as well as one air observation post (663). Polish squadrons were used also as occupational forces in Germany. 

According to official documents “Battle of Britain” was the intensive preparations to defence and combat of Royal Air Force against Luftwaffe since September 10 till October 31, 1940. Main effort during this fight was taken by RAF Fighter Command. Contribution of fighter pilots to defence of Great Britain is the best illustrated by Sir Winston Churchill words: Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few”. We Polish, living in United Europe 68 years after “Battle of Britain”, are very proud of that among so few” were also ours compatriots pilots of two Polish fighter squadrons and detached to RAF units. 

We still remember about “the few” who reversed the course of history and prevented the conquest of Europe by Germany. Far away from Homeland, to which a lot of them never would come back, they showed the world the best features of a Polish soldier: bravery, toughness and perseverance. Because of that, the following words on the monument to Polish airmen fallen in Great Britain are engraved: “I have fought a good fight, I have finished the course, I have kept my faith”. “A Question of Honor”: The Kosciuszko Squadron: Forgotten Heroes of World War II LYNNE OLSON and STANLEY W. CLOUD

4 lipca 1943 r. z lotniska w Gibraltarze wystartował “Liberator” z generałem Sikorskim na pokładzie. Po chwili samolot runął do morza. Wszyscy oprócz głównego pilota zginęli, w tym córka generała Zofia Leśniowska, której ciała nigdy nie znaleziono. Przyczyny katastrofy samolotu nie zostały jednoznacznie i precyzyjnie wyjaśnione. Ciało premiera i naczelnego wodza spoczywa w Krakowie na Wawelu.

 

General Sikorski was one of the great Polish heroes. After the German invasion of Poland, he became the Prime Minister of a new Polish Government in exile, and also Commander in Chief of the Polish Armed Forces, which fought with the Allies by land, sea and air throughout the Second World War. But he also personally directed Poland’s internal resistance movement against the German occupying army in Poland itself. He was thus Political leader, military leader and resistance leader, all at the same time. He was the personal embodiment of the whole Polish Nation’s fight for survival as a free nation and as a people, and liberation from the terrible oppression to which they had become subject. It is little wonder then that this man was so loved and respected by his people, and that they continue to revere and honour his memory to this day. As British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill said in his tribute to General Sikorski in the House of Commons, ‘he was truly the symbol and embodiment of that spirit which has borne the Polish nation through the centuries.’ General Sikorski was also very active in World politics at that time, attending many political conferences with the allies and was, indeed, one of the Architects of the United Nations. Churchill described his death as ‘a most grievous loss to the cause of the United Nations.’ And so it was as Commander in Chief of the Free Polish Forces that General Sikorski left England on 24th May 1943 onboard an RAF Liberator Aircraft bound for Cairo to visit Polish Troops fighting with the Allies in North Africa. On his return from Cairo, his Liberator aircraft touched down at Gibraltar, just as it had done on the way out to Cairo. General Sikorski was accompanied by his daughter Zofia, who was also Chief of the Polish Womens Auxiliary. The Party also included the Polish military Chief Of Staff and Chief of Operations, and their support staff. They arrived at Gibraltar on Saturday 3rd July at 6.37p.m. Their aircraft, the same Liberator, took off from Gibraltar airport at 11p.m. the next day, Sunday 4th July on the final leg of General Sikorskis return journey from Cairo to London. The aeroplane crashed seconds after take-off, just off the eastern end of the runway. General Sikorski, his daughter and all his party perished. General Sikorski’s body lay in State for several days at the Cathedral of St Mary the Crowned on Main Street, until a Polish warship could reach Gibraltar to take it to the UK for burial. On arrival at the Cathedral entrance the street was crowded with Gibraltarian men (their wives, children and parents had been evacuated from Gibraltar during the war) who wanted to show their respect to this courageous Polish hero. The then Bishop of Gibraltar celebrated a requiem mass in the Cathedral before the mortal remains of General Sikorski and his party were transferred to the Polish destroyer ‘Orkan’. General Sikorski was buried in Newark Cemetery in England. His grave became a shrine to free Poles throughout the world whose view was that the General’s remains should never be returned to Poland while the country was under foreign domination. It was therefore not until the fall of the Berlin Wall and the liberation of Eastern Europe from Soviet domination that, on 13th September 1993, his remains were disinterred and flown the next day to Warsaw and was re-interred  on the 16th September 1993 in a special crypt in Wawel Cathedral which lies inside the walls of the ancient castle, traditional burial place of Polish Kings.

 

 https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery /

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/04/13/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/friends-of-newark-cemetery-fonc/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

 General Sikorski was so impressed with the care of the War graves and requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark Cemetery UK until Poland was once again a free Country

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves location  of Cemetery Newark-on-Trent, London Road, Nottinghamshire

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Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

 

Lest We Forget

General Wladyslaw Sikorski. 4th July 2013 will mark the 70th anniversary of his death, I believe we should Remember him, RIP.

General Wladyslaw Sikorski 1881-1943, 13th Sept 1993 his remains was exhumed from Newark Cemetery. On the same day his coffin stay overnight, at Newark Parish Church.

14th September 1993 The next day had a farewell high Mass. These took place at Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene.

On 13-14 September 1993, at Newark Parish Church.

 

St Mary Magdalene. These being a farewell High Mass before he left Newark for the last time after the service, on his a home to Poland. He was buried in Newark Cemetery from 1943-1993.

On 13th September 1993, his remains were disinterred and flown to Warsaw to be re-interred in a special crypt in Wawel Cathedral which lies inside the walls of the ancient castle, traditional burial place of Polish Kings.

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  October – March 8am – 6pm

Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm 

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856.

Annual Air Bridge on  4th Sunday in September, 2pm Guests and Standard Bearers assemble at Newark Cemetery, Main Gates on London Road, 2pm Procession to the Air Bridge Memorial

The Polish Air Bridge Monument in Newark

The Air Bridge Monument in Newark remembers the aircrew who died during world war two, supporting the popular uprising in Warsaw of 1944. The uprising badly needed the support of the allies to provide food and munitions to the Polish Partisans, resulting in the Polish Government in London appealing to Churchill for assistance. After many discussions with the Allied Command and no help from Russia (they refused to grant permission for allied aircraft to land there) Churchill was told that an airlift of 2000 miles there and back would have no hope of success – the loss of aircraft flying over occupied territory would be to large. Although Churchill agreed, he nevertheless ordered the operation to be proceeded. The task was allocated to 205 group, of which RAF Squadrons 148 and 178, SAAF 31 and 34 squadrons and Polish Special Services Flight 1586 were part. The losses were horrendous, for every ton of supplies delivered and recovered by the Polish insurgents one aircraft was lost (39 four-engine bombers total). The operation was called “Warsaw Concerto”.

Annual Airmen honoured the service remembers at Newark Cemetery on  4th Sunday in September at 2pm. Let’s remember those who died during the Air bridge Operations when Britain and the Commonwealth forces answered a plea for help from the Polish Government in Exile to drop supplies to the Polish secret army which was striking back against the enemy. This event is held at Newark Cemetery, at a special memorial near to the Polish War Graves, organised by Newark Town Council.  The service remembers the 250 airmen who lost their lives during the Air Bridge operations, which helped the Warsaw uprising in 1944. People from Poland and all over the country attend and wreaths are laid.

Annual All Souls,  4th Sunday  October 2015

is held at Commonwealth and Polish war graves at Newark Cemetery on the last Sunday each October at 3pm.

We welcome visitors from Newark, Nottinghamshire and across Poland the UK and the Commonwealth.

 

Friends Of Newark Cemetery next  AGM – meeting is on Wednesday 16th September 2015, to be held at Newark Town Hall in the Pickin Room   arrive for a cuppa at 1.45pm meeting will start at 2pm. 

The Chapel Interpretation Centre will open for visits {Location walk from the parking lot to the main Arch turn left red side door}

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   An exhibition at The Chapel  Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery is on display

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General Sikorski  have a farewell Mass 14th September 1993 before return home to Poland

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Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

Laurencegoffnewark

 General Wladyslaw Sikorski  Our remembrance for Poland’s War hero,  Lest We Forget   4th July 1943 – 2013 marking the 70th anniversary of his death   

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/102974365

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The centre will  open by appointment for groups.

The Friends of Newark Cemetery, Also we will provide help In finding a specific grave location and are Offering a general tour of the Cemetery. A highlight within the Centre Will be a Display of history of Newark Cemetery

and
Photo Project from the 1st and 2nd World War by Pete Stevens will be on display. 
  Photographs from the names that are on the war Memorial to the Fallen located at the front gate off London Road.

Commemoration, Honouring The Memory As Our Fitting Tribute To Them

Newark Cemetery is open all year round

October – March 8am – 6pm

Spring – Summer April – September 8am – 8pm

They departed this life into the next. Though they are hidden in the shadow of Death.

Their lives for others in the love of serving their country or Newark-On-Trent that never dies.

The Season comes to end The Chapel Interpretation Centre will open only by appointment for groups by contact Friends of Newark Cemetery Chairman Laurence Goff 01636-681878  mobile 07794613879  or by leaving a message at Newark Town Hall. friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

The Polish Institute and Sikorski Museum Official Website 20 Prince’s Gate, London, SW7 1PTTelephone: 00 44 (0)207 589 9249 Monday – Friday – 9.30 – 16.3020 Prince’s Gate in the nineteen fifties by T.W. (watercolour)Polish version This website and it’s contents © The Polish Institute and Sikorski Museum 2008-2013 and no part may  be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved.Opening hours:Archives:Tuesday – Friday – 9.30 – 16.00Closed throughout FebruaryMuseum:

Description

KRESY-SIBERIA GROUP FOUNDATION 

“Research, Remembrance Recognition of Poland’s citizens’ struggles in the Eastern Borderlands and in Exile during World War II” 

CLICK HERE TO SUPPORT THE GROUP (tax-deductible in Australia, Canada, UK and USA) 

CLICK ON THE LINKS BELOW: VIRTUAL MUSEUM MEMORIAL GALLERY RESEARCH SOURCES PROPERTY CLAIMS KRESY-SIBERIA SHOP 

The “Kresy-Siberia Group” is for people with a special interest in the WW2 fate of over one million of Poland’s citizens in eastern Poland (Kresy) of all faiths and ethnicities (Polish, Jewish, Ukrainian, Belorussian, Catholic, Orthodox, etc.) persecuted, arrested or deported to labor camps in the USSR, in Nazi Germany (joint 1939 invaders with the Soviets), or by nationalist Ukrainian militias. 

This tragic history was hushed up by the Allies to protect the reputation of the Soviet Union, an important ally against Germany after 1941. Over 70 years later, we bring together surviving deportees and their descendants to learn, remember and spread word of their experiences to the world and to future generations. 

PO POLSKU: Niektorzy w naszej grupie mowia i po polsku i po angielsku, wiec prosze sie nie krepowac pisac po polsku i przetlumaczymy tresc Waszego pisma. Niestety, nie stac nam na przetlumaczenie wszystkich tekstow angielskich na polski, ale zapraszamy Wam sobie przetlumaczyc poprzez strone  

Photo: Basia and Farynka Sgrunowska, evacuating from Lugova to Krasnovodzk to escape from Soviet exile, 23 Mar 1942 (private archives of Zofia Jordanowska, courtesy VideoFact)

 http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Kresy-Siberia/

http://translate.google.com/#en|pl|

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Poland, First to Fight poster. Polish pilot descends from cockpit of spitfire. Issued by Polish Government in exile; refers to Polish participation in Battle of Britain.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

We will Remember them, RIP

 

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Wellington N2848 on Buckden Pike, north of Kettlewell.

This incident is well documented on a website run by surviving airmans son at “www.buckdenpike.co.uk” although this appears not to have been updated for some years.On the night of 30th/31st January 1942 the in this aircraft took off from Bramcote in Warwickshire to undertake a night time cross-country training flight over the north of England. Flying over Yorkshire they were met with heavy falling snow and poor visibilty, they eventually became lost in the Skipton area and around the same time the effects of icing conditions occured on the aircrafts surfaces which would have made controlling it difficult. Although it was not allowed many pilots opted to descend when they were lost in poor visibility to try and drop below the cloud or weather and try and get a visual fix on their position. It is possible that this occured in this case but with the aircraft was flying over Upper Wharfedale there was little space to descend before the aircraft struck a wall close to the summit of Buckden Pike. The aircraft crashed into snow covered grassy slope and broke up, it passed through a dry stone wall before coming to a halt pretty much on the summit ridge. The rear turret broke off during the crash and this probably saved the rear gunners life. The events surrounding his survival are well documented and have become legendary in the Yorkshire fellwalking community. He found a set of fox footprints in the snow which he followed, eventually these took him down to the small village of Cray where he sought help. He was met by lady by the name of Nanny Pember who was out tending to her hens and noticed a strange shape in the snow, after investigating it turned out to be the surviving airman. By the time help arrived at the crash site his fellow airmen had all died. The entry in the Unit ORB states that he showed “great fortitude and determination in his efforts.” In May 1942 he was presented with the BEM at Buckingham Palace for his bravery.Pilot – F/Lt Czeslaw Kujawa PAF (P/0115), aged 26, Buried Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire.2nd Pilot – P/O Jerzy Polczyk PAF (P/1615), aged 24, Buried Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire.Obs – F/O Tadeusz J Bieganski PAF (P/1368), aged 28, Buried Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire.WOp/AG – Sgt Jan Sadowski PAF (792642), aged 32, died of injuries before help arrived. Buried Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire.Front Gunner – Sgt Jan A Tokarzewski PAF (782024), aged 25, Buried Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire.Rear Gunner – Sgt Jozef Fusniak PAF (780945), injured, broken left ankle.

www.buckdenpike.co.uk

 

P/O Jerzy Polczyk and his gravestone in Newark Cemetery

   

 By Laurence Goff

  The four other airmen’s gravestones sadly killed as a result of this aircraft accident

 During Britain’s darkest hour, Polish pilots came to the UK and formed fighter squadrons that would operate during the Battle of Britain 70 years ago.

RAF Winthorpe near Newark was established in 1940. It was a satellite station for RAF Swinderby over the border in Lincolnshire. Two Polish squadrons, 300 and 301, were based at Winthorpe.

After the Battle of Britain more Polish squadrons were formed. By the end of 1943, a total of 14 Polish squadrons, including ten fighter squadrons, and a complete infrastructure was in existence, making the Polish Air Force the fourth largest Allied air force, numbering, on December 1, 1943, 11,638 personnel.

We must not forget the Polish airmen and those of the Commonwealth. They fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch.

We certainly owe them a debt of gratitude.

The Battle of  Britain, Bravery they face

Poland, First to Fight poster. Polish pilot descends from cockpit of spitfire. Issued by Polish Government in exile; refers to Polish participation in Battle of Britain

We Will Remember Them

We will Remember them, RIP

Newark is in Nottinghamshire near to  hence the close proximity to Newark museum which is located on part of the former World War 2 airfield of Winthorpe. 

http://www.newarkairmuseum.org/gallery.php

Many more bomber airfields. RAF Dibgy nearby was a fighter training and bomber affiliation base.

Opening times by Volunteers  by appointment for groups on Monday-Tuesday and Weekends

There are 603 war casualties names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen at Newark Cemetery, at the main gate on London Road. There are 456 names are first world war, 144 are from the second world war, one died in West Africa in 1961, one in Malaya in 1952 and one in Afghanistan in 2007.

Chapel Interpretation Centre, Newark Cemetery East Side in the former Chapel

 

For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

 During the 2nd World War there were nearly a quarter of a million Polish Armed Forces serving under British command. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission cares for the graves of nearly 4,500 Polish serviceman and women in 35 countries around the world. 

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves Newark On Trent Cemetery London Road NG24 1SQ

.

There were a number of Royal Air Force stations within and around Newark from which several Polish squadrons operated. 

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Newark-On-Trent is also important internationally, as it contains the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

The cemetery also contains 49 scattered burials of the First World War. A memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski in 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s remains were returned to Poland in 1993, but there is still a memorial to him at Newark. Za wolnosc nasza i wasza / For our freedom and yours

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark-on-Trent,

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  October – March 8am – 6pm

Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm

Za wolnosc nasza i wasza /

For our freedom and yours

  General Sikorski Will Live Forever In Our Hearts, RIP

Display of Photos of History of General Sikorski Exhibition 

 
Deputy Consulate General  of the Republic of Poland Grzegorz Dyk From Manchester UK with Newark Deputy Town Mayor Councillor Irene Brown {elected Mayor 13th May 2012} Visiting Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery Family History Day.
Commonwealth 
and Polish War Grave and History of Newark Cemetery Exhibition

Za wolnosc nasza i wasza / For our freedom and yours

General Sikorski was Laid to Rest in Newark Cemetery From 16th July 1943- 13th September 1993

 General Sikorski was killed on the 4th July 1943 on Thursday 15th July 1943 his body was taken to Holy Trinity RC Church on Parliament Street, Newark for a Requiem Mass. His body stayed overnight. General Sikorski was buried at Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July, 1943. His was returned to Poland when it was a free Country 14th September 1993 he left Newark after a Mass which was held at the Parish Church.

 General Sikorski was Laid to Rest in Newark Cemetery From 1943-1993 

General Wladyslaw Sikorski visited Newark Cemetery to unveil a Memorial Cross dedicated to Polish servicemen who had died fighting alongside the British.

A Memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and unveiled on 15th July 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander in Chief of the Polish Forces and war-time Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski (aged 62) in 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s It contains a memorial to Poland’s exiled war leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski, who died when the aeroplane he was travelling in crashed over Gibraltar on the 4th July 1943.

Statue of General Sikorski Portland Place, London – Erection of this Statue To The Former Commander-in-Chief  Of The Polish Armed Forces and  Prime Minster Of Poland

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

http://www.flickr.com/search/?w=all&q=Newark+cemetery+General+sikorski&m=text

http://www.flickr.com/search/?w=all&q=Newark+cemetery+uk&m=text

General Sikorski Former Grave Stone, which has been removed in 1993

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Remembering the many Polish Airmen that were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force

Polish and Commonwealth War Graves in Newark – Za wolnosc nasza i wasza / For our freedom and yours

Many Polish Airmen were flying Spitfires fighters for Britain’s Royal Force during the Battle of Britain. By the end of the war, 17,000 Polish pilots and ground crew members had formed 14 squadron in the RAF. 2.000 were kill with 422 buried in Newark-On-Trent.

Za wolnosc nasza i wasza / For our freedom and yours

By Laurence Goff

 

Newark-On-Trent is also important internationally, as it contains the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

The cemetery also contains 49 scattered burials of the First World War. A memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski in 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s remains were returned to Poland in 1993, but there is still a memorial to him at Newark. Za wolnosc nasza i wasza / For our freedom and yours

https://i1.wp.com/farm5.static.flickr.com/4087/4847887910_222ee37d72_b.jpg

By Laurence Goff

 http://www.flickr.com/photos/newarkcemeteryuk/4847887910/in/photostream/

By Laurence Goff

 Stanisław Ostrowski (October 29, 1892 – November 22, 1982) was a Polish politician, best known for serving as the last President. Za wolnosc nasza i wasza / For our freedom and yours

Stanisław Ostrowski

Born on 29 October 1892 in Lwow (Lvov), where he completed secondary school and, in 1919, the Faculty of Medicine of the Jan Kazimierz University.In 1912 joined the secret National Youth Organisation. Was member of the Gunners Union where he completed non-commissioned officers school and officers college. During the First World War, joined the 1st Brigade of the Legions and then in the Military Department of the Supreme National Committee.

Served in the Austrian army and in 1918 took part in the defence of Lwow. Later served in the Polish Army as a physician in Captains rank until 1922. After the war, he was an Assistant Professorof the Jan Kazimierz University, and from 1934 Deputy Mayor, and, subsequently, Mayor of the City of Lwow. Imprisoned by NKWD in Lwow and Moscow, was sentenced to 8 years of labour camp in Siberia and Mongolia. As a soldier of the 2nd Corps of General Anders took part in the Italian Campaign. After the Second World War, worked as a physician and professor of medicine. Sworn in as President on 9 April 1972, he resigned after a 7 years term of office, passing the function to Edward Raczynski. Died in London on 22 November 1982.

President Ostrowski died in London and is buried in a Polish military cemetery in Newark, along with past Presidents in exile.

In 1987 a table dedicated to Ostrowski was unveiled in Saint Stanisław Kostka church in Warsaw (Żoliborz).

 

Annual Air Bridge on the last Sunday in September, 1.45pm Guests and Standard Bearers assemble at Newark Cemetery, Main Gates on London Road, 2pm Procession to the Air Bridge Memorial

The Polish Air Bridge Monument in Newark

The Air Bridge Monument in Newark remembers the aircrew who died during world war two, supporting the popular uprising in Warsaw of 1944. The uprising badly needed the support of the allies to provide food and munitions to the Polish Partisans, resulting in the Polish Government in London appealing to Churchill for assistance. After many discussions with the Allied Command and no help from Russia (they refused to grant permission for allied aircraft to land there) Churchill was told that an airlift of 2000 miles there and back would have no hope of success – the loss of aircraft flying over occupied territory would be to large. Although Churchill agreed, he nevertheless ordered the operation to be proceeded. The task was allocated to 205 group, of which RAF Squadrons 148 and 178, SAAF 31 and 34 squadrons and Polish Special Services Flight 1586 were part. The losses were horrendous, for every ton of supplies delivered and recovered by the Polish insurgents one aircraft was lost (39 four-engine bombers total). The operation was called “Warsaw Concerto”.

By Laurence Goff

President Władysław Raczkiewicz of Polish buried at War Graves at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

Władysław Raczkiewicz

Born on 28 January 1885 in Caucasus. Son of a judge and grandson of a participant of the 1863 January Uprising, whose property was confiscated and he himself exiled to Siberia and then resettled to Caucasus. Completed secondary school in Tver, and studied in St. Petersburg, where he joined the illegal National Youth Organisation, and then the Polish Youth Union “Zet”, where he played aleading role. Graduated from the Faculty of Law at the University of Dorpat, Estoniain 1911.

After military service, started his career as an attorney in Minsk, capital of Byelorussia (now Belarus). In 1917, as former Warrant Officer of the tsarist army, was engaged in the creation of the Polish military formations in Russia. At the 1st General Congressof the Polish Military in Petrograd, he was elected President (the honorary presidency was awarded to Jozef Pilsudski). He was the Chairman of the Supreme Polish Military Committee which, after the Bolsheviks victory, was moved to Minsk. Co-operated with the Regency Council. Atthe end of the First World War he held the rank of Major. In 1921, he was appointed Minister of Internal Affairs, which position he held three times.

He was a voivode (province governor) several times. Became a senator in 1930 and, subsequently, Marshal (Speaker) of the Senate. Having assumed the office of the President on 30 September 1939, he appointed General Wladyslaw Sikorski Prime Minister, and after his death – Stanislaw Mikolajczyk. After the Yalta Conference, the great powers of the Coalition with drew their recognition for the Polish government-in-exile. On 6 June 1947 Wladyslaw Raczkiewicz died, having previously designated August Zaleski to the post of the President.

 

By Laurence Goff

By Laurence Goff

Newark On Trent it is in Nottinghamshire near to the County border with Lincolnshire, hence the close proximity to many bomber airfields. RAF Dibgy nearby was a fighter training and bomber affiliation base.

He was so impressed with the care of the War graves and requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark Cemetery UK until Poland was once again a free Country.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

By Laurence Goff

General Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister

Our memory to General Sikorski who was killed when his aircraft, leaving Gibraltar on 4th July 1943, crashed into the sea. The Newark funeral was a memorable occasion with Polish troops lining the route from the King Street Roman Catholic church to the London Road Polish war cemetery.

13th September 1993

Thousands of Newarkers saw the procession headed by the exiled Polish government and Newark’s mayor,  Cyril Parlby on 16th July 1943. After his body was exhumed on 13th September 1993, General Sikoraki his was still wrapped in a British army blanket, with the Polish flag draped across a fresh coffin. Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene overnight, guarded by members of the RAF Regiment with reversed arms.

After his remains were exhumed on 13th September 1993, General Sikoraki his was still wrapped in a British army blanket, with the Polish flag draped across a fresh coffin. Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene overnight, guarded by members of the RAF Regiment with reversed arms.

By Laurence Goff

 

Next day the Duke of Edinburgh was among a crowded congregation for the first Roman Catholic service to be held in the Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene, Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire since the reformation.

http://www.stmarysnewark.org

SAM_8892

By Laurence Goff

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Three Polish bishops officiated and music was provided by the RAF Cranwell band. A Newark civic party, headed by the town’s mayor, Harry Furness, flew with the body from Waddington to Warsaw. In Krakow Prince Philip, in field marshal’s uniform, walked with Newark’s mayor in his scarlet robe behind a gun carriage bearing the Sikorski coffin.

Poles crowded the route. At Warwel Royal Castle the procession halted for an outdoor service. Then General Sikorski was finally laid to rest in his home land. Fresh flowers now adorn the marble edifice at Newark Cemetery. General Sikorski’s name and title are inscribed on a silver plaque, but the circumstances of his violent death go unremarked for years to come. We must not forget the polish Airman and the Commonwealth they fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch. They fought to the end and then carried on the fight, we should be grateful. We certainly owe them a great deal of credit that they so rightly deserve.

By Laurence Goff

Newark-on-Trent is important internationally, as it is home to the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves where there are many graves of Polish airmen who died during the second world war. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for RAF burials and this is now the war graves for people to see across the UK  and the World.  Former Airmen choosing to be buried since staying  in England after the 2nd World War.

Many Poles remained in the UK after the war, married and started families. Who resting place is also at Newark Cemetery. We should remember the many Polish airmen who were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force, and Commonwealth pilots, during the Battle of Britain and pay tribute to them for their contribution.

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/09/10/remembering-the-2165-polish-airmen-and-their-sacrifice-during-the-2nd-world-war/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/04/17/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/05/05/we-must-not-forget-those-of-the-commonwealth-and-polish-airmen-they-fought-for-freedom-against-the-enemy-and-didnt-flinch/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/09/10/remembering-the-2165-polish-airmen-and-their-sacrifice-during-the-2nd-world-war/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/02/26/newark-on-trent-war-history-photos-information-by-laurence-goff/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/09/09/friends-of-newark-cemetery-translated-into-polish/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/02/01/friends-of-newark-cemetery-will-using-the-former-newark-cemetery-chapel-as-an-interpretation-centre/

 

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/02/01/friends-of-newark-cemetery-will-using-the-former-newark-cemetery-chapel-as-an-interpretation-centre/

 

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/07/16/we-will-remember-them/

 

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/11/11/245/

 

https://www.facebook.com/laurencegoffnewark

 

http://www.youtube.com/laurencegoff

SAM_7139

By Laurence Goff

General Sikorski former resting place at Newark Cemetery until 13th September 1993

Za wolnosc nasza i wasza / For our freedom and yours

August Zaleski

Born on 13 September 1883. Before the First World War completed studies in London. Worked in Warsaw as a librarian of the Krasinski estate. In 1917, lectured, on a permanent basis, in Polish language and literaturein London, where he joined the masonry, using the organistaion as ameans of influence for the benefit of Poland. During the First World War, one of his tasks was to convince the British that the action of the Pilsudskis army was not directed against the coalition powers, but only against Russia.

Was a diplomat accredited to Switzerland, Greece, Italy. After the coup detat of May 1926, he accepted the foreign affairs portfolio. He was successful at the Nations League forum. From 1928 to 1935 he was a senator. Later, he was the President of the Supreme Board of Bank Handlowy (Commercial Bank) in Warsaw, which he evacuated to France in September 1939. Having assumed the office of the President in exile (April 1947), he appointed General Tadeusz Bor-Komorowski Prime Minister. Having completed a 7 years term of office, he extended the term indefinitely. One of his adherents was Cat-Mackiewicz who replaced him at the post of Prime Minister, where as General Anders refused to obey him. Before his death in April 1972 he designated Stanislaw Ostrowski as his successor.

Economist

August Zaleski was a Polish economist, politician, and diplomat. Twice Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Poland, he served as the President of Poland within the Polish Government in Exile.

Born: September 13, 1883, Warsaw

Died: April 7, 1972, London

EducationLondon School of Economics

During the Second World War there were a number of R.A.F. stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for R.A.F.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/10089490@N06/5030594123/

 

Newark-On-Trent Names across America and the World

Brigadier General Tadeusz Sawicz

End of a valiant era as last Polish pilot from the Battle of Britain dies aged 97

  • Brigadier General Tadeusz Sawicz shot down three German aircraft

  • He received Poland’s highest honour and Britain awarded him the Distinguished Flying Cross

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2054013/Last-Polish-pilot-Battle-Britain-dies-aged-97.html

Brigadier General Tadeusz Sawicz

He did his very best to defending the city of Warsaw, after leaving his home land on 17th September 1939.

Joined up with other Polish pilots who were fighting in France, when Paris surrendered  German soldiers march into Paris, June 14, 1940, just six weeks after the enemy launched their invasion of Western Europe.

Squadron No:
300 301 – 302 303 – 304 – 305 306 – 307 – 308 309 – 315 – 316 317 – 318 – 663

Polish Fighting Team Fighter pilots scores

 

Za wolnosc nasza i wasza / For our freedom and yours

This website

Victory Salute” by Robert Taylor

http://www.acesofww2.com/UK/UK.htm

One of the squadron’s Wellington ICs. Visible propeller points to the Polish sign which reads:

UWAGA NA SMIGLO” – watch for propeller.

Many Thanks From

http://www.polishsquadronsremembered.com

Let us all Remember the many Polish Airmen that were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force during the Battle of Britain

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/09/10/remembering-the-2165-polish-airmen-and-their-sacrifice-during-the-2nd-world-war/

 https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/09/11/we-must-not-forget-those-of-the-commonwealth-and-polish-airmen-they-fought-for-freedom-against-the-enemy-and-didnt-flinch-2/

 https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/04/17/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

 https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2014/01/23/the-national-memorial-arboretum-staffordshire-laurence-goff-uplifting-visit/

 https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

Za wolnosc nasza i wasza / For our freedom and yours

http://www.derekcrowe.com/photoset.aspx?id=38

 http://www.aircrewremembrancesociety.com/

 http://www.secondworldwar.org.uk/spitfire.html

The Spitfire

 By Mike Kemble with additional research by Ray Holden

 Images: http://www3.sympatico.ca/angels_eight/421spit.html where you can find much more

 Acknowledgements & Useful Sites:

 http://www.trasksdad.com/PopsProg/poem.HTM

http://www.fighter-collection.com/spit_xxii/

 http://www.supermarine-spitfire.co.uk/spitfire.html

 http://www.spitfiresociety.demon.co.uk/intro.htm

 http://www.spitcrazy.com/

http://www.spitfire-sculpture.co.uk/spit1.htm

 http://www.nzfpm.co.nz

 http://www.luftwaffe-experten.co.uk/supermarine.html

 http://www.spitcrazy.com/

 http://www.fortunecity.co.uk/meltingpot/lightsey/28/machines/Spitfire.htm

 http://www.spitfireflight.com/

 http://www.rafmuseumphotos.com/page.php?page=index

 http://www.spitfireflight.com/ A spitfire Restoration Site, and they sometimes have spares for sale. Check it out here.

 http://mellanium.com/spitfireworld.htm – Virtual Spitfire World

 http://www.spitfirerestoration.com/ An Excellent site on Spitfire Restoration

 http://www.asrmcs-club.com/ – Air Sea Rescue

 http://www.flyingmachinestv.co.uk/SpitPL965.wmv Wonderful Video

 http://www.ody.ca/~bwalker/RAF_owned_w9999.html RCAF Spits

 http://www.spitfiresociety.com

Newark-On-Trent Cemetery Nottinghamshire, which is located  off London Road. Since it First opened in 1856, with two former Chapels one each side of the main Arch. These website has been set up as a fitting tribute, the views expressed our solely my own.

 Chapel Interpretation centre at Newark Cemetery  The centre contains displays of the history of Newark cemetery, Commonwealth and Polish during the World War II. 

Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery,

London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856.

If we can get more Volunteers it is can be open every weekend. At the present time open every 2nd Sunday each Month from April – October from 2pm -4pm.

Open  by appointment for groups contact me.

 FRIENDS OF NEWARK CEMETERY

Stowarzyszenie o nazwie Friends of Newark Cemetery powstało w listopadzie 2005 z myślą o niesieniu pomocy służbom odpowiedzialnym za opiekę nad cmentarzem, a także promowaniu go jako jednego z najbardziej urokliwych i ważnych ze względu na wartości historyczne zakątków miasta. Mając to na uwadze, wzięliśmy udział m. in. 

w obchodach 150 rocznicy założenia Cmentarza, mających miejsce 7 października 2007, a prowadzonych przez Burmistrza miasta. Friends of Newark Cemetery przygotowują i prowadzą też odbywające się co roku Dni Otwarte cmentarza w the Interpretation Centre (budynek dawnej kaplicy).

DZIAŁALNOŚĆ

Na przestrzeni kilku ostatnich lat zasadziliśmy ponad 2000 roślin w pobliżu kaplicy, czyściliśmy pomniki i malowaliśmy ławki. Członkowie stowarzyszenia cały czas instalują budki dla ptaków, a także wytyczają obszary porośnięte dziką roślinnością i oprowadzają zorganizowane wycieczki po cmentarzu skupiając się na zagadnieniach zarówno historycznych, jak też przyrodniczych.

Pomagamy w walce z wandalizmem, a także inną, szkodliwą dla cmentarza, działalnością, ponadto we współpracy z Town Council dążymy do rozwiązania tego typu problemów. Jednym z naszych podstawowych celów jest udzielanie pomocy oraz informacji wszystkim odwiedzającym cmentarz oraz the Chapel Interpretation Centre, w związku z czym dążymy do zintensyfikowania dyżurów.

Jedną z ciekawszych inicjatyw Friends of Newark Cemetery stało się wydanie tzw. Comfort Book – zbioru wierszy, cytatów i ustępów z Pisma Świętego, przygotowanej z myślą o rodzinach zmarłych. W trakcie pracy nad książką poprosiliśmy o pomoc mieszkańców Newark pytając o to, jakie teksty i wiersze chcieliby w niej zobaczyć.

CHCESZ POMÓC?

Zapraszamy wszystkich chętnych. Prosimy o kontakt mailowy, listowny lub telefoniczny.

Za wolnosc nasza i wasza / For our freedom and yours

FRIENDS OF NEWARK CEMETERY

 https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

 https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/friends-of-newark-cemetery-fonc/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

Newark [Notts & Lincs] Air Museum Ltd, Drove Lane, Newark, Notts, NG24 2NY

By Telephone: 01636 707170 for all General Enquiries [everyday during opening hours]

By Fax: 01636 707170

Curatorial enquiries: [Monday — Friday during opening hours] on 01636 705585 

Contact Person: Michael Smith

By Email: enquire@newarkairmuseum.org

Accredited Museum No. 551 Registered Charity No. 256434 Company No. 930888

Entry to the museum is £7 for adults, £6 for the over-60s, £4 for Children, and £20 for a family ticket of two adults and three children.

 http://www.newarkairmuseum.org/gallery.php

Air Museum Nottinghamshire.  You can see lot’s more at Newark museum which is located on part of the former World War Two airfield of Winthorpe in eastern Nottinghamshire close to the border with Lincolnshire. Very little of the original wartime buildings and what remains of the runways are no longer used.

Click on  for location of Cemetery Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

http://www.maps.google.co.uk

http://www.newarknotts.co.uk/history-sacrifice-and-a-forgotten-donkey/

 

 
 

During the Second World War there were a number of R.A.F. stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for R.A.F. burials and this is now the war graves plot, where all but ten of the 90 Commonwealth and all of the 397 Polish burials were made. The cemetery also contains 49 scattered burials of the First World War.

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/07/07/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

 https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/07/17/304-polish-bomber-squadron-sodn-during-the-2nd-world-war-that-are-buried-at-newark-on-trent-cemetery/  

Let’s further promote our Newark Cemetery and encouraging interested people to join the tribute. Together as a fitting tribute who resting place is at Newark Cemetery. Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years.

 The Friends of Newark Cemetery will be opening the Chapel Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery by appointment.    

This memorial website is Laurence Goff personal views, I have put it together and do not represent Newark Town Council . It dedicated to the thousands of  people since 1856.  I am happy to show you around Newark Cemetery for all to see and view. Having a means of further promoting Newark cemetery, and encouraging interested people to join the tribute.

Laurence Goff

Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery

01636-681878 (Home)

07794613879 (Mobile)

Would You Like To Become a Volunteer for the good of Newark Cemetery  

http://www.friendsofnewarkcemeteryuk.weebly.com/ http://www.facebook.com/laurencegoffnewark laurencegoff4newark@yahoo.co.uk frindsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk http://www.newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/ http://www.youtube.com/user/laurencegoff https://twitter.com/laurencegoff

My blogging principles are that I strive to be accurate. I promptly correct any inaccuracy or error with a visible edit and update. I attribute and link to sources on the web wherever possible. My direct contact details are displayed on every page of the site. I do not receive payment or services for any reviews or editorial. And this is a personal blog. The views expressed are solely my own, and do not reflect the views of Newark Town Council