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Commonwealth and Polish War Graves, Newark-On-Trent War History Photos – Information by Laurence Goff

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves, Newark-On-Trent

Nottinghamshire NG24 

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Many British Commonwealth helped thanks to Royal Australian Air Force (4 killed), British, Royal Canadian Air Force (17 killed), Royal New Zealand Air Force (3 killed) and Polish Air Force some (nearly 400 killed) They are Buried in Newark-On-Trent Cemetery 2nd World War at Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire. Let us all Remember the many Airmen that were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force during the Battle to save Europe 1939-1945. The first squadrons were 300 and 301 bomber squadrons and 302 and 303 fighter squadrons. The fighter squadrons, flying the Hawker Hurricane, first saw action in the third phase of the Battle of Britain in late August 1940, quickly becoming highly effective. Paying a fitting Tribute to our brave fighters for their contribution. 17,000 Polish pilots and ground crew members had formed 14 squadron in RAF and 2,000 were killed of which nearly 400 from 1940 – 1947 are buried in Newark Cemetery. The Polish forces as a whole are considered to have been the 4th largest Allied army in Europe, after the Soviet Union, United States and Britain. The European World War II opened with the German invasion of Poland on Friday September 1, 1939. The Polish Army was defeated in a month of fighting. After Poland had been overrun, a government-in-exile (headquartered in Britain), armed forces, and an intelligence service were established outside of Poland. The Polish contributed to the Allied effort throughout the war. The Polish Army was recreated in the West, as well as in the East. Poles provided crucial help to the Allies throughout the war, fighting on land, sea and air. The ultimate sacrifice and service of the Polish Air Force, not only in the Allied victory in the Battle of Britain but also the subsequent air war. Polish ground troops were present in the North Africa Campaign (siege of Tobruk); the Italian campaign (including the capture of the monastery hill at the Battle of Monte Cassino); and in battles following the invasion of France (the battle of the Falaise pocket; an airborne brigade parachute drop during Operation Market Garden and one division in the Western Allied invasion of Germany). Polish forces in the east, fighting alongside the Red army and under Soviet command, took part in the Soviet offensives across Belarus and Ukraine into Poland, across the Vistula and towards the Oder and the into Berlin. Some Polish contributions were less visible, and some even overlooked, most notably the prewar and wartime deciphering of German Enigma machine codes by cryptologists Marian Rejewski and his colleagues. The Polish intelligence network also proved to be of much value to the Allied intelligence. Many British Commonwealth helped thanks to Royal Australian Air Force (4 killed), British, Royal Canadian Air Force (17 killed), Royal New Zealand Air Force (3 killed) and Polish Air Force some (nearly 400 killed) They are Buried in Newark-On-Trent Cemetery 2nd World War at Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire. Let us all Remember the many Airmen that were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force during the Battle to save Europe 1939-1945. The first squadrons were 300 and 301 bomber squadrons and 302 and 303 fighter squadrons. The fighter squadrons, flying the Hawker Hurricane, first saw action in the third phase of the Battle of Britain in late August 1940, quickly becoming highly effective. Paying a fitting Tribute to our brave fighters for their contribution. 17,000 Polish pilots and ground crew members had formed 14 squadron in RAF and 2,000 were killed of which nearly 400 from 1940 – 1947 are buried in Newark Cemetery. The Polish forces as a whole are considered to have been the 4th largest Allied army in Europe, after the Soviet Union, United States and Britain. The European World War II opened with the German invasion of Poland on Friday September 1, 1939. The Polish Army was defeated in a month of fighting. After Poland had been overrun, a government-in-exile (headquartered in Britain), armed forces, and an intelligence service were established outside of Poland. The Polish contributed to the Allied effort throughout the war. The Polish Army was recreated in the West, as well as in the East. Poles provided crucial help to the Allies throughout the war, fighting on land, sea and air. The ultimate sacrifice and service of the Polish Air Force, not only in the Allied victory in the Battle of Britain but also the subsequent air war. Polish ground troops were present in the North Africa Campaign (siege of Tobruk); the Italian campaign (including the capture of the monastery hill at the Battle of Monte Cassino); and in battles following the invasion of France (the battle of the Falaise pocket; an airborne brigade parachute drop during Operation Market Garden and one division in the Western Allied invasion of Germany). Polish forces in the east, fighting alongside the Red army and under Soviet command, took part in the Soviet offensives across Belarus and Ukraine into Poland, across the Vistula and towards the Oder and the into Berlin. Some Polish contributions were less visible, and some even overlooked, most notably the prewar and wartime deciphering of German Enigma machine codes by cryptologists Marian Rejewski and his colleagues. The Polish intelligence network also proved to be of much value to the Allied intelligence. I have been walking around Newark cemetery since 2004. In 2005 we set up a group Friends Of Newark Cemetery, I have been Chairman since 2010. I have had met lot’s of visitors across the UK, and the World. Many kind words which I really enjoy and appreciate from people that have contacted me. It has intrigues me, something that makes me want to look into who is buried and history going back to 1856, which has been fascinating. It will never be the same without our Volunteers at Newark Cemetery. Perhaps the biggest difference that you will make is making people welcome. Volunteering is a life-changing experience. It will provide you with a new outlook and lease on life. You will understand better than most people how you fit into the family history of who is buried in Newark Cemetery since 1856. Make no mistake about it, this is an experience that you won’t want to miss. “I had the most unbelievable experience for the last nine years. It not hard work but hugely rewarding for me. I met so many great people and learnt so much about the Cemetery environment. An experience I will never forget and recommend to everyone.”

The Chapel Interpretation Centre is open by volunteers the more that come forward the better is will be for our visitors. It will open on Sunday 3rd and 31st August 28th September and 26th October from 10am until 4pm. Any other days by appointment for groups. Friends of Newark Cemetery – meeting is being held at Newark Town Hall (Pickin Room). 16th Sept 2015 arrive for a cuppa at 1:45pm before the start of the meeting at 2pm.

          

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King George Vl and General Wladyslaw Sikorski

Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish their Sacrifice 

 The dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth and Polish who also join up with the RAF

 Many were killed who resting place is Newark Cemetery 4 RAAF – Australian, 44 British Servicemen, 17 RCAF – Canadian, 3 RNZAF – New

Zealand and 397 Polish Serviceman -Airmen

                      Ma

Many British Commonwealth helped thanks to  Royal Australian Air Force (4 killed), British, Royal Canadian Air Force (17 killed), Royal New Zealand Air Force (3 killed) and Polish Air Force some (nearly 400 killed) They are Buried in Newark-On-Trent Cemetery 2nd World War at Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire. Let us all Remember the many Airmen that were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force during the Battle to save Europe 1939-1945. The first squadrons were 300 and 301 bomber squadrons and 302 and 303 fighter squadrons. The fighter squadrons, flying the Hawker Hurricane, first saw action in the third phase of the Battle of Britain in late August 1940, quickly becoming highly effective. Paying a fitting Tribute to our brave fighters for their contribution. 17,000 Polish pilots and ground crew members had formed 14 squadron in RAF and 2,000 were killed of which nearly 400  from 1940 – 1947 are buried in Newark Cemetery. The Polish forces as a whole are considered to have been the 4th largest Allied army in Europe, after the Soviet Union, United States and Britain. The European World War II opened with the German invasion of Poland on Friday September 1, 1939. The Polish Army was defeated in a month of fighting. After Poland had been overrun, a government-in-exile (headquartered in Britain), armed forces, and an intelligence service were established outside of Poland. The Polish contributed to the Allied effort throughout the war. The Polish Army was recreated in the West, as well as in the East. Poles provided crucial help to the Allies throughout the war, fighting on land, sea and air. The ultimate sacrifice and service of the Polish Air Force, not only in the Allied victory in the Battle of Britain but also the subsequent air war. Polish ground troops were present in the North Africa Campaign (siege of Tobruk); the Italian campaign (including the capture of the monastery hill at the Battle of Monte Cassino); and in battles following the invasion of France (the battle of the Falaise pocket; an airborne brigade parachute drop during Operation Market Garden and one division in the Western Allied invasion of Germany). Polish forces in the east, fighting alongside the Red army and under Soviet command, took part in the Soviet offensives across Belarus and Ukraine into Poland, across the Vistula and towards the Oder and the into Berlin. Some Polish contributions were less visible, and some even overlooked, most notably the prewar and wartime deciphering of German Enigma machine codes by cryptologists Marian Rejewski and his colleagues. The Polish intelligence network also proved to be of much value to the Allied intelligence.

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski

 

General Wladyslaw Sikorski  1881 – 1943

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski  

4th July 1943 – 2013

 Let’s mark the 70th anniversary of his death

Remembrance for Poland’s War hero

Lest We Forget

Buried in Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July 1943

Monday 13th September 1993, his remains were disinterred from Newark Cemetery after 50 years

On the same day his coffin stayed overnight,on 13-14 September 1993

 at 

Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene

Tuesday 14th September a farewell high Mass before returning home to Poland on the same day.

  Remember him

 RIP

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark-on-Trent

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  October – March 8am – 6pm – Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm

 Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls
 Dedicated to Commonwealth and Polish Serviceman

           

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves, Newark-On-Trent

Disclaimer

 In the public interest

I accept no responsibility for the accuracy of the information contained on this website, which is a non profit project designed soley by

Councillor Laurence Goff.  

The opinions expressed  are entirely my own, and do not represent the views of Newark Town Council who have possibility of Newark Cemetery.

Newark Town Council, Town Hall/Market Place, Newark-on-Trent NG24 1DU

Phone: 01636 680333

http://newark.gov.uk

post@newark.gov.uk

Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish their Sacrifice 

 The dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth and Polish who also join up with the RAF

 

Laurencegoff

 Polish flying skills were well-developed from the Invasion of Poland and the pilots were regarded as fearless and sometimes bordered on reckless. Their success rates were very high in comparison to the less-experienced British Commonwealth pilots.[5] 303 squadron became the most efficient RAF fighter unit at that time.[6] Many Polish pilots also flew in other RAF squadrons. In the following years, further Polish squadrons were created: 304 (bomber, then Coastal Command), 305 (bomber), 306 (fighter), 307 (night fighter), 308 (fighter), 309 (reconnaissance, then fighter), 315 (fighter), 316 (fighter), 317 (fighter), 318 (fighter-reconnaissance) and 663 (air observation/artillery spotting). The fighter squadrons initially flew Hurricanes, then Supermarine Spitfires, and eventually some were equipped with North American Mustangs. Night fighters used by 307 were the Boulton-Paul Defiant, Bristol Beaufighter and the de Havilland Mosquito. The bomber squadrons were initially equipped with Fairey Battles and Vickers Wellingtons, then Avro Lancasters (300 sqn), Handley Page Halifaxs and Consolidated Liberators (301 sqn) and de Havilland Mosquitos and North American Mitchells (305 sqn). 663 flew Auster AOP Mk Vs.

On April 6, 1944, a further agreement was reached and the Polish Air Forces in Great Britain came under Polish command, without RAF officers. This resulted in the creation of a dedicated Polish Air Force staff college at RAF Weston-super-Mare, which remained open until April 1946. After the war, in a changed political situation, their equipment was returned to the British. Due to the fact that Poland ended in Soviet occupation, only a small proportion of the pilots returned to Poland, while the rest remained in exile. A memorial to those Polish pilots killed while on RAF service has been erected at the south-eastern corner of RAF Northolt aerodrome. On the public highway, it is accessible without entering RAF areas. It is adjacent to a junction on the A40 Western Avenue; the official name for this junction is still “Polish War Memorial”. The Polish-American fighter ace Francis S. “Gabby” Gabreski flew his first combat missions attached to a Polish RAF squadron. King George VI, on visiting a Polish squadron, asked a Polish airman what was the toughest thing he had to deal with in the war. 

             

Remembering the Sad death of General Sikorski at age 62

On this date 4th July 1943 which is a significant date to remember the sad death of General Wladyslaw Sikorski Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Prime Minister death 69 years ago. He dies when his plane crashes less than a mile from take off from Gibraltar. The General was buried in Newark-On-Trent  Cemetery on 16th July 1943 until 13th September 1993, when he was exhumed. The next day after a Holy Mass service which was held at Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene.

Re-turned home to Poland after 50 years on 14th September 1993.

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Newark Cemetery 4th July  2013

A service of remembrance was held for wartime leader General Wladyslaw Sikorski

The Consul General of the Republic of Poland Lukasz Lutostanski

 Lest We Forget 4th July 1943 – 2013 marking the 70th anniversary of his death.

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Councillor Laurence Goff Chairman Friends Of Newark Cemetery

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Laurencegoff

Father Michael O’Donoghue from Holy Trinity RC Church Newark Town. A service of remembrance was held in Newark Cemetery today to mark the 70th anniversary of the death of Polish wartime leader General Wladyslaw Sikorski.

 

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Newark Cemetery marked the 70th anniversary of his death, we did Remember him.

General Wladyslaw Sikorski

 Poland’s war heroes

Lest We Forget

General Wladyslaw Sikorski. 4th July 2013 will mark the 70th anniversary of his death

Buried in Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July 1943 until 13th September 1993

 I believe we should Remember him, RIP

Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish

Their Sacrifice 

during the dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth and Polish who also join up with the RAF

 Many were killed who resting place is Newark Cemetery 4 RAAF – Australian, 44 British Servicemen, 18 RCAF – Canadian, 3 RNZAF – New Zealand and 397 Polish Airmen together with other servicemen

WWII victims remembered at  Polish War Memorial at Newark Cemetery

General Sikorski was so impressed with the care of the War graves at Newark Cemetery UK  his requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark.

Until Poland was once again a free Country.

15th July 1941

General Wladyslaw Sikorski visited Newark Cemetery to unveil a Memorial Cross dedicated to Polish servicemen who had died fighting alongside the British. He was so impressed with the care of the War graves and requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark Cemetery UK until his Country was free once again.

Memorial At Newark Cemetery Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

Inscription

 (On Plinth) Za Wolnosc – For Freedom 1940 – 1945/

(On Front Of Cross) To The Memory Of Fallen Polish Airmen/ I Have Fought A Good

Fight, I Have Finished My Course,

I Have Kept The Faith

Physical Description

These Very Tall Latin Cross, Decorated With 12 Cross And Polish Eagle Devices On The Front Face. On Two Stage

Plinth Time to emphasized the Heroism, Bravery, Valour and Determination for our Freedom. We must not forget the Polish Airman and the Commonwealth they fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch. They fought to the end and then carried on the fight, we should be grateful. We certainly owe them a great deal of credit that they so rightly deserve.

For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

                      

Many British Commonwealth helped thanks to  Royal Australian Air Force (4 killed), British, Royal Canadian Air Force (17 killed), Royal New Zealand Air Force (3 killed) and Polish Air Force some (nearly 400 killed) They are Buried in Newark-On-Trent Cemetery 2nd World War at Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire. Let us all Remember the many Airmen that were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force during the Battle to save Europe 1939-1945.  Paying a fitting Tribute to our brave fighters for their contribution. 17,000 Polish pilots and ground crew members had formed 14 squadron in RAF and 2,000 were killed of which nearly 400  from 1940 – 1947 are buried in Newark Cemetery.

 


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https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/friends-of-newark-cemetery-fonc/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/04/13/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

The Act Of Commemoration, Honouring The Memory As Our Fitting Tribute To Them

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Annual Air Bridge this year will Commemoration 70th anniversary.The Battle of Britain Memorial Flight Dakota Aircraft will fly three times over the Newark Cemetery. A Service of Remembrance is dedicated to preserving their Memory. On Sunday 28th September 2014 at 2pm

All Souls Day Ceremony of Remembrance organised by the Polish Air Force Association, will take place in the Commonwealth War Graves section of Newark Cemetery on Sunday 26th October 2014 at 3pm. The procession for both events will take place from the Main Gate located on London Road, Newark-On-Trent to the Air Bridge Memorial – Commonwealth and Polish War Graves. Polish Airmen who gave their lives in the 2nd World War are remembered at both services and ceremony in Newark, England. Let’s pay tribute to the gallant Polish men and women, both civilian and military, who gave their lives in World War II in the cause of freedom.

Laurencegoff

All Souls Day Ceremony of Remembrance organised by the Polish Air Force Association, will take place in the Commonwealth War Graves section of Newark Cemetery on Sunday 26th October 2014 at 3pm.

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Commonwealth and Polish War Graves, Newark-On-TrentSAM_0489

SAM_0523Annual Air Bridge Commemoration Service of Remembrance at Newark Cemetery is dedicated to preserving their Memory. On Sunday 28th September 2014 at 2pm

All Souls Day Ceremony of Remembrance organised by the Polish Air Force Association, will take place in the Commonwealth War Graves section of Newark Cemetery on Sunday 26th October 2014.

 The procession will take place from the Main Gate located on London Road, Newark-On-Trent at 3pm to the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves.

Held on the 4th Sunday in October, Polish Airmen who gave their lives in the 2nd World War are remembered at the All Souls ceremony in Newark, England. Let’s pay tribute to the gallant Polish men and women, both civilian and military, who gave their lives in World War II in the cause of freedom.

 General Sikorski was one of the great Polish heroes. After the German invasion of Poland, he became the Prime Minister of a new Polish Government in exile, and also Commander in Chief of the Polish Armed Forces, which fought with the Allies by land, sea and air throughout the Second World War. But he also personally directed Poland’s internal resistance movement against the German occupying army in Poland itself. He was thus Political leader, military leader and resistance leader, all at the same time. He was the personal embodiment of the whole Polish Nation’s fight for survival as a free nation and as a people, and liberation from the terrible oppression to which they had become subject. It is little wonder then that this man was so loved and respected by his people, and that they continue to revere and honour his memory to this day. As British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill said in his tribute to General Sikorski in the House of Commons, ‘he was truly the symbol and embodiment of that spirit which has borne the Polish nation through the centuries.’ General Sikorski was also very active in World politics at that time, attending many political conferences with the allies and was, indeed, one of the Architects of the United Nations. Churchill described his death as ‘a most grievous loss to the cause of the United Nations.’ And so it was as Commander in Chief of the Free Polish Forces that General Sikorski left England on 24th May 1943 onboard an RAF Liberator Aircraft bound for Cairo to visit Polish Troops fighting with the Allies in North Africa. On his return from Cairo, his Liberator aircraft touched down at Gibraltar, just as it had done on the way out to Cairo. General Sikorski was accompanied by his daughter Zofia, who was also Chief of the Polish Womens Auxiliary. The Party also included the Polish military Chief Of Staff and Chief of Operations, and their support staff. They arrived at Gibraltar on Saturday 3rd July at 6.37p.m. Their aircraft, the same Liberator, took off from Gibraltar airport at 11p.m. the next day, Sunday 4th July 1943 on the final leg of General Sikorskis return journey from Cairo to London. The aeroplane crashed seconds after take-off, just off the eastern end of the runway. General Sikorski, his daughter and all his party perished. General Sikorski’s body lay in State for several days at the Cathedral of St Mary the Crowned on Main Street, until a Polish warship could reach Gibraltar to take it to the UK for burial. On arrival at the Cathedral entrance the street was crowded with Gibraltarian men (their wives, children and parents had been evacuated from Gibraltar during the war) who wanted to show their respect to this courageous Polish hero. The then Bishop of Gibraltar celebrated a requiem mass in the Cathedral before the mortal remains of General Sikorski and his party were transferred to the Polish destroyer ‘Orkan’. General Sikorski was buried in Newark Cemetery in England. His grave became a shrine to free Poles throughout the world whose view was that the General’s remains should never be returned to Poland while the country was under foreign domination. It was therefore not until the fall of the Berlin Wall and the liberation of Eastern Europe from Soviet domination not until 13th September 1993, his remains were disinterred.  and flown to Warsaw on 14th September 1993 to be re-interred in a special crypt in Wawel Cathedral which lies inside the walls of the ancient castle, traditional burial place of Polish Kings.

 The body of the General was laid to rest in the newly established Polish Cemetery at Newark, Nottinghamshire.  The pilot, Flt. Lt. Edward Prchal of the Czechoslovakian Air Force, was the only survivor. The body of General Sikorski’s daughter, Zofia, Chief of the Polish Women’s Auxiliary, was never found.

His cap and uniform, recovered from the sea at the site of the crash, is displayed in the Sikorski Museum, in the Polish Institute at 20, Princess Gate, London.

General Wladyslaw Sikorski 1881-1943, 13th Sept 1993 his remains was exhumed from Newark Cemetery. On the same day his coffin stay overnight, at Newark Parish Church.

14th September 1993 The next day had a farewell high Mass.

These took place at Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene.

On 13-14 September 1993, 

at Newark Parish Church

Polish War Graves

The highest concentration of commemorations can be particularly found in Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire.  Our local cemetery with nearly 400 Polish Airmen that died, and are buried in special plot on the east side. You can park for free at the Main Gate parking lot at Newark Cemetery, It is location on London Road – Elm Avenue,

Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

General Sikorski was buried at Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July, 1943. On 13th September 1993 his remains were taken from Newark Cemetery and taken over night at St. Mary Magdalene (Newark parish church)  a Catholic service (Mass) was held  the  next day. On 14th September 1993 remains re-turn home to Poland after 50 years resting in Newark Cemetery.

 

General Wladyslaw Sikorski Farewell Mass Held At Newark Parish Church 14th September 1993 Be Re-turning Home To Poland

Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene

These being a farewell High Mass before he left Newark for the last time after the service, on his a home to Poland. He was buried in Newark Cemetery from 1943-1993

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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Laurencegoff

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Newark Town Councillor Laurence Goff visiting Newark Cemetery

Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856

 This memorial website is Laurence Goff personal views, I have put it together and do not represent Newark Town Council . It dedicated to the thousands of  people since 1856.There were a number of Royal Air Force stations within and around Newark from which several Polish squadrons operated. The highest concentration of commemorations can be particularly found in Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire.  Our local cemetery with nearly 400 that died, and are buried in special plot on the east side. You can park for free at the Main Gate parking lot at Newark Cemetery, It is location on London Road, Newark, Notts.

 Chapel Interpretation Centre (East side turn left at the Main Arch)

{Location walk from the parking lot to the main Arch turn left red side door}

Organised by

The Friends of Newark Cemetery

 The Chapel  Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery, will  open    from April – October  by appointment for groups for our exhibition  

Please give plenty of notice

New volunteers are welcome

For more information

Laurence Goff

Chairman

Friends of Newark Cemetery

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

 Newark Town Hall/Market Place

Newark-on-Trent NG24 1DU

01636-681878 (home)

07794613879 {Mobile}

The Friends of Newark Cemetery  will open The Chapel  Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery,  or by appointment for groups.  Historical  walks or  help by locating  families/casualties both in Newark Cemetery.  Friends of Newark Cemetery Volunteers will give assistance members of the public with display of history of well know people that are buried here.

 Come and see what you will find

At Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery.

We will have volunteers on site from Friends of Newark Cemetery

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The Friends of Newark Cemetery,
Also we will provide help
In finding a specific grave location and are
Offering a general tour of the Cemetery.
A highlight within the Centre Will be a
Display of history of Newark Cemetery

Photo Project from the First World War by Pete Stevens

He has over 150 Photographs from the Newark & Balderton Memorial to the Fallen

Laurencegoff

Friends of Newark Cemetery will be using the Interpretation centre in the former Eastern Chapel built in 1856

 Chapel Interpretation Centre (East side turn left at the Main Arch) 

{Location walk from the parking lot to the main Arch turn left red side door}

Organised by the Friends of Newark Cemetery

We will Remember  Them

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Opening 

 The Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery

{Location walk from the Main Gate on London Road up the main Arch turn left red side door}

Chapel Interpretation Centre {Former Non Conformist Chapel} 

 (East side turn left at the Main Arch)

By appointment

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Coming from the  Commonwealth and Polish  war graves  towards the Main Gate turn right to side door

 

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark-on-Trent

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  October – March 8am – 6pm – Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm

 

War Memorial to the Fallen of Newark 

Ministry of Defence

 First World War 1914-1918 total from Newark Killed  456

 

War Memorial to the Fallen of Newark commemorating, by name, those local military personnel who lost their lives in conflict going back to the first World War of 1914

Remembrance Day, for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

Ministry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

 

Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856

 

They shall grow not old,
As we that are left grow old,
Age shall not weary them,
Nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun,
And in the morning
We will remember them

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Pete Stevens from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission  {CWGC}

and

Newark Town Mayor Councillor Irene Brown

 

 SAM_1337Ministry of Defence

Newark Town Councillor Laurence Goff Chairman Friends Of Newark Cemetery and Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) Pete Stevens

 
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Display of history of Newark Cemetery Photo Project from the First World War by Pete Stevens, with over 150 Photographs from the Newark & Balderton Memorial to the Fallen.Refreshments available Admission is Free

 Annual Air Bridge Commemoration Service of Remembrance at Newark Cemetery is dedicated to preserving their Memory. On Sunday 22nd September 2013 at 2pm

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All Souls Day Ceremony of Remembrance organised by the Polish Air Force Association, will take place in the Commonwealth War Graves section of Newark Cemetery on Sunday 27th October 2013.

 The procession will take place from the Main Gate located on London Road, Newark-On-Trent at 3pm to the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves.

Held on the 4th Sunday in October, Polish Airmen who gave their lives in the 2nd World War are remembered at the All Souls ceremony in Newark, England. Let’s pay tribute to the gallant Polish men and women, both civilian and military, who gave their lives in World War II in the cause of freedom.

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski 1881-1943, 13th Sept 1993 his remains was exhumed from Newark Cemetery. On the same day his coffin stay overnight, at Newark Parish Church.

14th September 1993 The next day had a farewell high Mass.

This took place at Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene.

On 13-14 September 1993, 

at Newark Parish Church

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski 1881-1943, 13th Sept 1993 his remains was exhumed from Newark Cemetery. On the same day his coffin stay overnight, at Newark Parish Church.

14th September 1993 The next day had a farewell high Mass.

These took place at Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene.

On 13-14 September 1993, 

at Newark Parish Church

Polish War Graves

The highest concentration of commemorations can be particularly found in Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire.  Our local cemetery with nearly 400 Polish Airmen that died, and are buried in special plot on the east side. You can park for free at the Main Gate parking lot at Newark Cemetery, It is location on London Road – Elm Avenue,

Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

General Sikorski was buried at Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July, 1943. On 13th September 1993 his remains were taken from Newark Cemetery and taken over night at St. Mary Magdalene (Newark parish church)  a Catholic service (Mass) was held  the  next day. On 14th September 1993 remains re-turn home to Poland after 50 years resting in Newark Cemetery.

 

General Wladyslaw Sikorski Farewell Mass Held At Newark Parish Church 14th September 1993 Be Re-turning Home To Poland

Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene

These being a farewell High Mass before he left Newark for the last time after the service, on his a home to Poland. He was buried in Newark Cemetery 

 SAM_1104

Newark Cemetery can boast of having lot’s of impressive benefactors  since 1856. An array of  names and servicemen going back to 1914 to the present day who resting place is located in Newark-On-Trent.

Amongst the many well-known local people that are buried in Newark Cemetery include  among the many graves are Memorials to some of Newark’s greatest benefactors and people who have helped shape Newark

Thursday 30th October 1856

The Church of England portion of the new Cemetery was consecrated by the Bishop of Lincoln. Soon after the ceremony took place, the very first burial was made for the family of W.N. Nicholson, Ironmonger, Market Place, Newark. Their three year old son Charles John.

On 23rd February 1856

 At 10 O’clock the members of the Corporation and Burial Board together with Ministers of Churches from the area. The Town Mayor Henry Sutton, Chief Constable, Waterton, with the battle-axe and the Police, W.Newton the Clerk to the Board, Town Crier with Two Mace-bearers, 12 scholars from the Grammar School and other officials assembled at the Town Hall. The procession crossed the Market Place and went by Bridge Street, Carter Gate and Beaumont Street to the New Cemetery site. The corner-stone of the new buildings was laid by Joseph Branston Esq.

 

20150709_152626

Laurence Goff

Six Polish crew of Wellington HX384 were killed on 11th August 1942 Buried in Newark Cemetery.

Two tribute events to be held at 2:30pm – 14:30pm on Wednesday 12th August 2015 at two location at the same time – one by aviation historian Malcolm Cullen, of Marloes Dale Pembrokeshire West Wales and a 2nd one at Newark Cemetery by Alan Brooke Newark RAFA Club with support from Friends Of Newark Cemetery.

Crashed after takeoff into the sea. The crew of six Polish nationals perished in the crash. The wreckage was found on 21st September 1991 by divers from the Llantrisant Sub Aqua Club.

A propeller from a World War 2 bomber which crashed 73 years ago is to go on display at The Heritage Centre, Dale, Pembrokeshire, where it will be unveiled as the final part of Ceremony which will commence with a Memorial Service dedicated to the six Polish aircrew who lost their lives in the crash.

The propeller is currently being refurbished at Valero Oil Refinery, Pembroke, and will be a poignant memorial to the Polish aircrew Sgt. Drozdziok (wirless operator); Sgt. Wojtowicz (airgunner); Sgt. Modrzewski (airgunner); Sgt. Omieljaszko (pilot); P/O Maslanka (navigator); F/O Siuzdak (pilot) who were killed in August 1942 when their Wellington Mk.1c aircraft serial number HX384 of 304 (Polish) Squadron R.A.F. crashed into the sea during a night take-off from R.A.F. Dale, Pembrokeshire. The aircrew lie buried at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire. No. 304 (Polish) Squadron was a Polish manned unit within the Royal Air Force’s Coastal Command.

It was in 1991 that divers of the Llantrisant Diving Club, Glamorganshire, found the aircraft wreck and salvaged the two propellers one of which was later transported, together with a machine gun recovered at the same time, to Poland and is prominently displayed at the Polish War Museum in Warsaw. The other propeller, now destined for Dale, was for several years part of a small museum in Abergavenny. Recently recovered from a garden the Abergavenny propeller has been gifted by Mr. Steve Jones to the Heritage Centre where it will go on permanent display accompanied by a brief history of 304 Squadron; a description of the Wellington bomber; details of the crash and photographs of the crew who perished when the aircraft crashed.

The Memorial Service to the six aircrew will take place at Marloes Church followed by the acceptance of the propeller at the Heritage Centre, Dale, which will take place on 12th August 2015. We would like to acknowledge the Coastlands Local History Group in West Wales, who are organising this Service with support from Malcolm Cullen.

Newark Cemetery
A laying of poppy crosses on the graves of the six airmen will be preformed by members of Newark RAFA Club with support from the Polish Community and Friends of Newark Cemetery during a short service of remembrance to coincide with the service at Marloes Church, West Wales.

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Have a Look At The Map Newark Cemetery Newark-On-Trent

 E is for East side  W  for West going up the Main Drive, low numbers start at the other end going over the 400 numbers to the far end of the Newark Cemetery. Like all new tombstones are black  have numbers on the back which will read  the first letter for E for East  the next letter is row and then the number which will read EG 246 on the bottom  E side row G number 246 the West side read the same way tombstone start at A the next one B and so on read out would from the Main Drive  From East of West down the Main Drive.

Since it First opened in 1856, with two former Chapels one each side of the main Arch. These website has been set up as a fitting tribute, the views expressed our solely my own.

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This was the darkest days during the 2nd World War when 29 men and 12 women died with another 165 that were injured. When 10 bombs were dropped with 5 exploded on that Friday the 7th March 1941.

 Let’s give respect to the thousands of heroes that worked at R&M during the bombing, they also served their country.   Anyone can add memories, condolences, we will Remember them.

 I encourage you to share our tribute website with your family & friends.

We will remember them

Those 41 killed at Ransome and Marles are no less deserving of our acknowledgement with a memorial website. Pay your respects. We will Remember them

A complete listing of names “Roll Call of Honour

* A Star Buried   in  Newark   Cemetery   O  is  put after names that do not have a Tombstone )

1, George Harold Henry Adams, aged 45 *

2, Wilfred Evelyn Andrew, aged 39 *

3, Olive Ash, aged 31 * O

4, Bertie Augustus Ball, aged 18 * O

5, Ernest Patrick Beale, aged 27, Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment (Private) *

6, Edward Beaver, aged 26 (Buried in Mansfield) with no Tombstone

7, Harold Vincent Brown, aged 44 *

8, Vivian Maud Castle, aged 18

9, Enid Winifred Hall Cooper, aged 30 ( Buried in Balderton in St Giles Church Yard)

10, Edna May Cottam, aged 19 *

11, Gladys Cummings, aged 21 *

12, William Joseph Dixey, aged 62 *

13, Frederick Fowler, aged 39

14, George William Godridge, aged 29 * O

15, Robert Barnsdale Grant, aged 47, his son Chris was only five when his Father died, he became Newark town mayor 50 years later in 1991-1992 *

16, John Henry Green, aged 55, Volunteer Home Guard, 11th Nottinghamshire (Newark) *

17, Horace Grocock, aged 47 ( Buried in Barnby in the Willow)

18, Albert Robert Gyde, aged 42*

19, Rose Ellen Hall, aged 30 * O

20, James Hazelby Hanger, aged 29 *

21, Thomas McHallam Hardie, aged 26 *

22, Sybil Harriet Hayden, aged 34

23, Joyce May Kirton, aged 18

24, Lily Lambert, aged 22 * O

25, George Felix Lambley,  aged 39 *

26, Edith Makins, aged 21 ( Buried in South Collingham)

27, Frederick William Mann, aged 46 * O

28, Frederick Markwell, aged 50 ( Balderton ?)

29, Claude Ware Hannah Martin, aged 36 *

30, Edwin E. Martin, aged 46 *

31, Richard Naylor, aged 25 * O

32, Frederick William Packwood, aged 52 *

33, William Thomas Pepper, aged 18

34, Frederick Richards, aged 32 * O

35, Alfred Mayfield Ridge, aged 68 * O

36, Reginald William Senior, aged 35, died the next day Saturday  8th March 1941 *

37, George Swanwick, aged 38 * O

38, Norah Trueblood, aged 34, *

39, Esther Evelyn Varney, aged 19, (her body was never found)

40, William Warner, aged 51 *

41, Arthur Worrell, aged 31 *

SAM_0889

 

 Annual Air Bridge Commemoration Service of Remembrance at Newark Cemetery is dedicated to preserving their Memory. On Sunday 28th September 2014 at 2pm
All Souls Day Ceremony of Remembrance organised by the Polish Air Force Association, will take place in the Commonwealth War Graves section of Newark Cemetery on Sunday 26th October 2013.

 The procession will take place from the Main Gate located on London Road, Newark-On-Trent at 3pm to the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves.

Held on the 4th Sunday in October, Polish Airmen who gave their lives in the 2nd World War are remembered at the All Souls ceremony in Newark, England. Let’s pay tribute to the gallant Polish men and women, both civilian and military, who gave their lives in World War II in the cause of freedom.

Polish War Graves

The highest concentration of commemorations can be particularly found in Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire.  Our local cemetery with nearly 400 Polish Airmen that died, and are buried in special plot on the east side. You can park for free at the Main Gate parking lot at Newark Cemetery, It is location on London Road – Elm Avenue,

Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

 

General Wladyslaw Sikorski Farewell Mass Held At Newark Parish Church 14th September 1993 Be Re-turning Home To Poland

Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene

These being a farewell High Mass before he left Newark for the last time after the service, on his a home to Poland. He was buried in Newark Cemetery from 1943-1993.

SAM_7290

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We must not forget those of the Commonwealth and Polish airmen, they fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch

 This War Plaque is located on Stodman Street, Newark-On-Trent up high on the Nat West Bank

100_6717

Flying Over Newark-On-Trent, It was a joy taking this photo for all to see

 

Flying Over Newark-On-Trent, Commonwealth and Polish war graves.  It was a joy to take this photo

100_1046

Spitfire Flying Over Newark-On-Trent, It was a joy taking this one

Let us all Remember the many Airmen that were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force during the Battle of Britain and pay tribute to these brave fighters for their contribution. 17,000 Polish pilots and ground crew members had formed 14 squadron in RAF.

2,000 were killed of which are buried in Newark Cemetery.

 

SAM_0139

Ten Polish war graves in Newark Cemetery have been replaced as part of the work of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Stonemason Mr Pete Stevens, of Balderton, is one of four members of staff who care for war graves in seven counties, including Nottinghamshire, which make up the commission’s central north region.

The commission tends to the graves, regularly cleans the pale headstones and replaces those where the inscription is beginning to wear away.

It is tasked with maintaining 1.8m graves in seven countries of men from the Commonwealth who gave their lives during the first and second world wars and also those of the soldiers from other nations who fought for the Allied Forces.

Mr Stevens said: “One of the biggest problems we have in the UK is people don’t realise we have war graves here.

“They see them in France and Belgium but they don’t realise we have them here too.

“It is a big thing because it is history we can’t afford to lose.

“I am pleased to see that schools are now taking a big interest in it and are taking trips to France and Belgium to see the graves there.

“It is important. I don’t think we should ever forget the sacrifice made by these men, no matter what nationality they are.”

The Polish and Allied Servicemen’s war graves in Newark Cemetery is the biggest collection of memorials the central north team tend.

Ten of the Polish headstones have been replaced and there are a further 13 headstones in the cemetery due to be replaced, including soldiers from the town who fought in the first world war.

The commission is working to ensure all the headstones of first world war soldiers are in good condition before the 100th anniversary of the conflict next August.

Mr Stevens said: “We have been very busy with the 14-18 Project.

“Our workload has increased probably by 30% and we are looking at replacing in the Central North region about 350 headstones.

“In between that, of course, we are carrying on with the standard work we have.”

It can take up to two years for replacement stones to be provided for graves, and headstones are not removed until the day they are replaced unless they have been damaged or vandalised.

Damaged or vandalised stones are replaced within nine months.

Mr Stevens said damage and vandalism were extremely rare in the entire area.

New stones are commissioned from a factory at Arras in France and old stones are sent away to be crushed.

Mr Stevens said he enjoyed his job.

He said: “It’s not a boring job because we could be here one day then in Nottingham Cemetery the next day and at Sheffield the day after that.

“As well as looking after the larger sites we also go to graveyards where there is just one grave. 

“To put it in perspective, there are 278 sites in Lincolnshire and of those sites 126 have only one grave in them.

“It doesn’t matter whether there’s one or a thousand at a site, they all get the same attention.

“It’s not like a job. It’s a vocation and I suppose something we do out of respect.

“They are all the same and we don’t discriminate between rank, colour or creed.”

 War graves provide insight into history | Newark Advertiser http://t.co/YmjxOLmtmN via @advertisergroup

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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A list of grave monuments in St Mary Magdalene CemeteryNewark 

gravestonephotos.com › countries › England › Nottinghamshire

100+ items – Gravestone Photographic Resource cemetery list 

full name

relationship

birth year

burial year

Samuel Austin

1795

1820

25

Samuel Booker Austin

son of Samuel Austin

1795

1820

SAM_6173

Link

https://www.deceasedonline.com/…/GSDOSearch?…NEWARK…Share

Nearly 40,000 burial records are available, with a mixture of register scans and

computerised records. Newark Cemetery

Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery will only open by appointment for groups on weekends .  by Contact the Chairman Laurence Goff  01636-681878 or 07794613879 or leave a message at Newark Town Hall 01636-0333 or by Email: friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk   We  need to found more Volunteers to welcome visits to Newark Cemetery by  showing around our exhibition, serving refreshments giving tours or help locate a grave for visits.

 The Chapel Interpretation Centre will open only by appointment for groups  Contact Friends of Newark Cemetery Chairman Laurence Goff on

01636-681878 (home) Mobile 07794613879 at home or by leaving a message at Newark Town Hall 01636-680333.

Laurence Goff — Blogs, Pictures, and more on WordPress

newarkcemeteryuk : This memorial website has been put together by Friends Of Newark Cemetery Chairman Councillor Laurence Goff for the people of Newark Cemetery.

Contact by post:

Friends Of Newark Cemetery Chairman Councillor Laurence Goff

Newark Town Hall, Market Place, Newark, Notts, NG24 1DU

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

Laurence Goff 01636-681878 (Home)

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

laurencegoff4newark@yahoo.co.uk

http://www.flickr.com/photos/laurencegoff/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/newarkcemeteryuk/

http://www.facebook.com/laurencegoff4newark

This memorial website is my personal views, I have put it together and do not represent Newark Town Council . It dedicated to the thousands of  people since 1856.  Many are happy to have a resting place at Newark Cemetery for all to see and view. Having a means of further promoting Newark cemetery, and encouraging interested people to join and learn about cemetery for over 150 years. This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately, the content here is solely the responsibility of 

Laurence Goff

Chairman
Friends of Newark Cemetery Volunteer
Newark Town Councillor

 

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