We Will Remember Them at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish their Sacrifice 

 The dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth and Polish who also join up with the RAF

A time to remember – that you will never forget

 

100_1058

Laurencegoff 

Flying over Newark On Trent for our Freedom

Many were killed who resting place is Newark Cemetery 4 RAAF – Australian, 44 British Servicemen, 17 RCAF – Canadian, 3 RNZAF – New Zealand and 397 Polish Airmen together with other servicemen

 

 

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves, Newark -on-Trent NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark-on-Trent

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  October – March 8am – 6pm – Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm

 

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls


Our Historic Newark Cemetery

Newark

 NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery Is Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm

October – March 8am-6pm

For over 150 years since 1856

We Will Remember Them

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Deputy Consulate General  of the Republic of Poland Grzegorz Dyk From Manchester UK with Newark Deputy Town Mayor Councillor Irene Brown {Councillor Brown became Newark Town Mayor on 13th May 2012}Visiting Chapel Interpretation  Centre at Newark Cemetery Family History Day

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  October – March 8am – 6pm

Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm 

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Ben Parkinson

Our Beautiful And Historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire Newark NG24 1SQ

Ben Parkinson

This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately, the content here is solely the responsibility of Laurence Goff. As a fitting tribute to the people who resting place is at Newark cemetery. The views expressed our solely my own and do not reflect  Newark Town Council.

Newark Town Councillor Laurence Goff

Friends of Newark Cemetery

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag


Crew of Avro Lancaster ED823

 

411919

 

Flight Sergeant

 

L W LEAN

 

Royal Australian Air Force

Pilot

Aged 22   Australian

14855

 

Sergeant

 

F DUNKIN

 

Royal Australian Air Force

Flight Engineer

 

Aged 21  Australian

127064

 

Flying Officer

 

E LAMBERT

 

Royal Air Force

 

Navigator

Aged 34      British

 

1087359

 

Sergeant

 

H U OXSPRING

 

Royal Air Force

Bomb Aimer

Aged 27  British

 

 

1345277

 

Sergeant

 

W S L GRAHAM

 

Royal Air Force

Wireless Operator

Aged 20      British

 

 

R/11579

 

Flight  Sergeant

 

 

 

 

R D LEWIS

 

Royal Canadian  Air Force

Air Gunner

Aged 22  Canadian

 

1231524

 

Sergeant

 

W G STEPHENSON

 

Royal Air Force

Air Gunner

Aged 21         British

The Halam Lancaster Memorial displays the badges of the airforces of Great Britain, Australia and Canada in honour of the three different airforces from which the crew was drawn.

Memorial to the Crew of Avro Lancaster ED823

In the early hours of Saturday 10th April 1943 Lancaster ED823 belonging to 1661 Heavy Conversion Unit (H.C.U.) took off from RAF Winthorpe, near Newark, Nottinghamshire,England. At 01:25am the aircraft crashed in Halam shortly after take-off, just eight miles from the airfield.

1661 H.C.U. at RAF Winthorpe was a unit set up to train aircrews to fly heavy bombers such as the Manchester and Lancaster. The six week course was designed to “convert” the crews from flying lighter aircraft to larger, heavier ones. The final part of the aircrews’ training course was night navigational exercises, such as the flight ED823 was making when it crashed.

All seven crew members were sadly killed in the crash.

The crash site is about 1/2 mile from the centre of the village of Halam. It is on the west facing slope of a gentle hill; in 1943 the field was pasture, now in 2011 it is part of Norwood Park Golf Course.

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls 

From the left -Raymond Lewis – air gunner (RCAF); “Jock” Graham – wireless operator;
Ted Lambert – navigator; Len Lean – pilot (RAAF)

The pilot Len Lean and the flight engineer Frank Dunkin were both from Australia. They had both joined the RAAF for initial training before being embarked for Great Britain. Flt Sgt Lean came from Chatswood, Sydney, and Sgt Dunkin’s home was in Armidale, New South Wales. Raymond Lewis, one of the crew’s air gunners was from Melfort, Saskatchewan, Canada.

All three of these Commonwealth airmen are buried in Newark cemetery, about eight miles from this memorial.

The Navigator, Ted Lambert, lived with his wife Lavinia in Overhulton, Bolton, Lancashire. At 34 he was looked on by the rest of the crew as “the daddy” of the aircrew as he was “so much older” than the rest of them. He is buried in Fleetwood Borough Cemetery, near Blackpool.

Sgt Henry Oxspring as bomber aimer, manned the front gun turret and would have been responsible for releasing the plane’s bombs on target once the crew had gone operational and were sent on bombing runs. He is buried in Hoyland Nether Cemetery near Barnsley, South Yorkshire.

Wireless Operator “Jock” Graham’s family came from Glasgow. At 20 years old he was the youngest member of the crew. He is buried in the Glasgow Western Necropolis.

Sergeant William Stephenson was the crew’s second air gunner, along with Flt Sgt Lewis, his job was to provide the Lancaster’s defence against enemy fighters. He was from Leicester, where he is buried in Gilroes Cemetery.

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls


The pilot Len Lean – he is still a trainee pilot in this picture as he has white band on his flying cap


Flying Officer Ted Lambert (navigator) – at 34 years old, the most senior crew member in terms of rank and age

Frank Dunkin from Australia. He was the Flight Engineer – his role was to support the pilot by keeping “the kite” flying

Sergeant Henry Oxspring – bomb aimer. He would also have manned the front machine gun turret



Wireless Operator Sergeant “Jock” Graham from Glasgow. Sadly we have been unable to trace any relatives or family for Sgt. Graham – can you help?

Canadian Flight Sergeant Lewis was one of the Lancaster’s two air gunners. He would keep a sharp look-out for enemy fighters, and defend the bomber from attack

Sergeant Billy Stephenson from Leicester, the other air gunner on the plane. When flying with other bombers, or in formation, the air gunners would also look out for wandering “friendly” aircraft threatening to collide with their own plane, and would warn the pilot to take evasive action.

Official Crash Report

The official crash report was produced the day after the crash. It is a brief summary and gives little detail as to the events leading up to the crash. The report implies “pilot error” as the cause – HOWEVER, there is strong evidence that the Lancaster experienced problems with one of its engines right from take off. In fact it seems most likely that one of the engines was on fire when the plane crashed.

Flt Sgt Lean would have had to struggle to keep the plane on a level flight, especially if the fire was spreading to the wing. It may well be that he was looking for a flat field in which to crash land – a further hundred yards and he would have had somewhere to put the plane down. The trees on the hill at Norwood Park and the power cables across the field where they crashed meant they had no chance for a safe landing. The plane was certainly heading towards open country where a crash landing could be attempted.

Rather than pilot error, it may have been mechanical failure and sheer bad luck that Len couldn’t bring his crew down safely.

Why the engine problems, and possible fire, are not mentioned in the accident report remains a mystery. Was this an oversight in a rushed report by people busy fighting a desperate war? Perhaps it was easier to blame a trainee pilot rather than admit to a faulty, or poorly maintained aircraft…. after all to send an aircrew up in a plane that wasn’t airworthy would be to put seven lives as great risk…. Perhaps we will never know.

So far the official Accident Investigation Branch (A.I.B.) report hasn’t been traced – if that can be found, perhaps more light can be shone on the tragic events.

Can anyone provide any more information on the likely cause of the crash, or help us find the A.I.B. report?

To read the official RAF accident report for ED823 – Click Here

The Avro Lancaster Bomber

The Lancaster bomber was the most famous and most successful of the Second World War heavy bombers. Although primarily a night bomber, it excelled in many other roles including daylight precision bombing, and gained worldwide fame as the “Dam Buster” used in the 1943 raids on Germany’s Ruhr Valley dams

Role

Heavy Bomber

Manufacturer

Avro

Designed by

Roy Chadwick

First flight

8 January 1941

Introduced in service

1942

Length

69 ft 5 ins (21.2m)

Wingspan

102 ft (31.1m)

Weight (unloaded)

36,828 lb (16,705kg)

Weight (max. load)

63,000 lb (29,000kg)

Top speed

280mph

Number built

7,377

Unit cost

£45,000 – 50,000
[about £1.3 – £1.5m in 2011 currency]

   

During WWII 7,377 Lancasters were built and this workhorse of Bomber Command flew 156,000 sorties, dropping over 600,000 tons of bombs. Although of an exceptional design and thought by most pilots to be a great plane to fly, almost half of all Lancasters delivered during the war were lost (a total of 3,345 planes lost) on operations with the loss of over 21,000 crew members; a sad reflection of the casualties of war.

Unfortunately accidents involving aircrews in training were all too common. The crew of ED823 were such a trainee aircrew; on that tragic night seven young men “gave their tomorrows for our todays”.

Lest we forget

 

Lafarge granite gives tragic airmen lasting memorial

The generosity of a Leicestershire building materials firm will ensure the sacrifice of a county airman killed in WWII will forever be remembered.

Lafarge Aggregates & Concrete UK has donated a granite boulder from its Mountsorrel quarry, near Loughborough, to be erected as a memorial to second air gunner, Sgt Billy Stephenson and his comrades, who died during a training mission.All seven airmen perished when their Lancaster bomber crashed in the Nottinghamshire village of Halam in the early hours of Saturday April 10 1943.Villagers in Halam had long felt the sacrifice of the crew should be honoured and embarked on a mission to erect a memorial and trace relatives of the lost airmen.

Many thanks to Lafarge and Nottinghamshire County Council the memorial was  unveiled during a special ceremony on the 68thanniversary of the crash.

Andrew Paris, part of the Halam team responsible for organising the memorial, said:

 ”The loss of the lives of these seven brave young men was a sad wartime event for the village.

“When they left their homes and families they were really no more than boys. We wanted to do something to honour the sacrifice of these seven brave young men and now a vague idea over a pint in the village pub has become a wonderful reality.”Angus Shedden, operations manager for Lafarge’s Mountsorrel Quarry, said:  ”We are delighted that one of our armour stones is being used for such a worthy cause and will help keep alive the memory of these brave airmen.”Appeals through local newspapers and radio have ensured relatives of almost all of the seven were Remembered.

Those expected to attend include Sgt Stephenson’s two nephews and a niece, seven or eight nieces and nephews of the pilot Len Lean, coming from Australia; the son and grandson of navigator Ted Lambert, from Fleetwood, near Blackpool; and a nephew of Canadian air gunner, Raymond ‘Tony’ Lewis travelling from Bangkok.

Andrew, a Halam resident for the past 20 years, said:“We felt that such a significant event the village shouldn’t be forgotten or go unmarked.“Making contact with so many relatives of the aircrew has been a hugely interesting and very touching experience. We are delighted that so many of them will be there on April 10th“.

Open

The donated rock from Lafarge

The crew of the Lancaster bomber

Memorial for the aircrew who lost their lives when Lancaster bomber W4270 crashed near here on 18th February 1943

File:Lancaster W4270 memorial - geograph.org.uk - 930627.jpg

Lancaster W4270 crash memorial, Staunton in the Vale

            

On Thursday 18 February 1943, an Avro Lancaster, s/n W4270 of No.61 Squadron had taken off at about 1610 from RAF Syerston.

After 6 hours and 45 minutes a con rod broke on the number 3 engine, resulting in a fire. The crew tried desperately to put it out while they were diverting to RAF Bottesford. When the landing gear was lowered it caused a loss of control and the aircraft dived towards the ground. It crashed at 2256 approximately a mile north west of the Church at Staunon in the Vale.

The crew were;

Sergeant Thomas H Warne         Pilot                                  RCAF

 Sergeant George A Hitchon       Flight Engineer             RAF

Sergeant Robert J Preece            Observer                          RAFVR

Sergeant Thomas R Newton       W/Op & Air Gunner   RAFVR

Sergeant James M Whitehead   W/Op & Air Gunner   RAFVR

 Sergeant Edward J Loverock    Air Gunner                     RAFVR

Sergeant John Coaker                 Air Gunner                      RAFVR

            

The memorial is located in the grounds of St Marys Church and it was  dedicated in March 2003. The original brass plaques weathered badly and funds were raised to replace them with hard wearing slate plaques. The memorial was re-dedicated on 3 July 2010.

Thomas Herbert Warne CRAF

This War Graves shown is that of Thomas Herbert Warne, for anyone who wants to know more about what happened to Herb Warne and his crew, they may find this short film of interest. It was made in August 2010 primarily for the relatives of Herb Warne and his crew, so they could feel part of the rededication to the Memorial to the crew of Lancaster W4270 at Staunton in the Vale. Burial details:

Sgt. Thomas Herbert Warne. Newark-Upon-Trent Cemetery. Sec. P. Grave 307
Son of Samuel Kernick Warne and of Isabelle Warne (nee Munro), of Kennedy, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Sgt. George Arthur Hitchon. Padiham Churchyard. Row 3. Div. 7. Grave 5.
Son of Edwin and Lilian Mary Hitchon, of Padiham, Burnley, Lancashire
Sgt. Robert John Preece. Wembdon Churchyard. Sec. C. Row A. Grave 14.
Son of Herbert and Daisy Preece, of Bridgwater, Somerset
Sgt. Thomas Raine Newton. Brandon and Byshottles Cemetery. Grave 46.
Son of Herbert and Gertrude Newton, of Durham.
Sgt. James Milton Whitehead. Cambusnethan Cemetery. Sec. A. Grave 824.
Son of Willie and Janet Reid Greenshields Whitehead, of Riddrie, Glasgow.
Sgt. Edward John Loverock. Matlock Cemetery. Plot 1. Row 12. Grave 15.
Son of Frederick and Mabel Victoria Jubilee Loverock, of Matlock, Derbyshire
Sgt. John Coaker. Leusdon Churchyard..
Son of George and Edith Amy Coaker, of Poundsgate, Newton Abbot, Devon

*This is a cut down version of the original 35 minute piece*

On the night of the 18th February 1943, Lancaster Bomber W4270 crashed during a training mission, resulting in the deaths of all seven of its crew.

This is an account of that fateful night and the research that uncovered the airmen’s story.

It is a tribute to their brave service and tragic sacrifice.

Music:

Rival Consoles – Indie is Dead
Cinematic Orchestra – Build a Home
The Flashbulb – Into the Woods
Crystal Castles – Tell me What to Swallow

http://www.vimeo.com/14431980

Grateful thanks

Aircrew remembrance society

 http://www.aircrewremembrancesociety.com/raf1943/3/warnethomas.html

Newark-on-Trent is important internationally, as it is home to the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves where there are almost 400 graves of Polish airmen who died during the second world war.

Many British Commonwealth helped thanks to  Royal Australian Air Force (6 killed), British, Royal Canadian Air Force (17 killed), Royal New Zealand Air Force(3 killed) and Polish Air Force some (400 killed) They are Buried in Newark-On-Trent Cemetery 2nd World War at Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire. Let us all Remember the many Airmen that were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force during the Battle to save Europe 1939-1945.  Paying a fitting Tribute to our brave fighters for their contribution. 17,000 Polish pilots and ground crew members had formed 14 squadron in RAF and 2,000 were killed of which over 400  from 1940 – 1947 are buried in Newark Cemetery.

100_8321 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.100_8314 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.100_8313 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.

100_8320 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.100_8319 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.

http://www.aircrewremembrancesociety.com/raf1943/3/warnethomas.html 

Lancaster W4270 crash memorial, Staunton in the Vale. On Thursday 18 February 1943, an Avro Lancaster, s/n W4270 of No.61 Squadron had taken off at about 1610 from RAF Syerston.

100_8318 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.

We Will Remember The Commonwealth that came over during the war and are buried in Newark Cemetery

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We Will Remember Them

100_8359 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.

5ft x 3ft New Zealand Flag

Name: KENNEDY, JOHN BERNARD

Initials: J B
Nationality: New Zealand
Rank: Flight Sergeant (Pilot)
Regiment/Service: Royal New Zealand Air Force
Unit Text: 455 (R.A.A.F.) Sqdn
Age: 26
Date of Death: 13/02/1942
Service No: 402874
Additional information: Son of Patrick and Ethel Kennedy, of Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Sec. R. Grave 298.
Cemetery: NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY

Hampden 1 took off 2243 from Wigsley returned early with engine  trouble crashed at 0153 at Eagle, Lincoln while preparing to land. No other crew members of this aircraft are buried in Newark Cemetery.

5ft x 3ft Australia Flag

6 Royal Australian Air Force died and are buried in Newark Cemetery

Just 21 years old, died for our freedom, 14855 Sergeant F. Dunkin
https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/

NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY Lancaster 1 of 1661 HCU took off from Winthorpe for general practice with 10 trainee crew members, crashed due to fire in outer port engine crashed at Cromwell near Newark, all crew killed, three crew buried in Newark Cemetery -.Cowan, Burgess and Hannay. Cowan had previously completed a tour of operations with 9 Squadron, his brother was also a pilot on 9 Squadron, it was very rare that brothers served at the same time on the same Squadron.

5ft x 3ft New Zealand Flag

NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY

Name: BRADLEY, DESMOND GEORGE

Initials: D G
Nationality: New Zealand
Rank: Sergeant (Pilot)
Regiment/Service: Royal New Zealand Air Force
Unit Text: 408 (R.C.A.F.) Sqdn
Age: 22
Date of Death: 21/10/1941
Service No: 401801
Additional information: Son of Vincent Henry and Edith Victoria Bradley, of Waipukurau, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Sec. Q. Grave 300.
Cemetery: NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY 

5ft x 3ft Australia Flag

 Royal Australian Air Force died and are buried in Newark Cemetery

Just 22 years old, died for our freedom, 411919 Flight Sergeant L.W. Lean
https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/

Many thanks to Roger Audis 9 Squadron Association Historian help with information

Flight Sergeant R.D.Lewis, Air Gunner Royal Canadian Air Force, 10th April 1943 Age 22

http://www.airforce.gov.au/raafmuseum/

Royal Australian Air Force

ps600pages@petrowilliamus.co.uk

http://www.petrowilliamus.co.uk/pointgrey/pointgrey.htm

Ransome and Marles  Newark-On-Trent attack Friday 7th March 1941

 Royal New Zealand Air Force died Age 30 James Cowan DFC and Royal Canadian Air Force Died Age 23 T.H. Warne, Buried in Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire 

RAAF, RAF, RNZAF And RCAF were killed during the 2nd World War and are buried in newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

I just wanted to add something to this very interesting site, I notice one of the War Graves shown is that of Thomas Herbert Warne, for anyone who wants to know more about what happened to Herb Warne and his crew, they may find this short film of interest. It was made in August 2010 primarily for the relatives of Herb Warne and his crew, so they could feel part of the rededication to the Memorial to the crew of Lancaster W4270 at Staunton in the Vale http://www.vimeo.com/14431980

A short clips of Newark Cemetery on the film, on photos of Herb’s funeral that were sent to his family in 1943.

We will remember them.

 

  Royal New Zealand Air Force Flight Sergeant John Bernard Kennedy Age 26 Buried in Newark Cemetery Sec R 298 Royal New Zealand Air Force Sergeant Desmond George Bradley, died on 21st October 1941, Age 22 Buried in Newark Cemetery Sec Q 300 New Zealand Air Force Flight Lieutenant James Cowan Age 30 Buried in Newark Cemetery Sec P 308Flag of (In total 3 RNZAF died and resting place is in our cemetery)

Canada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flag

 Commonwealth and Polish War Graves located in Newark-On-Trent

 150 years of Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire  

Visits come from across Newark the World

Newark-on-Trent Town Hall

“We often take for granted the very things that most deserve our gratitude.” — Cynthia Ozick Roll Call of Names that died 1, George Harold Henry Adams, aged 45 * 2, Wilfred Evelyn Andrew, aged 39 * 3, Olive Ash, aged 31 * O 4, Bertie Augustus Ball, aged 18 * O 5, Ernest Patrick Beale, aged 27, Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment (Private) * 6, Edward Beaver, aged 26 (Buried in Mansfield) with no Tombstone 7, Harold Vincent Brown, aged 44 * 8, Vivian Maud Castle, aged 18 9, Enid Winifred Hall Cooper, aged 30 ( Buried in Balderton in St Giles Church Yard) 10, Edna May Cottam, aged 19 * 11, Gladys Cummings, aged 21 * 12, William Joseph Dixey, aged 62 * 13, Frederick Flowler, aged 39 14, George William Godridge, aged 29 * O 15, Robert Barnsdale Grant, aged 47, his son Chris was only five when his Father died, he became Newark town mayor 50 years later in 1991-1992 * 16, John Henry Green, aged 55, Volunteer Home Guard, 11th Nottinghamshire (Newark) * 17, Horace Grocock, aged 47 ( Buried in Barnby in the Willow) 18, Albert Robert Gyde, aged 42* 19, Rose Ellen Hall, aged 30 * O 20, James Hazelby Hanger, aged 29 * 21, Thomas McHallam Hardie, aged 26 * 22, Sybil Harriet Hayden, aged 34 23, Joyce May Kirton, aged 18 24, Lily Lambert, aged 22 * O 25, George Felix Lambley,  aged 39 * 26, Edith Makins, aged 21 ( Buried in South Collingham) 27, Frederick William Mann, aged 46 * O 28, Frederick Markwell, aged 50 ( Balderton ?) 29, Claude Ware Hannah Martin, aged 36 *30, Edward E. Martin, aged 46 * 31, Richard Naylor, aged 25 * O 32, Frederick William Packwood, aged 52 * 33, William Thomas Pepper, aged 18 34, Frederick Richards, aged 32 * O 35, Alfred Mayfield Ridge, aged 68 * O 36, Reginald William Senior, aged 35, died on the 8th March 1941 * 37, George Swanwick, aged 38 * O 38, Norah Trueblood, aged 34, * 39, Esther Evelyn Varney, aged 19, (her body was never found) 40, William Warner, aged 51 * 41 Arthur Worrell, aged 31 * We Will Remember the Ransome and Marles Bombing 41 were killed 30 are buried in Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire* A Star Buried   in  Newark   Cemetery  20  in total have a Tombstone.   O  is  put after names that do not have a Tombstone )

Ransome and Marles 70 years ago on 7th March 1941

These was a big part of our history during the 2nd Word War, with the most loss of life with 41 killed and another 165 that were injured. It was a huge event we most remember them. 41 Flags to Remember the Fallen the Brave People at Ransome and Marles.

Name

Address

Age

Gender

Died after AdmissionTo Hospital

London Rd Cemetery Grave Ref No

Date of Interment

(1) Adams, George   Harold Henry

77 Millgate  Newark

45

M

ED307  * Buried in Newark

14.03.1941  Yes (Found)

2) Andrew, Wilfred Evelyn

48 Chestnut Avenue  Newark

39

M

ED303  * Buried in Newark

11.03.1941    Yes(Found)

3) Ash, Olive

14 Portland Street  Newark

31

F

X

EK253   * Buried in Newark

14.03.1941  No Stone Found

4) Ball, Bertie Augustus

6 Newstead Avenue  Newark

18

M

EQ207    * Buried in Newark

13.03.1941  No Stone Marking Found

5) Beale, Ernest Patrick

38 Appletongate  Newark

27

M

X

WG288   * Buried in Newark

13.03.1941  Yes Stone Marking Found

6) Beaver, Edward

15 Roseberry Hill  Mansfield

26

M

X Mansfield  Crematorium

Buried in Mansfield Record Plot 21506

No Stone Marking Found

7) Brown, Harold Vincent

5 Charles Street  Newark

44

M

EQ149      * Buried in Newark

12.03.1941   Yes (Found)

(8) Castle, Vivien Maud

Elston  Nr Newark

18

F

No Record

9) Cooper, Winifred Hall

12 Pinfold Lane  Balderton

30

F

X

Record      *  Buried in St Giles Church

Found  in Balderton

10) Cottam, Edna May

27 William Street  Newark

19

F

WT303     * Buried in Newark

13.03.1941  Yes(Found)

11) Cummings, Gladys

42 Welbeck Avenue  Newark

21

F

X

ED305      * Buried in Newark

15.03.1941  Yes (Found)

12) Dixey, William Joseph

65 Bowbridge Road  Newark

62

M

EO145       * Buried in Newark

12.03.1941  Yes (Found)

13) Fowler Frederick

Long Street  Great Gonerby, Grantham

39

M

X

No Record

14) Godridge George William

28 Lime Grove  Newark

29

M

X

EH247        * Buried in Newark

14.03.1941   No Stone  Found

15) Grant, Robert Barnsdale

3 Sleaford Road  Newark

47

M

EG237       * Buried in Newark

Yes (Found)

16) Green, John Henry

9 Marton Road  Newark

55

M

WG308      * Buried in Newark

11.03.1941  Yes(Found)

17) Grocock, Horace

115 Millgate  Newark

47

M

X

Buried In Barnby- in- the- Willows

18) Gyde, Albert Robert

60A Barnbygate  Newark

42

M

X

WS305       * Buried in Newark

13.03.1941  Yes Found

19) Hall, Rose Ellen

19 Long Row  Newark

30

F

X

EI151           * Buried in Newark

13.03.1941 No Stone Marking Found

20) Hanger, James

6 Cedar Avenue  Newark

29

M

WR300       * Buried in Newark

Yes (Found)

21) Hardie, Thomas McHugh

56 Milton Street  Newark

26

M

ED304        * Buried in Newark

12.03.1941   Yes (Found)

22) Hayden, Sybil Harriet

Ivy Farm  Kirklington

34

F

X

No Record

23) Kirton, Joyne May

21 Guildhall Street  Newark

18

F

No Record    Not found

24) Lambert, Lily

59 Bowbridge Road  Newark

22

F

EH249        * Buried in Newark

11.03.1941  No Stone Marking Found

25) Lambley, George Felix

Marton Road  Newark

39

M

WD178         * Buried in Newark

11.03.1941   Yes Found

26) Makins, Edith

Green South Collingham Church

21

F

Record             South Collingham

27) Mann, Frederick William

“Manville”  New Balderton

46

M

X

EG238      * Buried in Newark

13.03.1941  No Marking or Stone

28) Markwell, Frederick, 

114 Hawton Lane  New Balderton

50

M

Record     Balderton ?

Not Located

29) Martin, Claude

33 Bowbridge Road  Newark

36

M

WT178       * Buried in Newark

12.03.1941   Yes (Found)

30) Martin, Edward E

46 Newton Street  Newark

46

M

Record      * Buried in Newark

(L)               Yes Found

31) Naylor, Richard

162 Barnbygate  Newark

25

M

WC175      * Buried in Newark

11.03.1941   Stone Marking Found

32) Packwood, Frederick William

56 Appletongate  Newark

52

M

WS304     * Buried in Newark

12.03.1941  Yes Found and located

33) Pepper, William  Thomas

7 Norwell Road  Caunton  Nr Newark

18

M

No Record

34) Richards, Frederick

Beacon Hill Road  Newark

32

M

X

WL306     C * Buried in Newark

12.03.1941  No Stone  Marking Found

35) Ridge, Alfred Mayfield

84 Beacon Hill  Newark

68

M

WF309      C * Buried in Newark

13.03.1941  No Stone Marking Found

36) Senior, Reginald William

8 Middleton Road  Newark

35

M

X

WQ305      * Buried in Newark

12.03.1941  Yes found and Located

37) Swanwick, George

4 Vernon Avenue  Newark

38

M

EQ252       * Buried in Newark

12.03.1941  No Stone Marking Found

38) Trueblood, Nora

42 William Street  Newark

34

F

X

WP305       * Buried in Newark

14.03.1941  Found and Located

39) Varney, Esther Evelyn   *( was never found)

9 Wilson Street  Newark

19

F

No Record               RIP

Her Body was never found

40) Warner, William

9 Grove Street  New Balderton

51

M

X

WB282       * Buried in Newark

13.03.1941  Yes Tombstone  Found

41) Worrell, Arthur

Chestnut Cottage  Girton

31

M

E 305          * Buried in Newark

Also Lasting Tribute with Recognition to Remember them when Ransome and Marles Ball Bearing Factory was Bombed.  On that Darkest day during the 2nd world war on 7th March 1941, This day became known as “Black Friday.”

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/01/26/ransome-and-marles-former-factory-workers-will-be-remembered-with-a-permanent-memorial-in-newark-on-trent-in-2011/

This was a big part of our history in Newark-On-Trent during the Second Word War, with the most loss of life, with 41 killed and another 165 injured.

We certainly owe them a debt of gratitude.

A memorial in Newark around the 70th anniversary on 7th March 2011 is taken place at Newark Town Hall. Ransome and Marles factory workers in Newark-On-Trent will be remembered once again. By Preserving the ultimate sacrifice with their memories for years to come, we will remember them.

( * Buried   in  Newark   Cemetery    30    in   total)  ( O   No   Tombstone )

1, George Harold Henry Adams, aged 45 *

2, Wilfred Evelyn Andrew, aged 39 *

3, Olive Ash, aged 31 * O

4, Bertie Augustus Ball, aged 18 * O

5, Ernest Patrick Beale, aged 27, Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment (Private) *

6, Edward Beaver, aged 26 (Buried in Mansfield) with no Tombstone

7, Harold Vincent Brown, aged 44 *

8, Vivian Maud Castle, aged 18

9, Enid Winifred Hall Cooper, aged 30 ( Buried in Balderton in St Giles Church Yard)

10, Edna May Cottam, aged 19 *

11, Gladys Cummings, aged 21 *

12, William Joseph Dixey, aged 62 *

13, Frederick Flowler, aged 39

14, George William Godridge, aged 29 * O

15, Robert Baldsdale Grant, aged 47, his son Chris was only five when his Father died, he became Newark town mayor 50 years later in 1991-1992 *

16, John Henry Green, aged 55, Volunteer Home Guard, 11th Nottinghamshire (Newark) *

17, Horace Grocock, aged 47 ( Buried in Barnby in the Willow)

18, Albert Robert Gyde, aged 42*

19, Rose Ellen Hall, aged 30 * O

20, James Hazelby Hanger, aged 29 *

21, Thomas McHallam Hardie, aged 26 *

22, Sybil Harriet Hayden, aged 34

23, Joyce May Kirton, aged 18

24, Lily Lambert, aged 22 * O

25, George Felix Lambley,  aged 39 *

26, Edith Makins, aged 21 ( Buried in South Collingham)

27, Frederick William Mann, aged 46 * O

28, Frederick Markwell, aged 50 ( Balderton ?)

29, Claude Ware Hannah Martin, aged 36 *

30, Edwin E. Martin, aged 46 *

31, Richard Naylor, aged 25 * O

32, Frederick William Packwood, aged 52 *

33, William Thomas Pepper, aged 18

34, Frederick Richards, aged 32 * O

35, Alfred Mayfield Ridge, aged 68 * O

36, Reginald William Senior, aged 35, died on the 8th March 1941 *

37, George Swanwick, aged 38 * O

38, Norah Trueblood, aged 34, *

39, Esther Evelyn Varney, aged 19, (her body was never found)

40, William Warner, aged 51 * O

41 Arthur Worrell, aged 31 *

On Friday, 7th March 1941, Ransome and Marles bearing factory was bombed. This was the most notable incident of enemy action in the town. The type of work carried out at the factory made it an obvious target for the Germans. It was shortly after 1pm, the sirens had already sounded, when there was a rattle of machine gun fire and the drone of an aircraft engine. Visibility was bad, but people in the streets suddenly saw the raider, an Heinkel 111 bomber, dive through the low clouds and almost immediately release 4 bombs. Two of these landed in the works, one on the road at the side of the factory, and one on an air raid shelter adjacent to Stanley Street. One of the witnesses was Mike Wright age 4 years. There was a constant chatter of machine gun fire from both the raider and the defenders, until the plane reached the sanctuary of the clouds. Civil defense, a network of voluntary groups dedicated to saving life and alleviating suffering came on the seen.

By laurencegoffnewarkuk


By laurencegoffnewarkuk

Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire Saturday 28th April 2007

War Memorial to the Fallen

The Memorial to the Fallen was unveiled by Richard Todd OBE.
Sir Andrew Buchanan Lord Lieutenant of Nottinghamshire read official message from Queen Elizabeth II . 

 

We will Remember them, RIP

Servicemen that died and Came From Newark-On-Trent

Memory to the Fallen 

First World War 1914-1918 total from Newark Killed  456

Second World War 1939-1945 total from Newark  killed 144

One from West Africa 1961 total  killed 1

One from Malaya 1962 total killed  1

One from Afghanistan 2007 total  killed 1

 Total 603

We will Remember them, RIP

Memorial to the Fallen located at Newark-On-Trent Cemetery

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Union Jack lhUnion Jack lhUnion Jack lhUnion Jack lhUnion Jack lhUnion Jack lhUnion Jack lh

Newark Advertiser Photo of Pete Stevens

The Chapel Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery, will open from 10-4pm exhibition on 2nd Saturday every Month until October 2012, or by appointment.  Pete Stevens from The Commonwealth War Graves Commission {CWGC} will be on hand to offer assistance to members of the public.  The Friends of Newark Cemetery, we also provide help in finding a specific grave and location  for you at Newark Cemetery.

An exhibition to Remember war dead of Newark with over 200 Photographs plus history by Pete Stevens, a Commonwealth War Graves Commission stonemason from Balderton, we are grateful to him for holding this exhibition.

Video http://youtu.be/11ipWE1C6qo
There are 603 war casualties names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen at Newark Cemetery, at the main gate on London Road. There are 456 names are first world war, 144 are from the second world war, one died in West Africa in 1961, one in Malaya in 1952 and one in Afghanistan in 2007.


Newark Cemetery Memorial to the Fallen

 

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire Saturday 28th April 2007 by you.

Our Lasting Tribute to our Heroes, during the 1st and 2nd world war

Mission: Training

Date: 18th February 1943 (Thursday)

Unit: No: 61 Squadron

Type: Lancaster I

Serial: W4270

Code: QR-? (extensively researched, but not found)

Base: R.A.F. Syerston, Nottinghamshire.

Location: In the area of Bottesford Airfield, Lincolnshire.

Pilot: Sgt. Thomas Herbert Warne R/102085 R.C.A.F. Age 23. Killed (Later WO.II)

Fl/Eng: Sgt. George Arthur Hitchon 576765 R.A.F. Age 19. Killed

Obs: Sgt. Robert John Preece 1174086 R.A.F.V.R. Age 22. Killed

W/Op/Air/Gnr: Sgt. Thomas Raine Newton 1119116 R.A.F.V.R. Age 21. Killed

W/Op/Air/Gnr: Sgt. James Milton Whitehead 975551 R.A.F.V.R. Age 22. Killed

Air/Gnr: Sgt. Edward John Loverock 950159 R.A.F.V.R. Age 21. Killed

Air/Gnr: Sgt. John Coaker 1276786 R.A.F.V.R. Age 22. Killed

REASON FOR LOSS:

Whilst on a Cross country training flight W4270 crashed at 22.56 hrs. following an engine fire about 2 miles north west of R.A.F. Bottesford, Leicestershire. The aircraft came down a mile from the village of Staunton in the Vale, Lincolnshire.

This tragic event has been well researched over a period of 11 years + and a Memorial to the crew set up in the burial ground of St Mary’s Church, Staunton-in-the-Vale. Living relatives of all 7 men have been contacted, and the research team are indebted to them for supplying further information, photographs, letters etc.

Crew of Lancaster W4270 (Courtesy DI Ablewhite)

 Sgt. George Arthur Hitchon (Courtesy Hitchon/Weaver family) Right: Sgt. James Milton Whitehead (Courtesy Mrs Sylvia Jamison – sister)

Memorial to the crew (Courtesy DI Ablewhite)

Staunton Lancaster Crash – background to the research
Prepared and written for the A.R. Society by Di Ablewhite:

“In November 1999, Mr Sid Baggaley, a retired farmer of Staunton, asked a family friend (Di Ablewhite) if she could do an investigation into a plane crash he witnessed in WW11, he knew she was interested in history and archaeology, but she had not undertaken any research of this nature before. For obvious reasons this tragic event left a huge mark on him, and since that night he had wanted to know more about what had happened. He had heard several rumours including the fact that one of the crew was a Canadian, but knew nothing of where they flew from or any other detail being of course wartime.

Working on the information he gave her and with a piece of the wreckage he later recovered from the crash site, she and eventually along with an ex RAF/BBMF friend she met through the Bomber Command Museum of Canada’s message board (Ian Hinks) and Sid’s Granddaughter (Annie Hogg) set about finding the details of the accident. Sid really wanted to know who these men were and to hopefully see what they looked like, but he had very little information for the team to work with. All he could remember was it was a cold winters night, he thought it was a Wellington Bomber and he knew 6/7 men had lost their lives. An initial reading of the Bomber Command Losses books, searching for a Wellington crashing in that area came up with nothing.

Luckily the piece of wreckage he saved was a structural piece and once cleaned up by Newark Air Museum had RAF Section/Reference marks on it, which identified the aircraft as a Mark 1 Lancaster. By another full search through W R Chorleys’ Bomber Command Losses books a list was made of all local Lancaster crashes.

Eventually the search narrowed down to it being just one aircraft.

On the 18th of February 1943, a crew from 61 squadron, RAF Syerston had been on a long cross country training flight when, at 22.56 hours, after 6 hrs 45 mins of flying, a con rod broke on the inner starboard engine, causing a fire, which , despite their best efforts, they failed to put out. A combination of this and the fact the landing gear was in a lowered position, caused them to lose control and the aircraft crashed.
All 7 crew members were killed and at 23 years of age the pilot, a Canadian from Saskatchewan, WO11 Thomas Herbert Warne (then a Sgt.) was the oldest and most experienced member of the crew despite only having 15 hours of night flying experience on this type of aircraft.

All the men except the Canadian Pilot were buried in their respective home towns, while he is buried in Newark War Cemetery.

Sid lived long enough to know the names of the crew and where they were from, but sadly didn’t get to see any of the photos, it was 8 years later that any of those surfaced. Eventually due to endless appeals for information in the local press and on the internet, several family members came forward with amazing photos and other documents relating to the crew, and because of this the personal side of this tragedy became more apparent, and the research team were more motivated to complete as much as they could to preserve these men in history, 11 years on and finally all of the crew’s relatives have been traced and made aware of the Memorial and research into the last few hours of their loved ones lives. Over 55,000 died in Bomber Command alone in WW11, not all can possibly be remembered in such detail, but it is so important as many as can be are paid tribute to.

A Memorial to this crew was built in the new burial ground of St Mary’s Church, Staunton-in-the-Vale for the millennium exhibition. The stone was kindly donated by Mr and Mrs E. Staunton, a Lancaster propeller blade from a crash site in Crowland, was donated by LARG (Lincolnshire Aircraft Recovery Group) organised for us by Ian Blackmore, the actual memorial plinth was built by Lee Brigham and memorial plaques again bought with donations. Sadly the original plaques deteriorated in the first 10 years, so Annie Hogg set about renovating the Memorial and replacing the brass plaques with slate ones in 2010.

The Memorial is now included in the Nottinghamshire Aviation Trail and it is hoped that more and more people will be visiting the site and remembering these 7 promising young men, who tragically lost their lives in training, without the chance to reach their full potential in life, paying the ultimate sacrifice. We will remember them.”

Di Ablewhite

Funeral of Sgt. Warne at Newark (Courtesy of the Warne/Boe family)

Sgt. Thomas Herbert Warne (Courtesy of the Warne/Boe family) Grave photo (Courtesy Gary Watson)

Part of a short film made on the re-dedication of this Memorial in 2010 can be seen “HERE

Burial details:

Sgt. Thomas Herbert Warne. Newark-Upon-Trent Cemetery. Sec. P. Grave 307
Son of Samuel Kernick Warne and of Isabelle Warne (nee Munro), of Kennedy, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Sgt. George Arthur Hitchon. Padiham Churchyard. Row 3. Div. 7. Grave 5.
Son of Edwin and Lilian Mary Hitchon, of Padiham, Burnley, Lancashire
Sgt. Robert John Preece. Wembdon Churchyard. Sec. C. Row A. Grave 14.
Son of Herbert and Daisy Preece, of Bridgwater, Somerset
Sgt. Thomas Raine Newton. Brandon and Byshottles Cemetery. Grave 46.
Son of Herbert and Gertrude Newton, of Durham.
Sgt. James Milton Whitehead. Cambusnethan Cemetery. Sec. A. Grave 824.
Son of Willie and Janet Reid Greenshields Whitehead, of Riddrie, Glasgow.
Sgt. Edward John Loverock. Matlock Cemetery. Plot 1. Row 12. Grave 15.
Son of Frederick and Mabel Victoria Jubilee Loverock, of Matlock, Derbyshire
Sgt. John Coaker. Leusdon Churchyard..
Son of George and Edith Amy Coaker, of Poundsgate, Newton Abbot, Devon
Researched by: Di Ablewhite, Ian Hinks, Annie Hogg and many others, but also with a special mention to the relatives of this crew. Many, many people have assisted in this research and the people who have made this memorial possible would like to thank everyone who has helped make this happen.

Newark Town Councillor and Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery

We are grateful to have a great  lovely kept local cemetery in Newark-On-Trent. Many thanks to Newark Town Council caring staff.

For over 150 years of Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire Location with this map

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Taken from The Newark Advertiser our local newspaper which comes out each Thursday

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

Air cadet Joe Parkes (14) of Newark 1260 Squadron, lays a wreath at the grave of Keith Couzin-Wood, who was killed in a plane crash, aged 16, in 1942. Two former air cadets from different eras were remembered during a service at Newark Cemetery. Fourteen members of 1260 Squadron Newark Air Training Corps marched to the war graves, where the Newark team curate, the Rev Tim Pownall-Jones, led a service at the grave of Keith Couzin-Wood. The crew, who also included another cadet, Geoffrey Hughes of Chesterfield, and two flying officers, were all killed. During a minute’s silence flags were lowered by corporal Sam Parkes (16) and Mr Robert Doyle, the standard bearer for Newark Royal British Legion. Mrs Karen Grayson, the mother of a current cadet, Kristian Grayson, read a poem called Somebody’s Darling. Cadet Joe Parkes (14) laid a wreath. The Mayor of Newark, Councillor Harry Molyneux, said: “The youngsters wanted to serve their country but little did they know what could happen to them. They were very brave.” Keith was from Leigh-on-Sea and his father’s family were from Southwell and Normanton. The cadets tracked down Keith’s nephew, who is in his seventies and lives in Australia. One of the pallbearers at Keith’s funeral was Mr Jack Stringer (85) of Grosvenor Road, Balderton. He was unable to attend the ceremony due to illness and was represented by his wife, Mrs Irene Stringer (83). She said her husband, who was a corporal in the RAF stationed at Balderton, was sorry he could not be there.     The cadets also honoured Sergeant Michael Patton, a former cadet of the Newark squadron, who died in September 1996 when he fell from an RAF helicopter during an exercise over south Wales. Air cadets, led by, left, Flight-lieutenant Mark Edwards and Pilot Officer Nick Squire, of the Newark squadron, march to the war graves section at Newark Cemetery. Cadet Andrew Tallis (13) laid a wreath beside a memorial tree and plaque for Sergeant Patton near the London Road entrance to the cemetery.Cadet Andrew Tallis (13) lays a wreath in memory of Sergeant Michael Patton.  Mr Patton’s niece, Miss Natalie Henstock (24) of Newark, represented his family. She said her grandparents, Mr and Mrs Brian Patton, of Bathley, who are Mr Patton’s parents, and her mother, Ruth Hughes, of William Street, Newark, who is Mr Patton’s sister, were unable to attend. Keith, who was on his first flight, was in an RAF Hampden bomber from 408 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force, when it stalled and crashed soon after take off from RAF Balderton. Mr Patton’s father-in-law, Mr Chris Grant, of The Park, Newark, attended along with his wife, Mrs Doreen Grant. It is hoped the memorial service, on the Saturday closest to Keith’s death, could become an annual event. Mr Pownall-Jones said: “Those young men stood out because of their uniform and what that uniform still represents. “The young men and women here today are champions of the same core values of the services.” He said the values were teamwork, initiative, dedication and being young at heart, and that the first letters of those words spelt tidy. He said when the cadets checked their uniforms were tidy they should think of those values.The service followed research by the cadets into the plane crash that killed him, aged 16, on July 29, 1942. Keith, who was on his first flight, was in an RAF Hampden bomber from 408 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force, when it stalled and crashed soon after take off from RAF Balderton.

Flying Over Newark Taken by Laurencegoff

Spitfire was heard over Newark to mark the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of Britain. Seventy years after the Battle of Britain, We cannot forget their bravery, heroism and let’s still remember their sacrifice. They gave their lives for our to-day

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Britain

The Battle of Britain (German: Luftschlacht um England or Luftschlacht um Großbritannien, literally “Air battle for England” or “Air battle for Great Britain”) is the

Flying Over Newark Taken by Laurencegoff

 

This unmistakable sound of the Spitfire over Newark-On-Trent. Seventy years after the Battle of Britain, We cannot forget their bravery, heroism and let’s still remember their sacrifice. They gave their lives for our to-day.

 

www.bbc.co.uk/history/battle_of_britain

An air conflict between Britain and Germany during the Second World War.

Images for Battle of Britain –

 

  •  

  1. Flag Flying over Newark-On-Trent

    Battle of Britain – History Learning Site

    www.historylearningsite.co.uk/battle_of_britain.htm

    The Fleet Air Arm and the Battle of Britain · The Few · Memories of ‘The Few’ · Battle of Britain Pilot Slang · Polish Pilots in the Battle of Britain · Czech Pilots and

  1. Battle of Britain Memorial Flight – Royal Air Force

    www.raf.mod.uk/bbmf/

    The Battle of Britain Memorial Flight is the RAF’s tribute to the aviators of WWII, and flies several Spitfires, two Hurricanes, a Dakota and a Lancaster.

  1. Battle of Britain (1969) – IMDb

    www.imdb.com/title/tt0064072/

    The Amazing Spitfire Flying For Our Freedom

    SAM_0071

    By Laurencegoff

    Polish War Memorial, Northolt

    This commemorates the 2165 Polish airmen who lost their lives during the 2nd World War fighting alongside the  Allies. RAF Northolt was the main base for the Polish fighter squadrons. The memorial is by the Western Avenue/West End Road roundabout, outside the airfield.

        

    Spitfire

    In 1940, the British Royal Air Force fights a desperate battle vs. the Nazi Germany Air Force for control of British air space to prevent a Nazi invasion…

  1. Directed by Guy Hamilton. Starring Michael Caine, Trevor Howard

  1. THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

    www.battleofbritain1940.net/

    The official website of the Battle of Britain Historical Sociey. An educational history of the Battle of Britain designed for the internet for use by students and

    1. Battle of Britain: 303 Squadron

      1. General Sikorski died on the 4th July 1943 in a plane crash leaving Gilbratar on his return to England

        www.channel4.com/play-win/303squadron/

        Take control of the heroic Polish airmen of the RAF during World War II and play with or against friends in multiplayer mode.

    1. Polish Air Forces in France and Great Britain – Wikipedia, the free

      en.wikipedia.org/…/Polish_Air_Forces_in_France_and_Great_Britain

      By the end of the war, around 19400 Poles were serving in the RAF. Contents. 1 History; 2 Polish Volunteer Air Force Squadrons Coat of Arms; 3 Polish volunteer wings in Allied ….. The Kosciuszko Squadron: Forgotten Heroes of World War II.

    1. No. 301 Polish Bomber Squadron – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No._301_Polish_Bomber_Squadron

      It was fighting alongside the Royal Air Force and operated from airbases in the Already before the outbreak of World War II, the Polish government signed an

    1. Non-British personnel in the RAF during the Battle of Britain

      en.wikipedia.org/…/Non-British_personnel_in_the_RAF_during_the…

      The British Royal Air Force (RAF) and Fleet Air Arm (FAA) had included After the beginning of the Second World War, there were volunteers from the Finally, in July 1940 the RAF announced that it would form two Polish fighter ….. 

      For Your Freedom and Ours: The Kościuszko Squadron: Forgotten Heroes of World War II.

     Polish Airmen and service men were killed during the 2nd World War  and are buried in Newark Cemetery, together with the British Commonwealth that joined the Royal Air Force with, Royal Australian Air Force {6 died RAAF},Royal Canadian Air Force {17 died RCAF}, Royal New Zealand Air Force {3 died RNZAF}, RAF, British service men and Cadets {44} plus a number are buried around the outside Commonwealth and Polish War graves 2 service men from the Ransome and Marles factory bombing on 7th March 1941, 41 were killed 30 in total are buried in our cemetery.  Over the years many of the Polish stayed in  the UK and had chosen Newark as their final resting place over the years since. Our tribute we should be grateful  to them, Newark has had close links with Poland over the years.

    Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

    Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire  397 Polish Airmen that were killed and are buried in Newark Cemetery,  Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ we should be grateful

    1. No. 307 Polish Night Fighter Squadron – Wikipedia, the free

      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No._307_Polish_Night_Fighter_Squadron

      It was the only Polish night fighter squadron fighting alongside the Royal Air Force during World War II. 307 Squadron is named after the City of Lwow in the ..

      Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

     Polish Airmen and service men, during the 2nd World War were killed and are buried in Newark Cemetery. Over the years many more had chosen Newark as their final resting place over the years since. 

     Our tribute we should be grateful  to them, Newark has had close links with Poland over the years.

    1. The Forgotten Few – the Polish Air Force in World War Two by Adam

      dalyhistory.wordpress.com/…/the-forgotten-few-the-polishair-force-…

      www.dalyhistory.wordpress.com/…/the-forgotten-few-the-polishair-force

    1.  The Forgotten Few – the Polish Air Force in World War Two by Adam Zamoyski. The Forgotten Few. One of the saddest and most tragic stories .

    Tribute to British Commonwealth, Polish Airmen that died during the 2nd World War there resting place is at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

    Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire since it was  open in 1856

    Newark Cemetery, Main Arch and two former Chapels since 1856

    Thursday 30th October 1856. The Church of England portion of the new Cemetery was consecrated by the Bishop of Lincoln. Soon after the ceremony took place, the very first burial was made for the family of W.N. Nicholson, Ironmonger, Market Place, Newark. Their three year old son Charles John.

    On 23rd February 1856 . At 10 O’clock the members of the Corporation and Burial Board together with Ministers of Churches from the area. The Town Mayor Henry Sutton, Chief Constable, Waterton, with the battle-axe and the Police, W.Newton the Clerk to the Board, Town Crier with Two Mace-bearers, 12 scholars from the Grammar School and other officials assembled at the Town Hall. The procession crossed the Market Place and went by Bridge Street, Carter Gate and Beaumont Street to the New Cemetery site. The corner-stone of the new buildings was laid by Joseph Branston Esq.

     

    The East on the left has been turned into The Chapel Interpretation Centre which was  opened by a former Newark Town Mayor on Saturday 11th September 2010.

    The Heritage Lottery Fund grant (£50k)

    The former East side Chapel has been turned into an Interpretation Centre, and will be used by friends of Newark Cemetery.  It has been fitted out with  display boards, text and ideas for

    display boards and leaflets etc were  provided by Friends of Newark Cemetery (FoNC). This shows information and images on the history of our town Cemetery and Chapels since 1856.

    Feature pieces regarding the polish connections.

    (Air Bridge and General Sikorski), the commonwealth war graves commission, the travelling community and the memorial to the fallen.

    Tribute to British Commonwealth, Polish Airmen that died during the 2nd World War. There resting place is at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire, we will Remember them.

    General Sikorski died on the 4th July 1943 in a plane crash leaving Gilbratar on his return to England

    100_3500 Lest We Forget, Britain honoured its war dead. Tribute to British Commonwealth and Polish Sacrifice.They departed this life into the next. Though they are hidden in the shadow of Death.Their lives for others in the love of serving our Country and Newark-On-Trent that never dies. Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856

    http://www.deceasedonline.com/

     Newark Town Council

    Newark Town Hall, Market Place, Newark, Nottinghamshire, NG24 1DU.

    Nearly 40,000 burial records are available, with a mixture of register scans and computerised records.

    Newark Cemetery – Added 7 June 2010

    Burials numbered 1 to 37,141 dated 31 December 1856 to 4 March 1997, are available as burial register scans. Subsequent data is only available as full computerised records. Initially, records have been added up to no 39,673 dated 26 March 2010.

    SAM_0262

    Laurencegoff

    This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately, the content here is solely the responsibility of Laurence Goff. As a fitting tribute to the people who resting place is at Newark cemetery. The views expressed our solely my own and do not reflect  Newark Town Council.

    I have been walking around Newark cemetery since  2004. In 2005 we set up a group Friends Of Newark Cemetery, I have been Chairman since 2010. I had an opportunity to have a blog for the last four years and I have had 37,260 visit across the UK, and the World. Many kind words which I really enjoy and appreciate from people that have contacted me. It has intrigues me, something that makes me want to look into who is buried and history going back to 1856, which has been fascinating.

    It Will Never Be The Same If You Become A Volunteer at Newark Cemetery. Perhaps the biggest difference that you will make is in you. Volunteering is a life-changing experience. It will provide you with a new outlook and lease on life. You will understand better than most people how you fit into the family history of who is buried in Newark Cemetery since 1856. Make no mistake about it, this is an experience that you won’t want to miss.

    “I had the most unbelievable experience for the last nine years. It not hard work but hugely rewarding for me. I met so many great people and learnt so much about the Cemetery environment. An experience I will never forget and recommend to everyone.”

    Friends of Newark Cemetery  – meeting is being held at Newark Town Hall (Pickin Room).  9th July 2014 arrive for a cuppa at 14:15pm before the start of the meeting at 14.30pm.

     

    SAM_0072

    Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery will only open by appointment for groups on weekends .

     by Contact the Chairman Laurence Goff  01636-681878 or 07794613879 or leave a message at Newark Town Hall 01636-0333 or by Email: friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk  

    We  need to found more Volunteers to welcome visits to Newark Cemetery by  showing around our exhibition, serving refreshments giving tours or help locate a grave for visits.

    http://www.youtube.com/user/laurencegoff

    www.facebook.com/laurencegoffnewark

    www.flickr.com/photos/friendsofnewarkcemetery

    http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=newark%20cemetery%20

    https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/

    https://twitter.com/laurencegoff

    Contact

     Friends of Newark Cemetery

    Newark Town Hall/Market Place
    Newark-on-Trent NG24 1DU

    Town Hall 01636-680333

    01636-681878 {My Home Phone}

    Mobile 07794613879

    Cllr Laurence Goff
    Chairman
    Friends of Newark Cemetery Volunteer
    Newark Town Councillor

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