Our Beautiful and Historic Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire Since 1856, put together by Laurence Goff

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According to Sir Archibald Sinclair Britains wartime air force Minister, ‘without the Poles our shortage of trained pilots would have made it impossible to defeat the German air force and to win the Battle of Britain’. We owe them a great deal and the way they were treated after the war was and is disgraceful. Without their contribution we could not have won the Battle of Britian and our future would have very different, we owe them a debt of gratitude that can never be repaid except to say that they will be Forever Remembered and Never Forgotten for Time Shall Not Wither and Fade Their Names and Deeds, R.I.P. True and Brave Heroes.

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Airmen during the 2nd World War flying a Spitfire

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Polish

Remembering the many Polish Airmen that were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force, and Commonwealth from RAAF, RCAF, RNZAF during the Battle of Britain, let’s pay tribute to these brave fighters for their contribution.

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Laurencegoff

This unmistakable sound of the Spitfire over Newark-On-Trent

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By Laurencegoff

15th July 1941

General Wladyslaw Sikorski visited Newark Cemetery to unveil a Memorial Cross dedicated to Polish servicemen who had died fighting alongside the British. He was so impressed with the care of the War graves and requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark Cemetery UK until his Country was free once again.

 

Memorial At Newark Cemetery Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

Inscription

(On Plinth) Za Wolnosc – For Freedom 1940 – 1945

(On Front Of Cross) To The Memory Of Fallen Polish Airmen  I Have Fought A Good

 Fight, I Have Finished My Course, I Have Kept The Faith Physical Description

The Very Tall Latin Cross, Decorated With 12 Cross And Polish Eagle

Devices On The Front Face On Two Stage Plinth

General Sikorski was so impressed with the care of the War graves at Newark Cemetery UK  his requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark . When Poland was once again a free Country his remains were returned home on

14th September 1993.

polish20emblem2.jpg Polish Flag image by PolishAmericans

The Amazing Spitfire Flying For Our Freedom

  

 

SAM_0719

Laurencegoff

SAM_0718

Laurencegoff

Dakota from the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight flew three times over Newark cemetery during the annual Air Bridge Commemoration Service held on Sunday afternoon (September 28th 2014). 

 

Air Bridge  { held on  Sunday 28th September 2014} parade starts from the Main Gate on London Road at 2pm. This event is held at Newark Cemetery, at a special memorial near to the Polish War Graves, organised by Newark Town Council.  The service remembers the 250 airmen who lost their lives during the Air Bridge operations, which helped the Warsaw uprising in 1944. People from Poland and all over the country attend and wreaths are laid.

For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

 

The Air Bridge Monument in Newark remembers the aircrew who died during world war two, supporting the popular uprising in Warsaw of 1944. The uprising 

  1. Newark Cemetery Airbridge Tribute with Dakota DC3 Fly over 

     Uploaded by Laurence Goff

    Dakota DC3 Flying over Newark Cemetery twice in this video at start of the Airbridge service held near the 

     
  2. Newark Cemetery a Air Bridge ceremony to commemorate – YouTube

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnqWf5wCRqI

     

    25 Sep 2012 – Uploaded by Laurence Goff

    The service remembers those who died during the Air Bridge and the Commonwealth forces answered a 

     

    We will remember them at Newark Cemetery

The Chapel Interpretation Centre will open for visits from out of town at 12 noon and after the service. Parade will starts from the Main Gate on London Road at 2pm up the Main Drive to the Air Bridge Memorial.

Annual All Souls Day, 3pm Newark Cemetery

Sunday 26th October 2014 arrive before Parade that will start at 2.45pm

Opening of Newark Cemetery Chapel Interpretation Centre at 12.30pm and after the service. 

Newark Cemetery is open all year round

October – March 8am – 6pm April – September 8am – 8pm 

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Our Historic Newark Cemetery

Newark

NG24 1SQ

Laurencegoff

Main Gate to Cemetery on London Road, Newark-On-Trent Nottinghamshire

Newark Cemetery Is Open all year round 

April – September 8am-8pm

October – March 8am-6pm

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

 

By Laurencegoff

Angels When you were born, an angel smiled,

As you became a child, an angel sat on your shoulder

When you became an adult, an angel held your hand

As you grew old, an angel walked down the road with you,

And, when you died, another angel got their wings.

–Unknown


polish20emblem2.jpg Polish Flag image by PolishAmericans

By Laurencegoff

General Wladyslaw Sikorski  was born 20th May 1881 – died  4th July 1943

 Marking the 70th anniversary of his death

Remembrance for Poland’s War hero

Lest We Forget

4th July 1943 – 2013

Buried in Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July 1943

Monday 13th September 1993, his remains were disinterred from Newark Cemetery after 50 years

On the same day his coffin stayed overnight,on 13-14 September 1993

 at 

Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene

Tuesday 14th September a farewell high Mass before returning home to Poland on the same day.

 We Remember him

Newark Cemetery British Commonwealth And Polish War Graves

General Wladyslaw Sikorski was one of the great Polish heroes, let’s commemorate our wartime links with Poland. After the German invasion of Poland, he became the Prime Minister of a new Polish Government in exile, and also Commander in Chief of the Polish Armed Forces, which fought with the Allies by land, sea and air throughout the Second World War.  He was thus Political, military and resistance leader, during the  2nd world war.The Polish fighting for survival for a free nation and  liberation from the terrible oppression to which they had become subject for too long. It is little wonder then that General Sikorski was so loved and respected by his people, and that they continue to revere and honour his memory to the present day. As British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill said in his tribute to General Sikorski in the House of Commons, ‘he was truly the symbol and embodiment of that spirit which has borne the Polish nation through the centuries.’ General Sikorski was also very active in World politics at that time, attending many political conferences with the allies and was, indeed, one of the Architects of the United Nations. Churchill described his death as ‘a most grievous loss to the cause of the United Nations.’ And so it was as Commander in Chief of the Free Polish Forces that General Sikorski left England on 24th May 1943 onboard an RAF Liberator Aircraft bound for Cairo to visit Polish Troops fighting with the Allies in North Africa. On his return from Cairo, his Liberator aircraft touched down at Gibraltar, just as it had done on the way out to Cairo. General Sikorski was accompanied by his daughter Zofia, who was also Chief of the Polish Womens Auxiliary. The Party also included the Polish military Chief  of Staff, Operations. They arrived at Gibraltar on Saturday 3rd July at 6.37p.m. Their aircraft, the same Liberator, took off from Gibraltar airport at 11pm. the next day, Sunday 4th July 1943 on the final leg of General Sikorski was returning his journey from Cairo to London. The aeroplane crashed seconds after take-off,  just off the eastern end of the runway. General Sikorski, his daughter and all his party perished. General Sikorski’s body lay in State for several days at the Cathedral of St Mary the Crowned on Main Street, until a Polish warship could reach Gibraltar to take it to the UK for burial. On arrival at the Cathedral entrance the street was crowded with Gibraltarian men (their wives, children and parents had been evacuated from Gibraltar during the war) who wanted to show their respect to this courageous Polish hero. The then Bishop of Gibraltar celebrated a requiem mass in the Cathedral before the mortal remains of General Sikorski and his party were transferred to the Polish destroyer ‘Orkan’. General Sikorski was buried in Newark Cemetery in England on 16th July 1943. His grave became a shrine to free Poles throughout the world their view was that the General’s remains should never be returned to Poland while the country was under foreign domination. It was therefore not until the fall of the Berlin Wall and the liberation of Eastern Europe from Soviet domination. On this date Monday 13th September 1993, his remains were disinterred from Newark cemetery and  taken Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magadalene stayed over night the next day had a farewell Catholic Mass. After the service  was flown home to Warsaw to be re-interred in a special crypt in Wawel Cathedral which lies inside the walls of the ancient castle, traditional burial place of Polish Kings.

 
 

 

        

 

Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish their Sacrifice 

 The dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth and Polish who also join up with the RAF

 Many were killed who resting place is Newark Cemetery 4 RAAF – Australian, 44 British Servicemen, 17 RCAF – Canadian, 3 RNZAF – New

Zealand and 397 Polish Serviceman -Airmen

            

 

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By Laurencegoff

Our Historic Newark Cemetery

Newark

NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery Is Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm,

October – March 8am-6pm

For over 150 years since 1856

We Will Remember Them

Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish their Sacrifice 

The dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth and Polish who also join up with the RAF.

Many were killed who resting place is Newark Cemetery 4 RAAF- Australian, 44 British Servicemen, 17 RCAF- Canadian, 3 RNZAF- New Zealand and 397 Polish Airmen together with other servicemen.

By Laurencegoff

Lukasz Lutostański Polish Consul General in Manchester and  Father Krzysztof Kawczynski from the Polish Church, Nottingham

 

 

 

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By Laurencegoff

 

Commonwealth and Polish War grave

Our Historic Newark Cemetery

Newark

NG24 1SQ

We Will Remember Them

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By Laurencegoff

Our Lasting Tribute

Time to emphasized the heroism, bravery, valour and determination for  our freedom.

 Lest We Forget

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By Laurencegoff

The Commonwealth – Polish servicemen

Newark Cemetery British, Commonwealth and Polish

We will remember them, let’s  honoured our war dead

  

polish20emblem2.jpg Polish Flag image by PolishAmericans

General Wladyslaw Sikorski. 4th July 2013 we will mark the 70th anniversary of his death, let’s remember him 

Time to emphasized the Heroism, Bravery, Valour and Determination for our Freedom. We must not forget the Polish Airman and the Commonwealth they fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch. They fought to the end and then carried on the fight, we should be grateful. We certainly owe them a great deal of credit that they so rightly deserve.

A memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and was unveiled on 15th July 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic.

Supported by

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General Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister.

He was  head of the war time Polish Government in London,   When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski in 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s remains were returned to Poland in 1993, but there is still a memorial to him at Newark.

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

Cemetery Newark-on-TrentNottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery

 

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By Laurencegoff

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Newark Cemetery also contains 49 scattered burials of the First World War

 Remember  the  Men and Women  that worked at Ransome and Marles  who died on that Friday afternoon 7th March 1941 when the factory was bombed by  the enemy

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/03/08/ransome-and-marles-former-factory-workers-will-be-remembered-with-a-permanent-memorial-in-newark-on-trent-in-2011/

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This  website is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit,  which is supported privately by me. The views expressed and content here is solely the responsibility of myself as a fitting tribute to the people who resting place is at Newark cemetery. They  do not reflect Newark Town Council.

 

Taken from The Newark Advertiser our local newspaper which comes out each Thursday

Lieutenant-Colonel Sam Derry

Colonel Derry helped save the lives of 5,000 Allied Servicemen in the second world war through the Rome Escape Line, which he operated from the Vatican with an Irish priest, Monsignor Hugh O’Flaherty.

There is a community garden dedicated to Monsignor O’Flaherty in Ireland and a statue to be unveiled later this year, but Colonel Derry is better remembered there and in Italy than in his home town where there is a plaque in the parish church.

This year marks significant anniversaries in the Derry story.

It is 70 years since he entered Rome, hidden under cabbages in a cart, and met Monsignor O’Flaherty.

It is also 50 years since he was the subject of This Is Your Life on the BBC.

His family hope that if the people of Newark decide a lasting memorial is appropriate, it could be created by April 10, 2014, on what would have been his 100th birthday.

The Advertiser is asking readers what they feel would be a fitting tribute to the man who saved so many lives.

Early suggestions include a statue or bust and a display of his medals alongside a portrait in Newark Town Hall.

The MP for Newark, Mr Patrick Mercer, said a permanent memorial to Colonel Derry had been overdue since his death in 1996.

“I would hope that in calling for a memorial we knock on an open door,” said Mr Mercer.

“A public memorial is the only thing that is appropriate for the greatest soldier Newark has produced since King Charles’ nephew Prince Rupert in the civil war.”

The chairman of the Royal British Legion in Nottinghamshire, Mr Andy Gregory, said while the legion could not help financially, he was keen to support the idea.

“It is something I am sure the local branches would like to be involved in,” he said.

“Colonel Derry is a hero and a significant historical figure.

“I don’t think, however, too many people would know that he came from Newark and that is a regret.

“We do so much to remember the acts of the fallen that sometimes the deeds of the survivors are overlooked.”

Colonel Derry’s son William, of London Road, Newark, says the family would contribute financially.

Mr Derry said: “We put it in the hands of the people of Newark to decide whether a permanent memorial is fitting.

“There is certainly a move towards creating one and for that alone we are grateful.

“Father was an ordinary man working for the family plumbing business before the war, and did extraordinary things during the war.

“He organised the escape of thousands of people under the noses of the Gestapo.

“By my own mathematics, if each of those people he saved had the 2.4 children they say is the norm, 200,000 people are alive today who otherwise wouldn’t have been.”

Mr Derry’s grandson, Mr Dan Derry, also of Newark, said: “My grandfather was a very humble man and quite happy to be out of the limelight.

“That said, he did some fantastic things in Italy. It is an inspirational story.

“It is not a familiar war story but a story of hope, courage and achievement.

“My grandfather was rewarded with the Military Cross for bravery in tank battles but when asked what his greatest achievement was, would say saving 5,000 people from being tortured and shot.

“But if he talked about it it would be in terms of what others achieved.

“He refused an OBE for that reason and came home to Newark where he was always happiest.”

http://www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Time-to-honour-a-true-hero

 

Extraordinary life of an ordinary man

Sam Derry had already earned a Military Cross, the second highest military honour behind the Victoria Cross, in the deserts of North Africa before his exploits in Rome.

He was born in Newark on April 10, 1914, and attended the Magnus Grammar School from 1922-31.

After school he joined the family firm of R. I. Derry and Son, heating engineers.

He rowed for Newark, captained Newark Rugby Club and became a county player.

He was commissioned into the Territorial Army in 1936, joining 60th North Midland Field Brigade at Lincoln.

Mobilised in 1939, and promoted to captain, he served with the British Expeditionary Force in France until May 1940, escaping in the Dunkirk evacuation.

He was moved to the Western Desert in June, 1941, and promoted to major.

He was awarded the Military Cross in December, 1941, after his gun battery was attacked by 28 German tanks. They destroyed seven of those tanks and scattered the rest.

This was after he had driven through the battle in a tractor for more ammunition. The tractor was hit.

Sam Derry was taken prisoner by the Germans in February, 1942.

He escaped by making a dash for it and hurling himself over a precipice under rifle fire. He walked back over the desert to British lines.

He was recaptured by the same German unit in July, 1942 when overtaken during a rearguard action.

He was transported to Italy where he commanded the escape organisation in the the country’s biggest officer prisoner camp.

In 1943 he organised an escape in which five tunnels broke ground simultaneously and 46 prisoners escaped.

He made his own escape by leaping from a speeding train carrying him to Germany.

He entered the neutral Vatican disguised as a clerk, and set up and commanded, under the noses of the Gestapo, the Rome Escape Line that kept 5,000 Allied escapees out of enemy hands until the liberation of Rome in June, 1944.

He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order for his work saving men who otherwise would probably have been tortured for information about the Rome Escape Line and shot.

Fifty years ago, dozens of ex-prisoners of war surged on to the stage at the end of the This Is Your Life programme hosted by Eamonn Andrews to shake hands with the man who helped them.

For most it was their first face-to-face meeting with Sam Derry.

“I wouldn’t have had an easy moment for the rest of the war if I’d known what he was up to,” said his wife, Nancy, who surprised him on the programme with his children Richard, William, twins James and Andrew and daughter Claire.

Colonel Derry wrote a book entitled The Rome Escape Line that was later adapted into a film, The Scarlet and The Black, starring Gregory Peck.

Let us know what you think      

d.churcher@newarkadvertiser.co.uk

news@newarkadvertiser.co.uk  o1636-681234

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

Amongst the many well-known local people that are buried in Newark Cemetery include  among the many graves are Memorials to some of Newark’s greatest benefactors and people who have helped shape Newark

He might have departed this life, we will remember him

Lieutenant-Colonel Sam Derry was born on 10th April 1914 here in his home Town

Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

A former POW died on 3rd December 1996 age 82, many he RIP

Commemoration, Honouring The Memory As Our Fitting Tribute To Him

Lest we forget

Newark’s most decorated war hero,  holder of the Military Cross and Distinguished Service Order for his work in Rome. 

Jumped from a moving train to escape the Germans during the 2nd world war.

 Ministry of Defence

 He must have departed this life, let’s remember him on his  

100th Birthday 10th April 1914

 Sam Derry who came from

Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

Lest We Forget

Time to emphasize his heroism, bravery, valour and determination for our freedom

Honouring his memory

Lieutenant-Colonel Sam Derry Let’s Have A Memorial to Commemorate his 100th Birthday next year on 14th April 1914 – 2014.  We could Pay a fitting Tribute to our brave former Newark resident.

Lieutenant-Colonel Sam Derry, of Newark-On-Trent and former POW died on 3rd December 1996 age 82, many he RIP

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/05/22/lieutenant-colonel-sam-derry-of-newark-on-trent/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/friends-of-newark-cemetery-fonc/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856. This memorial website is my personal views, I have put it together and do not represent Newark Town Council. It dedicated to the thousands of  people for over 150 years.There were a number of Royal Air Force stations within and around Newark from which several Polish squadrons operated. The highest concentration of commemorations can be particularly found in Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire.  Our local cemetery with nearly 400 that died, and are buried in special plot on the east side. You can park for free at the Main Gate parking lot at Newark Cemetery, It is location on London Road, Newark-On-Trent.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/07/17/304-polish-bomber-squadron-sodn-during-the-2nd-world-war-that-are-buried-at-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

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Polish War Graves

The highest concentration of commemorations can be particularly found in Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire.  Our local cemetery with nearly 400 Polish Airmen that died, and are buried in special plot on the east side. You can park for free at the Main Gate parking lot at Newark Cemetery, It is location on London Road – Elm Avenue, Newark-On-Trent.

Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

1940 some 8,400 Polish airmen were evacuated to the United Kingdom, which they now called Wyspa Ostatniej Nadziei or “The Island of Last Hope.”

We are paying tribute to the gallant Polish men and women, both civilian and military, who gave their lives in World War II in the cause of freedom.

 

Lest We Forget

The United Kingdom, also have over 2,100 Polish War dead, we here in Newark Cemetery have 397 since 1947 and more use Newark as their rest place to the present day. Polish died are also commemorated in 244 different locations. Our lasting tribute, is a time to remember them for their  heroism, bravery, valour and determination for freedom.  Let’s remember them by paying our tribute to them and for their contribution during the 2nd World War.

 

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/04/13/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

They departed this life into the next. Though they are hidden in the shadow of Death.

Their lives for others in the love of serving our Country and Newark-On-Trent that never dies.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

During the 2nd World War there were nearly a quarter of a million Polish Armed Forces serving under British command. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission cares for the graves of nearly 4,500 Polish serviceman and women in 35 countries around the world. 

There were a number of Royal Air Force stations within and around Newark from which several Polish squadrons operated. The highest concentration of commemorations can be particularly found in Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire.  Our local cemetery with nearly 400 that died, and are buried in special plot on the east side. You can park for free at the Main Gate parking lot at Newark Cemetery, It is location on London Road – Elm Avenue, Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ.

“Loved In Life, Honoured In Death, Cherished In Our Memory, Amen”

They Died So That We Might Live “The grass withers and the flowers fall, but the word of our God stands forever.”

Isaiah 40:8

We Will Remember Them, our Airmen from The Commonwealth and Poland  who“Made the Ultimate Sacrifice” In An Extremely Patriotic & Heroic Devotion To Our Country By Giving Up His Life During The 2nd World War.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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  London Road, Newark-On-Trent ~ Nottinghamshire UK

 Our Historic Newark Cemetery

Newark

NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery Is Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm,

October – March 8am-6pm

For over 150 years since 1856

We Will Remember Them

Lasting Tribute

By Laurencegoff

  

On Saturday 28th April 2007, Richard Todd OBE officially unveiled the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery

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Lasting Tribute at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

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By Laurencegoff

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A Dakota from the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight flew three times over Newark cemetery during the the annual Air Bridge Commemoration Service held on Sunday afternoon (September 23rd 2012). 

The annual Air Bridge Service is held to commemorate the casualties stemming from the 1944 Warsaw Uprising during World War II, resulting in the Polish Government in exile in London appealing to Winston Churchill for assistance. Help came when the Allies decided to fly in food and munitions to the Polish Partisans or Home Army, but the help was delivered at enormous cost, hence the commemorations which continue to this day.

The open-air service used to be organised by the Airbridge Association but has now been taken on by Newark Town Council, as survivors from that era grow fewer. Some 250 airmen from Britain and the Commonwealth died during the perilous Air Bridge operation. Visitors from Poland and all over the UK attend the service and lay wreaths. Mayor of Newark were among those who laid a wreath in memory of the airman who lost their lives on the mission.

• Pics:  over Newark, taken by Newark  Resident Laurence Goff Friends Of Newark Cemetery.

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By Laurencegoff

Memorial At Newark Cemetery Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

Inscription

(On Plinth) Za Wolnosc – For Freedom

1940 – 1945/

(On Front Of Cross) To The Memory Of Fallen Polish Airmen/ I Have Fought A Good

Fight, I Have Finished My Course, I Have Kept The Faith Physical Description

These Very Tall Latin Cross, Decorated With 12 Cross And Polish Eagle Devices On The Front Face. On Two Stage Plinth

 3pm All Souls Day Ceremony of Remembrance organised by the Polish Air Force Association, will take place in the Commonwealth War Graves section of Newark Cemetery on  Sunday   26th October 2014.

By Laurencegoff

The procession will take place from the Main Gate located on London Road, Newark-On-Trent at 3pm to the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves.

Held on the last Sunday in October, Polish Airmen who gave their lives in the 2nd World War are remembered at the All Souls ceremony in Newark, England. Let’s pay tribute to the gallant Polish men and women, both civilian and military, who gave their lives in World War II in the cause of Freedom.

 Location of Cemetery Newark-on-TrentNottinghamshire NG24 1SQ 

 Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

Cemetery Newark-on-TrentNottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery

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By Laurencegoff

A ceremony to commemorate the 1944 Warsaw Uprising will take place at the Airbridge Memorial at Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire

By Laurencegoff

Former Newark Town Mayor Councillor Irene Brown at The service remembers those who died during the Air Bridge Operations when Britain and the Commonwealth forces answered a plea for help from the Polish Government in Exile to drop supplies to the Polish secret army which was striking back against the enemy. The service remembers the 250 airmen who lost their lives during the Air Bridge operations, which helped the Warsaw uprising in 1944. — at Newark on Trent

The annual Air Bridge Service is held to commemorate the casualties stemming from the 1944 Warsaw Uprising during World War II, resulting in the Polish Government in exile in London appealing to Winston Churchill for assistance. Help came when the Allies decided to fly in food and munitions to the Polish Partisans or Home Army, but the help was delivered at enormous cost, hence the commemorations which continue to this day.

The open-air service used to be organised by the Airbridge Association but has now been taken on by Newark Town Council, as survivors from that era grow fewer. Some 250 airmen from Britain and the Commonwealth died during the perilous Air Bridge operation. Visitors from Poland and all over the UK attend the service and lay wreaths. Mayor of Newark Mrs. Irene Brown was among those who laid a wreath in memory of the airman who lost their lives on the mission.

• Pic: Dakota over Newark, taken by  Laurence Goff Friends Of Newark Cemetery.

By Laurencegoff

Air Bridge Memorial at the Commonwealth and Polish War graves Located up the Main Drive of Newark Cemetery

London Road Newark, Nottinghamshire

Laurencegoff

The Air Bridge Commemoration Service at Newark Cemetery was held on 4th Sunday September each year

By Laurencegoff

Annual Air Bridge will be held on  Sunday 28th September 2014  

 Laurencegoff

The Warsaw Uprising (1944) needed the support of the allies to provide food and munitions to the Polish Partisans (AK, Home Army), resulting in the Polish Government in London, appealing to Winston Churchill for assistance. After many discussions with the Allied Command and getting no help from Russia, who refused even to grant permission for allied aircraft to land in Russia, he ordered relief to be flown to Warsaw from Italy, which was some 100 miles less than that from England, but was told by General Durrant, that an airlift of 2000 miles there and back, would have no hope of success, in that the loss of aircraft flying over occupied territory would be tremendous! Although Churchill agreed with him, he nevertheless ordered the operation to be proceeded with. The task was allocated to 205 group, of which RAF Squadrons 148 and 178, SAAF 31 and 34 squadrons and Polish Special Services Flight 1586 were part. The losses were horrendous: for every ton of supplies delivered and recovered by the Polish insurgents one aircraft was lost (39 four-engine bombers total). The operation was called “Warsaw Concerto”. Annual Air bridge Memorial Service at Newark Cemetery is held on the Last Sunday in September each year. The Polish war graves service each year starting from the main gate on London Road, Newark 1:45pm to the Memorial. Annual All Souls at Newark Cemetery is held on the the Last Sunday in October each year starting from the main gate on London Road, Newark at 2:45pm.

The service is held in remembrance of the casualties stemming from the 1944 Warsaw Uprising, resulting in the Polish Government in exile in London appealing to Winston Churchill for assistance. Help came when the Allies decided to fly in food and munitions to the Polish Partisans or Home Army, but the help was delivered at enormous cost, hence the commemorations which continue to this day.

After many discussions with the Allied Command and getting no help from Russia, who refused even to grant permission for Allied aircraft to land in Russia, Churchill ordered relief to be flown to Warsaw from Italy.

He was told by General Durrant that an airlift of 2000 miles there and back would have no hope of success, in that the loss of aircraft flying over occupied territory would be tremendous. Although Churchill agreed with him, he nevertheless ordered the operation to proceed. The operation was called “Warsaw Concerto”.

The task was allocated to 205 group, of which RAF Squadrons 148 and 178, SAAF 31 and 34 squadrons and Polish Special Services Flight 1586 were part. The losses were horrendous: for every ton of supplies delivered and recovered by the Polish insurgents one aircraft was lost (39 four-engine bombers in total).

The Air Bridge Commemoration Service follows the  Battle of Britain Memorial Ceremony which was held at the War Memorial outside Newark Parish Church, followed by the Battle of Britain Memorial Service inside Church. 

This annual service commemorates the remarkable victory, and loss of life, by Royal Air Force pilots and aircrew during the Battle of Britain in 1940 and is an occasion to mark the nation’s gratitude for the service and sacrifice of those who took part in this critical phase of World War Two.

The Battle of Britain was the first major campaign to be fought entirely in the skies. When the Battle of Britain was over, 544 Allied pilots and aircrew were dead. The conflict also brought together a truly multinational force comprising 574 British, 139 Poles, 98 New Zealanders, 86 Canadians, 84 Czechoslovakians, 29 Belgians, 21 Australians, 20 South Africans, 13 French, 10 Irish plus others from the USA, Jamaica, Palestine

and Southern Rhodesia.


 Laurencegoff

http://www.newarknotts.co.uk/air-bridge-heroics-remembered-at-newark-cemetery/

 

By Laurencegoff

• Photo by Laurence Goff shows a Spitfire flying over Newark

We Will Remember Them

By Laurencegoff

You will found this memorial plaque which is located up high on the wall of Natwest Bank Stodman Street, Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire 

Memorial plaque reads

Dedicated to the thousands of men and women of many nations on the nearby airfields and walked and enjoyed these ancient Streets of Newark during the war years  1939 – 1945.

In the morn they came and passed a few quiet hours. In the evening twilight their aircraft in countless numbers circled above the town and surrounding countryside. Climbing higher and higher. In the blackness of the night they fought and died. Remember them as you pass by. These brave young men who fell from the sky. 55,573 Airmen died in the night skies over Europe. May have graves known only to God.

 Site Given by

The National Westminster Bank Plc

Erected by Bomber Airfield Society

Plaque donated by Mr and Mrs Tony Wilkinson

By Laurencegoff  Spitfire photo

Laurencegoff

Flypast – Spitfire Hurricane and Lancaster

The joy seeing them flying over Newark-On-Trent

Battle of Britain in 1940 and is an occasion to mark the nation’s gratitude for the service and sacrifice of those who took part in this critical phase of World War Two.

The Battle of Britain was the first major campaign to be fought entirely in the skies. The battle of Britain was over 544 RAF pilots and aircrew were dead. The conflict also brought together a truly multinational force comprising 574 British, 139 Poles, 98 New Zealanders, 86 Canadians, 84 Czechoslovakians, 29 Belgians, 21 Australians, 20 South Africans, 13 French, 10 Irish plus others from the USA, Jamaica, Palestine and Southern Rhodesia.

 Tribute to British Commonwealth and Polish Sacrifice

By Laurencegoff

Polish Airmen, Lest We Forget

A Memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and unveiled on 14th July 1941 by General Sikorski

Time to emphasized the heroism, bravery, valour and determination for freedom during the 2nd War World 

Letter t0 the Newark Advertiser http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

Locating a grave have a look at this Map, walking up the Main Drive numbers start low and high at the other end of  cemetery. Please note E side stand for East and W side for West . The graves are numbered from A the next one will be B, C, D, E, and so on going outward on either side East or West. All new tombstone are black with the information on the back has  E for East then the letter for the row then the number, looking something like this E B 100 or West side W E 200.

Spring – Summer April – September 8am – 8pm

As the Season comes to end The Chapel Interpretation Centre will open only by appointment for groups. Contact Friends of Newark Cemetery Chairman Laurence Goff on 01636-681878 at home or by leaving a message at Newark Town Hall.

The Friends of Newark Cemetery AGM – meeting, to be held at Newark town hall in Pickin room on Wednesday 30th April 2014. Arrive at 5:45pm for a cuppa meeting will start at 6:00pm.

Newark Town Councillor Laurence Goff

Chairman

Friends of Newark Cemetery

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  October – March 8am – 6pm

Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm

Cemetery Newark-on-TrentNottinghamshire NG24 1SQ 

By Laurencegoff

Cadet Keith Rollason CouzinWood, they believed that it would be an air experience flight of a life time.

On this date 29th July 1942, to help mark the 70th anniversary

Sadly two young cadets died in an accident when the plane crash, Keith Rollason Couzin-Wood  age 16 and Geoffrey Hughes of Chesterfield.  They were both on their  first flight, when RAF Hampden bomber from 408 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force, when it stalled and crashed soon after take off from RAF Balderton.

War plane crash boy remembered 70 years on.  A Newark town councillor laid a palm cross of remembrance on the grave of an air cadet killed 70 years ago in a second world war plane crash.

Keith Couzin-Wood, 16, is buried in the war graves section of Newark Cemetery.He was a passenger in an RAF Hampden bomber that crashed just after take-off from RAF Balderton on July 29, 1942.The plane, from 408 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force, stalled and crashed about two miles south-east of the airfield. The crew, which also included another cadet, Geoffrey Hughes, of Chesterfield, and two flying officers, were all killed.

Keith, a member of the Southend-on-Sea squadron of the Air Training Corps, was from Leigh-on-Sea and the youngest of four children. His father’s family were from Southwell and Normanton. It was his first flight. There is no record of the crash in the Advertiser’s archives because information was often heavily censored during the war. Many cadets were sent to work on RAF stations across the country during the war. They were used to carry messages, move equipment, load ammunition and do office work. Town councillor Mr Laurence Goff said he felt compelled to mark the 70th anniversary of Keith’s death as there was no official commemoration. He also laid flowers at the grave on the anniversary.

Dan Churcher – Newark Advertiser Reporter  http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

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For all the men who gave their lives so bravely, for our country during the 2nd World War, so many volunteered from The Commonwealth from TheRoyal Australian Air Force (RAAF) The Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) The Royal New Zealand Air Force, Polish Airmen fighter pilots served in the RAF during the Battle of Britain. 1940 some 8,400 Polish airmen were evacuated to the United Kingdom, which they now called Wyspa Ostatniej Nadzieior “The Island of Last Hope.”

 Time to emphasized the Heroism, Bravery, Valour and Determination for our Freedom

We must not forget the Polish Airman and the Commonwealth they fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch. They fought to the end and then carried on the fight, we should be grateful. We certainly owe them a great deal of credit that they so rightly deserve.

  London Road, Newark-On-Trent ~ Nottinghamshire UK

 Our Beautiful and Historic Newark Cemetery

Newark

NG24 1SQ

For over 150 years since 1856

We Will Remember Them

Lasting Tribute

Flying over Newark-On-Trent For our Freedom, we will Remember them

Lasting Tribute

Our Beautiful And Historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark

NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery Is Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm

October – March 8am-6pm

The

By Laurencegoff

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves were those brave Airmen gave their lives for our Freedom and are Buried  Newark Cemetery.

 By Laurencegoff

Marking the 70th anniversary 

General Sikorski of his death needs to be Remember next year in Newark and around the world when General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Prime Minister of Poland’s London-based government in exile was killed on the 4th July 1943

General Sikorski was one of the great Polish heroes. After the German invasion of Poland, he became the Prime Minister of a new Polish Government in exile, and also Commander in Chief of the Polish Armed Forces, which fought with the Allies by land, sea and air throughout the Second World War. But he also personally directed Poland’s internal resistance movement against the German occupying army in Poland itself. He was thus Political leader, military leader and resistance leader, all at the same time. He was the personal embodiment of the whole Polish Nation’s fight for survival as a free nation and as a people, and liberation from the terrible oppression to which they had become subject. It is little wonder then that this man was so loved and respected by his people, and that they continue to revere and honour his memory to this day.

By laurencegoff

Sikorski Close
Newark NG24 1FD

 General Wladyslaw Sikorski died on July 4th 1943, when a Royal Air Force aircraft he was travelling aboard plunged into the sea seconds after take-off from Gibraltar. General Wladyslaw Sikorski wishes were remembered and on Thursday 15, July 1943, his body arrived in Newark and was taken to Holy Trinity RC Church on Parliament Street Newark, NottinghamshireEngland. A Requiem Mass was held and the Catholic Church was guarded overnight.General Wladyslaw Sikorski wishes were remembered and on Thursday 15, July 1943 , his body arrived in Newark and was taken to Holy Trinity RC Church on Parliament Street Newark , Nottinghamshire England. A Requiem Mass was held and the Catholic Church was guarded overnight.The following morning was Friday 16, July 1943 early Masses were held and members of the public were allowed to file past the coffin to pay their respects. Outside the Catholic Church, reporters from across theUK and BBC representatives set up their equipment on top of a nearby air raid shelter. A large crowd gathered in the Newark Streets to see the funeral procession.

16th July 1943, Councillor Cyril Parlby Newark Town Mayor, a guard of honour from the Polish Air Force

The history of Polish heroism and support for the British people is long and glorious. During our darkest hours in World War Two, when the Battle of Britain hung in the balance, the contribution of Polish airmen helped tip the balance in the Allies’ favour. Eight Polish fighter squadrons formed within the RAF shot down 629 Axis aircraft by May 1945, with the Polish 303 Fighter Squadron claiming more kills than any other squadron during the war.

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November 2010

The bodies of three Polish Army officers who died in the plane crash on 4th July 1943 that were killed together with their country’s wartime leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski, are to be exhumed from Newark Cemetery. The Ministry of Defence has agreed that the bodies can be removed from the Polish war graves section. The remains were taken to London and on to Poland with full military honours for a post mortem examination.

The bodies are those of the Chief of the Polish General Staff, Major General Tadeusz Klimecki; the Chief of Operation Staff, Colonel Andrzej Marecki; and Lieutenant Jozef Ponikiwski.  They died with General Sikorski when his RAF Liberator plunged into the sea after taking off from Gibraltar on 4th July, 1943. General Sikorski’s remains were exhumed from Newark Cemetery in 1993 and taken back to Poland where he is now buried in the Hall of Kings in Wawel Cathedral.

Lieutenant Ponikiwski will be reburied in the Roman Catholic churchyard at Oporowo, Poland, and the two others will be reburied in the Powazki Military Cemetery in Warsaw. A wartime inquiry ruled that the crash was an accident but there have long been rumours that there was more to it. Conspiracy theories include suggestions that the accident was the work of Stalin’s assassins or British agents working under Churchill’s orders. A post mortem was carried out on General Sikorski’s body again in November, 2008 following suggestions that he may have been poisoned before take-off. It confirmed that the remains were those of the general and that he had died from injuries consistent with a plane crash. Post mortems are planned to see if the other officers suffered similar injuries.

Passengers 17 in total

1.

General Władysław Sikorski

Prime Minister and Commander-in-Chief of Poland

2.

Zofia Leśniowska

Chief of the Polish Women’s Auxiliary

3.

Major General Tadeusz Klimecki

Chief of the Polish General Staff

4.

Colonel Andrzej Marecki

Chief of Operations Staff

5.

Lieutenant Jozef Ponikiewski

Naval A.D.C.

6.

Adam Kulakowski

Personal secretary to Sikorski

7.

Colonel Victor Cazalet

M.P., British Liason Officer

8.

Brigadier J.P. Whitely

M.P.

9.

Mr. W.H. Lock

(Never found, presumed dead)

10.

Mr. Pinder

Head of British Intelligence Service in the Middle East (his position was never revealed to General Sikorski)

11.

Bombardier Gralewski

(Joined the party at Gibraltar)

Crew:

1.

1Lt Edward Maks Prchal

Captain/1st Pilot

2.

Squadron Leader W.S. Herring

2nd Pilot (never found)

3.

Warrant Officer L. Zalsberg

Navigator

4.

Sergeant F. Kelly

Flight Engineer

5.

Flight Sergeant C.B. Gerrie

Radio Operator/Air Gunner

6.

Flight Sergeant D. Hunder

Radio Operator/Air Gunner (never found)

 

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves, newark Cemetery

 

By Laurencegoff

By Laurencegoff

By Laurencegoff

By Laurencegoff

By Laurencegoff

Lest We Forget

Our Beautiful And Historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire

Newark

NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery Is Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm,

October – March 8am-6pm

By Laurencegoff

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The Valiant Contribution made by the Commonwealth and Polish Airmen for protection of our country freedom.The Newark Town Council are particularly proud to be the custodian of the Memorial  to General Wladyslaw Sikorski

 

 

http://www.newarknotts.co.uk/history-sacrifice-and-a-forgotten-donkey/

Pete Stevens of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, who lives in Balderton, has made it a project to try to produce a photo of every one of the 456 WWI fallen who are buried here and all 144 of those from WWII. Photos found so far are displayed in the Interpretation Centre. 

Newark Cemetery is open all year round

October – March 8am – 6pm

Spring – Summer April – September 8am – 8pm

They departed this life into the next. Though they are hidden in the shadow of Death.

Their lives for others in the love of serving their country or Newark-On-Trent that never dies.

The Season May – October Chapel Interpretation Centre will open  on the 1st weekend each Month or by appointment for groups by contact Friends of Newark Cemetery Chairman Laurence Goff 07794613879 or by leaving a message  01636-681878 at  his home or by leaving a message at Newark Town Hall 01636-680333.  friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

 Newark Town Council

Newark Town Hall, Market Place, Newark, Nottinghamshire, NG24 1DU.

Nearly 40,000 burial records are available, with a mixture of register scans and computerised records. www.deceasedonline.com/
Deceased Online – research burial and cremation records

Newark Cemetery – Added 7 June 2010

Burials numbered 1 to 37,141 dated 31 December 1856 to 4 March 1997, are available as burial register scans. Subsequent data is only available as full computerised records. Initially, records have been added up to no 39,673 dated 26 March 2010.

  1. Deceased Online

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  October – March 8am – 6pm

Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm

Newark Cemetery can boast of having lot’s of impressive benefactors  since 1856. An array of  names and servicemen going back to 1914 to the present day who resting place is located in Newark-On-Trent.

Amongst the many well-known local people that are buried in Newark Cemetery include  among the many graves are Memorials to some of Newark’s greatest benefactors and people who have helped shape Newark

Thursday 30th October 1856. The Church of England portion of the new Cemetery was consecrated by the Bishop of Lincoln. Soon after the ceremony took place, the very first burial was made for the family of W.N. Nicholson, Ironmonger, Market Place, Newark. Their three year old son Charles John.

On 23rd February 1856 . At 10 O’clock the members of the Corporation and Burial Board together with Ministers of Churches from the area. The Town Mayor Henry Sutton, Chief Constable, Waterton, with the battle-axe and the Police, W.Newton the Clerk to the Board, Town Crier with Two Mace-bearers, 12 scholars from the Grammar School and other officials assembled at the Town Hall. The procession crossed the Market Place and went by Bridge Street, Carter Gate and Beaumont Street to the New Cemetery site. The corner-stone of the new buildings was laid by Joseph Branston Esq.

Locating a grave have a look at this Map, walking up the Main Drive numbers start low and high at the other end of  cemetery. Please note E side stand for East and W side for West . The graves are numbered from A the next one will be B, C, D, E, and so on going outward on either side East or West. All new tombstone are black with the information on the back has  E for East then the letter for the row then the number, looking something like this E B 100 or West side W E 200.

 Go to fullsize imagePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

29th July 1942-2012 We will Remember them

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Honouring-lives-of-past-cadets

Honouring lives of  2 past cadets

Air cadet Joe Parkes (14) of Newark 1260 Squadron, lays a wreath at the grave of Keith Couzin-Wood, who was killed in a plane crash, aged 16, in 1942. Two former air cadets from different eras were remembered during a service at Newark Cemetery .

                                                                                                                                                 

Keith Couzin-Wood

Honouring Lives Of Past Cadets | Newark Advertiser

1st Aug 2008

 Fourteen members of 1260 Squadron Newark Air Training Corps marched to the war graves,  led a service at the grave of Keith Couzin-Wood. Plaque for Sergeant Patton near the London Road entrance to the cemetery.

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Honouring-lives-of-past-cadets

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Laurencegoff

Air Cadet Keith Rollason Couzin-Wood, the young cadet killed buried in

Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

http://www.flickr.com/photos/newarkcemeteryuk/4847272393/sizes/l/in/photostream/

Honouring lives of past cadets

Air cadets, led by, left, Flight-lieutenant Mark Edwards and Pilot Officer Nick Squire, of the Newark squadron, march to the war graves section at Newark Cemetery.  

Fourteen members of 1260 Squadron Newark Air Training Corps marched to the war graves, where the Newark team curate, the Rev Tim Pownall-Jones, led a service at the grave of Keith Couzin-Wood.

The service followed research by the cadets into the plane crash that killed him, aged 16, on July 29, 1942.

Keith, who was on his first flight, was in an RAF Hampden bomber from 408 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force, when it stalled and crashed soon after take off from RAF Balderton.

The crew, who also included another cadet, Geoffrey Hughes of Chesterfield, and two flying officers, were all killed.

It is hoped the memorial service, on the Saturday closest to Keith’s death, could become an annual event. 

Mr Pownall-Jones said: “Those young men stood out because of their uniform and what that uniform still represents.

“The young men and women here today are champions of the same core values of the services.”

He said the values were teamwork, initiative, dedication and being young at heart, and that the first letters of those words spelt tidy. He said when the cadets checked their uniforms were tidy they should think of those values.

Cadet Andrew Tallis (13) lays a wreath in memory of Sergeant Michael Patton. 

During a minute’s silence flags were lowered by corporal Sam Parkes (16) and Mr Robert Doyle, the standard bearer for Newark Royal British Legion.

Mrs Karen Grayson, the mother of a current cadet, Kristian Grayson, read a poem called Somebody’s Darling.

Cadet Joe Parkes (14) laid a wreath. 

The Mayor of Newark, Mr Harry Molyneux, said: “The youngsters wanted to serve their country but little did they know what could happen to them. They were very brave.”

Keith was from Leigh-on-Sea and his father’s family were from Southwell and Normanton. The cadets tracked down Keith’s nephew, who is in his seventies and lives in Australia.

One of the pallbearers at Keith’s funeral was Mr Jack Stringer (85) of Grosvenor Road, Balderton. He was unable to attend the ceremony due to illness and was represented by his wife, Mrs Irene Stringer (83).

She said her husband, who was a corporal in the RAF stationed at Balderton, was sorry he could not be there. 

The cadets also honoured Sergeant Michael Patton, a former cadet of the Newark squadron, who died in September 1996 when he fell from an RAF helicopter during an exercise over south Wales. 

Cadet Andrew Tallis (13) laid a wreath beside a memorial tree and plaque for Sergeant Patton near the London Road entrance to the cemetery.

Mr Patton’s niece, Miss Natalie Henstock (24) of Newark, represented his family. 

She said her grandparents, Mr and Mrs Brian Patton, of Bathley, who are Mr Patton’s parents, and her mother, Ruth Hughes, of William Street, Newark, who is Mr Patton’s sister, were unable to attend. 

Mr Patton’s father-in-law, Mr Chris Grant, of The Park, Newark, attended along with his wife, Mrs Doreen Grant.

The cadets, who meet at their Sherwood Avenue headquarters on Tuesdays and Thursdays, are looking for adult helpers.

July 2008

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Honouring-lives-of-past-cadets

Laurencegoff

By Laurencegoff

Servicemen that died and Came From Newark-On-Trent

Memory to the Fallen 

First World War 1914-1918 total from Newark Killed  456

Second World War 1939-1945 total from Newark  killed 144

One from West Africa 1961 total  killed 1

One from Malaya 1962 total killed  1

One from Afghanistan 2007 total  killed 1

Total 603

We will Remember them, RIP

Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire

Remembering them, Newark Cemetery  Our Tribute

Laurencegoff

We welcome visitors to  Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire  across the World, UK,  Poland and the Commonwealth.

48 BLATHERWICK’S THAT ARE BURIED IN NEWARK CEMETERY … >>

Richard Pursey Blatherwick JP (1880–1971) and wife Ethel died age 87 on 28th December 1968 (Daughter of Cornelius Brown who died age 55 on 4th November 1907)

 Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire, England Since 1856 « Newark … >>

Cornelius Brown, who died in 1907 after writing the definitive history of Newark and editing the Newark Advertiser for 33 years, lies here as do renowned artist William H. Cubley, Joseph Gilstrap, whose son founded Newark’s first ….. Newark mayor Douglas Pursey Blatherwick and 45 of his family are buried in Newark Cemetery, Mayor’s of Newark Beacher Tidd Pratt Mayor 7 times 1877-1878 two years and 1885, 1886 and 1887 three years, 1896 and 1901, Thomas

 Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom since … >>

Cornelius Brown (1852-1907) a historian and editor of the Newark Advertiser for 33 years, Mr Cornelius Brown, (plot WM59) was born in Lowdham, Notts, and also lived in Southwell and Newark. The author of seven major books, including the massive two-volume “The Newark mayor Douglas Pursey Blatherwick and 47 of his family are buried in Newark cemetery, Oliver Quibell , The list goes on. It has always been a enjoy going around Newark Cemetery taking .

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

 Newark cemetery

For over 150 years since 1856

Our Beautiful And Historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire

Newark

NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery Is Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm,

October – March 8am-6pm

By Laurencegoff

The Commonwealth and Polish War Grave were those brave Airmen gave their lives for our freedom. Buried  Newark Town Council  particularly proud to be the custodian of the Memorial to General Wladyslaw Sikorski

 

 Commonwealth and Polish War Graves located in Newark-On-Trent

 Laurence Goff At Newark Cemetery

History and sacrifice come alive in Newark cemetery

Pete Stevens of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, who lives in Balderton, has made it a project to try to produce a photo of every one of the 456 WWI fallen who are buried here and all 144 of those from WWII. Photos found so far are displayed in the Interpretation Centre.

http://www.newarknotts.co.uk/history-sacrifice-and-a-forgotten-donkey/

Some 30 fatalities from the Ransome and Marles bombing in 1941 are buried here, including John Henry Green, a roof spotter in the Home Guard who had the misfortune, aged 55, to be up there when the bombs rained down, and Edward Beale. Laurence located his grave last year when far-flung family members travelled to Newark to see it for the first time.

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/

There are of course 397 Polish war graves here from WWII (the figure of 422 given in the cemetery leaflet includes fatalities from 1947) – and General Sikorski was buried here during his country’s occupation, his remains being finally repatriated in 1993.

Given the prospect of a sunny summer’s day, most folk would contemplate a trip to the seaside rather than visit the local cemetery, but having just spent two fascinating hours in Newark Cemetery I’m starting to appreciate its attractions, writes Graham Keal.

These even include a donkey, though he’s not giving rides and he (or she) is there in photographic form only. Newark town councillor and chair of the Friends of Newark Cemetery Laurence Goff showed me round and shared his increasing knowledge about the cemetery its residents. And he told me about the donkey, whose photograph he’s pictured holding:

“He used to live in the cemetery many years ago and pulled the cart with the coffins. I’m still trying to find out what his name was,” said Laurence.

Apart from the donkey photo there were many more reasons to visit, especially on this Saturday’s next Open Day (July 14 2012) – peace and quiet, flowers and the freshly mown grass, the chaffinch perched perkily on a nearby gravestone while we reviewed the final home of Newark’s local notables, and the chance to quietly appreciate for a moment the sacrifice made by so many young men in wars spanning centuries.

The Victorian chapel now converted into the cemetery’s Interpretation Centre holds a wealth of information, photographic displays and leaflets detailing everything from the sobering number of soldiers and servicemen – English, Polish, Canadians, Australians and New Zealanders – laid to rest here to the most famous residents and the native fauna and flora. Apart from the chaffinch, you might see a spotted flycatcher, gold crests, field fares and tree creepers as well as the more common blackbirds, sparrows and wood pigeons – plus squirrels and hedgehogs.

Laurence has become thoroughly absorbed in the cemetery’s history since becoming a founder member of the Friends of Newark Cemetery in 2005. He has been Chairman of the Friends for three years: “It’s been fascinating to find out about the people here. I didn’t know when I started that I would get so heavily involved, but once you’ve taken that first step, you have to find out the next chapter.”

He gets enquiries from all over the world about long-lost graves of family members – his website at https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com has had 26,000 hits. Last year a lady from Australia came in search of the grave of Hilda Scaife, who died in 1923, aged 39.

Her gravestone reads “She kept her honour bright” but the grave took some finding, not least because it was smothered in ivy. Laurence later cleared the ivy and tidied the area before emailing a picture of Hilda’s grave, brightness restored, to her relative.

Local notables buried here include war hero Sam Derry, whose daring undercover work in The Vatican during WWII was immortalised in his gripping book The Rome Escape Line, about his work with Monsignor Hugh O’Flaherty, sustaining escaped PoWs and smuggling them back to Britain. Their exploits were also recorded in the film The Scarlet and the Black, starring Gregory Peck. Sam even appeared on This Is Your Life.

Balderton’s distinguished actor Sir Donald Wolfit is not buried here, but his older brother Philip Woolfitt is (Sir Donald changed the spelling for his stage name). Philip was a casualty of WWI, aged just 19. He joined up after travelling to Canada and served in the Canadian infantry.

Cornelius Brown, who died in 1907 after writing the definitive history of Newark in two huge volumes and editing the Newark Advertiser for 33 years, lies here as do renowned artist William H. Cubley, Joseph Gilstrap, whose son founded Newark’s first free library in 1883, countless Quibells and 48 Blatherwicks, both families having made great contributions to the town’s history and civic life.

  • Further Open Days at the Cemetery Interpretation Centre are planned from April – October 2012. 22nd September 2013, the start of English Heritage Open Week. Laurence can also open the centre for groups of visitors on Mondays, Tuesdays or weekend afternoons by arrangement. Call him on 01636 681878 or email friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

Graham Keal 

John Reddish (1847-1931) is pictured in Newark cemetery, where he was assistant sexton from about 1900. He is pictured with the white donkey and its cart. He was born in Lowdham, one of nine children born to Stephen and Ann Reddish. Stephen is described on the census as a stocking frameworker knitter (a trade very common in that area). Upon arriving i Newark he worked as a maltkiln worker, later a maltkiln stoker, working in the maltings along Northgate. He married Mary Ann Harrison, and they had four children, one of them my grandfather James Thomas.

The
family lived in Cemetery House, down Elm Avenue (formerly Sparrow Lane).A great grandfather
 of Jill Campbell

Go to fullsize imagePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls 

Newark Cemetery Commonwealth and Polish war graves

Flying the British and Polish flags over Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

Sergeant Sam Johnson who came from Newark-On-Trent and was reported missing in action 14th June 1940.

Sam last letter to his family is enclosed, we will Remember them

Sergeant Sam Johnson who came from Newark-On-Trent and was reported missing in action 14th June 1940.

His last letter to his family is posted in his memory, we will Remember them.

 War Memorial to the Fallen at Newark Cemetery

We Will Remember Them

First World War 1914-1918 total from Newark Killed  456

Second World War 1939-1945 total from Newark  killed 144

One from West Africa 1961 total  killed 1

One from Malaya 1962 total killed  1

One from Afghanistan 2007 total  killed 1

Total 603

We will Remember them, RIP

Newark Advertiser Photo of Pete Stevens

The Chapel Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery, will open from 10-4pm exhibition on 2nd Saturday every Month until October 2012, or by appointment.  Pete Stevens from The Commonwealth War Graves Commission {CWGC} will be on hand to offer assistance to members of the public.  The Friends of Newark Cemetery, we also provide help in finding a specific grave and location  for you at Newark Cemetery.

An exhibition to Remember war dead of Newark with over 200 Photographs plus history by Pete Stevens, a Commonwealth War Graves Commission stonemason from Balderton, we are grateful to him for holding this exhibition.

Video http://youtu.be/11ipWE1C6qo
There are 603 war casualties names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen at Newark Cemetery, at the main gate on London Road. There are 456 names are first world war, 144 are from the second world war, one died in West Africa in 1961, one in Malaya in 1952 and one in Afghanistan in 2007.

By Laurencegoff

Angels When you were born, an angel smiled,

As you became a child, an angel sat on your shoulder

When you became an adult, an angel held your hand

As you grew old, an angel walked down the road with you,

And, when you died, another angel got their wings.

–Unknown

Don’t Tell Me

Don’t tell me that you understand, don’t tell me that you know,Don’t tell me that I will survive, how I will surely grow.

Don’t tell me this is just a test, that I am truly blessed,That I am chosen for this task, apart from all the rest.Don’t come at me with answers that can only come from me,Don’t tell me how my grief will pass, that I will soon be free.Don’t stand in pious judgment of the bonds I must untie,Don’t tell me how to suffer, don’t tell me how to cry.My life is filled with selfishness, my pain is all I see,But I need you, I need your love, unconditionally.Accept me in my ups and downs, I need someone to share, Just hold my hand and let me cry, and say,”My friend, I really do care.”

Author Unknown

Dates when Visiting Centre will be open Times on the 2nd Saturday May-October.

Can also open by Appointment in the East side former Chapel by contacting

Laurence Goff

01636-681878 {Home} 

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

Burial records, cremation records, grave maps, genealogy 

Newark Town Hall, Market Place, Newark, Nottinghamshire, NG24 1DU

“Loved In Life, Honoured In Death, Cherished In Our Memory, Amen”

Deputy Consulate General  of the Republic of Poland Grzegorz Dyk From Manchester UK with Newark Deputy Town Mayor Councillor Irene Brown Visiting Chapel Interpretation  Centre at Newark Cemetery Family History Day

Madam Mayor Councillor Irene Brown

New Newark Mayor Town is Councillor Irene Brown who was installed at the annual mayor-making ceremony  on 13th May 2012.

Mayor of Newark was elected this lunchtime at the town’s traditional Mayor-Making ceremony in Newark Town Hall.

 The New Mayor wore the traditional red robes and gold chain.

Laurence Goff 

Newark Town Councillor

Saturday 29th July 2012 will mark his 70th Anniversary, we should we Remember him

 Cadet Keith Couzin-Wood died at age 16 who is the youngest person buried in the Commonwealth war graves Newark-On-Trent

During a minute’s silence flags were lowered by corporal Sam Parkes (16) and Mr Robert Doyle, the standard bearer for Newark Royal British Legion.

Mrs Karen Grayson, the mother of a current cadet, Kristian Grayson, read a poem called Somebody’s Darling.

Cadet Joe Parkes (14) laid a wreath. 

The Mayor of Newark, Mr Harry Molyneux, said: “The youngsters wanted to serve their country but little did they know what could happen to them. They were very brave.”

Keith was from Leigh-on-Sea and his father’s family were from Southwell and Normanton. The cadets tracked down Keith’s nephew, who is in his seventies and lives in Australia.

One of the pallbearers at Keith’s funeral was Mr Jack Stringer (85) of Grosvenor Road, Balderton. He was unable to attend the ceremony due to illness and was represented by his wife, Mrs Irene Stringer (83).

She said her husband, who was a corporal in the RAF stationed at Balderton, was sorry he could not be there. 

The cadets also honoured Sergeant Michael Patton, a former cadet of the Newark squadron, who died in September 1996 when he fell from an RAF helicopter during an exercise over south Wales. 

Cadet Andrew Tallis (13) laid a wreath beside a memorial tree and plaque for Sergeant Patton near the London Road entrance to the cemetery.

Mr Patton’s niece, Miss Natalie Henstock (24) of Newark, represented his family. 

She said her grandparents, Mr and Mrs Brian Patton, of Bathley, who are Mr Patton’s parents, and her mother, Ruth Hughes, of William Street, Newark, who is Mr Patton’s sister, were unable to attend. 

Mr Patton’s father-in-law, Mr Chris Grant, of The Park, Newark, attended along with his wife, Mrs Doreen Grant. 

The cadets, who meet at their Sherwood Avenue headquarters on Tuesdays and Thursdays, are looking for adult helpers.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

 

Taken from The Newark Advertiser our local newspaper which comes out each Thursday

Lieutenant-Colonel Sam Derry

Colonel Derry helped save the lives of 5,000 Allied Servicemen in the second world war through the Rome Escape Line, which he operated from the Vatican with an Irish priest, Monsignor Hugh O’Flaherty.

There is a community garden dedicated to Monsignor O’Flaherty in Ireland and a statue to be unveiled later this year, but Colonel Derry is better remembered there and in Italy than in his home town where there is a plaque in the parish church.

This year marks significant anniversaries in the Derry story.

It is 70 years since he entered Rome, hidden under cabbages in a cart, and met Monsignor O’Flaherty.

It is also 50 years since he was the subject of This Is Your Life on the BBC.

His family hope that if the people of Newark decide a lasting memorial is appropriate, it could be created by April 10, 2014, on what would have been his 100th birthday.

The Advertiser is asking readers what they feel would be a fitting tribute to the man who saved so many lives.

Early suggestions include a statue or bust and a display of his medals alongside a portrait in Newark Town Hall.

The MP for Newark, Mr Patrick Mercer, said a permanent memorial to Colonel Derry had been overdue since his death in 1996.

“I would hope that in calling for a memorial we knock on an open door,” said Mr Mercer.

“A public memorial is the only thing that is appropriate for the greatest soldier Newark has produced since King Charles’ nephew Prince Rupert in the civil war.”

The chairman of the Royal British Legion in Nottinghamshire, Mr Andy Gregory, said while the legion could not help financially, he was keen to support the idea.

“It is something I am sure the local branches would like to be involved in,” he said.

“Colonel Derry is a hero and a significant historical figure.

“I don’t think, however, too many people would know that he came from Newark and that is a regret.

“We do so much to remember the acts of the fallen that sometimes the deeds of the survivors are overlooked.”

Colonel Derry’s son William, of London Road, Newark, says the family would contribute financially.

Mr Derry said: “We put it in the hands of the people of Newark to decide whether a permanent memorial is fitting.

“There is certainly a move towards creating one and for that alone we are grateful.

“Father was an ordinary man working for the family plumbing business before the war, and did extraordinary things during the war.

“He organised the escape of thousands of people under the noses of the Gestapo.

“By my own mathematics, if each of those people he saved had the 2.4 children they say is the norm, 200,000 people are alive today who otherwise wouldn’t have been.”

Mr Derry’s grandson, Mr Dan Derry, also of Newark, said: “My grandfather was a very humble man and quite happy to be out of the limelight.

“That said, he did some fantastic things in Italy. It is an inspirational story.

“It is not a familiar war story but a story of hope, courage and achievement.

“My grandfather was rewarded with the Military Cross for bravery in tank battles but when asked what his greatest achievement was, would say saving 5,000 people from being tortured and shot.

“But if he talked about it it would be in terms of what others achieved.

“He refused an OBE for that reason and came home to Newark where he was always happiest.”

http://www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Time-to-honour-a-true-hero

 

Extraordinary life of an ordinary man

Sam Derry had already earned a Military Cross, the second highest military honour behind the Victoria Cross, in the deserts of North Africa before his exploits in Rome.

He was born in Newark on April 10, 1914, and attended the Magnus Grammar School from 1922-31.

After school he joined the family firm of R. I. Derry and Son, heating engineers.

He rowed for Newark, captained Newark Rugby Club and became a county player.

He was commissioned into the Territorial Army in 1936, joining 60th North Midland Field Brigade at Lincoln.

Mobilised in 1939, and promoted to captain, he served with the British Expeditionary Force in France until May 1940, escaping in the Dunkirk evacuation.

He was moved to the Western Desert in June, 1941, and promoted to major.

He was awarded the Military Cross in December, 1941, after his gun battery was attacked by 28 German tanks. They destroyed seven of those tanks and scattered the rest.

This was after he had driven through the battle in a tractor for more ammunition. The tractor was hit.

Sam Derry was taken prisoner by the Germans in February, 1942.

He escaped by making a dash for it and hurling himself over a precipice under rifle fire. He walked back over the desert to British lines.

He was recaptured by the same German unit in July, 1942 when overtaken during a rearguard action.

He was transported to Italy where he commanded the escape organisation in the the country’s biggest officer prisoner camp.

In 1943 he organised an escape in which five tunnels broke ground simultaneously and 46 prisoners escaped.

He made his own escape by leaping from a speeding train carrying him to Germany.

He entered the neutral Vatican disguised as a clerk, and set up and commanded, under the noses of the Gestapo, the Rome Escape Line that kept 5,000 Allied escapees out of enemy hands until the liberation of Rome in June, 1944.

He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order for his work saving men who otherwise would probably have been tortured for information about the Rome Escape Line and shot.

Fifty years ago, dozens of ex-prisoners of war surged on to the stage at the end of the This Is Your Life programme hosted by Eamonn Andrews to shake hands with the man who helped them.

For most it was their first face-to-face meeting with Sam Derry.

“I wouldn’t have had an easy moment for the rest of the war if I’d known what he was up to,” said his wife, Nancy, who surprised him on the programme with his children Richard, William, twins James and Andrew and daughter Claire.

Colonel Derry wrote a book entitled The Rome Escape Line that was later adapted into a film, The Scarlet and The Black, starring Gregory Peck.

Let us know what you think      

d.churcher@newarkadvertiser.co.uk

news@newarkadvertiser.co.uk  o1636-681234

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/


The Chapel Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery, will open  by appointment.  Pete Stevens from The Commonwealth War Graves Commission {CWGC} will be on hand to offer assistance to members of the public.  The Friends of Newark Cemetery, we also provide help in finding a specific grave and location  for you at Newark Cemetery.

An exhibition to Remember war dead of Newark with over 200 Photographs plus history by Pete Stevens, a Commonwealth War Graves Commission stonemason from Balderton, we are grateful to him for holding this exhibition.

Video http://youtu.be/11ipWE1C6qo
There are 603 war casualties names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen at Newark Cemetery, at the main gate on London Road. There are 456 names are first world war, 144 are from the second world war, one died in West Africa in 1961, one in Malaya in 1952 and one in Afghanistan in 2007.

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Lasting Tribute Time to emphasized the heroism, bravery, valour and determination for freedom, lest We Forget.  Let’s pay tribute to these brave fighters for their contribution.

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/friends-of-newark-cemetery-fonc/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/category/general-sikorski/

Click on  for location of Cemetery Newark-on-Trent

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

maps.google.co.uk

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire is open all year round Summer 8am-8pm Winter 8am-6pm

Laurence Goff Visiting Newark Cemetery at Memorial to the Fallen

Memorial To The Fallen located off London Road at Newark Cemetery

  1. Newark-On-Trent Memorial To The Fallen at Newark Cemetery 

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8WKt3ObNh4013 Apr 2012 – 1 min – Uploaded by laurencegoff
    There are 603 names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen atNewark Cemeterylocated off London Road 

    More videos for Memorial To The Fallen located off London … »

  2. Newark Cemetery UK « Newark-On-Trent Cemetery 

    Newark CemeteryLondon Road, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ off the A1. There are 603 war casualties names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen at Newark . Locatedat the Main Gate at Newark CemeteryLondon Road Newark-On-Trent

Chapel Interpretation Centre, Newark Cemetery

Pete Stevens exhibition  at Chapel Interpretation Centre up the Main Drive to the Left former Chapel, Newark Cemetery

Laurence Goff

The Chapel Interpretation Centre

at Newark Cemetery, exhibition

 Pete Stevens from The Commonwealth War Graves Commission {CWGC}  offered assistance to members of the public.  The Friends of Newark Cemetery, will also provide help in finding a specific grave and location  for you at Newark Cemetery.

An exhibition to Remember war dead of Newark with over 200 Photographs plus history by Pete Stevens, a Commonwealth War Graves Commission stonemason from Balderton, we are grateful to him for holding this exhibition.

Video http://youtu.be/11ipWE1C6qo
There are 603 war casualties names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen at Newark Cemetery, at the main gate on London Road. There are 456 names are first world war, 144 are from the second world war, one died in West Africa in 1961, one in Malaya in 1952 and one in Afghanistan in 2007.

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

Mission: Training

Date: 18th February 1943 (Thursday)

Unit: No: 61 Squadron

Type: Lancaster I

Serial: W4270

Code: QR-? (extensively researched, but not found)

Base: R.A.F. Syerston, Nottinghamshire.

Location: In the area of Bottesford Airfield, Lincolnshire.

Pilot: Sgt. Thomas Herbert Warne R/102085 R.C.A.F. Age 23. Killed (Later WO.II)

Fl/Eng: Sgt. George Arthur Hitchon 576765 R.A.F. Age 19. Killed

Obs: Sgt. Robert John Preece 1174086 R.A.F.V.R. Age 22. Killed

W/Op/Air/Gnr: Sgt. Thomas Raine Newton 1119116 R.A.F.V.R. Age 21. Killed

W/Op/Air/Gnr: Sgt. James Milton Whitehead 975551 R.A.F.V.R. Age 22. Killed

Air/Gnr: Sgt. Edward John Loverock 950159 R.A.F.V.R. Age 21. Killed

Air/Gnr: Sgt. John Coaker 1276786 R.A.F.V.R. Age 22. Killed

REASON FOR LOSS:

Whilst on a Cross country training flight W4270 crashed at 22.56 hrs. following an engine fire about 2 miles north west of R.A.F. Bottesford, Leicestershire. The aircraft came down a mile from the village of Staunton in the Vale, Lincolnshire.

This tragic event has been well researched over a period of 11 years + and a Memorial to the crew set up in the burial ground of St Mary’s Church, Staunton-in-the-Vale. Living relatives of all 7 men have been contacted, and the research team are indebted to them for supplying further information, photographs, letters etc.


Crew of Lancaster W4270 (Courtesy DI Ablewhite)

Left: Sgt. George Arthur Hitchon (Courtesy Hitchon/Weaver family) Right: Sgt. James Milton Whitehead (Courtesy Mrs Sylvia Jamison – sister)

 

Memorial to the crew (Courtesy DI Ablewhite)Staunton Lancaster Crash – background to the research
Prepared and written for the A.R. Society by Di Ablewhite:“In November 1999, Mr Sid Baggaley, a retired farmer of Staunton, asked a family friend (Di Ablewhite) if she could do an investigation into a plane crash he witnessed in WW11, he knew she was interested in history and archaeology, but she had not undertaken any research of this nature before. For obvious reasons this tragic event left a huge mark on him, and since that night he had wanted to know more about what had happened. He had heard several rumours including the fact that one of the crew was a Canadian, but knew nothing of where they flew from or any other detail being of course wartime.Working on the information he gave her and with a piece of the wreckage he later recovered from the crash site, she and eventually along with an ex RAF/BBMF friend she met through the Bomber Command Museum of Canada’s message board (Ian Hinks) and Sid’s Granddaughter (Annie Hogg) set about finding the details of the accident. Sid really wanted to know who these men were and to hopefully see what they looked like, but he had very little information for the team to work with. All he could remember was it was a cold winters night, he thought it was a Wellington Bomber and he knew 6/7 men had lost their lives. An initial reading of the Bomber Command Losses books, searching for a Wellington crashing in that area came up with nothing.Luckily the piece of wreckage he saved was a structural piece and once cleaned up by Newark Air Museum had RAF Section/Reference marks on it, which identified the aircraft as a Mark 1 Lancaster. By another full search through W R Chorleys’ Bomber Command Losses books a list was made of all local Lancaster crashes.Eventually the search narrowed down to it being just one aircraft.On the 18th of February 1943, a crew from 61 squadron, RAF Syerston had been on a long cross country training flight when, at 22.56 hours, after 6 hrs 45 mins of flying, a con rod broke on the inner starboard engine, causing a fire, which , despite their best efforts, they failed to put out. A combination of this and the fact the landing gear was in a lowered position, caused them to lose control and the aircraft crashed. All 7 crew members were killed and at 23 years of age the pilot, a Canadian from Saskatchewan, WO11 Thomas Herbert Warne (then a Sgt.) was the oldest and most experienced member of the crew despite only having 15 hours of night flying experience on this type of aircraft.All the men except the Canadian Pilot were buried in their respective home towns, while he is buried in Newark War Cemetery.Sid lived long enough to know the names of the crew and where they were from, but sadly didn’t get to see any of the photos, it was 8 years later that any of those surfaced. Eventually due to endless appeals for information in the local press and on the internet, several family members came forward with amazing photos and other documents relating to the crew, and because of this the personal side of this tragedy became more apparent, and the research team were more motivated to complete as much as they could to preserve these men in history, 11 years on and finally all of the crew’s relatives have been traced and made aware of the Memorial and research into the last few hours of their loved ones lives. Over 55,000 died in Bomber Command alone in WW11, not all can possibly be remembered in such detail, but it is so important as many as can be are paid tribute to.A Memorial to this crew was built in the new burial ground of St Mary’s Church, Staunton-in-the-Vale for the millennium exhibition. The stone was kindly donated by Mr and Mrs E. Staunton, a Lancaster propeller blade from a crash site in Crowland, was donated by LARG (Lincolnshire Aircraft Recovery Group) organised for us by Ian Blackmore, the actual memorial plinth was built by Lee Brigham and memorial plaques again bought with donations. Sadly the original plaques deteriorated in the first 10 years, so Annie Hogg set about renovating the Memorial and replacing the brass plaques with slate ones in 2010.The Memorial is now included in the Nottinghamshire Aviation Trail and it is hoped that more and more people will be visiting the site and remembering these 7 promising young men, who tragically lost their lives in training, without the chance to reach their full potential in life, paying the ultimate sacrifice. We will remember them.”Di Ablewhite

Funeral of Sgt. Warne at Newark (Courtesy of the Warne/Boe family)

 

Lancaster W4270 crash memorial, Staunton in the Vale

On Thursday 18 February 1943, an Avro Lancaster, s/n W4270 of No.61 Squadron had taken off at about 1610 from RAF Syerston.

After 6 hours and 45 minutes a con rod broke on the number 3 engine, resulting in a fire. The crew tried desperately to put it out while they were diverting to RAF Bottesford. When the landing gear was lowered it caused a loss of control and the aircraft dived towards the ground. It crashed at 2256 approximately a mile north west of the Church at Staunon in the Vale.

Mission: Training

Date: 18th February 1943 (Thursday)

Unit: No: 61 Squadron

Type: Lancaster I

Serial: W4270

Code: QR-? (extensively researched, but not found)

Base: R.A.F. Syerston, Nottinghamshire.

Location: In the area of Bottesford Airfield, Lincolnshire.

Pilot: Sgt. Thomas Herbert Warne R/102085 R.C.A.F. Age 23. Killed (Later WO.II)

Fl/Eng: Sgt. George Arthur Hitchon 576765 R.A.F. Age 19. Killed

Obs: Sgt. Robert John Preece 1174086 R.A.F.V.R. Age 22. Killed

W/Op/Air/Gnr: Sgt. Thomas Raine Newton 1119116 R.A.F.V.R. Age 21. Killed

W/Op/Air/Gnr: Sgt. James Milton Whitehead 975551 R.A.F.V.R. Age 22. Killed

Air/Gnr: Sgt. Edward John Loverock 950159 R.A.F.V.R. Age 21. Killed

Air/Gnr: Sgt. John Coaker 1276786 R.A.F.V.R. Age 22. Killed

REASON FOR LOSS:

Whilst on a Cross country training flight W4270 crashed at 22.56 hrs. following an engine fire about 2 miles north west of R.A.F. Bottesford, Leicestershire. The aircraft came down a mile from the village of Staunton in the Vale, Lincolnshire.

This tragic event has been well researched over a period of 11 years + and a Memorial to the crew set up in the burial ground of St Mary’s Church, Staunton-in-the-Vale. Living relatives of all 7 men have been contacted, and the research team are indebted to them for supplying further information, photographs, letters etc.

61 Squadron Lancaster W4270 Crew
Crew of Lancaster W4270 (Courtesy DI Ablewhite)

The crew were;

Sergeant Thomas H Warne         Pilot                                  RCAF  Buried in Newark Cemetery

 Sergeant George A Hitchon       Flight Engineer             RAF

Sergeant Robert J Preece            Observer                          RAFVR

Sergeant Thomas R Newton       W/Op & Air Gunner   RAFVR

Sergeant James M Whitehead   W/Op & Air Gunner   RAFVR

 Sergeant Edward J Loverock    Air Gunner                     RAFVR

Sergeant John Coaker                 Air Gunner                      RAFVR

The memorial is located in the grounds of St Marys Church and it was  dedicated in March 2003. The original brass plaques weathered badly and funds were raised to replace them with hard wearing slate plaques. The memorial was re-dedicated on 3 July 2010.

Sgt. Thomas Herbert Warne (Courtesy of the Warne/Boe family) Grave photo (Courtesy Gary Watson)

Part of a short film made on the re-dedication of this Memorial in 2010 can be seen “HERE

Burial details:

Sgt. Thomas Herbert Warne. Newark-Upon-Trent Cemetery. Sec. P. Grave 307
Son of Samuel Kernick Warne and of Isabelle Warne (nee Munro), of Kennedy, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Sgt. George Arthur Hitchon. Padiham Churchyard. Row 3. Div. 7. Grave 5.
Son of Edwin and Lilian Mary Hitchon, of Padiham, Burnley, Lancashire
Sgt. Robert John Preece. Wembdon Churchyard. Sec. C. Row A. Grave 14.
Son of Herbert and Daisy Preece, of Bridgwater, Somerset
Sgt. Thomas Raine Newton. Brandon and Byshottles Cemetery. Grave 46.
Son of Herbert and Gertrude Newton, of Durham.
Sgt. James Milton Whitehead. Cambusnethan Cemetery. Sec. A. Grave 824.
Son of Willie and Janet Reid Greenshields Whitehead, of Riddrie, Glasgow.
Sgt. Edward John Loverock. Matlock Cemetery. Plot 1. Row 12. Grave 15.
Son of Frederick and Mabel Victoria Jubilee Loverock, of Matlock, Derbyshire
Sgt. John Coaker. Leusdon Churchyard..
Son of George and Edith Amy Coaker, of Poundsgate, Newton Abbot, Devon
Researched by: Di Ablewhite, Ian Hinks, Annie Hogg and many others, but also with a special mention to the relatives of this crew. Many, many people have assisted in this research and the people who have made this memorial possible would like to thank everyone who has helped make this happen.

Annual Air Bridge will be held on Sunday 23rd September 2012 at 2pm from the Main Gate on London London, Newark

Air Bridge Memorial at the Commonwealth and Polish War graves Located going up the Main Drive from

London Road Newark, Nottinghamshire

The Warsaw Uprising (1944) needed the support of the allies to provide food and munitions to the Polish Partisans (AK, Home Army), resulting in the Polish Government in London, appealing to Winston Churchill for assistance. After many discussions with the Allied Command and getting no help from Russia, who refused even to grant permission for allied aircraft to land in Russia, he ordered relief to be flown to Warsaw from Italy, which was some 100 miles less than that from England, but was told by General Durrant, that an airlift of 2000 miles there and back, would have no hope of success, in that the loss of aircraft flying over occupied territory would be tremendous! Although Churchill agreed with him, he nevertheless ordered the operation to be proceeded with. The task was allocated to 205 group, of which RAF Squadrons 148 and 178, SAAF 31 and 34 squadrons and Polish Special Services Flight 1586 were part. The losses were horrendous: for every ton of supplies delivered and recovered by the Polish insurgents one aircraft was lost (39 four-engine bombers total). The operation was called “Warsaw Concerto”. Annual Air bridge Memorial Service at Newark Cemetery is held on the Last Sunday in September each year. The Polish war graves service each year starting from the main gate on London Road, Newark 1:45pm to the Memorial. Annual All Souls at Newark Cemetery is held on the the Last Sunday in October each year starting from the main gate on London Road, Newark at 2:45pm.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

   

Our beautiful grounds are kept well by Newark Town Council. Our historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ.  It is open all year round Spring – Summer April – September 8am-8pm and October – March 8am-6pm.

Laurence Goff at Newark Cemetery Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/friends-of-newark-cemetery-fonc/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/03/08/ransome-and-marles-former-factory-workers-will-be-remembered-with-a-permanent-memorial-in-newark-on-trent-in-2011/

Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery {left side on the main drive off London Road} is opened  by appointment. please contact Laurence Goff  Friends of Newark Cemetery 01636-681878 or 

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

British Commonwealth and Polish War Graves from the 2nd World War, We Will Remember them

We will always Remember them all year Round

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/05/15/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/01/26/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

The Annual Air Bridge Commemoration Service on Sunday 25th September 2011. Assemble at Newark Cemetery Main Gates on London Road, Newark at 1:45pm, 2pm procession up the Main Drive to the Air Bridge Memorial near the Commonwealth and Polish War graves.

British Commonwealth Are Buried in Newark-On-Trent Cemetery

Newark Cemetery during the War

Canada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flag

Canada flag

Canada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flagCanada flag

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

Love each other until we meet again RIP Newark Cemetery

We Will Remember Them All Year Round

General Wladyslaw Sikorski farewell Mass was said at Newark Parish on 14th Sept 1993 before leaving for Poland on his way home after been buried in Newark Cemetery for 50 years.

We always will Remember them


Flying over Newark-On-Trent For our Freedom, we will Remember them

Newark Cemetery is located on London Road off the A1

Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

maps.google.co.uk

Newark-on-Trent is important internationally, as it is home to the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves where there are over 400 graves of Polish airmen who died during the second world war. They fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch we should be grateful.

100_7456

By Laurencegoff

Newark Cemetery Commonwealth and Polish War Graves 

Flying the British and Polish flags over Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire 

The annual Airbridge on the last Sunday in September

and

All Souls held on the 4th Sunday in October each year.

General Sikorski former grave at Newark Cemetery from 1943-1993 still has his Memorial for all to see, we will remember him


A service of remembrance for Poland’s war heroes was held at Newark Cemetery.
The service, organised by the Order of Saint Stanislas


Commonwealth and Polish War Graves Newark-On-Trent

Newark War Memorial

Aircrew Remembrance Society – All site material is owned or managed by the Aircrew Remembrance Society and should not be used without prior permission. This is usually granted (Subject to permission from relatives and or suppliers) if not used for profit.

Kelvin Youngs (Webmaster)

WELCOME TO THE SITE OF REMEMBRANCE
The aim of this website is to perpetuate the memory of airmen from all nations, those who fought, those who paid the ultimate sacrifice during the 1939 – 45 air war over the United Kingdom & Europe.

The aircrew remembrance website archives photographs, along with personal accounts from those who survived together with official documentation relating to those who tragically lost their lives, thus preserving their fading memories in a positive, dignified way. 

Over 800.000 hits since we started these pages of remembrance
PLEASE HELP US TO PRESERVE THEIR MEMORY “HERE”
——————————————————————————————
This website is updated on a daily basis
Best viewed with
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(Both available as a free download by clicking onto the links shown)

http://www.aircrewremembrancesociety.com/

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Ransome and Marles’ Factory Bombed Memorial

A Public Memorial is offering poignant reminders of the sacrifice the town has made in defence of the country during the Friday afternoon 7th March 1941. We are grateful that wishes of relatives of the victims, who have previously asked for a public memorial, are to be met. NSK Europe, as Ransome and Marles has now, put in place a memorial that is located at Newark town hall (Buttermarket) near the staircase at the glass door. The Memorial, in the form of a large chrome-plated bearing, will feature the names of those killed in the air raid. 

Those 41 killed at Ransome and Marles are no less deserving of acknowledgement with a memorial at which everyone can pay their respects. There is a tree and commemorative plaque on the at the former Ransome Marles factory (NSK) site but it does not carry the names of the victims and can only be visited by appointment.

We will Remember them

70th anniversary 7th March 1941 Ransome and Marles, Newark targeted on that Friday afternoon

THE factories of Ransome and Marles, Newark where ball bearings were made, a vital component for just about every moving part used by the armed forces. The town, strategically placed at the centre of road, rail and river routes, was turning out guns, tank parts and bridges for the Allied war effort. In the early afternoon of a damp and gloomy March day, a single Heinkel 111 bomber, piloted by Lieutenant Rudolph and his three-man crew, began its first bombing run, having followed the railway line from Grantham to Newark. The anti-aircraft batteries protecting the factory tried to pick off the raider but, at 1,000ft, it was a difficult target to hit.

As the piercing wail of a siren split the air, workers made their way to the air-raid shelters. But, having heard the warning many times before, some did not move fast enough. Roy Lale said: “I was as bad as the rest, taking my time strolling out of the workshop. As I got outside, I heard machine-gun fire. I looked up and saw a German plane come into view. I saw the bombs released and, with no time to run, dived to the back of a bike rack, hoping for the best.

“A few seconds later, the wall of the workshop came crashing down on me.”The Heinkel had released a stick of four high-explosive bombs. Two landed on the factory, another on the air-raid shelter, the fourth between the railway line and the factory. The twin-engined Heinkel banked away and then levelled out for a second run, strafing the works with a burst from its MG 15 machine guns. It dropped another bomb, but this time it failed to detonate. Lt Rudolph returned for one more strafing run before heading for the cover of low cloud.

The tool shop, smithy and a store were destroyed. A shelter 15 feet below ground had been wrecked by a direct hit. The dead and injured lay all around the devastated factory. Survivor Jack Griffin, who was 19, had sheltered in a passageway while others dived under a reinforced finishing table in the tool room. “A large 500lb bomb went through, taking the roof off,” he recalled. “About 15 people were killed under that table. “Another worker, standing in his shredded clothes, heard the raider return. “Within minutes machine-fun fire was hitting what was left of the tool room…and then a deadly silence took over.”

In a nearby lane, Allen Dickenson had watched the German plane fly over – so low that he could see its black crosses – and then the pilot raised a gloved hand in a cynical wave. Confusion reigned as ambulances and army trucks converged on the factory and about 1,500 workers tried to get out. More than 80 casualties were taken to hospitals, Newark General being swamped by the largest influx.

Tragically, the rescue workers were caught in the open when a second raid swooped, dropping five more bombs. Miraculously, only one detonated. Fire crews and rescue teams from West Bridgford, Arnold, Sutton-in-Ashfield and Mansfield Woodhouse worked into the night to reach trapped victims, but more often finding the grisly, dismembered remains of the casualties.

The raid caused £91,789 damage (£3.6m today) and temporarily disrupted vital war work. But the real cost of what has become known locally as Black Friday was in human lives: 29 men and 12 women killed, including Esther Varney, whose body was never found.

Those killed on March 7, 1941, were:

George Harold Henry Adams, aged 45; Wilfred Evelyn Andrew, 39; Olive Ash, 31; Bertie Augustus Ball, 18; Private Ernest Patrick Beale, 27, Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment); Edward Beaver, 26; Harold Vincent Brown, 44; Vivian Maud Castle, 18; Enid Winifred Hall Cooper, 30; Edna May Cottam, 19; Gladys Cummings, 21; William Joseph Dixey, 62; Frederick Fowler, 39; George William Godridge, 29; Robert Grant, 47; John Henry Green, 55, 11th Nottinghamshire (Newark) Volunteer Home Guard; Horace Grocock, 47; Albert Robert Gyde, 42; Rose Ellen Hall, 30; James Hazelby Hanger, 29.

Thomas McHallam Hardie, 26; Sybil Harriet Hayden, 34; Joyce May Kirton, 18; Lily Lambert, 22; George Felix Lambley, 39; Edith Makins, 21; Frederick William Mann, 46; Frederick Markwell, 50; Claude Ware Hannah Martin, 36; Edwin E Martin, 46; Richard Naylor, 25; Frederick William Packwood, 52; William Thomas Pepper, 18; Frederick Richards, 32; Alfred Mayfield Ridge, 68; Reginald William Senior, 35; George Swanwick, 38; Norah Trueblood, 34; Esther Evelyn Varney, 19; William Warner, 51; Arthur Worrell, 31.

Soon after the raid, an official German communiqué announced that “a daring low-level attack took place on an armament factory at Newark, causing heavy damage in the workshops”. Two months later, they would be back, with Nottingham in their sights. We are indebted to David Needham and his book Battle of the Flames, for help with this article.

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/03/08/ransome-and-marles-former-factory-workers-will-be-remembered-with-a-permanent-memorial-in-newark-on-trent-in-2011/

As part of the anniversary, an exhibition of photos and history is held at the Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery. It open on the 1st weekend from 2 – 4pm each Month or by appointment

Councillor Laurence Goff, chairman of the Friends of Newark Cemetery

The Friends of Newark Cemetery Interpretation Centre {left side}.

The conversion of the former 19th-century eastern chapel at the cemetery in London Road is almost complete. 

 Friends will also have displays of history, information and photos put together over many years. They will have guided walks round the cemetery by  Laurence Goff. Friends of Newark Cemetery will use the centre with the support from Newark Town Council who will rent it out to groups for a small charge.

The Friends are looking for more volunteers. The more people that come forward the better to make it a success, so it can open all year round. The two chapels were built in 1856 when the cemetery was opened. The east wing is to be used as an interpretation centre by the Friends thanks to a £50,000 grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund. Display boards containing information about the cemetery, this once beautiful building has been preserved.

 Councillor Laurence Goff and Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery


We will Remember them that died in Newark-On-Trent  70 years ago. On the Friday afternoon 29 men and 12 women were killed with a further 165 being injured. Newark was attacked because of its significance to airfields and war work carried out within the area. The most significant attack was on Friday, 7th March 1941 when two German planes dropped a series of bombs on and around Ransome and Marles who made ball bearings for naval gun turrets. A total of 41 people were killed with a further 165 being injured.

Memorial is located at Newark Town, all welcome 

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

Newark Town  

and Newark Cemetery have  commemorated the  70th Anniversary of Ransome and Marles  Ball Bearings

Factory that was  bomb on Friday,     7th March 1941.

Bert Emerson and Laurence Goff Visit Newark Cemetery to Remember the Bombing of Ransome and Marles Ball and Roller Bearing Factory, 70 years ago on this date, 7th March 1941

Ransome and Marles Ball and Roller Bearing Factory, 7th March 1941

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/03/08/ransome-and-marles-former-factory-workers-will-be-remembered-with-a-permanent-memorial-in-newark-on-trent-in-2011/

Newark in the Second World War records the events surrounding the bombing of the Ransome and Marles bearing factory at Newark-on-Trent. On Friday 7th March 1941 the most well known of all the raids on [Newark-On-Trent] took place when Ransome and Marles factory was bombed. The type of work carried out at the factory made it an obvious target for the Germans. The raid commenced at about 1.40pm. Many workers were returning from their lunch break when the alert sounded at 1.35pm. A few minutes later a single Heinkel III bomber – flying so low that those on the ground could see its markings – approached from the south, following the railway line. As it neared Ransome and Marles it was fired on from several different points but still managed to drop four high explosive bombs. Two of these landed in the works, one on the road at the side of the factory and the other on an air raid shelter adjacent to Stanley Street. The plane also machine-gunned the site before circling, passing over the factory again and dropping another bomb. Fortunately this one did not explode. According to German reports the aircraft flew over for a third time in order to take photographs. The Raiders Passed siren was sounded and rescue parties went immediately into action. Various ambulances transported casualties to hospital and the Home Guard helped to close the roads around the works. The First Aid posts and the Womens Voluntary Service canteen were also kept busy. At 2.24pm the alert sounded again. Another enemy aircraft approached and dropped five more bombs but only one exploded. This was near the road and caused more damage and casualties, many of those hurt being rescue workers. Raiders Passed was sounded again at 2.51pm. As a result of the raid 29 men and 12 women were killed. One young woman was never found and presumed dead. Amongst those killed, were a young woman who had planned to get married the following weekend and a man who had recently been discharged from the army. Sixty-five people were admitted to Newark Hospital and 100 more were treated at the works own underground hospital. The official German communiqué of the raid stated that A daring low level attack took place on an armament factory at Newark causing heavy damage in the workshops. The bombers were under the command of Lietenant Knaut and Lieutenant Randolf. Local papers were severely restricted in what they could report. The day after the raid the Newark Herald reported that A single German plane came out of the low-lying clouds yesterday and dropped a number of bombs on an East Midlands town. An hour later the same or another raider dropped more bombs in the same locality. There were a number of casualties, some being fatal. The official report from which much of this information comes was not made public until the end of the war. The day became known locally as Black Friday. After the raid the two paired Lewis guns which were mounted in sand-bagged positions on Clay Lane Bridge were replaced by a Bofors 40mm anti-aircraft gun mounted on a proper gun platform. Fortunately the factory was not attacked again. We will Remember them

Ransome and Marles Newark-On-Trent attack Friday 7th March 1941

Bert Emerson helped rescue other survivors of the bombing at Ransome and Marles Newark-On-Trent on 7th March 1941. The factory was targeted 

by laurencegoff |

Ransome & Marles unvailing of Memorial at Newark Town Hall 7th March 2011

by laurencegoff |

Laurence Goff Visits the Ransome & Marles Memorial at Newark Town Hall UK

Laurence Goff rall call of names from Ramsome and Marles Bombing on 7th March 1941.

by laurencegoff |

Newark Cemetery visiting grave relating to the Ransone and Marles bombing

1941 when two German planes dropped a series of bombs on and around Ransome and Marles who made ball bearings for naval gun turrets. A total of 

by laurencegoff |

This was a big part of our history in Newark-On-Trent during the Second Word War. Also was the most loss of life, with 41 that were killed and another 165 injured. Our recognition to always remember them at Newark cemetery at the Chapel Interpretation Centre which will be open by appointment  with an exhibition in their memory.

Tours of Newark Cemetery by Laurence Goff by appointment

On 7th March 2011 we had Remember each one of them that died, 70 years ago in the bombing of Ransome and Marles Ball Bearings factory on that Friday afternoon. Friends of Newark cemetery are happy for this Permanent Memorial at Newark Town Hall at the foot of the staircase near the glass door.

We certainly owe them a great deal of credit that they so rightly deserve.

Ransome & Marles Memorial unveiled at Newark Town Hall

Relatives of those who died in the 1941 Ransome and Marles bombing in Newark were invited to attend the unveiling of a memorial marking the 70th anniversary of the tragedy. The memorial, being made by NSK Europe — the successors of Ransome and Marles — was  unveiled at Newark Town Hall by Newark Town Mayor Councillor Tony Roberts MBE on Monday, March 7th 2011. The memorial featured a large chrome-plated bearing, of the type still made at the factory today, and an item of memorabilia salvaged from the bombing. The names of the 41 people killed  are on a plaque on the memorial, which will be in the staircase entrance to the Town Hall, alongside the glass plaques bearing the names of aldermen, mayors and MPs of Newark.

Mr Chris Grant, a former Mayor 1991-1992 of The Park, whose father, Mr Robert Grant, died in the bombing, said: “I am very happy we have got a successful conclusion — it has been a long haul. “It seems to me that the position chosen is first class because I am sure the memorial is going to be seen by far more people there than anywhere else.” Mr Grant, a former mayor, said it would be a visible memorial to the most important wartime event in Newark. Although the names of those who died are recorded in a book in the parish church and on a plaque at NSK, there is no visual marker in the town. The chairman of the Friends of Newark Cemetery, Mr Laurence Goff, campaigned for a memorial. “It is a fitting tribute to something we feel strongly about,” he said.

Friends of Newark Cemetery organised an exhibition about the bombing at the cemetery chapel over 3 days, 70th anniversary has been remembered.

The chapel Interpretation is open from 2-4pm every weekend or by appointment, `please contact Laurence Goff  01636-681878  or by email:

laurencegoff4newark@yahoo.co.uk

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk


Ransome and Marles bombing will be Remembered at Newark Cemetery marking the 70th anniversary. Friends of Newark Cemetery chairman, Mr Laurence Goff, campaigned for a memorial. “It is a fitting tribute to something we feel strongly about, we have organised an exhibition about the bombing at the cemetery chapel on the weekend from 2-4pm or by appointment.

Newark-on-Trent Town Hall

“We often take for granted the very things that most deserve our gratitude.” — Cynthia Ozick Roll Call of Names that died 1, George Harold Henry Adams, aged 45 * 2, Wilfred Evelyn Andrew, aged 39 * 3, Olive Ash, aged 31 * O 4, Bertie Augustus Ball, aged 18 * O 5, Ernest Patrick Beale, aged 27, Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment (Private) * 6, Edward Beaver, aged 26 (Buried in Mansfield) with no Tombstone 7, Harold Vincent Brown, aged 44 * 8, Vivian Maud Castle, aged 18 9, Enid Winifred Hall Cooper, aged 30 ( Buried in Balderton in St Giles Church Yard) 10, Edna May Cottam, aged 19 * 11, Gladys Cummings, aged 21 * 12, William Joseph Dixey, aged 62 * 13, Frederick Flowler, aged 39 14, George William Godridge, aged 29 * O 15, Robert Barnsdale Grant, aged 47, his son Chris was only five when his Father died, he became Newark town mayor 50 years later in 1991-1992 * 16, John Henry Green, aged 55, Volunteer Home Guard, 11th Nottinghamshire (Newark) * 17, Horace Grocock, aged 47 ( Buried in Barnby in the Willow) 18, Albert Robert Gyde, aged 42* 19, Rose Ellen Hall, aged 30 * O 20, James Hazelby Hanger, aged 29 * 21, Thomas McHallam Hardie, aged 26 * 22, Sybil Harriet Hayden, aged 34 23, Joyce May Kirton, aged 18 24, Lily Lambert, aged 22 * O 25, George Felix Lambley,  aged 39 * 26, Edith Makins, aged 21 ( Buried in South Collingham) 27, Frederick William Mann, aged 46 * O 28, Frederick Markwell, aged 50 ( Balderton ?) 29, Claude Ware Hannah Martin, aged 36 * 30, Edward E. Martin, aged 46 * 31, Richard Naylor, aged 25 *  32, Frederick William Packwood, aged 52 * 33, William Thomas Pepper, aged 18 34, Frederick Richards, aged 32 * O 35, Alfred Mayfield Ridge, aged 68 * O 36, Reginald William Senior, aged 35, died on the 8th March 1941 * 37, George Swanwick, aged 38 * O 38, Norah Trueblood, aged 34, * 39, Esther Evelyn Varney, aged 19, (her body was never found) 40, William Warner, aged 51 * 41 Arthur Worrell, aged 31 * We Will Remember the Ransome and Marles Bombing 41 were killed 30 are buried in Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire* A Star Buried   in  Newark   Cemetery  20  in total have a Tombstone.   O  is  put after names that do not have a Tombstone )

Ransome and Marles 70 years ago on 7th March 1941

These was a big part of our history during the 2nd Word War, with the most loss of life with 41 killed and another 165 that were injured. It was a huge event we most remember them. 41 Flags to Remember the Fallen the Brave People at Ransome and Marles.

Name

Address

Age

Gender

Died after AdmissionTo Hospital

London Rd Cemetery Grave Ref No

Date of Interment

(1) Adams, George   Harold Henry

77 Millgate  Newark

45

M

ED307  * Buried in Newark

14.03.1941  Yes (Found)

2) Andrew, Wilfred Evelyn

48 Chestnut Avenue  Newark

39

M

ED303  * Buried in Newark

11.03.1941    Yes(Found)

3) Ash, Olive

14 Portland Street  Newark

31

F

X

EK253   * Buried in Newark

14.03.1941  No Stone Found

4) Ball, Bertie Augustus

6 Newstead Avenue  Newark

18

M

EQ207    * Buried in Newark

13.03.1941  No Stone Marking Found

5) Beale, Ernest Patrick

38 Appletongate  Newark

27

M

X

WG288   * Buried in Newark

13.03.1941  Yes Stone Marking Found

6) Beaver, Edward

15 Roseberry Hill  Mansfield

26

M

X Mansfield  Crematorium

Buried in Mansfield Record Plot 21506

No Stone Marking Found

7) Brown, Harold Vincent

5 Charles Street  Newark

44

M

EQ149      * Buried in Newark

12.03.1941   Yes (Found)

(8) Castle, Vivien Maud

Elston  Nr Newark

18

F

No Record

9) Cooper, Winifred Hall

12 Pinfold Lane  Balderton

30

F

X

Record      *  Buried in St Giles Church

Found  in Balderton

10) Cottam, Edna May

27 William Street  Newark

19

F

WT303     * Buried in Newark

13.03.1941  Yes(Found)

11) Cummings, Gladys

42 Welbeck Avenue  Newark

21

F

X

ED305      * Buried in Newark

15.03.1941  Yes (Found)

12) Dixey, William Joseph

65 Bowbridge Road  Newark

62

M

EO145       * Buried in Newark

12.03.1941  Yes (Found)

13) Fowler Frederick

Long Street  Great Gonerby, Grantham

39

M

X

No Record

14) Godridge George William

28 Lime Grove  Newark

29

M

X

EH247        * Buried in Newark

14.03.1941   No Stone  Found

15) Grant, Robert Barnsdale

3 Sleaford Road  Newark

47

M

EG237       * Buried in Newark

Yes (Found)

16) Green, John Henry

9 Marton Road  Newark

55

M

WG308      * Buried in Newark

11.03.1941  Yes(Found)

17) Grocock, Horace

115 Millgate  Newark

47

M

X

Buried In Barnby- in- the- Willows

18) Gyde, Albert Robert

60A Barnbygate  Newark

42

M

X

WS305       * Buried in Newark

13.03.1941  Yes Found

19) Hall, Rose Ellen

19 Long Row  Newark

30

F

X

EI151           * Buried in Newark

13.03.1941 No Stone Marking Found

20) Hanger, James

6 Cedar Avenue  Newark

29

M

WR300       * Buried in Newark

Yes (Found)

21) Hardie, Thomas McHugh

56 Milton Street  Newark

26

M

ED304        * Buried in Newark

12.03.1941   Yes (Found)

22) Hayden, Sybil Harriet

Ivy Farm  Kirklington

34

F

X

No Record

23) Kirton, Joyne May

21 Guildhall Street  Newark

18

F

No Record    Not found

24) Lambert, Lily

59 Bowbridge Road  Newark

22

F

EH249        * Buried in Newark

11.03.1941  No Stone Marking Found

25) Lambley, George Felix

Marton Road  Newark

39

M

WD178         * Buried in Newark

11.03.1941   Yes Found

26) Makins, Edith

Green South Collingham Church

21

F

Record             South Collingham

27) Mann, Frederick William

“Manville”  New Balderton

46

M

X

EG238      * Buried in Newark

13.03.1941  No Marking or Stone

28) Markwell, Frederick, 

114 Hawton Lane  New Balderton

50

M

Record     Balderton ?

Not Located

29) Martin, Claude

33 Bowbridge Road  Newark

36

M

WT178       * Buried in Newark

12.03.1941   Yes (Found)

30) Martin, Edward E

46 Newton Street  Newark

46

M

Record      * Buried in Newark

(L)               Yes Found

31) Naylor, Richard

162 Barnbygate  Newark

25

M

WC175      * Buried in Newark

11.03.1941  Yes Stone Marking Found

32) Packwood, Frederick William

56 Appletongate  Newark

52

M

WS304     * Buried in Newark

12.03.1941  Yes Found and located

33) Pepper, William  Thomas

7 Norwell Road  Caunton  Nr Newark

18

M

No Record

34) Richards, Frederick

Beacon Hill Road  Newark

32

M

X

WL306     C * Buried in Newark

12.03.1941  No Stone  Marking Found

35) Ridge, Alfred Mayfield

84 Beacon Hill  Newark

68

M

WF309      C * Buried in Newark

13.03.1941  No Stone Marking Found

36) Senior, Reginald William

8 Middleton Road  Newark

35

M

X

WQ305      * Buried in Newark

12.03.1941  Yes found and Located

37) Swanwick, George

4 Vernon Avenue  Newark

38

M

EQ252       * Buried in Newark

12.03.1941  No Stone Marking Found

38) Trueblood, Nora

42 William Street  Newark

34

F

X

WP305       * Buried in Newark

14.03.1941  Found and Located

39) Varney, Esther Evelyn   *( was never found)

9 Wilson Street  Newark

19

F

No Record               RIP

Her Body was never found

40) Warner, William

9 Grove Street  New Balderton

51

M

X

WB282       * Buried in Newark

13.03.1941  Yes Tombstone  Found

41) Worrell, Arthur

Chestnut Cottage  Girton

31

M

E 305          * Buried in Newark

Also Lasting Tribute with Recognition to Remember them when Ransome and Marles Ball BearingFactory was Bombed.  On that Darkest day during the 2nd world war on 7th March 1941, This daybecame known as “Black Friday.”

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/01/26/ransome-and-marles-former-factory-workers-will-be-remembered-with-a-permanent-memorial-in-newark-on-trent-in-2011/

This was a big part of our history in Newark-On-Trent during the Second Word War, with the most loss of life, with 41 killed and another 165 injured.

We certainly owe them a debt of gratitude.

A memorial in Newark around the 70th anniversary on 7th March 2011 is taken place at Newark Town Hall. Ransome and Marles factory workers in Newark-On-Trent will be remembered once again. By Preserving the ultimate sacrifice with their memories for years to come, we will remember them.

( * Buried   in  Newark   Cemetery    30    in   total)  ( O   No   Tombstone )

1, George Harold Henry Adams, aged 45 *

2, Wilfred Evelyn Andrew, aged 39 *

3, Olive Ash, aged 31 * O

4, Bertie Augustus Ball, aged 18 * O

5, Ernest Patrick Beale, aged 27, Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment (Private) *

6, Edward Beaver, aged 26 (Buried in Mansfield) with no Tombstone

7, Harold Vincent Brown, aged 44 *

8, Vivian Maud Castle, aged 18

9, Enid Winifred Hall Cooper, aged 30 ( Buried in Balderton in St Giles Church Yard)

10, Edna May Cottam, aged 19 *

11, Gladys Cummings, aged 21 *

12, William Joseph Dixey, aged 62 *

13, Frederick Flowler, aged 39

14, George William Godridge, aged 29 * O

15, Robert Baldsdale Grant, aged 47, his son Chris was only five when his Father died, he became Newark town mayor 50 years later in 1991-1992 *

16, John Henry Green, aged 55, Volunteer Home Guard, 11th Nottinghamshire (Newark) *

17, Horace Grocock, aged 47 ( Buried in Barnby in the Willow)

18, Albert Robert Gyde, aged 42*

19, Rose Ellen Hall, aged 30 * O

20, James Hazelby Hanger, aged 29 *

21, Thomas McHallam Hardie, aged 26 *

22, Sybil Harriet Hayden, aged 34

23, Joyce May Kirton, aged 18

24, Lily Lambert, aged 22 * O

25, George Felix Lambley,  aged 39 *

26, Edith Makins, aged 21 ( Buried in South Collingham)

27, Frederick William Mann, aged 46 * O

28, Frederick Markwell, aged 50 ( Balderton ?)

29, Claude Ware Hannah Martin, aged 36 *

30, Edwin E. Martin, aged 46 *

31, Richard Naylor, aged 25 * 

32, Frederick William Packwood, aged 52 *

33, William Thomas Pepper, aged 18

34, Frederick Richards, aged 32 * O

35, Alfred Mayfield Ridge, aged 68 * O

36, Reginald William Senior, aged 35, died on the 8th March 1941 *

37, George Swanwick, aged 38 * O

38, Norah Trueblood, aged 34, *

39, Esther Evelyn Varney, aged 19, (her body was never found)

40, William Warner, aged 51 * O

41 Arthur Worrell, aged 31 *

On Friday, 7th March 1941, Ransome and Marles bearing factory was bombed. This was the most notable incident of enemy action in the town. The type of work carried out at the factory made it an obvious target for the Germans. It was shortly after 1pm, the sirens had already sounded, when there was a rattle of machine gun fire and the drone of an aircraft engine. Visibility was bad, but people in the streets suddenly saw the raider, an Heinkel 111 bomber, dive through the low clouds and almost immediately release 4 bombs. Two of these landed in the works, one on the road at the side of the factory, and one on an air raid shelter adjacent to Stanley Street. One of the witnesses was Mike Wright age 4 years. There was a constant chatter of machine gun fire from both the raider and the defenders, until the plane reached the sanctuary of the clouds. Civil defense, a network of voluntary groups dedicated to saving life and alleviating suffering came on the seen. 

War time Newark was full of airmen from all over the world. There was a few Americans, Lots from the Commonwealth, Australians, Canadians, New Zealanders and a smattering from other Commonwealth Countries. There were lots of Poles, Czechs and some Greeks. Newark pubs were full of these visitors and given a good welcome, especially the aircrew of bombers flying from one of the 11 airfields within 8 miles of Newark.

Since the life expectancy of air crew was less than 20 missions the people of Newark would go the extra mile to welcome them. They knew that the airman they were talking to could be dead later that night. My Father in law drove the airmen from their airfield to Newark and would drive them back again after their night out. One night Sid had collected his passengers from outside the Clinton Arms when they dared him to drive his bus through the arcade. Sid was up to the challenge and with inches to spare completed the run to applause. Needless to say all the overhanging signs of all the shops were broken.

The Airfields around Newark

Balderton, Bottesford, Fulbeck, Newton, Orston, Ossington, Swinderby, Syerston, Wellingore, Wigsly and Winthorpe all had bomber stations.

The grass airfield at Balderton, opened in June 1941 and originally housed Hampden bombers. The need in August 1943 for runways capable of taking 4-engined bombers meant that ballast from Farndon harbour was used in its construction. From August to November 1943Lancasters and Halifaxes used the base until it was taken over by the Americans, mainly for transport aircraft.

Horsa gliders were stored at Balderton prior to D-Day.

On the morning or 17th September 1944, 50 C-47 Dakota’s towing gliders containing both men and artillery and 30 aircraft carrying paratroopers took off for Njmegen.

The airfield was then transferred back to Bomber Command flying Lancasters.

Bottesford opened on 10th September 1941. Aircraft from here were used in The attack on the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau when the German Navy sailed up the channel in broad daylight. For a short while the airfield was then used by the Australians flying Lancasters and later by the Americans for storing aircraft. Later in the war it was transferred back to the RAF as a Lancaster base.

Fulbeck was opened in 1940 and was used as a relief landing ground for Cranwell. It was used as a training airfield for bomber crews. Americans used the field to receive Dakotas that flew directly from the States. Just after midnight on 6th June 1944, 45 planes were loaded with US paratroopers and flown to St. Mere Eglise in Normandy. If you saw the film “The Longest Day” you may remember one paratrooper being caught on the church spire of the village. After June 1944 Fulbeck was transferred back to Bomber Command for Lancasters.

Newton and Orston were used for a long part of the war by the Polish squadrons mainly for flight training.

Ossington was used primarily for training of aircrews.

Swinderby opened in late 1940 and until July 1941 was used for Polish squadrons for attacks over Germany. It was bombed in October 1940. This was the first of many attacks. A decoy airfield was constructed at Bassingham, but was soon abandoned. 19 of the graves in Newark cemetery are of airmen who died while serving at Swinderby. The Poles moved out and the Australians moved in. There was an embarrassing moment when a pilot landed on the A46 instead of the runway. Embarassed he taxied his plane into a ditch.

The grass airfield at Syerston opened in December 1940 and was manned by Poles. In July the Canadians arrived. Syerston was closed and made ready for 4-engined bombers. Again ballast from Farndon was used. Guy Gibson of Dambusters fame was commanding officer of 106 squadron.

Winthorpe opened in September 1940 as a satellite station for Swinderby with Wllington Bombers of Polish squadrons using the base. Fortunately, someone at R&M told the authorities of the stupidity of its location. Half a mile beyond the end of the runway lay a ball and roller bearing factory that was the target of an earlier German raid. At sometime bombers from the Newark area attacked the ball bearing factories in Schweinfurt. All it needed was a fault at take off and a plane full of fuel and bombs would have a direct hit on a major manufacturer of a crucial war component.

Military Bases

The unit stationed at Newark for the longest time was 58 Maintenance Unit known to everyone at the time as 58MU. This was sited where Yorke Drive now stands. Its purpose was to go out and collect as much of a crashed aircraft as it could, including German aircraft. Each day a Queen Mary truck would leave the base with a salvage crew comprising an engine fitter, airframe fitter, armourer, electrician and crane driver. The truck with damaged aircraft on board would return to Newark where it would be stripped to salvage as much useful parts as possible.

The parade ground of the Training Battalion of the Royal Engineers was sited in what is now Bailey road named after Captain Bailey. Training exercises included building bridges over the river Trent,

Hawton road camp, which could accommodate up to 5000 people, was sited on the former Newark Golf Course, between Hawton road and the river Devon. One of the units at the camp was the 21st Independent Parachute Company, which moved there in July 1944. On 17th September 1944, 186 officers and men of the company parachuted into Arnhem. After the battle the company returned to Newark as heroes. The men became associated with the Ram and the White Hart.

The Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers REME used the area now occupied by Brownlows the Motor Home Company. Equipment such as radar and anti-aircraft guns were both repaired and stored there. Prisoner of War camps were set-up at Allington, Syerston, Little Carlton and Sconce Hills.

What was made in Newark

Abbotts Blagg and Johnston

British Glues

Cafferata

Farrar Boilers Mumby and Son

Ransome and Marles

Boilers and air receivers.

Pressings for Bailey and pontoon bridges and for waterproofing tanks used on D-Day

Glues for shell cases and drop tanks of long range fighters. Grease for the manufacture of explosives and soap. Phosphatic fertilizer and mineral supplements for poultry pigs and cattle.

Plaster of Paris for repairing broken limbs. Building plaster to repair bombed houses.

Foundations to thousands of miles of aircraft runways.

Heavy turrets for tanks. Reconditioning of tanks.

Clothing for 315,000 army and air force personnel. “Civvie” suits for discharged soldiers. 45000 garments for displaced persons throughout Europe.

Bearings for all fighting vehicles and ships.

Worthington Simpson Pumps for all fighting vehicles and ships. Gun Carriages and fire fighting trailer pumps.

Nicholsons Agricultural machinery.

photo

Remembering the war in the face of a child

Since the RAF loses still grew, the decision about forming Polish bomber We cannot forget their bravery, heroism and let’s still remember their sacrifice. Seventy years after the Battle of Britain, they gave their lives for our to-day for freedom

Lasting Tribute

Lasting Tribute

 Lest We Forget.Time to emphasized the heroism, bravery, valour and determination for  our freedom. 

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

RAF EnsignRAF Ensign

RAF EnsignRAF Ensign

Ransome and Marles Stanley factory (later RHP and now owned by NSK)

During WWI women replaced many factory workers – in Newark women worked in Ransome & Marles and Wothington & Simpsons factories making munitions, Mumby & Sons making uniforms and Coopers making parachutes.

The Ransome Brass Band was formed on the 1st November 1937 as the works band of Ransome and Marles. In 1939 the Ransome and Marles Band made the first of over 500 radio broadcasts –  many were broadcast direct from the works canteen via a BBC direct radio link. These popular broadcasts included favourites such as “Music While You Work”, “Workers’ Playtime”, “Friday Night Is Music Night” and “Strike Up the Band”. See Charlotte Hall’s oral history, and the band’s website.

A few weeks later, in May 1941, we moved to Bunny so that my father could concentrate on helping to establish the new factory. We only stayed at Bunny until November 1942 when we moved to Dundee in Scotland, where R&M took over three former jute factories. We returned to the Coddington area in May 1949 but it was not until November that we were able to take possession of our house at 123 Beacon Hill Road because the tenants had been reluctant to leave and my parents had to go to court to settle the matter. Keen to pursue engineering as a career, in mid 1951, after taking my GCE ‘O’ level examinations, I went to work for R&M, but continued my studies at Newark and Nottingham Technical Colleges, on a part-time basis.Ransome & Marles Ball Bearings Factory, provided components to all three Armed Forces during WWII, including the gun turrets of naval guns. The Air Raid of 7th March 1941. The factory is mentioned in a number of the Coddington oral histories, as a source of employment, as a supporter of leisure activities (Cricket Club) and of course for eyewitness accounts of the German air-raid in 1941. The reconnaissance photo for this raid taken 4th December 1940 (published in a book about the second world war in Newark)  stretches as far as the borders of Coddington and includes the familiar outline of Coddington Hall (at that time incorporated into Winthorpe Airbase). An account of the raid of Friday 7th March, 1941 When two German planes bombed the works of Ransome & Marles  41 were killed with another 165 people injured making the incident Newark’s “Blackest Day” during the war. The 1st Alert was sounded at 13.35 when a Heinkel 111 made its 1st pass over the factory at 1,000 feet dropping 4 bombs. 2 hit the works, 1 hit the edge of the works and 1 hit the works shelter at the rear of Stanley Street. The works was also machine gunned. The plane made a further 2 passes over the factory causing more damage although one of its bombs failed to explode. Shortly after that the All Clear was sounded and rescue work began and the Home Guard cleared roads to allow ambulances to get through. At 14.24 the Alert was sounded and another enemy plane attacked the works while rescuers were assisting the casualties. It dropped 5 bombs but only 1 exploded causing a number of casualties and some damage, 4 bombs failed to explode. The All Clear was sounded at 14.51. 100 were treated at the works own underground hospital. During WWII Newark was attacked 8 times killing 43 people, but this was by far the worst raid. There is still a memorial plaque  in the grounds of the factory to commemorating the victims which was put there by Chris Grant as Newark Town Mayor in 1991. Chris Father was killed in the bombing   he was just age 5 at the time, R&M factory changed to RHP and is now NSK. The first raid was in 1940 to RAF Swinderby; RAF Winthorpe was attacked in Nov 1940 using parachute landmines for the first time, but although the runway was damaged there were no casualties. On Jan 30th 1941 two people were killed in an attack by a single plane, which dropped 14 bombs along the River Trent and Muskham Rd. A list of the 41 people (29 men and 12 women) who died as a result of the raid on Ransome and Marles Factory on 7th March, Friends of Newark Cemetery  has been trying to raise awareness of the raid and are happy to get a proper memorial to 41 victims. An accessible  place has been found at Newark Town hall next to the glass door at the foot of the staircase in an appropriate position for all to see. Eyewitness / Oral History accounts of the raid by Coddington residents Michael Sellars (People/Oral Histories) The day Ransome & Marles (R&M) was bombed I was at home because I was sick, In the early afternoon I was lying in bed and heard a plane. I looked out of the window to-wards Newark and saw a plane flying low and heard a ‘crump’ sound, followed by another. I went downstairs to tell my mother that I thought the plane was dropping bombs but my mother told me not to be silly and sent me back upstairs to bed. A while later, a neighbour called in to tell us that there had in fact been an air raid. My mother came upstairs to apologise and just then, we heard another plane go over. We looked out of the front bed-room window just in time to see a man, who was cycling to-wards Coddington, leap off his bicycle and take cover in the ditch which ran the down the side of the road. It would not have been a pleasant experience for him, if he landed in the water, because some houses up the road had arranged for the effluent from their cesspits to flow into the ditch so that they did not have to pump them out. The area was provided with a sewer main in mid 1951. The neighbour then called in again to advise us that the R&M factory had been hit and my mother became concerned because my father at the time was spending part of his work time at R&M Newark and the rest at R&M Bunny, which was in the process of being established. She also had concerns about my grandmother who lived on Beacon Hill, not far from the factory. As with most people, we did not have a phone in those days and the only way my mother could find out if my father and grandmother were all right was to go and find out. She asked me to get dressed and then, with my little brother in the pram, we walked to my grandmother’s house. It was about 5 p.m. by about this time and, just as we arrived at my grandmothers, a car pulled up at her neighbour’s house and a woman who was sobbing got out. The sobbing lady had just been advised that her husband had been killed in the raid. (This was presumably the wife of Frederick Richards ( Beacon Hill Rd, aged 32) or of Alfred Mayfield Rudge (84 Beacon Hill, aged 68)). My mother left my brother and myself with our grandmother while she went down to the entrance of the works but she was unable to learn anything. It was not until after 10 p.m. that my father came home. He had been at Bunny when the first raid took place and he had been called back to Newark to help make the bombed areas safe from further roof collapse and to cover over the machinery exposed by the raids in case it rained.   

During 1956 ? 1958 I did my two years National Service in the RAF. After training as a radar technician, I was posted to Cyprus and Jordan. On completion of my National Service, I went back to R&M and continued studying part-time. By 1961 I was a Graduate Member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers and I was offered a three years contract in Sydney with R&M Australia, which I accepted …   Around this period, having now completed all the educational and industrial experience requirements for full membership of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, I was admitted as a Member and at the same time, became a Chartered Mechanical Engineer. When the contract ended I was asked to stay on with R&M Australia, which I did. However, by 1971, it became increasingly obvious that Ransome Hoffmann Pollard (as R&M had become) had no chance of being able to compete with the Japanese bearing companies and I looked around for an alternative position. Maureen Andrews (People/Oral Histories) Maureen remembers the air raid over Newark in the 2nd World War when Ransome and Marle’s Factory was bombed, she lost her uncle Wilfred Andrews amongst the fatalities. Another of Maureen’s uncles, Albert Thompson, was injured in Normandy and died in England from his wounds. He was the only soldier from Coddington to be killed in the 2nd World War. John Kirton (People/Oral Histories) I don’t remember a lot about the war as I was only 8 when it started, but I do remember bombs being dropped on Stapleford Woods as the Germans thought that it was a camouflaged munitions factory of course what they were looking for was Ransome and Marle’s at the bottom of the hill. They did bomb the factory in 1940, I actually saw them drop the bombs, myself and Ken Maltby –we were going home for dinner, as there were no school dinners in those days. We came out of school and this airplane came in low across the spinney, heading towards Newark. Ken said, ” that is a bloody funny Blenhiem” (that was a type of plane) and then we saw the markings and we realized it was a German plane. We went home as quickly as we could. We didn’t hear any bangs and it wasn’t until a little time later that we heard, they had bombed Ransome and Marles. We had incendiaries dropped in the village, I can show where one landed in the stackyard. Our Dad did not have to join up being a farmer, but to do his bit, he joined the A.R.P. (Air Raid Precaution) and he was an A.R.W. Air Raid Warden. They practiced running up and down the street with a barrel on a trolley to see how fast they could reach a fire. The oldest member of the crew was Jack Ingram. They patrolled the village in pairs my Dad pared with Uncle Walter. We always joked that they would be no good, but when the incendiary bombs landed in the stack yards they got there and put the fires out. Reverend Bully took his turn and did very well. Jack lived on Main Street and his house was Ist Aid Headquarters. The kids of the village helped with Sunday First Aid Practice. We were given tags on our wrists to say what injuries we were to be treated for. Well if the injuries were too severe we would be whipped into the ambulance and taken down to the hospital on London Road. We quite enjoyed that as we were given a biscuit and a bottle of pop as well as our ride in the ambulance. Nancy Sleight (People/Oral Histories)

She remembers the war when not very much happened until the two German planes flew over and dropped bombs on the Ransome and Marle?s factory which was making munitions. The children saw the planes from the school and were more excited than afraid.

Colin Smith remembers going on  at weekends to help father .   When war came in 1939 Len (Smith) was too old to be called up but his war effort was to build ‘gun turrets’ for the ministry of defence around Newark. ‘Bofors’ anti-aircraft guns were placed on these gun sites, they made a terrific noise when fired. Unfortunately they did not stop the German bombers bombing Ransom and Marles on the 7th March 1941. Comments left on the Webpage by Laurence Goff – Chairman of Friends of Newark Cemetery.

Abide With Me Hymn

Abide with me; fast falls the eventide;
The darkness deepens; Lord with me abide.
When other helpers fail and comforts flee,
Help of the helpless, O abide with me.

Swift to its close ebbs out life’s little day;
Earth’s joys grow dim; its glories pass away;
Change and decay in all around I see;
O Thou who changest not, abide with me.

Not a brief glance I beg, a passing word;
But as Thou dwell’st with Thy disciples, Lord,
Familiar, condescending, patient, free.
Come not to sojourn, but abide with me.

Come not in terrors, as the King of kings,
But kind and good, with healing in Thy wings,
Tears for all woes, a heart for every plea—
Come, Friend of sinners, and thus bide with me.

Thou on my head in early youth didst smile;
And, though rebellious and perverse meanwhile,
Thou hast not left me, oft as I left Thee,
On to the close, O Lord, abide with me.

I need Thy presence every passing hour.
What but Thy grace can foil the tempter’s power?
Who, like Thyself, my guide and stay can be?
Through cloud and sunshine, Lord, abide with me.

I fear no foe, with Thee at hand to bless;
Ills have no weight, and tears no bitterness.
Where is death’s sting? Where, grave, thy victory?
I triumph still, if Thou abide with me.

Hold Thou Thy cross before my closing eyes;
Shine through the gloom and point me to the skies.
Heaven’s morning breaks, and earth’s vain shadows flee;
In life, in death, O Lord, abide with me.

“Ransome and Marles bombing which will be the 70th anniversary next year on the 7th March 2011. Newark was attacked because of its significance to airfields and war work carried out within the area. The most significant attack was on Friday, 7th March 1941 when two German planes dropped a series of 10 bombs on and around Ransome and Marles who made ball bearings for naval gun turrets. A total of 41 people were killed 29 men and 12 women with a further 165 being injured. I have put these Websites together as a fitting Tribute in their memory. These are my own views and do not represent Newark Town Council or Friends of Newark Cemetery as Chairman. It has been built as a means of further promoting our cemetery and encouraging interested people to join the tribute.  Our courageous heroes that will live on in our memories. I am Campaigning and want to see those who died remembered with a permanent Memorial at Newark Cemetery. During the 2nd World War there were a number of Polish stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for Polish Air Force. A Memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and unveiled on 14th July 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander in Chief of the Polish Forces and war-time Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died. General Wladyslaw Sikorski, who died when the aeroplane he was travelling in crashed over Gibraltar on the 4th July 1943.During the 2nd World War there were nearly a quarter of a million Poles in the Polish Armed Forces serving under British command. Today the Commission cares for the graves of nearly 4,500 Polish servicemen and women in 35 coutries around the World. Newark has had close links with Poland and the local Polish community, both here and in Nottinghamshire for many years. Many Poles came to England to help with the war effort and many chose to stay on and make this country their home. Newark’s place in Poland’s heart was cemented when the remains of Poland’s war time leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski were entrusted to the town until his return to Krakow in 1993. From the British Commonwealth are also buried in Newark Cemetery, The Royal Australian Air Force 6 buried (RAAF), British Royal Air Force 44 (RAF), Canadian 17 (RCAF) New Zealand 3 (RNZAF) and Polish squadrons were formed within the Royal Air Force. Many Polish Airmen were flying Spitfires fighters for Britain’s Royal Force. 422 Polish Airman had been buried during the 2nd World War. Former Polish airmen stayed over after the war and married also chose their resting place as Newark cemetery, Nottinghamshire .” Charlotte Hall (People/Oral Histories) ‘In 1939, she married Cyril Hackett and they had one daughter, Patricia. Cyril was a foundry man and worked at Nicholsons, Ransome and Marles, and finally at Worthington and Simpsons. One day during the war, a car stopped alongside Audrey Patterson, a friend of Charlotte’s, who lived in Balderton and they asked for direction to get to Ransome and Marles, she was reluctant to answer, war time ‘Careless talk costs lives’ etc. The driver saw her reluctance to answer and told her ‘This is Gracie Fields in the back of the car’. Gracie was going to sing to the workers for Workers Playtime. Cyril who was a keen member of the Red Cross, worked there at the time, has a photograph of himself and Gracie Fields on a calendar. Cricket Club (People/Village Clubs) John Hallam recalls that during his short time as a Coddington player (before 1953, after which as an apprentice he joined the Ransome & Marle’s team) he opened the bowling with Fred Tomlinson, under Captain Owen Taylor. Peggy Campion (People/Oral Histories) Charles was a foreman joiner and wheelwright at Ransome and Marles and obviously was very handy.


RAF Ensign

http://www.rafmuseum.org.uk/RAF Ensign

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/friends-of-newark-cemetery-fonc/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/category/general-sikorski/

The Warsaw Uprising (1944) needed the support of the allies to provide food and munitions to the Polish Partisans (AK, Home Army), resulting in the Polish Government in London, appealing to Winston Churchill for assistance. After many discussions with the Allied Command and getting no help from Russia, who refused even to grant permission for allied aircraft to land in Russia, he ordered relief to be flown to Warsaw from Italy, which was some 100 miles less than that from England, but was told by General Durrant, that an airlift of 2000 miles there and back, would have no hope of success, in that the loss of aircraft flying over occupied territory would be tremendous! Although Churchill agreed with him, he nevertheless ordered the operation to be proceeded with. The task was allocated to 205 group, of which RAF Squadrons 148 and 178, SAAF 31 and 34 squadrons and Polish Special Services Flight 1586 were part. The losses were horrendous: for every ton of supplies delivered and recovered by the Polish insurgents one aircraft was lost (39 four-engine bombers total). The operation was called “Warsaw Concerto”. Annual Airbridge Memorial Service at Newark Cemetery is held on the the Last Sunday in September each year starting from the main gate on London Road, Newark 1:45pm to the Memorial. Annual All Souls at Newark Cemetery is held on the the Last Sunday in October each year starting from the main gate on London Road, Newark at 2:45pm to the Polish war graves service.

Polish Airmen during the 2nd World War flying a Spitfire

Remembrance commemorates the sacrifices made and reminds everyone that the protection and care for the freedoms we enjoy and the lives of those who cannot defend themselves comes at a cost. This memorial website has been put together in the public interest as regular visit Newark Cemetery for many years. It has been dedicated to the thousands of people who’s resting place is in our beautiful and historic Cemetery for over 150 years. These website has been set up as a means of further promoting our Newark Cemetery and encouraging interested people to join the tribute.

Since the RAF loses still grew, the decision about forming Polish bomber We cannot forget their bravery, heroism and let’s still remember their sacrifice. Seventy years after the Battle of Britain, they gave their lives for our to-day.

Chris Grant at Newark Cemetery, his father died at age 47 during the bombing of Ransome and Marles 70 years ago, we will remember them..

Ransome and Marles’ Factory was Bombed, Friday 7th March 1941. We will Remember the 41 that died in Newark-On-Trent. 29 men and 12 women were killed with a further 165 being injured.

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/03/08/ransome-and-marles-former-factory-workers-will-be-remembered-with-a-permanent-memorial-in-newark-on-trent-in-2011/

Bomb horror at factory Newark-On-Trent in Nottinghamshire people can recall Wartime memories for the 70th the anniversary in 2011. The bombing of the Ransome and Marles factory in Newark when two Luftwaffe Heinkel bombers carried out separate raids on the Northern Road factory within an hour of each other at about lunchtime on March 7 1941. The raids cost 41 lives and the cost in terms of damage was put at £91,789. A German aerial photograph taken in October 1940 was later recovered. It was used in the planning of the raid, detailing the longitude and latitude of the factory. The first German bomber used the railway line from Grantham as a guide and dropped four bombs. Two hit the factory, where the tool room and grindery took the brunt of the blast. One bomb hit the air raid shelter, another landed in the road nearby. The plane then circled and dropped a fifth bomb, which hit the factory floor but failed to explode. Five bombs were dropped in the second attack. Only one exploded but caused casualties to rescue workers tending people injured in the first raid. The Germans reported a successful low-level bomb attack on a ball bearing factory in Newark. Thirty men and ten women were killed. One woman was never found and presumed dead. There have been reports over the years of sightings of her ghost in the factory. Mr Bill Midwinter of Valley Prospect, Newark, was a production control supervisor who had gone home for lunch on that fateful day, when the air raid sirens sounded. He recalls: “I was in London Road and saw a bomb drop. “The plane seemed low. “It was a terrible day, pouring with rain. “I do not think the bomber could get the height so the bomb did not explode.”Mr Midwinter, as a member of the factory defence unit, helped to guard the 1,000lb unexploded bomb he saw fall. He said: “We ended up guarding the bomb for several days until the Bomb Disposal Unit arrived. “We were given strict instructions that no one should attempt to touch it or go near it. “The bomb looked quite small when it was in the ground but when it was removed you could see how big it really was. “I have no doubts that if that bomb had gone off the factory would have been completely wiped out.” About 4,000 people worked at the factory during the second world war, and a chance conversation probably saved the life of Mr Bert Emerson of Keats Road, Balderton, who worked in the equipment drawing office. He said: “I was making my way down from the grindery to the tool room when I stopped for a chat. “I was showered in glass from the sheer impact of the bombing but even then I escaped without a scratch.”He remembered, as a 19 year old, helping to take a stretcher down to the underground hospital at the factory, when it was bombed for the second time. “I count myself lucky to have escaped,” he said. More than 100 people were initially treated at the underground hospital, and ambulances took 65 people to hospital. The underground hospital, 15ft under the factory’s carpark, was bricked up and forgotten about after the war. It came to light again last year when plans were drawn up to mark the factory’s 100th anniversary.Gallons of groundwater were pumped out before the hospital could be opened but the effort was worth it as the hospital attracted 3,000 visitors. A future use for the hospital as a venue for fire service training exercises has been suggested but until a decision is made it will remain closed. Many people who worked at the factory for years were unaware the hospital existed, but the vital contribution it made on March 7 1941 is unlikely to be forgotten.

On Friday, 7th March 1941, the most well known of all raids on Newark-On-Trent took place, when the Ransome and Marles factory was bombed at 1.40pm. A single German Heinkell 111 bomber, flying so low that those on the ground could see its markings, approached from the south following the railway line. It dropped four high explosive bombs. Two of these landed on the works causing considerably damage, one on the road at the side of the factory and the other on an air raid shelter adjacent to Stanley Street. The plane machined gunned the site before circling, passing over the factory again and dropping another bomb. This did not explode. At 2.24pm another enemy aircraft approached dropped five more bombs but only one exploded, causing more damage and casualties, mainly rescue workers. As a result 29 men and 12 women were killed, 65 treated in hospital and 100+ treated at the works own underground hospital, which is still around but not in use. This day became known as “Black Friday.” We will Remember them RIP. Ransome and Marles changed its name to R.H.P. (Ransome, Hoffmann and Pollard) and is now called N.S.K. (Nippon Seiko K.K.)

We Will Remember the Ransome and Marles Bombing 41 were killed 30 are buried in Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire ,these graves are near the Commonwealth and Polish war graves at Newark-On-Trent

John Henry Green grave died at age 55 during the bombing of Ransome and Males his name is on the war memorial at the front off London Road , Newark

Laurence Goff and Chris Grant in the Nottingham Evening Post

Laurence Goff Pointing to John Henry Green and Ernest Beale names are on the war Memorial at Newark Cemetery.

They were killed in the Ransome and Marles bombing…

Polish contribution to the Allied victory in World War 2 (1939-1945) It was the only country to fight in the 2nd world war from the first to the last day of the greatest armed conflict to remember them to this day. The most important issue of the Polish contribution to the defeat of the enemy with determination, valor and perseverance. 

Since the RAF loses still grew, the decision about forming two Polish bomber squadrons (300 and 301) as well as two Polish fighter squadrons (302 and 303) was made.

Training was performed very slowly. For a long time the British commanders did not believe the Poles could fly modern fighters.

They were detached to RAF squadrons and were excellent pilots. The first Polish pilot who shot a German airplane was F/O Antoni Ostowicz. It happened on July 19, 1940. But the most famous was Sgt. Antoni Glowacki – on August 24, 1940 he shot five German aircraft and became “the fighter ace” in one day.

Bomber Command WWII Bases: No. 300 (Polish) Squadron Bramcote : Jul 1940-Aug 1940 Swinderby : Aug 1940–Jul 1941 Hemswell : Jul 1941-May 1942 Ingham : May 1942-Jan 1943 Hemswell : Jan 1943-Jun 1943 Ingham : Jun 1943-Mar 1944 Faldingworth : Mar 1944 onwards RAF Station Winthorpe, No. 51 Base, was opened as a satellite station for RAF Swinderby. Early operations were mainly centred on the Polish squadrons 300 and 301, who usually flew Fairey Battles, operating from Winthorpe when Swinderby was water logged. Control of Winthorpe was passed to RAF Ossington and was used for a period as a Relief Landing Ground by No. 14 Pilots Advanced Flying Unit (PAFU) who had arrived at Ossington in January 1942. The Station was selected to investigate improvements to bombing techniques. A Bombing Officer was appointed to each flight and an all round effort from Flying Staff, Armament and Electrical Officers helped with the eventual achievement of worthwhile improvements. We certainly owe them a debt of gratitude.

Time to emphasized the heroism, bravery, valour and determination for freedom. Lest We Forget, Britain honoured its war dead. Tribute to British Commonwealth and Polish Sacrifice.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

“It is important to recognise the sacrifices that our armed forces have made, and continue to make for our country.”

Lasting Tribute with Recognition to Remember them when Ransome and Marles Ball BearingFactory was Bombed.  On that Darkest day during the 2nd world war on 7th March 1941, This daybecame known as “Black Friday.”

Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2010/11/13/245/

Aviation Classics: Aviation News

There are still some important decisions to be taken about how the project should  Podcast To Honour Polish Airmen 11 October 2010 – Photos: RAF Museum ….. aircrew for all parts of the RAF and Commonwealth Air Force squadrons. …. UK airshow goers may remember this aircraft making an appearance at 2002 Flying 

http://www.aviationclassics.co.uk/news.html

Flying the British and Polish flag over Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

Remembrance commemorates the sacrifices made and reminds everyone that the protection and care for the freedoms we enjoy and the lives of those who cannot defend themselves comes at a cost.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

It has been dedicated to the thousands of people who final resting place is in our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery for over 150 years.

Spitfire Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Lasting Tribute to  British Commonwealth, Polish Airmen and Workers of Ransome and Marles bombing that are buried in Newark-On-Trent

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/friends-of-newark-cemetery-fonc/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/01/26/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/10089490@N06/5030594123/

Ransome and Marles’ Factory was Bombed, we will Remember them that died in Newark-On-Trent with 29 men and 12 women were killed with a further 165 being injured. Newark was attacked regularly because of its significance to airfields and war work carried out within the area. The most significant attack was on Friday, 7th March 1941 when two German planes dropped a series of bombs on and around Ransome and Marles who made ball bearings for naval gun turrets. A total of 41 people were killed with a further 165 being injured. More on these can be found on these link.

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/02/05/ransome-and-marles-former-factory-workers-will-be-remembered-with-a-permanent-memorial-in-newark-on-trent-in-2011/

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsTribute to their sacrificePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

In Memory of 
Private PHILIP WOOLFITT

180165, 43rd Bn., Canadian Infantry (Manitoba Regiment) who died age 19 on 1st November 1916
Son of William Pearce Woolfitt and Emma Woolfitt, of Homeleigh, New Balderton, Newark.

Remembered with honour

NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY


Cemetery: NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY

 The British Commonwealth, Polish Sacrifice and Ransome and Marles bombing 70 years ago Friday afternoon 7th march 1941

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls British Commonwealth and Polish Airman together with other service men are buried in Newark Cemetery. Many came over during the2nd World war, Royal Australian Air Force, British from overseas, Royal Canadian Air Force, Royal New Zealand Air Force and Polish Airman and others.

General Sikorski former resting place at Newark Cemetery until 13th September 1993.We must not forget the polish Airman and the Commonwealth they fought for Freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch. They fought to the end and then carried on the fight, we should be grateful. We certainly owe them a great deal of credit that they so rightly deserve.

 

Newark-On-Trent is also important internationally, as it contains the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

A true sacrifice for Freedom is Remembered at All Souls Day held on Sunday 26th October 2014 each year at Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire.

Remembering the many Polish Airmen that were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force

 

Newark-On-Trent is also important internationally, as it contains the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

Newark-On-Trent is also important internationally, as it contains the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

Remembering the many Polish Airmen that were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force

Remembering the many Polish Airmen that were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force

 

Newark-On-Trent is also important internationally, as it contains the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

 

Newark-On-Trent is also important internationally, as it contains the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

 

Newark-On-Trent is also important internationally, as it contains the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

 

Newark-On-Trent is also important internationally, as it contains the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves.

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsww.youtube.com/watch?v=BK3vuWnHKGQ&feature=related

Newark-on-Trent is important internationally, as it is home to the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves where there are many graves of Polish airmen who died during the second world war. Many Poles remained in the UK after the war, married and started families. Their resting place is also at Newark Cemetery.

We should remember the many Polish airmen who were flying Spitfires and bomber planes with the Royal Air Force, and Commonwealth pilots, during the Battle of Britain and pay tribute to them for their contribution.During Britain’s darkest hour, Polish pilots came to the UK and formed fighter squadrons that would operate during the Battle of Britain 70 years ago.RAF Winthorpe near Newark was established in 1940. It was a satellite station for RAF Swinderby over the border in Lincolnshire. Two Polish squadrons, 300 and 301, were based at Winthorpe. Polish contribution to the Allied victory in World War 2 (1939-1945) It was the only country to fight in the 2nd world war from the first to the last day of the greatest armed conflict to remember them to this day. The most important issue of the Polish contribution to the defeat of the enemy with determination, valor and perseverance. We must not forget the Polish airmen and those of the Commonwealth. They fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch.

We certainly owe them a debt of gratitude.

Laurence Goff, Friends of Newark Cemetery, Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire.

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls 

Let us be grateful to the Polish airmen during the 2nd world war

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We Will Remember Them Our Lasting Tribute

Guardian Angel Watching Over Newark Cemetery Each Day

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Lasting Tribute to British Commonwealth, Polish Airmen that died during the 2nd World War there resting place is at Newark Cemetery, Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsNottinghamshire

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls  Where would we be without them, they are appreciated There will always be men and women braver than ourselves

 Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

British Commonwealth and Polish Airman buried in Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire during the 2nd world war Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire War Memorial Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire War Memorial

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

We will Remember them at Newark Cemetery in front on the Warsaw Uprising Memorial Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Let’s We will Remember them at Warsaw Uprising Memorial, Newark Cemetery

 Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

http://www.warsaw-life.com/poland/warsaw-1944-uprising

Lasting Tribute to  British Commonwealth and Polish Airmen

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls
Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Do not weep, I am happy in the next world

British Plane Flying over in Freedom Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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War Memorial to the Fallen Richard Todd OBE

Richard Todd OBE Came to Newark-On-Trent to officially unveiled the Memorial to Fallen on 28th April 2007 at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire. Actor in the Dam Busters and the Longest Day movies, WAR hero and film star died 4th Dec 2009 age 90.

  

Remembrance Day at Newark Cemetery

War Memorial to the Fallen Richard Todd OBE Newark-On-Trent an officially unveiled the Memorial to  Fallen on 28th April 2007 at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire. Actor in the Dam Busters and the Longest Day movies, WAR hero and film star died 4th Dec 2009 age 90. View Image Royal New Zealand Air Force Flight Sergeant John Bernard Kennedy Age 26 Buried in Newark Cemetery Sec R 298 Royal New Zealand Air Force Sergeant Desmond George Bradley, died on 21st October 1941, Age 22 Buried in Newark Cemetery Sec Q 300 New Zealand Air Force Flight Lieutenant James Cowan Age 30 Buried in Newark Cemetery Sec P 308 Flag of (In total 3 RNZAF died and resting place is in our cemetery) Lasting Tribute to  British Commonwealth and  Polish Airmen  http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=2088977&id=1405133581&ref=notif&notif_t=like

Royal Australian Air Force Sergeant Frank Dunkin died on 9th April 1943, buried in Newark Cemetery Sec. P 311 Royal Australian Air Force Flight Sergeant Leonard Wentworth Lean died during 2nd World War and in Buried in Newark Cemetery Sec. P 310 A (In total 6 RAAF died and resting place is in our cemetery)

 

Royal Canadian Air Force Sergeat Alexander Teryl Mc Millan Air Observer Died 21st Oct 1941 Age 24 Resting Place at Newark Cemetery Sec. Q 299 Royal Canadian Air Force Flight Sergeant Raymond David Lewis died on 10th April 1943 age 22, Buried in Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire, Sec. B 310

Canadian Red Ensign Flag during the 2nd world war

17 (RCAF) Royal Canadian Air Force were

killed and are buried in Newark-On-Trent Cemetery

This was the official flag of Canada from 1921 until 1957. Since 1868, Canada has used this design with slightly different alterations to the Canadian shield. The Canadian badge in the fly of the flag has gone through several revisions since then. This was used by Canadian troops in the trenches of World War I. It was also the Canadian flag that was carried to the beaches at Normandy, France by Canadian troops during the D-Day invasion of occuppied France. The entities represented in the shield are the arms of the countries where the vast majority of Canadian people hail from: England, Scotland, Ireland and France. The three green maple leaves in the bottom of the shield represent Canada itself. In 1957, the three Maple leaves were changed from green to red and that design was used until the establishement of the maple leaf flag we know today in 1965.

Royal Canadian Air Force Sergeat Alexander Teryl Mc Millan Air Observer Died 21st Oct 1941 Age 24 Resting Place at Newark Cemetery Sec. Q 299

(In total 17 RCAF died and resting place at Newark Cemetery)

Symbol of the Government of CanadaSymbol of the Government of CanadaSymbol of the Government of CanadaSymbol of the Government of CanadaSymbol of the Government of CanadaSymbol of the Government of CanadaSymbol of the Government of CanadaSymbol of the Government of CanadaSymbol of the Government of CanadaSymbol of the Government of CanadaSymbol of the Government of CanadaSymbol of the Government of CanadaSymbol of the Government of CanadaSymbol of the Government of CanadaSymbol of the Government of CanadaSymbol of the Government of CanadaSymbol of the Government of Canada


Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve Sergeant Frederick George Bellchambers Flight Engineer died 1st October 1942, We will Remember them at Newark Cemetery Sec. P. Grave 306 Royal Canadian Air Force Flight Sergeant Albert Edward Hannay died on 12th March 1943 at age 24 Resting Place at Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire Sec. P 310  

www.vac-acc.gc.ca

Though they are hidden in the shadow of Death, their lives for others in the love of Freedom that never dies. In Memory of our Fallen Heroes, greater love hath no one then this, that one lay down your life for his friends and Country.  We departed this life into the next, though they are hidden in the shadow of Death. Their lives for others in the love of serving our Country and Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire.

 Polish Flag is posted at The Chapel Interpretation Newark-On-Trent, Cemetery, Nottinghamshire   Many British Commonwealth helped thanks to  Royal Australian Air Force (6 killed), British, Royal Canadian Air Force (17 killed), Royal New Zealand Air Force(3 killed) and Polish Air Force some (400 killed) They are Buried in Newark-On-Trent Cemetery 2nd World War at Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire. Let us all Remember the many Airmen that were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force during the Battle to save Europe 1939-1945.  Paying a fitting Tribute to our brave fighters for their contribution. 17,000 Polish pilots and ground crew members had formed 14 squadron in RAF and 2,000 were killed of which over 400  from 1940 – 1947 are buried in Newark Cemetery.

 Royal New Zealand Air Force died Age 30 James Cowan DFC and Royal Canadian Air Force Died Age 23 T.H. Warne, Buried in Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire

RAAF, RAF, RNZAF And RCAF were killed during the 2nd World War and are buried in newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

I just wanted to add something to this very interesting site, I notice one of the War Graves shown is that of Thomas Herbert Warne, for anyone who wants to know more about what happened to Herb Warne and his crew, they may find this short film of interest. It was made in August 2010 primarily for the relatives of Herb Warne and his crew, so they could feel part of the rededication to the Memorial to the crew of Lancaster W4270 at Staunton in the Vale http://www.vimeo.com/14431980

A short clips of Newark Cemetery on the film, on photos of Herb’s funeral that were sent to his family in 1943.

We will remember them.

  1. Lancaster W4270 memorial:: OS grid SK8043 :: Geograph Britain and 

    Memorial for the aircrew who lost their lives when Lancaster bomber W4270crashed near here on 18th February 1943. …
    http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/930627 – Cached – Similar

  2. [KML]

SK8043 : Lancaster Bomber Memorial, Staunton Churchyard

File Format: KML Document – View on Google Maps
20 Nov 2005 … kml_Snippet, Memorial to commemorate the lives of the crew …
http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/83294.kml

Per Purum Tonantes
22 min – 25 Aug 2010
vimeo.com

 

Per Purum Tonantes
25 Aug 2010
vimeo.com

hello@georgehorne.co.uk

On the night of the 18th February 1943, Lancaster Bomber W4270 crashed during a training mission, resulting in the deaths of all seven of its crew. This is an account of that fateful night and the research that uncovered the airmen’s story. It is a tribute to their brave service and tragic sacrifice.

This is a cut down version of the original 35 minute piece*

http://vimeo.com/14431980


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6 ARAF – Australian, 44 British RAF and Servicemen, 17 CRAF – Canadian and 3 NZRAF – New Zealand were also killed during the 2nd World War and are buried in Newark Cemetery for all to see. If it hadn’t  been for the courageous Polish Air Force we would have struggled and things could have turned out differently. These airmen helped us win the war for Freedom. Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

War Memorial to the Fallen, we will Remember them

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Not enough credit is given to the Polish pilots who went out of their way to help us in the dark days of the 2nd World war. They never let us down to gain Freedom for us and should not be forgotten as our heroes of World War II. This memorial website is dedicated to the thousands of men and women from the 2nd World War. Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Memorial to the Fallen of Newark commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914 for over 94

years. Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls This being the darkest days during the 2nd World war when 29 men and 12 women died with another 165 that were injured. When 10 bombs were dropped with 5 exploded on that Friday the 7th March 1941.

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/03/08/ransome-and-marles-former-factory-workers-will-be-remembered-with-a-permanent-memorial-in-newark-on-trent-in-2011/

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsFile:Flag of the United Kingdom.svgPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls The Battle of Britain was not just won by our brave Airmen, many thanks to the people around Newark that worked at Ransome & Marles Ball Bearings Factory. They provided components to all three Armed Forces, that needed parts for our Spitfires, Hurricanes, Lancaster bombers. Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls 41 Were killed in the Ransome and Marles bombing, 41 were killed 30 are buried in Newark Cemetery Six graves near to the British Commonwealth Polish War Graves Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

41-killed-by-enemy-action-during-a-bombing 7th-march-1941 Laurence Goff Friends of Newark Cemetery Chairman

 Laurence Goff Visiting  Graves 30 are Buried in Newark Cemetery,  When 41 Were Killed at Ransome and Marles bombing.

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/01/01/ransome-and-marles’-41-killed-by-enemy-action-during-a-bombing-7th-march-1941/ http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=153850701312504&ref=ts

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Robert Grant died at age 47 during the Ransome and Marles’ Factory bombing On Friday 7th March 1941, we did Remember them 2011 for the 70th Anniversary. His son Mr Chris Grant became Mayor of Newark  50 years later 1991-1992.  RIP

http://www.flickr.com/search/?s=int&w=all&q=ransome+and+Marles+&m=text

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Lasting Tribute to  British Commonwealth,  Polish Airmen and Workers of

Ransome and Marles Bombing

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We will Remember themPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

Crew killed and are buried in Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

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We would wish to acknowledge the generosity of the following local organization for their assistance in the production of this Comfort Book

The Grange House Hotel across from the London Road Cemetery Newark-On-Trent

E.Gill & Son Funeral Services, Newark

Lidsters of Worksop Ltd

Lincolnshire Co-Operative Funeral Service, Newark

Newark and Nottinghamshire Agricultural Society

If you would like to Sponsor our 4th order of the book of support  with reading of poems,quotations and passages from scriptures.

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

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Our spiritual Angle believed to act for us. A time to pray for our loss friends. Many believe that these supernatural beings watch over us and can also come to our spiritual and physical aid. Let’s also remember them in love, peace, joy also tranquility

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John Henry Green is one 41 killed at age 55 when Ransome and Marles’ Factory was Bombed, we will Remember them that died in Newark-On-Trent with 29 men and 12 women were killed with a further 165 being injured. Newark was attacked regularly because of its significance to airfields and war work carried out within the area. The most significant attack was on Friday, 7th March 1941. Friday afternoon when two German planes dropped a series of bombs on and around Ransome and Marles who made ball bearings for naval gun turrets. A total of 41 people were killed with a further 165 being injured. More on these can be found on these link.

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/03/08/ransome-and-marles-former-factory-workers-will-be-remembered-with-a-permanent-memorial-in-newark-on-trent-in-2011/

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http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=ransome%20and%20Marles&w=all http:/  

Bert Emerson and Laurence Goff Visit Newark Cemetery to Remember the Bombing of Ransome and Marles Ball and Roller Bearing Factory, 70 years ago on this date, 7th March 1941

Ransome and Marles Ball and Roller Bearing Factory, 7th March 1941
Newark in the Second World War records the events surrounding the bombing of the Ransome and Marles bearing factory at Newark-on-Trent. On Friday 7th March 1941 the most well known of all the raids on [Newark-On-Trent] took place when Ransome and Marles factory was bombed. The type of work carried out at the factory made it an obvious target for the Germans. The raid commenced at about 1.40pm. Many workers were returning from their lunch break when the alert sounded at 1.35pm. A few minutes later a single Heinkel III bomber – flying so low that those on the ground could see its markings – approached from the south, following the railway line. As it neared Ransome and Marles it was fired on from several different points but still managed to drop four high explosive bombs. Two of these landed in the works, one on the road at the side of the factory and the other on an air raid shelter adjacent to Stanley Street. The plane also machine-gunned the site before circling, passing over the factory again and dropping another bomb. Fortunately this one did not explode. According to German reports the aircraft flew over for a third time in order to take photographs. The Raiders Passed siren was sounded and rescue parties went immediately into action. Various ambulances transported casualties to hospital and the Home Guard helped to close the roads around the works. The First Aid posts and the Womens Voluntary Service canteen were also kept busy. At 2.24pm the alert sounded again. Another enemy aircraft approached and dropped five more bombs but only one exploded. This was near the road and caused more damage and casualties, many of those hurt being rescue workers. Raiders Passed was sounded again at 2.51pm. As a result of the raid 29 men and 12 women were killed. One young woman was never found and presumed dead. Amongst those killed, were a young woman who had planned to get married the following weekend and a man who had recently been discharged from the army. Sixty-five people were admitted to Newark Hospital and 100 more were treated at the works own underground hospital. The official German communiqué of the raid stated that A daring low level attack took place on an armament factory at Newark causing heavy damage in the workshops. The bombers were under the command of Lietenant Knaut and Lieutenant Randolf. Local papers were severely restricted in what they could report. The day after the raid the Newark Herald reported that A single German plane came out of the low-lying clouds yesterday and dropped a number of bombs on an East Midlands town. An hour later the same or another raider dropped more bombs in the same locality. There were a number of casualties, some being fatal. The official report from which much of this information comes was not made public until the end of the war. The day became known locally as Black Friday. After the raid the two paired Lewis guns which were mounted in sand-bagged positions on Clay Lane Bridge were replaced by a Bofors 40mm anti-aircraft gun mounted on a proper gun platform. Fortunately the factory was not attacked again. We will Remember them

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British Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

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Andeusz Kukurowski Polish Airman resting place at Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire during the 2nd world war Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Andrzej Mierzejewski Polish Forces died age 20 Resting Place Newark-On-Trent

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Main Gate on London Road, Newark Cemetery

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ZA WOLNOSC – FOR FREEDOM

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls New Zealand Air Force 3 Killed During the 2nd World War and are Buried in Newark Cemetery. These Website is dedicated to the fallen and missing Airman from 1939-1945, we will preserve their Memories. You paid the ultimate Sacrifice for our Freedom http://www.flickr.com/photos/newarkcemeteryuk/5032411669/

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We are Grateful to the Many Young Men that came over from the British Commonwealth 3 Died from Royal New Zealand Air Force RNZAF, 6 from Royal Australian Air Force RAAF and 17 Royal Canadian  Air Force RCAF

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The RCAF and their former Canada Flag, 17 Canadian Airman from the 2nd World War were killed and are Buried in Newark Cemetery.

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Major General Tadeusz KLIMECKI, Chief of the Polish General Staff died with General Sikorski on the 4th July 1943

Lieutenant Jozef Ponikiewski died with General Sikorski on 4th July 1943

Colonel Andrzej MARECKI, Chief of Operations Staff died with General Sikorski on 4th July 1943

4 July 1943: After tours of Gibraltar and festivities, General Sikorski departs for London at 11:00pm. After reaching only 100 feet, the plane began a slow dive into the sea. Only the pilot survived. All others died or were presumed dead on impact at 11:06pm. B-24C Liberator AL 523 Full List of Passengers: 1. General Władysław SikorskiPrime Minister and Commander-in-Chief of Poland 2. Zofia LeśniowskaChief of the Polish Women’s Auxiliary 3. Major General Tadeusz KlimeckiChief of the Polish General Staff 4.Colonel Andrzej MareckiChief of Operations Staff 5. Lieutenant Jozef PonikiewskiNaval A.D.C. 6. Adam KulakowskiPersonal secretary to Sikorski 7. Colonel Victor CazaletM.P., British Liason Officer 8.Brigadier J.P. WhitelyM.P. 9.Mr. W.H. Lock(Never found, presumed dead) 10. Mr. PinderHead of British Intelligence Service in the Middle East (his position was never revealed to General Sikorski) 11. Bombardier Gralewski (Joined the party at Gibraltar) Crew: 1. 1Lt Edward Maks Prchal Captain/1st Pilot 2. Squadron Leader W.S. Herring2nd Pilot (never found) 3. Warrant Officer L. Zalsberg Navigator 4. Sergeant F. Kelly Flight Engineer 5. Flight Sergeant C.B. GerrieRadio Operator/Air Gunner 6. Flight Sergeant D. HunderRadio Operator/Air Gunner (never found)

Memorial to the Fallen Newark cemetery

Nottinghamshire

 Lasting Tribute  Memorial to the Air Bridge of August 1944 British, Polish and  South African help with the Warsaw Uprising which was said all Poles  in Warsaw are  to be killed, no prisoners. A further moment to war time confilict is the Air Bridge Monument which remembers the aircrew who died, during world war two, supporting the popular uprising in Warsaw in 1944. The Warsaw Uprising (1944) badly needed the support of the allies to provide food and munitions to the Polish Partisans (AK, Home Army), resulting in the Polish Government in London, appealing to Mr Winston Churchill the Prime Minister for assistance. After many discussions with the Allied Command and getting no help from Russia, who refused even to grant permission for allied aircraft to land in Russia, he ordered relief to be flown to Warsaw from Italy, which was some 100 miles less than that from England, but was told by General Durrant, that an airlift of 2000 miles there and back, would have no hope of success, in that the loss of aircraft flying over occupied territory would be tremendous. Although Churchill agreed with him, he nevertheless ordered the operation to be proceeded with. The task was allocated to 205 group, of which RAF Squadrons 148 and 178, SAAF 31 and 34 squadrons and Polish Special Services Flight 1586 were part. The losses were horrendous, for every ton of supplies delivered and recovered by the Polish insurgents one aircraft was lost (39 four-engine bombers total). The operation was called “Warsaw Concerto”.

Lasting Tribute at Newark Cemetery

Remembrance Day at Newark Cemetery

Lasting Tribute Preserve the Memory in year to come Lasting Tribute to  Polish Airmen


Lance Corporal Adam Cornelius, a very close friend, said: “Sean was an all round good guy. I will remember Sean best for his ‘Cheeky Chappy’ attitude to life both in and out of work. His death is a massive loss as he was an individual who had so much to give to others.” Lance Corporal Violino was married to Katey Anne and had eight-year-old twins from a previous marriage, Ellie and Lewis. He was an Army canoeist and regularly represented his regiment at rugby. His wife said: “Sean will be sadly missed for his infectious enthusiasm for life and his desire to be everyone’s friend. He was popular with everyone he met and was loved by friends and family alike. Sean was very proud to be a member of the Armed Forces, in particular the Royal Engineers. The world is a poorer place without Sean.” He was killed in an explosion during a routine convoy to transport vital engineering equipment to a Forward Operating Base in the Helmand province. Despite the best efforts of the Air Medical Emergency Response Team, Lance Corporal Violino was pronounced dead on arrival at the field hospital at Camp Bastion. Defence Secretary Des Browne said: “The death of Lance Corporal Violino is profoundly tragic. The Army has lost a highly professional soldier and his death is an immense blow to all who knew him. I hope that his family, friends and comrades will draw comfort from the fact that he died doing a job he clearly excelled at.” Memory to Lance Corporal Ivano ‘Sean’ Violino

We should Remember him and other.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Lance Corporal Ivano ‘Sean’ Violino his name has been added to the War Memorial to the fallen at Newark-On-Trent Cemetery off London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire. He will not be forgotten.  Lasting Tribute, Greater Love Hath No Man Than This That a Man Lay Down His Life For His Friends. Lance Corporal Ivano Violino killed in Afghanistan.It is with immense sadness that the Ministry of Defence must confirm the death of Corporal Ivano Violino from 20 Field Squadron, 36 Engineer Regiment in southern Afghanistan on Monday 17th September 2007.  

Main Arch down the Main drive of Newatk Cemetery with two former Chapels since 1856

Memory to the fallen Lance Corporal Ivano ‘Sean’ Violino, 29 his good name has been added to Newark War Memorial to the Fallen. He went to school in Newark-On-Trent Nottinghamshire and whose family still live in the town. He was killed in Helmand Province, southern Afghanistan, on September 17, 2007, RIP

 

I’m PROUD to Support Our Brave Troops. Let’s stand as one, and show our Brave Boys & Girls, just how Proud of them we ALL are !! They ALL put their Precious Lives on the line 24/7/365 to ensure we remain living in the Freedom we can ALL take for granted, the least we can do, is show them how grateful we really are, and show them ALL, Love, Loyalty, Support, and most important of all  Our RESPECT and God Bless ALL Troops and our Allies, and a massive THANK YOU.   

Flying the Flag in Tribute to Lance Corporal Ivano Sean Violino a Lasting Tribute and for others, Laurence Goff

Lance Corporal Ivano Violino, known as Sean, was killed while serving in Afghanistan on Monday, 17th September, 2007, aged 29.He was described by his commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Richard Wardlaw, as “experienced and dedicated … the very epitome of a modern professional soldier, who lived life to the full and gave his all to the Army, his comrades and to his family.” Lance Corporal Violino was born in Salford, Manchester. He joined the Army at 24 and, having completed combat and driver training, joined the Kent-based 36 Engineer Regiment in February 2003. He took part in Operation TELIC in Kuwait and was promoted to Lance Corporal in October 2004, receiving recognition for his high professional standards. At the start of 2007 he wascross-posted with 20 Field Squadron and took part in construction exercises in Canada. He arrived in Afghanistan on 2 September, 2007, and was the first fatality from his regiment.

Memory to Lance Corporal Ivano ‘Sean’ Violino Help for Heroes which was taken in Newark Market Place, we will Remember them.

http://www.the-soldiers.co.uk/

  • Related tributes:
  • Links:

 NEWARK TOWN NOTTINGHAMSHIRE ENGLAND UK FROM THE FIRST WORLD WAR MEMORIAL TO THE FALLEN by friendsofnewarkcemetery.

Our Heroes  in memory to the fallen Lance Corporal Ivano ‘Sean’ Violino, 29  his good name has been added to the war memorial at Newark-On-Trent Cemetery, RIP. He went to school in Newark-On-Trent and whose family still live in the town. He was killed in Helmand Province, southern Afghanistan, on September 17, 2007. RIP

laurencegoffnewark

Lance Corporal Violino was commanding an FL12 Self-Loading Dump Truck on a routine logistics convoy, moving vital engineering equipment to a Forward Operating Base 19km north east of the town of Gereshk in Helmand province, when his vehicle was caught in an explosion. Despite the best efforts of the Air Medical Emergency Response Team who arrived on the scene shortly after the explosion, Corporal Violino was sadly pronounced dead on arrival at the field hospital at Camp Bastion. RIP

Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

Pictures come in for project, thanks to The Newark Advertiser  

http://www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Pictures-come-in-for-project

Photographs of ten fallen heroes have so far been found for a pictorial project to honour Newark’s war dead.

Mr Brian Clark-Dench, 74, of Balderton, whose uncle features on the Newark Memorial To The Fallen. The project, which aims to put faces to the 603 names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen at Newark Cemetery, is being coordinated by Mr Pete Stevens, a Commonwealth War Graves Commission stonemason. He hopes to find all of the pictures in time for the 100th anniversary of the start of the first world war in 2014. The Newark memorial names 456 Servicemen who died in the first world war and 144 casualties from the second world war. Also named are one Serviceman who died in West Africa in 1961, one who died in Malaya in 1952, and one in Afghanistan in 2007. Mr Stevens is seeking pictures to a further 45 names from the first world war on the memorial in St Giles’ Church, Balderton, and 13 from the second world war. Mr Stevens has set up a website to add each picture collected to the details of the casualty on one of the war memorials.The website can be viewed at 

www.memorialphotoproject.tumblr.com

So far those who have come forward to help with the project include Mr Brian Clark-Dench, of Gibson Crescent, Balderton, whose uncle, Mr Alfred Charles Dench, is one of the names on the Newark memorial. Mr Dench, who was born in Winthorpe and lived on Middlegate, Newark, for most of his life, served in 1st Battalion King’s Company of the Grenadier Guards. He was killed in 1915 at the village of Loos, France, at the age of 23, and was later buried to the north-west of the village.

Over the years Mr Clark-Dench has compiled and collected military items related to his uncle, including his original dog tags, campaign medals, postcards sent from France, photographs and even his death notice, signed by Field Marshall Herbert Kitchener, British Secretary of State for War from 1914-16. Mr Clark-Dench, who served in the same battalion as his uncle during the 1950s, said: “When I saw the article in the Advertiser I was amazed and wanted to come forward and help. “I never knew my uncle but I do feel the need to keep his memory alive because his story is an interesting tale. “He was held in high regard as being a real hard man, strong as an ox. “During battle he saved his company commander from No Man’s Land, despite being under heavy enemy fire — this was the type of man he was.“Coming forward to help with the project is very important because the men on the memorials should be remembered — what they did for this country should never be forgotten. “I am immensely proud of what my uncle did and the rest of my family — that is something I wanted to honour.” Any relative of one of the fallen featured on either memorial and who has a photograph of them or who can help in any way can contact Mr Stevens via Petejstevens@hotmail.co.uk or contact the Advertiser newsdesk on 01636 681234. The Newark project mirrors a much bigger scheme to find photographs of as many as possible of the 72,000 British and Commonwealth casualties of the Battle of The Somme, whose names are commemorated on the French Thiepval Memorial To The Missing.

Thanks to Dan Churcher Newark Advertiser Reporter

 

On 28th April 2007, Richard Todd OBE, officially unveiled the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery

.Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire Saturday 28th April 2007 by you.

Friends of Newark Cemetery is grateful to NSK and Newark Town Council,  a Memorial has been put in place at Newark Town Hall on the ground floor as you walk up stairs to .   Ransome & Marles of Newark  will have a Lasting Tribute to the 41 Killed and 165 that where injured on that Friday 7th March 1941.

These being the darkest days during the 2nd World war when 29 men and 12 women died with another 165 that were injured. When 10 bombs were dropped with 5 exploded on that Friday the 7th March 1941.https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2010/09/10/ransome-and-marles’-41-killed-by-enemy-action-during-a-bombing-7th-march-1941/ Laurencegoff

Newark names of the World at side in the front of St. Mary Magdalene Parish Church

The large plaque on Church Street close by the ancient Parish Church of St. Mary Magdalene – a piece of Newark heritage right there in the street which many of us pass regularly or even step over without really noticing it or appreciating what it stands for. 

There are 26 Newarks listed including 21 from American States – Arkansas, California, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, South Dakota, Texas, Vermont, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

Also on the plaque is the Newark of Natal in South Africa, Newark Ontario in Canada, Newark in Queensland Australia. Please note Newark Bay in the Falkland Islands is not named.

Not included, it seems, is Newark in Cambridgeshire, nowadays absorbed as part of the city of Peterborough.

Laurence Goff

By Laurencegoff

Friends of Newark Cemetery are happy to use the Interpretation centre in the former Eastern Chapel

By Laurencegoff

Cremated remains at Newark Cemetery

By Laurencegoff

Looking over at Cremated Remains at Newark Cemetery

By Laurencegoff

 

By Laurencegoff

Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire has been open since 1856

In 1943 General Wladyslaw Sikorski died on July 4th 1943, when a Royal Air Force aircraft he was travelling aboard plunged into the sea seconds after take-off from Gibraltar.

1981 Newark town Mayor Councillor Jean Moore at General Wladyslaw Sikorski grave his wishes were remembered and on Thursday 15, July 1943, his body arrived in Newark and was taken to Holy Trinity RC Church on Parliament Street Newark, Nottinghamshire England. A Requiem Mass was held and the Catholic Church was guarded overnight.  A Requiem Mass was held and the Catholic Church was guarded overnight. The following morning was Friday 16, July 1943 early Masses were held and members of the public were allowed to file past the coffin to pay their respects. Outside the Catholic Church, reporters from across the UK and BBC representatives set up their equipment on top of a nearby air raid shelter. A large crowd gathered in the Newark Streets to see the funeral procession, headed by the exiled Polish government and Newark Town Mayor Councillor Cyril Parlby. A guard of honour from the Polish Air Force was on hand. After General Silorski remains were exhumed from Newark Cemetery on 13th September 1993. He was taken Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene overnight, then next day a farewell Mass before his return home to Poland.  By Laurencegoff

General Sikorski was Also Laid to Rest in Newark Cemetery From 1943-1993. A Memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and unveiled on 14th July 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander in Chief of the Polish Forces and war-time Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski (aged 62) in 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s It contains a memorial to Poland’s exiled war leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski, who died when the aeroplane he was travelling in crashed over Gibraltar.

By Laurencegoff

General Sikorski was buried at Newark on Friday 16thJuly, 1943, and it was his dying wish that his body should be returned to Poland when it was a free country. His remains were returned on  14th September 1993 A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for RAF burials and this is now the war graves for people to see across the UK and the World. Former Airmen choosing to be buried since staying in England after the 2nd World War. Newark Cemetery also contains graves from the 1st world war scattered around the Cemetery.

Each year British and Polish servicemen honoured at Newark service, candles lit to honour the fallen on the last Sunday in October starting at 3pm from the main gate of Newark Cemetery UK. War veterans and civic dignitaries attended a service to honour the Polish servicemen who died during the 2nd World War. Lighting of candles were lit on each of the Polish graves at Newark Cemetery. During the service, conducted in both Polish and English, to mark All Souls Day.

The Amazing Spitfire Flying For Our Freedom

SAM_0071

By Laurencegoff

Polish War Memorial, Northolt

This commemorates the 2165 Polish airmen who lost their lives during the 2nd World War fighting alongside the  Allies. RAF Northolt was the main base for the Polish fighter squadrons. The memorial is by the Western Avenue/West End Road roundabout, outside the airfield.

    

According to Sir Archibald Sinclair Britains wartime air force Minister, ‘without the Poles our shortage of trained pilots would have made it impossible to defeat the German air force and to win the Battle of Britain’. We owe them a great deal and the way they were treated after the war was and is disgraceful. Without their contribution we could not have won the Battle of Britian and our future would have very different, we owe them a debt of gratitude that can never be repaid except to say that they will be Forever Remembered and Never Forgotten for Time Shall Not Wither and Fade Their Names and Deeds, R.I.P. True and Brave Heroes.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Tribute to them at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

 I would like to say many thanks to  Gail Edwards for giving me permission to you these poems and photos.

Profile picture

Laurence Goff  Tribute to  Lance Corporal Ivano Sean Violino a Lasting Tribute and our British Troops

Injured soldiers join fundraising effort

Mon Jun 28, 2010

Soldiers who have been helped by the Newark Patriotic Fund after being injured in Afghanistan were in the town’s  of Newark in the Market Place to help raise money for the cause.

Local hero Newark Newark was attacked  because of its significance to airfields and war work carried out within the area. The most significant attack was on Friday, 7th March 1941 when two German planes dropped a series of 10 bombs on and around Ransome and Marles who made ball bearings for naval gun turrets. A total of 41 people were killed with a further 165 being injured.

Cornelius Brown Historian of Newark-On-Trent, died over a 100 years ago in 1907, we will Remember

him.

William Oliver Quibell and Family are Buried in Newark Cemetery

Grave from the 1st World War, at Newark Cemetery. Service together for others and our Country

Memorial to the Fallen at Newark Cemetery Memorial, we will Remember them

Newark Cemetery Chapel Interpretation centre , we have displays of the history of Newark cemetery, Commonwealth, Polish, Ransome and Marles  during the 2nd world war.

Link pages http://www.aircrewremembrancesociety.com/welcome.html http:/

/www.winthorpe.org.uk/the-history-of-winthorpe-airfield

www.aviationanoraks.co.uk/page5.html

http://www.controltowers.co.uk/W-Z/Winthorpe.htm

http://www.bbc.co.uk/nottingham/content/articles/2009/05/15/air_museum_poles_feature.shtml

http://www.coddington.org.uk/

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

http://www.cwgc.org

Lasting Tribute to  British Commonwealth

http://www.google.co.uk/images?client=safari&rls=en&q=newark+cemetery

http://www.google.co.uk/images?client=safari&rls=en&q=ramsome+and+marles

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

This website has been set up as a means of further promoting our Newark Cemetery and encouraging interested people to join the tribute. Together as a Fitting tribute who resting place is at Newark Cemetery.


Crew of Avro Lancaster ED823

411919

 

Flight Sergeant

 

L W LEAN

 

RAAF

Pilot

Aged 22

14855

 

Sergeant

 

F DUNKIN

 

RAAF

Flight Engineer

Aged 21

127064

 

Flying Officer

 

E LAMBERT

 

 

Navigator

Aged 34

1087359

 

Sergeant

 

H U OXSPRING

 

 

Bomb Aimer

Aged 27

1345277

 

Sergeant

 

W S L GRAHAM

 

 

Wireless Operator

Aged 20

R/115799

 

Flight Sergeant

 

R D LEWIS

 

RCAF

Air Gunner

Aged 22

1231524

 

Sergeant

 

W G STEPHENSON

 

 

Air Gunner

Aged 21

From the left -Raymond Lewis – air gunner (RCAF); “Jock” Graham – wireless operator;
Ted Lambert – navigator; Len Lean – pilot (RAAF)

The pilot Len Lean and the flight engineer Frank Dunkin were both from Australia. They had both joined the RAAF for initial training before being embarked for Great Britain. Flt Sgt Lean came from Chatswood, Sydney, and Sgt Dunkin’s home was in Armidale, New South Wales. Raymond Lewis, one of the crew’s air gunners was from Melfort, Saskatchewan, Canada.

All three of these Commonwealth airmen are buried in Newark cemetery, about eight miles from this memorial.

The Navigator, Ted Lambert, lived with his wife Lavinia in Overhulton, Bolton, Lancashire. At 34 he was looked on by the rest of the crew as “the daddy” of the aircrew as he was “so much older” than the rest of them. He is buried in Fleetwood Borough Cemetery, near Blackpool.

Sgt Henry Oxspring as bomber aimer, manned the front gun turret and would have been responsible for releasing the plane’s bombs on target once the crew had gone operational and were sent on bombing runs. He is buried in Hoyland Nether Cemetery near Barnsley, South Yorkshire.

Wireless Operator “Jock” Graham’s family came from Glasgow. At 20 years old he was the youngest member of the crew. He is buried in the Glasgow Western Necropolis.

Sergeant William Stephenson was the crew’s second air gunner, along with Flt Sgt Lewis, his job was to provide the Lancaster’s defence against enemy fighters. He was from Leicester, where he is buried in Gilroes Cemetery.


The pilot Len Lean – he is still a trainee pilot in this picture as he has white band on his flying cap


Flying Officer Ted Lambert (navigator) – at 34 years old, the most senior crew member in terms of rank and age

Frank Dunkin from Australia. He was the Flight Engineer – his role was to support the pilot by keeping “the kite” flying

Sergeant Henry Oxspring – bomb aimer. He would also have manned the front machine gun turret


Wireless Operator Sergeant “Jock” Graham from Glasgow. Sadly we have been unable to trace any relatives or family for Sgt. Graham – can you help?

Canadian Flight Sergeant Lewis was one of the Lancaster’s two air gunners. He would keep a sharp look-out for enemy fighters, and defend the bomber from attack

Sergeant Billy Stephenson from Leicester, the other air gunner on the plane. When flying with other bombers, or in formation, the air gunners would also look out for wandering “friendly” aircraft threatening to collide with their own plane, and would warn the pilot to take evasive action.

Official Crash ReportThe official crash report was produced the day after the crash. It is a brief summary and gives little detail as to the events leading up to the crash. The report implies “pilot error” as the cause – HOWEVER, there is strong evidence that the Lancaster experienced problems with one of its engines right from take off. In fact it seems most likely that one of the engines was on fire when the plane crashed.Flt Sgt Lean would have had to struggle to keep the plane on a level flight, especially if the fire was spreading to the wing. It may well be that he was looking for a flat field in which to crash land – a further hundred yards and he would have had somewhere to put the plane down. The trees on the hill at Norwood Park and the power cables across the field where they crashed meant they had no chance for a safe landing. The plane was certainly heading towards open country where a crash landing could be attempted.Rather than pilot error, it may have been mechanical failure and sheer bad luck that Len couldn’t bring his crew down safely.Why the engine problems, and possible fire, are not mentioned in the accident report remains a mystery. Was this an oversight in a rushed report by people busy fighting a desperate war? Perhaps it was easier to blame a trainee pilot rather than admit to a faulty, or poorly maintained aircraft…. after all to send an aircrew up in a plane that wasn’t airworthy would be to put seven lives as great risk…. Perhaps we will never know.So far the official Accident Investigation Branch (A.I.B.) report hasn’t been traced – if that can be found, perhaps more light can be shone on the tragic events.Can anyone provide any more information on the likely cause of the crash, or help us find the A.I.B. report?

To read the official RAF accident report for ED823 – Click Here

The Avro Lancaster Bomber

The Lancaster bomber was the most famous and most successful of the Second World War heavy bombers. Although primarily a night bomber, it excelled in many other roles including daylight precision bombing, and gained worldwide fame as the “Dam Buster” used in the 1943 raids on Germany’s Ruhr Valley dams

Role

Heavy Bomber

Manufacturer

Avro

Designed by

Roy Chadwick

First flight

8 January 1941

Introduced in service

1942

Length

69 ft 5 ins (21.2m)

Wingspan

102 ft (31.1m)

Weight (unloaded)

36,828 lb (16,705kg)

Weight (max. load)

63,000 lb (29,000kg)

Top speed

280mph

Number built

7,377

Unit cost

£45,000 – 50,000
[about £1.3 – £1.5m in 2011 currency]

During WWII 7,377 Lancasters were built and this workhorse of Bomber Command flew 156,000 sorties, dropping over 600,000 tons of bombs. Although of an exceptional design and thought by most pilots to be a great plane to fly, almost half of all Lancasters delivered during the war were lost (a total of 3,345 planes lost) on operations with the loss of over 21,000 crew members; a sad reflection of the casualties of war.

Unfortunately accidents involving aircrews in training were all too common. The crew of ED823 were such a trainee aircrew; on that tragic night seven young men “gave their tomorrows for our todays”.

Lest we forget

Lafarge granite gives tragic airmen lasting memorial

The generosity of a Leicestershire building materials firm will ensure the sacrifice of a county airman killed in WWII will forever be remembered. 

Lafarge Aggregates & Concrete UK has donated a granite boulder from its Mountsorrel quarry, near Loughborough, to be erected as a memorial to second air gunner, Sgt Billy Stephenson and his comrades, who died during a training mission.

All seven airmen perished when their Lancaster bomber crashed in the Nottinghamshire village of Halam in the early hours of Saturday April 10 1943.

Villagers in Halam had long felt the sacrifice of the crew should be honoured and embarked on a mission to erect a memorial and trace relatives of the lost airmen.

Now thanks to Lafarge and Nottinghamshire County Council the memorial will be unveiled during a special ceremony on the 68thanniversary of the crash.

Andrew Paris, part of the Halam team responsible for organising the memorial, said:

 “The loss of the lives of these seven brave young men was a sad wartime event for the village.

“When they left their homes and families they were really no more than boys. We wanted to do something to honour the sacrifice of these seven brave young men and now a vague idea over a pint in the village pub has become a wonderful reality.”

Angus Shedden, operations manager for Lafarge’s Mountsorrel Quarry, said:

  “We are delighted that one of our armour stones is being used for such a worthy cause and will help keep alive the memory of these brave airmen.”

Appeals through local newspapers and radio have ensured relatives of almost all of the seven will be at the event on Sunday April 10.

Those expected to attend include Sgt Stephenson’s two nephews and a niece, seven or eight nieces and nephews of the pilot Len Lean, coming from Australia; the son and grandson of navigator Ted Lambert, from Fleetwood, near Blackpool; and a nephew of Canadian air gunner, Raymond ‘Tony’ Lewis travelling from Bangkok.

Andrew, a Halam resident for the past 20 years, said:

We felt that such a significant event the village shouldn’t be forgotten or go unmarked.

“Making contact with so many relatives of the aircrew has been a hugely interesting and very touching experience. We are delighted that so many of them will be there on April 10th“.


The donated rock from Lafarge

The crew of the Lancaster bomber

Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years

Application Form

If you would like to be part of the group and help us to achieve our aims – please complete this Application Form and send it to address given below.

Return to:

Friends of Newark Cemetery

Mr Laurence Goff

Newark Town Hall, Market Place

NG24 1DU, Newark, Nottinghamshire

You can also send us an e-mail:

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

FRIENDS OF NEWARK CEMETERY

NAME

ADDRESS

PHONE

E-MAIL

Minimum Subscriptions:

 £2.00 Individual  £5.00 Family  £10.00 Institutions  £20.00 Businesses

Please make cheques payable to:

The Friends of Newark Cemetery

“From death springs life and from the graves of great patriots springs a great nation”.

Patrick Henry Pearse

“He spake well who said that graves are the footprints of angels”.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The Friends of Newark Cemetery was set up in November 2005 with the aim of helping to improve the services and facilities of the Cemetery and to promote the site as

an attractive amenity to residents and visitors.

At our disposal we have the former Newark Cemetery Chapel, build in 1856 and renewed in 2010 (officially opened as an Interpretation Centre by the Newark Town Mayor on Saturday 11th September 2010).

*** Purpose of the Friends of Newark Cemetery:

 To offer suggestions to the Newark Town Council on ways to improve the service and facilities of the Cemetery.

 To provide input into the Cemetery Regulations.

To help identify problems with vandalism and other activities detrimental to the well-being of the Cemetery, and to work with Council to seek solutions to these problems.

 To play an active part in assisting the Town Council with practical tasks such as litter-picking, painting seats, benches, open-days, etc.

 To provide a welcoming presence and a source of help and information at the Cemetery during opening hours.

 To act as guides for visitors to the Cemetery.

 To collect feedback from visitors in the form of simple questionnaires.

 To provide extra presence for the Cemetery site.

Any questions? Want to join the Friends of Newark Cemetery? Please contact us:

 by e-mail:

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

 by phone: 01636-681878 We will answer as soon as possible.

Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856

This memorial website is Laurence Goff personal views, I have put it together and do not represent Newark Town Council . It dedicated to the thousands of  people since 1856.  Many are happy to have a resting place at Newark Cemetery for all to see and view. Having a means of further promoting Newark cemetery, and encouraging interested people to join the tribute. This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately, the content here is solely the responsibility of

Laurence Goff  

Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery {left side on the main drive off London Road} is opened  by appointment. please contact Laurence Goff

Friends of Newark Cemetery

01636-681878 or 07794613879

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire
open all year  April – September 8am-8pm  October – March 8am-8pm

Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856

Click on  for location of Cemetery Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Honouring lives of past cadets | Newark Advertiser

Air Cadet Keith Rollason Couzin-Wood, the young cadet or person killed on 29th July 2012. He is buried here in CommonwealthWar Graves Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

http://www.flickr.com/photos/newarkcemeteryuk/4847272393/sizes/l/in/photostream/

Honouring lives of past cadets

Laurence Goff  Tribute to  Lance Corporal Ivano Sean Violino

Memory to the fallen Lance Corporal Ivano ‘Sean’ Violino, 29 his good name has been added RIP. He went to school in Newark-On-Trent and whose family still live in the town. 

A Lasting Tribute and our British Troops. 

Memory to the fallen Lance Corporal Ivano ‘Sean’ Violino, 29 his good name has been added RIP. He went to school in Newark-On-Trent and whose family still live in the town. He was killed in Helmand Province, southern Afghanistan, on September 17, 2007

Newark Cemetery, London Road,Newark, Nottinghamshire UK

Injured soldiers join fundraising effort

Soldiers who have been helped by the Newark Patriotic Fund after being injured in Afghanistan were in the town’s  of Newark in the Market Place to help raise money for the cause.

Local hero Newark 

Newark was attacked  because of its significance to airfields and war work carried out within the area. The most significant attack was on Friday, 7th March 1941 when two German planes dropped a series of 10 bombs on and around Ransome and Marles who made ball bearings for naval gun turrets. A total of 41 people were killed with a further 165 being injured.

Tribute to British Commonwealth and Polish Sacrifice that are buried at Newark Cemetery

Link and Title of pages by Laurence Goff on Newark Cemetery UK Website, just click on page

Home page

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Prime Minister of Poland’s London-based government in exile

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We Remember Them not just on Remembrance Day at Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

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General Sikorski was Laid to Rest in Newark Cemetery From 1943-1993

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We must not forget those of the Commonwealth and Polish airmen, they fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch

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Newark, Nottinghamshire England is going back in time over the years since 1856

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Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire UK Those Who Lost Their Lives during the Second World War

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Thomas Earp who departed this life into the next, former Town Mayor and Newark MP, Died 100 years

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A time to pray for our loss friends at Newark Cemetery

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Ransome and Marles former factory workers Remembered with a Permanent Memorial in Newark-On-Trent on 7th March 2011

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FRIENDS OF NEWARK CEMETERY TRANSLATED INTO POLISH

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski

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Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom

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If any of you have ever been to a military funeral in which taps was played; this brings out a new meaning of it

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Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire, memorial website

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Lasting Tribute to British Commonwealth, Polish Airmen and Workers of Ransome and Marles bombing

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Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom

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Lasting Tribute to British Commonwealth, Polish Airmen and Workers of Ransome and Marles bombing

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If any of you have ever been to a military funeral in which taps was played; this brings out a new meaning of it

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Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire, England Since 1856

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48 BLATHERWICK’S THAT ARE BURIED IN NEWARK CEMETERY UK From 1858-2011

Chapel Interpretation Centre, Will Be Used By Friends Of Newark Cemetery

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Lance Sgt Nathan Cumberland completed the Newark-On-Trent Half Marathon in 2.5 hours

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM FOR OUR TOMORROW THEY GAVE THEIR TODAY

Newark Cemetery is located on the south side of London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire. The main entrance, small car park near the main gate on London Road, Newark.

Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery {left side on the main drive off London Road} is opened by appointment. please contact Laurence Goff Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery 01636-681878 or o7794613879 friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

Newark Town Council

Newark Town Hall, Market Place, Newark, Nottinghamshire, NG24 1DU.

Nearly 40,000 burial records are available, with a mixture of register scans and computerised records. www.deceasedonline.com/
Deceased Online – research burial and cremation records

Newark Cemetery – Added 7 June 2010

Burials numbered 1 to 37,141 dated 31 December 1856 to 4 March 1997, are available as burial register scans. Subsequent data is only available as full computerised records. Initially, records have been added up to no 39,673 dated 26 March 2010.

  1. Deceased Online

Please Note

Newark Town Council have requested that the addresses of the deceased and places of death not be shown in computerised burial register records for the last 13 years.

Newark Town Hall was designed in Palladian style in 1776 by the architect John Carr of York. Rooms within form part of the museum including civic treasures in the Mayor’s Parlour, a fine art gallery and elegant 18th-century Assembly Room. Newark Town Council has a fine collection of oil paintings reflecting the civic side of the Town appropriately displayed in the Town Hall’s Council Chamber.

Newark Town Hall has housed the Mayor and the Town Council since it was built in 1776. In September 1999, the Town Hall became a registered museum, opening up access to the Grade 1 listed building and its displays.

ontact Details

Newark Town Council paintings can be found at these locations:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/yourpaintings/paintings/search/belongs_to/newark-town-council-979

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsThere are only 40 airworthy Spitfires left in the world, each one is worth £1.5 million

They fought the most important battle this country ever faced and their victory saved Britain from the tyranny of Nazi Germany.

The heroes of the Battle of Britain repelled Hitler’s Luftwaffe in the summer of 1940, although only around 70 of them are still alive.

At the time were in their late teens or early 20s when they took to the skies in Spitfires and Hurricanes from July to October 1940. Others flew in Blenheims, Beaufighters and Defiants, becoming the ‘aces’ of the Battle, shooting down plane after plane.

During the Battle, Sir Winston Churchill said: ‘The gratitude of every home in our island, in our empire, and indeed throughout the world, goes out to the British airmen who, undaunted by odds, unwearied in their constant challenge and mortal danger, are turning the tide of the world war by their prowess and by their devotion.

‘Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.’

When it was over, 544 RAF pilots and aircrew were dead and had made the ultimate sacrifice to keep generations of Britons safe.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2221792/Oldest-surviving-pilot-fight-Battle-Britain-Spitfire-shot-dies-aged-99.html#ixzz2A8x9D07f
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2221792/Oldest-surviving-pilot-fight-Battle-Britain-Spitfire-shot-dies-aged-99.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/global/2012/oct/23/william-walker

William Walker, believed to be oldest surviving Battle of Britain pilot, dies at 99

A restored Second World War Spitfire fighter flying in September.

Oldest Battle of Britain veteran, Spitfire pilot William Walker, dead at 99

Spectators and veterans place poppies at a wreath laying ceremony at the National War Memorial and Tomb of the Unknown Soldier to commemorate the 95th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge in Ottawa on Monday, April 9, 2012.  (Patrick Doyle / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Newark Cemetery two lovely post cards, going back into our history Newark on Trent since 1905

A restored Second World War Spitfire fighter flying in September.LONDON – William Walker, whose poem is part of a national monument to his comrades in the Battle of Britain, has died at age 99.

The Battle of Britain Trust said Walker died Sunday at home in London.

Walker, a Spitfire fighter pilot, was shot down and took a bullet in his right ankle on August 26, 1940, as British pilots engaged a German bomber force.

His poem “Our Wall” is inscribed on the memorial on the Dover cliffs to the nearly 3,000 men who flew in the battle from June to October 1940

After retiring as chairman of the Ind Coope brewery, Walker wrote poetry including tributes to the fliers hailed by Winston Churchill: “Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.”

http://www.therecord.com/news/article/822431–william-walker-believed-to-be-oldest-surviving-battle-of-britain-pilot-dies-at-99

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag
Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856

By Laurencegoff

 We will Remember them

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The Chapel Interpretation Centre {Location walk from the parking lot from London Road to the main Arch turn left red side door} Chapel Interpretation Centre and around the cemetery for tours. Open on the 1st Weekend from 2pm – 4pm from May – October and other times by appointment.

Location of the grave, the Friends group we will help if needed. 

SAM_0048

Pete Stevens of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, who lives in Balderton, has made it a project to try to produce a photo of every one of the 456 WWI fallen who are buried here and all 144 of those from WWII. Photos found so far are displayed in the Interpretation Centre. 

This memorial website has been put together by Friends Of Newark Cemetery Chairman Councillor Laurence Goff for the people of Newark CemeteryPics:  over Newark, taken by Newark Town Councillor Laurence Goff and Chairman Friends Of Newark Cemetery.

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856. This memorial website is Laurence Goff personal views, I have put it together. It dedicated to the thousands of  people since 1856.  Having a means of further promoting Newark cemetery, and encouraging interested people to join the tribute. I have put this Website  together as a fitting tribute to the people who resting place is Newark cemetery. The views expressed our solely my own and do not reflect  Newark Town Council. It my interests for Newark-On-Trent Cemetery Nottinghamshire. Any comments about this website are most welcome.

Laurence Goff

Friends of Newark Cemetery

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

www.facebook.com/laurencegoffnewark

www.flickr.com/photos/friendsofnewarkcemetery

www.youtube.com/laurencegoff

www.flickr.com/photos/newarkcemeteryuk/

www.flickr.com/photos/laurencegoffnewark/

www.flickr.com/photos/friendsofnewarkcemetery /

http://www.deceasedonline.com/

Contact by post:

Friends Of Newark Cemetery

 Laurence Goff

 c/o Newark Town Council

Market Place

Newark On Trent

Nottinghamshire

NG24 1DU

Town Hall phone number 01636-680333

Laurence Goff

 01636-681878 (Home)

Mobile: 07794613879

Laurence Goff  Friends of Newark Cemetery Volunteer friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

Click on  for location of Cemetery Newark-on-Trent

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Giant flag

13 thoughts on “Our Beautiful and Historic Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire Since 1856, put together by Laurence Goff

  1. Pingback: Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire since 1856 « Newark-On-Trent Cemetery UK

  2. Pingback: Ransome and Marles will be remembered with a permanent Memorial, let’s have it at Newark Cemetery « Newark-On-Trent Cemetery UK

  3. Pingback: We Remember Them not just on Remembrance Day at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire « Newark-On-Trent Cemetery UK

  4. Pingback: Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom « Newark-On-Trent Cemetery UK

  5. Pingback: Lance Sgt Nathan Cumberland completed the Newark-On-Trent Half Marathon in 2.5 hours raising funds for group

  6. Pingback: Newark, Nottinghamshire England is going back in time over the years since 1856 « Newark-On-Trent Cemetery UK

  7. Pingback: Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom « Newark-On-Trent Cemetery UK

  8. Pingback: Lasting Tribute to Lance Corporal Ivano Sean Violino, British Commonwealth, Polish Airmen and Workers of Ransome & Marles (via Newark-On-Trent Cemetery UK) « Newark-On-Trent Cemetery UK

  9. Pingback: General Sikorski was Laid to Rest in Newark Cemetery From 1943-1993 « Newark-On-Trent Cemetery UK

  10. Pingback: Camp innewrak | AceFlyer

  11. Pingback: General Sikorski was Laid to Rest in Newark Cemetery From 1943-1993 « Newark-On-Trent Cemetery, Nottinghamshire UK

  12. Pingback: Friends of Newark Cemetery will using the former Newark Cemetery Chapel as an Interpretation Centre « Newark-On-Trent Cemetery, Nottinghamshire UK

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