Newark-On-Trent Cemetery Newark, Nottinghamshire, England UK since 1856

Our Historic Newark Cemetery

Newark

 NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery Is Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm

October – March 8am-6pm

For over 150 years since 1856

We Will Remember Them

For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

Ministry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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Newark Town Councillor Laurence Goff Chairman Friends Of Newark Cemetery and Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) Pete Stevens

 
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Display of history of Newark Cemetery Photo Project from the First World War by Pete Stevens, with over 150 Photographs from the Newark & Balderton Memorial to the Fallen.Refreshments available Admission is Free

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 456 WWI Fallen who are came from Newark-On-Trent

and 

144 from WWII

newarkcemeteryukRemembering Them

Remembering Him

We will Remember Them

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Zawolnosc nasza i wasza / For our freedom and yours

Memorial to the Fallen Newark-On-Trent

On 28th April 2007, Richard Todd OBE, officially unveiled the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery on London Road. Around 200 VIP guests plus Newark’s general public attended a Service which started with a fly-past of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight’s Lancaster Bomber.

History and Exhibition 

  A name and photographs of our fallen heroes have been on display at The Chapel Interpretation Centre, Newark Cemetery for the last six Months 

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First World War 1914-1918 total from Newark Killed  456

Second World War 1939-1945 total from Newark  killed 144

One from West Africa 1961 total  killed 1

One from Malaya 1962 total killed  1

One from Afghanistan 2007 total  killed 1

Total 603

We will Remember them, RIP

Our Lasting Tribute To Our Heroes, During The 1st, 2nd World War And To The Present

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Newark Town Councillor and Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery

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Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire, England Since 1856
We are grateful to have a great  lovely kept local cemetery and grounds. Many thanks to Newark Town Council caring staff.

Our Lasting Tribute to our Heroes, during the 1st and 2nd world war.

For over 150 years of Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire Location with this map


 Polish Airmen and service men were killed during the 2nd World War  and are buried in Newark Cemetery, together with the British Commonwealth that joined the Royal Air Force with, Royal Australian Air Force {6 died RAAF}, Royal Canadian Air Force {17 died RCAF}, Royal New Zealand Air Force {3 died RNZAF}, RAF, British service men and Cadets {44} plus a number are buried around the outside Commonwealth and Polish War graves 2 service men from the Ransome and Marles factory bombing on 7th March 1941, 41 were killed 30 in total are buried in our cemetery.  Over the years many of the Polish stayed in  the UK and had chosen Newark as their final resting place over the years since. Our tribute we should be grateful  to them, Newark has had close links with Poland over the years.
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 Polish Airmen and service men, during the 2nd World War were killed and are buried in Newark Cemetery. Over the years many more had chosen Newark as their final resting place over the years since. 

 Our tribute we should be grateful  to them, Newark has had close links with Poland over the years.


Our Lasting Tribute to our Heroes

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/03/08/ransome-and-marles-former-factory-workers-will-be-remembered-with-a-permanent-memorial-in-newark-on-trent-in-2011/

We are also grateful to ~Newark Town Council~ that it letting Friends of Newark Cemetery use the Chapel Interpretation Centre open by appointment for groups.

Several hundred members of the public have stopped to visit the former chapel which was first open back in 1856, and we reopened in 2011, after closing it doors 40 years ago. The centre contains displays of the history of Newark cemetery, Commonwealth and Polish during the World War II.

Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire since it was  open in 1856

Newark Cemetery, Main Arch and two former Chapels since 1856

The East on the left has been turned into The Chapel Interpretation Centre which was  opened by our Newark Town Mayor on Saturday 11th September 2010.

Chapel Interpretation Centre (East side turn left at the Main Arch)

 {Location walk from the parking lot to the main Arch turn left red side door}

Organised by the Friends of Newark Cemetery

    The Chapel  Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery, will  open on the 1st weekend each Month from April – October 2pm – 4pm or by appointment for groups for our presentation and selection of exhibition – tours on Monday – Tuesday Am afternoon and pm and weekends afternoon and pm.

The Heritage Lottery Fund grant (£50k)

The former East side Chapel has been turned into an Interpretation Centre, and will be used by friends of Newark Cemetery.  It has been fitted out with  display boards, text and ideas for

display boards and leaflets etc were  provided by Friends of Newark Cemetery (FoNC). This shows information and images on the history of our town Cemetery and Chapels since 1856.

Feature pieces regarding the polish connections.

(Air Bridge and General Sikorski), the commonwealth war graves commission, the travelling community and the memorial to the fallen.

Tribute to British Commonwealth, Polish Airmen that died during the 2nd World War. There resting place is at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire, we will Remember them.

 Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire Main Arch with two former Chapels one each side 1856

Newark Cemetery former West side Chapel

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Air cadet Joe Parkes (14) of Newark 1260 Squadron, lays a wreath at the grave of Keith Couzin-Wood, who was killed in a plane crash, aged 16, in 1942. Two former air cadets from different eras were remembered during a service at Newark Cemetery. Fourteen members of 1260 Squadron Newark Air Training Corps marched to the war graves, where the Newark team curate, the Rev Tim Pownall-Jones, led a service at the grave of Keith Couzin-Wood. The crew, who also included another cadet, Geoffrey Hughes of Chesterfield, and two flying officers, were all killed. During a minute’s silence flags were lowered by corporal Sam Parkes (16) and Mr Robert Doyle, the standard bearer for Newark Royal British Legion. Mrs Karen Grayson, the mother of a current cadet, Kristian Grayson, read a poem called Somebody’s Darling. Cadet Joe Parkes (14) laid a wreath. The Mayor of Newark, Councillor Harry Molyneux, said: “The youngsters wanted to serve their country but little did they know what could happen to them. They were very brave.” Keith was from Leigh-on-Sea and his father’s family were from Southwell and Normanton. The cadets tracked down Keith’s nephew, who is in his seventies and lives in Australia. One of the pallbearers at Keith’s funeral was Mr Jack Stringer (85) of Grosvenor Road, Balderton. He was unable to attend the ceremony due to illness and was represented by his wife, Mrs Irene Stringer (83). She said her husband, who was a corporal in the RAF stationed at Balderton, was sorry he could not be there.     The cadets also honoured Sergeant Michael Patton, a former cadet of the Newark squadron, who died in September 1996 when he fell from an RAF helicopter during an exercise over south Wales. Air cadets, led by, left, Flight-lieutenant Mark Edwards and Pilot Officer Nick Squire, of the Newark squadron, march to the war graves section at Newark Cemetery. Cadet Andrew Tallis (13) laid a wreath beside a memorial tree and plaque for Sergeant Patton near the London Road entrance to the cemetery.Cadet Andrew Tallis (13) lays a wreath in memory of Sergeant Michael Patton.  Mr Patton’s niece, Miss Natalie Henstock (24) of Newark, represented his family. She said her grandparents, Mr and Mrs Brian Patton, of Bathley, who are Mr Patton’s parents, and her mother, Ruth Hughes, of William Street, Newark, who is Mr Patton’s sister, were unable to attend. Keith, who was on his first flight, was in an RAF Hampden bomber from 408 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force, when it stalled and crashed soon after take off from RAF Balderton. Mr Patton’s father-in-law, Mr Chris Grant, of The Park, Newark, attended along with his wife, Mrs Doreen Grant. It is hoped the memorial service, on the Saturday closest to Keith’s death, could become an annual event. Mr Pownall-Jones said: “Those young men stood out because of their uniform and what that uniform still represents. “The young men and women here today are champions of the same core values of the services.” He said the values were teamwork, initiative, dedication and being young at heart, and that the first letters of those words spelt tidy. He said when the cadets checked their uniforms were tidy they should think of those values.The service followed research by the cadets into the plane crash that killed him, aged 16, on July 29, 1942. Keith, who was on his first flight, was in an RAF Hampden bomber from 408 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force, when it stalled and crashed soon after take off from RAF Balderton.

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Newark-On-Trent Cemetery Newark, Nottinghamshire, let’s Remember them. Airman from British Commonwealth and over 400 Polish Airman were killed
and are buried in Newark Cemetery from the 2nd World War with more since choose to be buried in Newark Cemetery over the years after the 2nd world war.
 
 

As a result of this bombing raid 29 men and 12 women were killed On Friday 7th March 1941 when Ransome and Marles’ Factory was  being Bombed. We will Remember the 70th Anniversary in March 2011. I am sorry to say there was one young woman killed called Ester Varney just 19 years of age who body was never found after the raid, RIP. Chris Grant was only 5 at the time when his Father was killed. In 1991-1992 Chris Grant became Newark town mayor on the 50th Anniversary of the bombing. 41 Flags have be posted on these website in their memory.

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Ransome and Marles’ Factory was Bombed

We will Remember  when Newark-On-Trent was being bombed at the ball bearing factory, and also the pump factory Worthington Simsons in Balderton. Newark was attacked regularly because of its significance to airfields and war work carried out within the area. The most significant attack was on 7th March 1941 when two German planes dropped a series of bombs on and around Ransom and Marles who made ball bearings for naval gun turrets. A total of 41 people were killed with a further 165 being injured.


 

1, George Harold Henry  Adams, aged 45

2, Wilfred Evelyn Andrew, aged 39

3, Olive Ash,  aged 31

4, Edward Beaver 26

5, Bertie Augustus Ball, aged 18

6, Ernest Patrick Beale aged 27, Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment) (Private)

7, Harold Vincent Brown, aged 44

8, Vivian Maud Castle, aged 18

9, Enid Winifred Hall Cooper aged 30

10, Edna May Cottam, aged 19

11, Gladys Cummings, aged 21

12, William Joseph Dixey, aged 62

13, Frederick Fowler, aged 39

14, George William Godridge,  aged 29

15, Robert Grant, aged 47, his son Chris was only five when his Father died, he became Newark town mayor 50 years later in 1991-1992

16, John Henry Green, aged 55,  Volunteer Home  Guard, 11th Nottinghamshire (Newark)

17, Horace Grocock, aged 47

18, Albert Robert Gyde, aged 42

19, Rose Ellen Hall, aged 30

20, James Hazelby Hanger,  aged 29

21, Thomas McHallam Hardie,  aged 26

22, Sybil Harriet Hayden, aged 34

23, Joyce May Kirton, aged 18

24, Lily Lambert, aged 22

25, George Felix Lambley, 39

26, Edith Makins, aged 21

27, Frederick William Mann, aged 46

28, Frederick Markwell, aged 50

29, Claude Ware Hannah Martin, aged 36

30, Edwin  E. Martin, aged 46

31, Richard Naylor, aged 25

32, Frederick William Packwood, aged 52

33, William Thomas Pepper, aged 18

34, Frederick Richards, aged 32

35, Alfred Mayfield Ridge, aged 68

36, Reginald William Senior, aged 35, died on the 8th March,

37, George Swanwick, aged 38

38, Norah Trueblood, aged 34,

39, Esther Evelyn Varney,  aged 19, (her body was never found)

40, William Warner, aged 51

41  Arthur  Worrell, aged 31


 


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General Sikorski

Visiting Newark Cemetery in 1941 and the many Polish Airman during the 2nd World War. General Sikorski the wartime leader of the Polish Government in exile met his death in an air crash at Gibraltar on the evening of 4th July 1943 and was buried in Newark Nottinghamshire. General Sikorski was buried in the Polish part of cemetery in Newark on 16th July, 1943.   17th September 1993, 50 years later his ashes were brought back to Poland.

The many flowers planted from bulbs 101_1882 by you.The many flowers planted from bulbs 101_1878 by you.

Second World War there were nearly a quarter of a million Poles in the Polish Armed Forces serving under British command. Today the Commission cares for the graves of nearly 4,500 Polish servicemen and women in 35 countries around the world. The highest concentration of commemorations can be found in the United Kingdom, where over 2,100 Poles are commemorated from Scotland, Newark-On-Trent to Cornwall in 244 different locations. In particular, over 400 casualties are commemorated in Newark-upon-Trent. There were a number of RAF stations within a few miles of Newark from which several Polish squadrons operated, and a special plot on the eastern side Newark-upon-Trent Cemetery was set aside for RAF burials. The plot includes a memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here which was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. Both men subsequently died and were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial, until their remains were Newark-upon-Trent Cemetery repatriated back to Poland  on the 17th September 1993.

Each year British and Polish servicemen honoured at Newark service, candles lit to honour the fallen on the last Sunday in October starting at 3pm from the main gate of Newark Cemetery UK. War veterans and civic dignitaries attended a service on Sunday to honour the Polish servicemen who died during the 2nd World War. Lighting of candles were lit on each of the Polish graves at Newark Cemetery. During the service, conducted in both Polish and English, to mark All Souls Day.

 


Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire Saturday 28th April 2007 by you.

It now has a Memorial to the Fallen of Newark commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914 -1945 and the present day.

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From the British Commonwealth, The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), British Royal Air Force (RAF), Canadian (RCAF) New Zealand (RNZAF) and Polish squadrons were formed within the Royal Air Force. Many Polish Airmen were flying Spitfires fighters for Britain’s Royal Force some 423 Polish Airman WHO HAD been buried in Newark cemetery during the 2nd World War.

Newark-On-Trent Cemetery remember the brave Polish Airman that died and our buried in our cemetery during the 2nd World War.
 

Newark-On-Trent Cemetery has over 400 Polish Airmen that died during the 2nd World War and are buried in our local Cemetery.FIRST MAP  COPY IN THE MAIN LODGE AT NEWARK CEMETERY UK 1856 by friendsofnewarkcemetery.105_1351 by laurencegoff.

NEWARK TOWN NOTTINGHAMSHIRE ENGLAND UK FROM THE FIRST WORLD WAR MEMORIAL TO THE FALLEN by friendsofnewarkcemetery.

Memorial to the Fallen at the Main gate at Newark cemetery

Newark -On-Trent  Air Bridge Memorial

Memorial in memory to the Air Bridge

A time to Remember
THANKS TO THE NATIONAL LOTTERY FUND by friendsofnewarkcemetery.
Newark-On-Trent is also important internationally as it contains a War Graves Cemetery, which includes graves of many Polish airmen, and was the historical burial place of General Sikorski (the wartime leader of Poland) whose body has now been returned to Poland, but whose memorial remains. There is also a Memorial to the Fallen of Newark commemorating, by name, those local military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914.  A further monument to war time confilict is the Air Bridge Monument which remembers the aircrew who died, during world war two, supporting the popular uprising in Warsaw in 1944.

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Honouring lives of past cadets at Saturday 26th July 2008
Two former air cadets from different place were remembered during a serviceTwo former air cadets from different place were remembered during a service at Newark-On-Trent Cemetery on Saturday 26th July 2008. Air cadet Joe Parkes (14) of Newark 1260 Squadron, lays a wreath at the grave of Keith Couzin-Wood, who was killed in a plane crash, aged 16, in 1942. Air cadets, led by, left, Flight-lieutenant Mark Edwards and Pilot Officer Nick Squire, of the Newark squadron, march to the war graves section at Newark Cemetery. Fourteen members of 1260 Squadron Newark Air Training Corps marched to the war graves, where the Newark team curate, the Rev Tim Pownall-Jones, led a service at the grave of Keith Couzin-Wood. The crew, who also included another cadet, Geoffrey Hughes of Chesterfield, and two flying officers, were all killed. It is hoped the memorial service, on the Saturday closest to Keith’s death, could become an annual event. Mr Pownall-Jones said: “Those young men stood out because of their uniform and what that uniform still represents. “The young men and women here today are champions of the same core values of the services.” He said the values were teamwork, initiative, dedication and being young at heart, and that the first letters of those words spelt tidy. He said when the cadets checked their uniforms were tidy they should think of those values.
The service followed research by the cadets into the plane crash that killed him, aged 16, on July 29, 1942.Keith, who was on his first flight, was in an RAF Hampden bomber from 408 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force, when it stalled and crashed soon after take off from RAF Balderton. The crew, who also included another cadet, Geoffrey Hughes of Chesterfield, and two flying officers, were all killed. It is hoped the memorial service, on the Saturday closest to Keith’s death, could become an annual event. Mr Pownall-Jones said: “Those young men stood out because of their uniform and what that uniform still represents. “The young men and women here today are champions of the same core values of the services.” He said the values were teamwork, initiative, dedication and being young at heart, and that the first letters of those words spelt tidy. He said when the cadets checked their uniforms were tidy they should think of those values. During a minute’s silence flags were lowered by corporal Sam Parkes (16) and Mr Robert Doyle, the standard bearer for Newark Royal British Legion.Mrs Karen Grayson, the mother of a current cadet, Kristian Grayson, read a poem called Somebody’s Darling. Cadet Joe Parkes (14) laid a wreath. The Mayor of Newark, Mr Harry Molyneux, said: “The youngsters wanted to serve their country but little did they know what could happen to them. They were very brave.”  Keith was from Leigh-on-Sea and his father’s family were from Southwell and Normanton. The cadets tracked down Keith’s nephew, who is in his seventies and lives in Australia.One of the pallbearers at Keith’s funeral was Mr Jack Stringer (85) of Grosvenor Road, Balderton. He was unable to attend the ceremony due to illness and was represented by his wife, Mrs Irene Stringer (83) She said her husband, who was a corporal in the RAF stationed at Balderton, was sorry he could not be there. The cadets also honoured Sergeant Michael Patton, a former cadet of the Newark squadron, who died in September 1996 when he fell from an RAF helicopter during an exercise over south Wales. Cadet Andrew Tallis (13) laid a wreath beside a memorial tree and plaque for Sergeant Patton near the London Road entrance to the cemetery. Mr Patton’s niece, Miss Natalie Henstock (24) of Newark, represented his family. She said her grandparents, Mr and Mrs Brian Patton, of Bathley, who are Mr Patton’s parents, and her mother, Ruth Hughes, of William Street, Newark, who is Mr Patton’s sister, were unable to attend. Mr Patton’s father-in-law, Mr Chris Grant, of The Park, Newark, attended along with his wife, Mrs Doreen Grant. The cadets, who meet at their Sherwood Avenue headquarters on Tuesdays and Thursdays.
Honouring lives of past cadets

ON A LOVELY NOVEMBER DAY IN NEWARK CEMETERY UK by friendsofnewarkcemetery.We have many visits from the UK and around the world by friendsofnewarkcemetery.

The Cemetery currently has both areas for burials and a Garden of Remembrance for cremated remains


Many Commonwealth helped like Australia,  and other Nations are buried from the 2nd World War at Newark Cemetery UK by friendsofnewarkcemetery.Polish and Commonwealth  graves from the 2nd World War RIP by friendsofnewarkcemetery.The Main Drive to Arch at Newark Cemetery UK taken 5th Feb 2009 by friendsofnewarkcemetery.
The Cemetery currently has both areas for burials and a Garden of Remembrance for cremated remains.
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On Friday 7th March 1941, the most most well know of all the raids on the Newark Town tool place when Ransome and Marles’ Factory was bombed. As a result of this raid 30 men and 10 women were killed, a number are buried in Newark Cemetery. 

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/03/08/ransome-and-marles-former-factory-workers-will-be-remembered-with-a-permanent-memorial-in-newark-on-trent-in-2011/


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On 28th April 2007, Richard Todd OBE, officially unveiled the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery on London Road.Around 200 VIP guests plus Newark’s general public attended a Service held between 10.45am – 11.30am which started with a fly-past of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight’s Lancaster Bomber.  The Lord Lieutenant of Nottinghamshire Sir Andrew Buchanan read out a Telegram from the Queen. Friends of Newark Cemetery has decided to see that the memorial has a display of fresh flowers throughout the year. Other local organisations, associated with the armed forces, have pledged their support to this initiative. Our Heroes  in memory to the fallen Lance Corporal Ivano ‘Sean’ Violino, 29  his good name has been added to the War Memorial to the fallen, RIP. He went to school in Newark-On-Trent and whose family still live in the town. He was killed in Helmand Province, southern Afghanistan, on September 17, 2007.

 

Let us all Remember the many Airmen that were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force during the Battle of Britain and pay tribute to these brave fighters for their contribution. 17,000 Polish pilots and ground crew members had formed 14 squadron in RAF and 2,000 were killed of which 424 are buried in Newark Cemetery plus

6 ARAF- Australian,  44 British Servicemen,  17 CRAF- Canadian and  3 RNZAF- New Zealand were also killed during the 2nd World War and are buried in Newark Cemetery for all to see. If it hadn’t been for the courageous  Air Force we would have struggled and things could have turned out differently. These airmen helped us win the war for Freedom.  Not enough credit is given to the Polish pilots who went out of their way to help us in the dark days of the 2nd World war. They never let us down to gain Freedom for us and should not be  forgotten as our heroes of World War II.   This memorial  website is dedicated to the thousands of men and women from the 2nd World War.

During the 2nd World War there were a number of RAF stations within a few miles of Newark many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for RAF burials and this is now the war graves for people to see across the UK  and the World.  Former Airmen choosing to be buried since staying  in England after the 2nd World War. Newark Cemetery also contains  graves from the 1st world war  scattered around the  Cemetery . Many airmen married lived around Newark and since died and are also buried in Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire, England. Newark-On-Trent also contains  graves from the 1st world War  scattered around the  Cemetery.

NEWARK CEMETERY UK by friendsofnewarkcemetery.Thomas Earp Former Town Mayor 3 times and Newark MPDied 100 years ago 17th February 1910 Buried amongst his Friends in Newark Cemetery Plot Number WP43https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/ by laurencegoffnewarkuk.100_8277 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.Martha Earp wife of Thomas Earp who departed this life into the next 22nd Nov 1888 age 55. Though they are hidden in the shadow of Death. They lives in the love that never ends or dies.Thomas Earp who departed this life into the next 17th Feb 1910 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.100_8279 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.100_8280 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.100_8282 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.100_8283 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.100_8284 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.100_8285 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.100_8286 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.100_8287 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.100_8288 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.100_8289 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.
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FIRST MAP  COPY IN THE MAIN LODGE AT NEWARK CEMETERY UK 1856 by friendsofnewarkcemetery.

The Chapel Interpretation Centre is now almost near completion. The project began back in 2008 to restore one of the two Chapels in Newark Cemetery, to enable re-use as a centre that would be available for the community to use, to learn more about the history of the cemetery, its environment and the heritage of our town. The final stages of the project are now coming together with the creation of the Interpretation Boards that will be on display in the Cemetery Chapel.

After careful restoration which was funded by a grant awarded to Newark Town Council of £50,000 by the Heritage Lottery Fund, the Chapel Interpretation Centre is set to house an exciting collection of Boards explaining the many different aspects of the Cemetery including notable residents, the Commonwealth & Polish War Graves, our travelling community and the flora and fauna of the Cemetery. Along with this there will be an area for quiet contemplation, advice on genealogy and how to find specific burial plots as well as information leaflets and guides about the local environment and habitats found in and around the Cemetery.

The gathering and collating of information for the Interpretation Centre displays has largely been supported by the Friends of Newark Cemetery. The final panels and information are due to be installed shortly. The Friends of Newark Cemetery hope to hold an official opening of the Cemetery Interpretation Centre, which everyone is welcome to attend. Newark Town Council hopes that the general public use this new service and continue to learn about the heritage of our town and Cemetery.


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On 28th April 2007, Richard Todd OBE, officially unveiled the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery on London Road. FoNC has decided to see that the memorial has a display of fresh flowers throughout the year. This is planned to start in November; other local organisations, associated with the armed forces, have pledged their support to this initiative.


NEWARK TOWN NOTTINGHAMSHIRE ENGLAND UK FROM THE FIRST WORLD WAR MEMORIAL TO THE FALLEN by friendsofnewarkcemetery.MAYOR  AND MAYORESS OF NEWARK 2008 105_3127 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.NEWARK TOWN MAYOR Cllr HARRY MOLYNEUX AND MAYORESS WITH CHAIRMEN NEWARK AND SHERWOOD DISTRCT COUNCIL, IN MEMORY OF POLISH PITOTS DURING THE SERVICE FOR ALL SOULS' NEWARK CEMETERY UK by laurencegoffnewarkuk.NEWARK TOWN MAYOR 2008 CLLR HARRY AND MRS MOLYNUEX by laurencegoffnewarkuk.
Former Newark Town Mayor Councillor Harry Molyneux and former Newark Mayoress Mrs Christine Molyneux 2008-2009
FIRST MAP  COPY IN THE MAIN LODGE AT NEWARK CEMETERY UK 1856 by friendsofnewarkcemetery.MAYOR OF NEWARK 2008 105_2084 by laurencegoffnewarkuk.

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Newark-On-Trent Cemetery Newark, Nottinghamshire
Memorial to the Fallen
NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY
Name: STEVENS, RONALD
Initials: R
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Sergeant (W.Op./Air Gnr.)
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Age: 20
Date of Death: 11/03/1943
Service No: 1331708
Additional information: Son of Harry and Winifred Stevens, of Brighton, Sussex.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Sec. P. Grave 309.
Cemetery: NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY
Stevens was not part of Cowan’s crew, he was killed when his aircraft crashed the day before Cowan. 
Lancaster 1 of 1661 HCU took off from Winthorpe for general practice with 10 trainee crew members, crashed due to fire in outer port engine crashed at Cromwell near Newark, all crew killed, three crew buried in Newark Cemetery -.Cowan, Burgess and Hannay. Cowan had previously completed a tour of operations with 9 Squadron, his brother was also a pilot on 9 Squadron, it was very rare that brothers served at the same time on the same Squadron.Name: BURGESS, ANTHONY RICHARDInitials: A R
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Sergeant (Pilot)
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Age: 21
Date of Death: 12/03/1943
Service No: 1315656
Additional information: Son of Richard Samuel and Iva Ellen Burgess, of Oxford.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Sec. P. Grave 309A.
 

MR JIM AUTON MBE CHAIRMAN OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES AIR BRIDGE ASSOCIATION WITH FORMER MAYOR OF NEWARK-0N-TRENT COUNCILLOR HARRY MOLYNEUX
On Saturday 28th April 2007, Richard Todd OBE officially unveiled the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery on London Road, Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

Name: KENNEDY, JOHN BERNARD
Initials: J B
Nationality: New Zealand
Rank: Flight Sergeant (Pilot)
Regiment/Service: Royal New Zealand Air Force
Unit Text: 455 (R.A.A.F.) Sqdn
Age: 26
Date of Death: 13/02/1942
Service No: 402874
Additional information: Son of Patrick and Ethel Kennedy, of Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Sec. R. Grave 298.
Cemetery: NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY
Hampden 1 took off 2243 from Wigsley returned early with engine  trouble crashed at 0153 at Eagle, Lincoln while preparing to land. No other crew members of this aircraft are buried in Newark Cemetery.

6 Royal Australian Air Force died and are buried in Newark Cemetery
Just 21 years old, died for our freedom, 14855 Sergeant F. Dunkin
https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/

 
NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY Lancaster 1 of 1661 HCU took off from Winthorpe for general practice with 10 trainee crew members, crashed due to fire in outer port engine crashed at Cromwell near Newark, all crew killed, three crew buried in Newark Cemetery -.Cowan, Burgess and Hannay. Cowan had previously completed a tour of operations with 9 Squadron, his brother was also a pilot on 9 Squadron, it was very rare that brothers served at the same time on the same Squadron.
 
NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY
Name: BRADLEY, DESMOND GEORGE
Initials: D G
Nationality: New Zealand
Rank: Sergeant (Pilot)
Regiment/Service: Royal New Zealand Air Force
Unit Text: 408 (R.C.A.F.) Sqdn
Age: 22
Date of Death: 21/10/1941
Service No: 401801
Additional information: Son of Vincent Henry and Edith Victoria Bradley, of Waipukurau, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Sec. Q. Grave 300.
Cemetery: NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY

 
6 Royal Australian Air Force died and are buried in Newark Cemetery
Just 22 years old, died for our freedom, 411919 Flight Sergeant L.W. Lean
https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/

Many thanks to Roger Audis 9 Squadron Association Historian help with infomation

Flight Sergeant R.D.Lewis, Air Gunner Royal Canadian Air Force, 10th April 1943 Age 22

Thomas Earp Former Town Mayor and Newark MP

Died 100 years ago 17th February 1910

Buried amongst his Friends in Newark Cemetery Plot Number WP43

This being Important to Newark-On-Trent history I could not forget to comment on the grand old gentleman who lived 79 year ambitious years. He lived in a grand house which was called White house and still stands at 84 Mill Gate, Newark-On-Trent. White House is situated on the south western fringe of Newark-On-Trent river and the Farndon Road Marina. The property is situated within the Mill Gate Conservation Area dominated by Georgian and Victorian housing and wharf side developments. Thomas Earp came to Newark from Derby on 1st February 1845 at the age of 29 when he was chosen as a Liberal candidate for Newark Constituency. On 31st January 1874 he was elected member of Parliament for Newark until 24th November 1885. Thomas Earp choose a large home called White House at 48 Mill Gate, Newark which is grade ll listed building. He live next door to another Friend William Harold Cubley at 80-82 Mill Gate and Joseph Gilstap who lived at 109 Mill Gate, Newark in a large house called Trent view. All three were Alderman and former Mayors he serve three times 1869, 1891 and 1892. Mr Earp was involved and a partner in Trent Brewery of Richard, Earp and Slater 1864 he relinquish his managerial role. 1880 joined Sir William Gilstrap malting of co-founder of Gilstrap & Earp Co., these was one of the largest in the UK he retired in 1905. His Generous gift to Newark Benefactor and charitable patrons providing assistance in many forms to many good cause like education Magnus and Grammar School of Art, Science and Art, London Road. It was part of 60th Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria which was open on Thursday afternoon, 25th October 1900. Newark was like to have Alderman Thomas Earp generously contribution of £250 with many other good people also given a donation. 1902 After many years devoted service to Newark town money was raised by over 100 subscribers to hand over a large portrait of Alderman Thomas Earp JP recognition for 40 years service. It was painted by Mr Harold Knight, a presentation took place a seat down lunch took place in the ballroom which was the chamber at the time. It hangs in Newark Town Chamber With many other Alderman and former Mayors of Newark. 1874 Elected Member Parliament for Newark when his was in his 30’s Elected borough councillor East Ward. Alderman high-ranking member borough council, chosen by an elected members themselves. ( these has be discontinued) Justice of the Peace for town and county.

Street was named Earp Avenue which is next to Magnus School name He died at noon in his lovely home at White House 84 Mill Gate, all his true friends came out in large numbers. Buried in Newark Cemetery. Laurence Goff Friends of Newark Cemetery Newark Town Councillor

 

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM FOR OUR TOMORROW THEY GAVE THEIR TODAY

Newark Cemetery is located on the south side of London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire. The main entrance, small car park near the Cemetery Office is situated off the London Road. Other entrances can be found along Elm Avenue near the Cemetery Cottage and at the end of Elm Avenue, off Bromley Avenue and at Thoresby Road where a second car park is sited. The Cemetery is controlled and administered by Newark Town Council The first instalment (£25k) of the Heritage Lottery Fund grant (£50k) has been received and works have commenced in one of the two former Chapel which were closed in 1977 has been converted. This  will be changed from a Chapel into an Interpretation Centre which will now be fitted out with audio visual and interpretation boards, displays and DVD presentations which will be designed by James Fountain of Bazzoo. Text and ideas for display boards and leaflets etc are being provided by Friends of Newark Cemetery.  It is anticipated that the boards would show information and images on the history of  Newark Cemetery and the two former Chapels which was built in 1856, origins of the practice of burials/cremations etc, famous people buried in, or associated with, the cemetery and flora and fauna in the cemetery. It could also feature pieces regarding the polish connections (Air Bridge and General Sikorski), the commonwealth war graves commission, the travelling community and the memorial to the fallen.  During the Second World War there were a number of Polish stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. The cemetery is also important internationally as it contains over 400 Polish Airmen that are buried during the 2nd world war.   A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for Polish Air Force since the Second World War. Many Polish Airmen that served both countries married and stayed in the UK and still have families in Newark and across the UK. They are also buried in Newark Cemetery among friends who gave their lives for Freedom, we will not forget the brave Airmen who are gone and are buried in Newark Cemetery. The cemetery is also important internationally as it contains From the British Commonwealth are also buried in Newark Cemetery, The Royal Australian Air Force 6 buried (RAAF), British Royal Air Force 44 (RAF), Canadian 17 (RCAF) New Zealand 3 (RNZAF) Many Polish Airmen were flying Spitfires fighters for Britain’s Royal Force during the Battle of Britain. Let’s paid tribute to the contribution made by Polish Airmen. By the end of the war, 17,000 Polish pilots and ground crew members had formed 14 squadron in RAF. 2.000 Polish Airmen were killed 422 had been buried in Newark Cemetery during the Second World War. Many more Polish Airmen that remained and lived since the War have been added around the outside of the Polish War graves since. A Memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and unveiled on 14th July 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander in Chief of the Polish Forces and war-time Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski (aged 62) in 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s It contains a memorial to Poland’s exiled war leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski, who died when the aeroplane he was travelling in crashed over Gibraltar. General Sikorski was buried at Newark in July, 1943, and it was his dying wish that his body should be returned to Poland when it was a free country. His remains were returned in 1993, four years after the collapse of Communism. The graves of people killed when a German bomb hit the Ransome and Marles factory are behind the Polish section. I have been appointed as the Friends of Newark Cemetery manager of the Interpretation Centre as one of there Volunteers. We are looking for your help and support.


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Many Polish Airmen were flying Spitfires fighters for Britain’s Royal Force during the Battle of Britain. Let’s paid tribute to the contribution made by Polish Airmen. By the end of the war, 17,000 Polish pilots and ground crew members had formed 14 squadron in RAF. 2.000 Polish had been killed.  Newark Cemetery had 422 that were buried during the 2nd World War  in Newark-On-Trent Cemetery. We are grateful fighting and help this country, we will Remember them. Yes We will Remember them in years to come.
polish20emblem2.jpg Polish Flag image by PolishAmericans

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski, was buried in Newark

See full size imageCemetery UK for 50 years from 16th July 1943 until he was exhumed and returned to Poland  17th September 1993

Back in Poland, he was buried in the Hall of Kings in Wawel Cathedral, next to Polish Kings and great Polish National heroes

CLICK PICTURE FOR LARGER IMAGEPolish and British Union Flag is proudly flying at Newark Cemetery by you.
 

Memorial during the Warsaw uprising  1st August- 2nd October 1944

Warsaw Rises!

On 1st August Poland had commemorated the 65th Anniversary of the Warsaw Uprising. This moment was marked by the unveiling of the brand newRising Museum in a solemn ceremony which was attended by Colin Powell and Chancellor Schroeder alongside other eminent statesmen. The unprecedented brutality of the Second World War may have long since been consigned to the history books by many countries, particularly those in the West, but in Poland the terrible wounds are far from healed. Poland lost seventeen percent of its population during the war, a staggering 6 million people (compared to 500,000 Americans, or 400,000 Brits), and its capital, Warsaw, was utterly destroyed. Moreover, unlike its Allies, Poland’s sufferings didn’t stop in 1945 at the end of the War. For nearly half a century more, the Poles were denied their freedom and forced to endure the brutal and totalitarian regime of Soviet Russia. During these fifty years of Communist rule all mention of the heroic Warsaw Uprising was forbidden – unless it was to slander those who had taken part in it. Following the absorption of Poland into the Soviet sphere of influence, Stalin declared the Uprising illegal and set about hunting down any surviving freedom fighters, with a view to killing or imprisoning them. It was a cynical attempt to suppress Polish nationalism and spirit.Sixty years on and the enforced silence of the Communists has been broken: the brave resistance of the Armia Krajowa (also known as the Home Army) is finally gaining the recognition it deserves as one of the most heroic – and ultimately tragic – episodes of the Second World War.


http://www.warsawuprising.com/photos.htm

http://www.warsaw-life.com/poland/warsaw-1944-uprising


[RAF ensign]

Remembrance Sunday was a moving and emotional day for the good people that come out in large numbers in Newark-On-Trent and across the UK and around the world. Wreaths were layed beside Newark war Memorials next to The Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene. We did Remember them

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We will Remember them
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In Flanders FieldsIn Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.
Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields. by Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae

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44  British were killed serving the Arm Force and servicemen are Buried during the  2nd World War in Newark Cemetery

Polish Airmen  had 422 were killed and are Buried during the  2nd World War in Newark Cemetery, plus more have been added since many Polish married and live in the UK. Many have their resting place in Newark Cemetery.  I counted 11 graves that have been resumed after the war.
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Australian RAF had 6 were killed during the 2nd World War and are buried in Newark Cemetery


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Symbol of the Government of Canada
Canadian RAF have 17 were killed and are Buried during the  2nd World War in Newark Cemetery


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New Zealanders RAF 3 were killed  during the  2nd World War and are buried in Newark Cemetery

MANY THANKS FOR TAKEN THE TIME TO VISIT NEWARK CEMETERY UK by friendsofnewarkcemetery.
WE WILL REMEMBER THEM FOR OUR TOMORROW THEY GAVE THEIR TODAY
Newark Cemetery with a little of our history from Laurence Goff

Howard Heeley looking at  a replica of a Polish pilots badge

Notts treasures: The Polish connection

During the Second World War two Polish RAF squadrons were based in Nottinghamshire. Their contribution is remembered at Newark Air museumNottinghamshire has strong links with Poland, especially around the Newark area.Many Poles came to England to help with the war effort and many chose to stay on after Hitler was defeated. Newark’s special relationship with Poland was cemented when the remains of the country’s war time leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski were entrusted to the town until his return to Krakow in 1993

This photograph shows the Polish C-in-C General Wladyslaw Sikorski decorating Malinowski (left) and Jarzembowski (right) with Polish Silver Cross of Virtuti Militari, the VM.

This is the single highest Polish war decoration that can be awarded.

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RIP Władysław Eugeniusz Sikorski

 

(May 20, 1881 – July 4, 1943; Polish pronunciation: [vu̯aˈdɨsu̯af ɕiˈkɔrski] (Speaker Icon.svglisten)) was a Polish military and political leader. He was born in Tuszów Narodowy a village in the present-day Subcarpathian Voivodeship of south-eastern Poland, which at the time was part of Austria-Hungary, one of Poland’s three partitioners. Prior to World War I, he established and participated in several underground organizations that promoted the cause of Polish independence. He fought with distinction in the Polish Legions during World War I, and later in the newly created Polish Army during thePolish-Soviet War (1919 to 1921). In that war he played a prominent role in the decisive Battle of Warsaw, when Soviet forces, expecting an easy final victory, were surprised and routed by the Polish counterattack.

In the early years of the Second Polish Republic, Sikorski held government posts including prime minister (1922 to 1923) and minister of military affairs (1923 to 1924). Following Józef Piłsudski’s May Coup (1926) and the installation of theSanacja government, he fell out of favor with the new regime. Up until, and throughout 1939, he remained in the opposition, and wrote several books on the art of warfare and on Polish foreign relations.

During World War II he became Prime Minister of the Polish Government in Exile,Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Armed Forces, and a vigorous advocate of the Polish cause on the diplomatic scene. He supported the reestablishment ofdiplomatic relations between Poland and the Soviet Union, which had been severed after the Soviet alliance with Germany in the 1939 invasion of Poland. In April 1943, however, Soviet dictatorJoseph Stalinbroke off Soviet-Polish diplomatic relations following Sikorski’s request that the International Red Cross investigate the Katyń massacre. In July 1943, Sikorski was killed in a plane crash into the sea immediately on takeoff from Gibraltar. The exact circumstances of his death remain in dispute, which has given rise to conspiracy theories, however, investigators have concluded that Sikorski’s injuries were consistent with a plane crash

Newark has had close links with Poland and the local Polish community, both here and in Nottingham for many years. Many Poles came to England to help with the war effort and many chose to stay on and make this country their home. Newark’s place in Poland’s heart was cemented when the remains of Poland’s war time leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski were entrusted to the town until his return to Krakow in 1993.

Tribute to General Wladyslaw Sikorski – Churchill and Estreicher.
Two Speeches mourning General Sikorski’s Death.

Mr.Winston ChurchillsTribute to General Sikorski. House of Commons 7th July 1943
We learned yesterday that the cause of the United Nations had suffered a most grievous loss. (Hear, hear.) It is my duty to express the feelings of this House, and to pay my tribute to the memory of a great Polish patriot and staunch ally General Sikorski. (Sympathetic cheers.) His death in the air crash at Gibraltar was one of the heaviest strokes we have sustained.
From the first dark days of the Polish catastrophe and the brutal triumph of the German war machine until the moment of his death on Sunday night he was the symbol and the embodiment of that spirit which has borne the Polish nation through centuries of sorrow and is unquenchable by agony. When the organized resistance of the Polish Army in Poland -was beaten down, General Sikorski’s first thought was to organize all Polish elements in France to carry on the struggle, and a Polish army of over 80,000 men presently took its station on the French fronts. This army fought with the utmost resolution in the disastrous battles of 1940. Part fought its way out in good order into Switzerland, and is today interned there. Part marched resolutely to the sea, and reached this island.Here General Sikorski had to begin his work again. He persevered, unwearied and undaunted. The powerful Polish forces which have now been accumulated and equipped in this country and in the Middle East, to the latter of whom his last visit was paid, now await with confidence and ardor the tasks which lie ahead. General Sikorski commanded the devoted loyalty of the Polish people now tortured and struggling in Poland itself. He personally directed that movement of resistance which has maintained a ceaseless warfare against German oppression in spite of sufferings as terrible as any nation has ever endured. (Hear, hear.) This resistance will grow in power until, at the approach of liberating armies, It will exterminate the German ravagers of the homeland.I was often brought into contact with General Sikorski in those years of war. I had a high regard for him, and admired his poise and calm dignity amid so many trials and baffling problems. He was a man of remarkable pre-eminence, both as a statesman and a soldier, His agreement with Marshal Stalin of July 30th, 1941, was an outstanding example of his political wisdom. Until the moment of his death he lived in the conviction needs of the common struggle and in the faith that a better Europe will arise in which a great and independent Poland will play an honorable part. (Cheers.) We British here and throughout the Commonwealth and Empire, who declared war on Germany because of Hitler’s invasion of Poland and in fulfillment of our guarantee, feel deeply for our Polish allies in their new loss.We express our sympathy to them, we express our confidence in their immortal qualities, and we proclaim our resolve that General Sikorski’s work as Prime Minister and Commander-in-Chief shall not have been done in vain. (Cheers.) The House would, I am sure, wish also that its sympathy should be conveyed to Madame Sikorski, who dwells here in England, and whose husband and daughter have both been simultaneously killed on duty.Mr. Churchill in the House of Commons
July 7th, 1943
General Sikorski.
by Karol Estreicher
By cruel fate General Wladyslaw Sikorski was killed in an air crash near Gibraltar. His death came at a moment when Poland needed him perhaps more than ever before, for though the war situation had begun to improve even this did not save Poland from suffering many setbacks.Sikorski was a statesman, outstanding among the leaders of the Second World War. This position he owed to his character, his faith in ultimate victory, his clearness of decision and his energy in all actions. I should like to speak about him, pointing out not only what he meant to Poland, but to the whole of Europe; and to show the reader the values which he brought with him and which will forever be connected with his name.This is his life:He was born in 1881, at a time when Poland was not even spoken of in European politics. Her name had been blotted out from the map and she was partitioned between Russia, Austria and Germany. The Polish nation, however, never accepted such a situation and towards the end of the 19th century Sikorskis generation believed as firmly as previous generations had done in an ultimate liberation of Poland. Maybe the young generation, in whose political life Sikorski took an active part, believed in it even more strongly before the outbreak of the First World War, hoping that the fight between her three oppressors would bring freedom to the Polish nation.After leaving school, Sikorski entered the Technical Institute in Lvov. As he himself often used to tell his friends, he did not go in for humanistic studies or law because he foresaw that the future of the world lay above all in the technical developments brought about by the 20th century. In his later life his technical qualifications as a road and bridge builder were a great help. They were useful in his career as a soldier and also, as we shall see later, in his career as a statesman. They taught him the power of swift decision, gave him a sense of reality and the conviction that the fate of mankind depends chiefly on man himself.Long before the First World War, Sikorski had already begun his military studies. He was one of the organizers of the underground forces formed in those parts of Poland which had been occupied by the Austrians. At the outbreak of war in 1914, a National Committee was formed in Cracow which soon afterwards led to the organization of the Legions of Joseph Pilsudski, and in that Committee, thirty-three-year-old Colonel Sikorski became chief of the military department and immediately began to act with dynamic energy.The idea of the National Committee in Cracow was to create Polish military units which, during the last phase of the war, would play a deciding part in the fate of the Polish nation.After the war, Sikorski occupied an important position in the organization of the Polish State, He fought for the liberation of Lvov and Przemysl in 1919, and in the Polish-Russian war of 1920, gaining great popularity in Poland as an outstanding soldier. During the Russian offensive against Warsaw, he commanded the Northern Army, winning one of the decisive battles of the war. He was not only a victorious general in the front lines, but he also became a prominent organizer of the young Polish army during the post-war period, when he was chief of the General Staff.In 1922, internal political conflicts in Poland put Sikorski at the head of the government. Within a short time he carried out essential reforms and guided foreign policy into a direction which gained the approval and co-operation of the League of Nations, while he also obtained recognition of Poland’s Eastern frontiers by Great Britain, France and the U.S.A. As a Prime Minister he won universal respect and popularity in Poland.He was a democrat and a supporter of Parliament. In spite of the many facilities which an anti-constitutional regime would bring with it he never changed his convictions. They estranged him completely from the party of Marshal Pilsudski. While this political group was in power, Sikorski remained in opposition. He foresaw that this system was not the right one for Poland, and that events would take a different course. The catastrophe of 1939 found him at the head of the opposition and consequently the whole nation looked to him for guidance.These are Sikorski’s activities during the Second World War:While remaining in political opposition Sikorski had not been inactive. It was his conviction that political parties are a necessity in the life of a nation and that their right balance constitutes a parliamentary system. He was trying to smooth out the differences between the various parties and to unite them before the outbreak of the coming world war; he was looking for those who would support his outlook at home as well as abroad. He made friends with Ignacy Paderewski, the statesman and musician, and with Vincent Witos, the leader of the Polish peasants. He also worked as a writer, publishing books dealing with a future war and strategic problems, besides writing political articles for various papers. He warned Poland and the whole of Europe of the growing power of Germany. Sikorski was well known in political circles in France as an irreconcilable enemy of Fascism and Hitlerism. It will be worth while to remind the reader here that the attempt made in 1935 by the dethroned King Alphonse XIII to win over Sikorski to an ” anti-Bolshevist Crusade ” in Spain failed completely. Sikorski saw clearly that the real danger in Europe was not radical socialism, but reactionary politics which were weakening Europe, and which made her unable to defend herself against the growing Teutonic doctrine of brute force.Therefore, it was not surprising that when Sikorski found himself in Paris on September 24th, 1939, he should be chosen as the head of the new Polish Government and Commander-in-Chief. In this way he united in himself two of the most important state positions which he interpreted, not in the manner of a dictator, but as a ruler who needed such powers to help him to act decisively with the Allies at time of critical difficulty.He immediately formed a government on a democratic basis. It included representatives of the four most important political parties and several specialists. Sikorski’s government summoned a National Council in exile as a kind of provisional parliament, proving that the Government wished to exercise its authority in a democratic spirit.At Sikorski’s appeal, Poles from all over the world began to arrive in France and the Middle East to join the newly organized Polish army; most of them had managed to escape from Poland. Sikorski considered it of great importance that Poland’s war effort should be considerable and it is due to him that the Polish forces have grown to such an extent, and are today fighting on all fronts, and gaining universal respect.Sikorski’s most important political contacts, however, were those made during the Second World War, with regard to Polish foreign policy. Already while organizing the Polish army in November 1939, he went to London.He had no doubt that the war would spread over the whole world. Speaking of the present war, he said:This is no ordinary war for material interests or territorial ambitions, it does not resemble those conflicts of the past, the outcome of which was decided in a single battle. Whether the world will achieve the realization of the highest ideals or be defeated by a primitive barbaric materialism that reduces men to beasts depends on the outcome of this war. We are fighting a mortal war, which will decide the fate of nations, of continents and of the whole world. Such is the true nature of this war.He foresaw Germany’s attack on the neutral countries; America’s entry into the war and the attack on Russia. With this constant desire to find understanding for the Polish cause through-out the world, repeatedly attending conferences with all the allies, Sikorski was truly one of the architects of the confederation of the. United Nations.At that time Sikorski also began to organize the underground movement in Poland. Underground fighting, famous in Polish history, once more activated the whole nation.During the defeat of France, Sikorski did not give way to despair and doubts. His arrival in England and Churchill’s quick decision after a conference with him on June 18th, 1940, to evacuate the Polish army from France, enabled half of it to get away safely.Sikorski’s faith in an ultimate victory for Great Britain never wavered for an instant. He represented the Polish nation, which in spite of the most cruel persecutions and the most terrible oppression remained faithful to a cause for which it had begun to fight on September 1st, 1939. Polish airmen distinguished themselves during the Battle of Britain; the Polish army in Scotland began to reorganize and prepare for a possible German invasion, and units of the Polish Navy were fighting side by side with the victorious Royal Navy.All through 1940 and 1941 Sikorski worked untiringly to further diplomatic relations between the allies. He was a warm supporter of a Central European federation, especially of a close relationship between Poland and Czechoslovakia.

His visits to the United States and his collaboration with the allied leaders showed him to be not only an outstanding member of the Polish nation, but also one of Europe’s foremost personalities.

Then Germany’s star began to decline and the position of the allies improved considerably. For a long time Sikorski had been expecting a German attack on Russia and had foreseen the latter’s heroic and victorious fight. He soon made it clear that he was willing to come to an understanding with Russia in the name of the Polish Government, and that he was prepared to forget all neighborly misunderstandings alienating Poland from Russia. This would enable the two nations to fight side by side against the enemy of all humanity. The Russian-Polish agreement of 1941 and the subsequent meeting with Stalin in Moscow were largely due to Sikorski’s political realism of which he gave constant proof during his lifetime. The Polish-Russian pact facilitated the mutual under-standing and closer relationship between Russia, Britain and America. Although in 1943, for various reasons, the agreement had broken down, it remained none the less a foreshadow of a future when the misunderstanding between two Slavonic nations would come to an end and the desire for collaboration would prevail.

Sikorski died at the very moment when his country most needed his help in the difficult situation in which it found itself after the failure of Polish-Russian agreement. His death meant an irreparable loss to Poland, a loss which will be even more noticeable after the war, when the Polish State will have to be rebuilt. There still remain, however, Sikorski’s principles, his methods of political action and his character, which will be an example to Poles for many years to come.

And finally:

Although he was a soldier by choice and profession, his ideas were anything but militaristic. He knew the difficult art of distinguishing between the position of a politician and a soldier, always finding the right balance between the two. He was a great believer in law and exact legal structures and a practical and realistic man, ready to interpret a situation1 and to compromise between theory and practice.

As a politician, he was a statesman without obsessions. He never looked back on the past, but preferred to look forward to a brighter future.

Sikorski combined in his character all that was best in the Polish Nation. He understood not only his own people, but he envisaged the world of the future as well. That was the reason why he so easily found support in carrying out his ideas, and in Great Britain he made friends amongst politicians of all parties. He moved with the times in social as well as international questions.

Wladyslaw Sikorski bequeathed much to those he left behind, and the fact that Polands name became famous during the war was largely due to him. Great Britain lost in him a great friend and one of the champions of a just and wise world policy.

General Wladyslaw Sikorski by Molecule Man.
 
Statue of General Wladyslaw Sikorski, located on Portland Place, West Central London.

POLISH WAR GRAVE NEWARK CEMETERY UK by you.

On 14th July 1941 General Wladyslaw Sikorski visited Newark Cemetery to unveil a Memorial Cross Dedicated to Polish Airmen that died serving both Poland and British during that 2nd World War. Rest place at Newark Cemetery.

General Wladyslaw Sikorski Prime Minister of Polish Government in exile during World War Two. In July 1941, he visited Newark to unveil a Memorial Cross dedicated to Polish Serviceman who died fighting alongside the British. He requested should he die while Poland was still occupied that would like to be buried alongside his men in Newark Cemetery.

FOMER POLISH PRESIDENT AT NEWARK CEMETERY UK by you.

FOMER POLISH PRESIDENTS AT NEWARK CEMETERY UK

POLISH PRESIDENT BURIED AT NEWARK CEMETERY UK by you.POLISH WAR GRAVES AT NEWARK CEMETERY UK by you.Snow at Newark-On-Trent Cemetery 5-02-'09 by you.POLISH WAR GRAVES AT NEWARK CEMETERY UK by you.

Snow at Newark-On-Trent Cemetery 5-02-’09

Help for Heroes which was taken in Newark Market Place, we will Remember them. http://www.the-soldiers.co.uk/ by you.

AS OF THIS WEEKEND 214 BRITISH SOLDIERS HAVE LOST THERE LIVES IN AFGANISTAN SINCE 2001
Lance Corporal Ivano ‘Sean’ Violino
Lance Corporal Ivano Violino, known as “Sean”, aged 29, was born in Salford. He joined the Army on 18 January 2002. Having completed combat engineer training at 3 Royal School Military Engineering Regiment and driver training at the Defence School of Transport, Leaconfield, Lance Corporal Violino joined 36 Engineer Regiment as a member of the Combat Support Troop, 50 Headquarters & Support Squadron on 11 February 2003. He was an Army canoeist and regularly represented the regiment at rugby. In March 2003 Lance Corporal Violino deployed with the Regiment to Kuwait and took part in Operation TELIC. He was deservedly promoted to Lance Corporal in October 2004 and in April 2006 he was cross-posted within 36 Engineer Regiment to Support Troop, 20 Field Squadron. As part of 20 Field Squadron he deployed to Canada in February 2007 to take part in a demanding construction exercise to upgrade and construct facilities at the British Army Training Unit, Suffield. Thereafter Lance Corporal Violino participated fully in the pre-deployment training for Afghanistan deploying with his Squadron on the 52 Infantry Brigade exercise on Salisbury Plain and taking part in a live firing exercise on Thetford Training Area. Prior to his deployment, Lance Corporal Violino’s high professional standards were recognised when he was selected for promotion to Corporal. Lance Corporal Violino arrived in Afghanistan on 2 September 2007 and is sadly the first fatality from 36 Engineer Regiment. He leaves behind his wife, Katey Anne (known as Katey), and seven-year-old twins from a previous relationship, Ellie and Lewis.
Memory to  Lance Corporal Ivano ‘Sean’ Violino, age 29 his good name has been added RIP. He went to school in Newark-On-Trent and whose family still live in the town. He was killed in Helmand Province, southern Afghanistan, on September 17, 2007 RIP.
 

From the British Commonwealth are also buried in Newark Cemetery, The Royal Australian Air Force  6 buried (RAAF), British Royal Air Force  44 (RAF), Canadian 17 (RCAF)           New Zealand 3 (RNZAF) and Polish squadrons were formed within the Royal Air Force. Many Polish Airmen were flying Spitfires fighters for Britain’s Royal Force. 422 Polish Airman had been buried during the 2nd World War. Former Polish airmen stayed over after the war and married are all resting place is Newark cemetery.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM LET’S GIVE OUR THANKS AND HONOUR THEM. WE WON’T LET THEIR MEMORY FADE

FOR THEIR SAKE LET’S REMEMBER THEM

Memorial to the Fallen of Newark commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict during the 2nd World War

On 14th July 1941 General Wladyslaw Sikorski visited Newark Cemetery to unveil a Memorial Cross Dedicated to Polish Airmen that died serving both Poland and British during the 2nd World War.  There rest place at Newark-On-Trent Cemetery London Road, Newark Nottinghamshire.

General Wladyslaw Sikorski Prime Minister of Polish Government in exile during World War Two. In July 1941, he visited Newark to unveil a Memorial Cross dedicated to Polish Serviceman who died fighting alongside the British. He requested should he die while Poland was still occupied that would like to be buried alongside his men in Newark Cemetery.

Lance Corporal Ivano ‘Sean’ Violino his name has been added to the War Memorial to the fallen at Newark-On-Trent Cemetery off London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire. he will not be forgotten as his name has been added. RIP

THE  FINAL INSPECTION


The soldier stood and faced God,

Which  must always come to pass.
He hoped his shoes  were shining,
Just as brightly as his  brass.

‘Step forward now, you  soldier,
How shall I deal with you ?
Have  you always turned the other cheek ?
To My  Church have you been true?’

The soldier  squared his shoulders and said,
‘No, Lord, I  guess I ain’t.
Because those of us who carry  guns,
Can’t always be a saint.

I’ve  had to work most Sundays,
And at times my  talk was tough.
And sometimes I’ve been  violent,
Because the world is awfully  rough.

But, I never took a penny,
That  wasn’t mine to keep…
Though I worked a lot  of overtime,
When the bills got just too  steep.

And I never passed a cry for  help,
Though at times I shook with  fear.
And sometimes, God, forgive me,
I’ve  wept unmanly tears.

I know I don’t  deserve a place,
Among the people  here.
They never wanted me around,
Except  to calm their fears.

If you’ve a place  for me here, Lord,
It needn’t be so  grand.
I never expected or had too  much,
But if you don’t, I’ll  understand.

There was a silence all  around the throne,
Where the saints had often  trod.
As the soldier waited quietly,
For  the judgment of his God.

‘Step forward  now, you soldier,
You’ve borne your burdens  well..
Walk peacefully on Heaven’s  streets,
You’ve done your time in  Hell.’

Author Unknown~

It’s the  Military, not the reporter who has given us the  freedom of the
Press.. It’s the Military, not  the poet, who has given us the freedom  of
Speech. It’s the Military, not the  politicians that ensures our right to
Life,    Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness. It’s the  Military who salutes

The  flag, who serves beneath the flag, and whose  coffin is draped by
The flag.

If you  care to offer the smallest token of recognition  and appreciation for
The Military, please  pass this on and pray for our men and women who  have
Served and are currently serving our  country and pray for those who
Have given the  ultimate sacrifice for freedom.


An ex-Royal Marine is set to climb Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania to raise cash for forces charity Help For Heroes.Gavin Stewart is hoping to raise £3,000 for the charity, which helps injured servicemen and women, and is holding a fundraising quiz night at Chinnor Rugby Club, near Thame, on Friday, November 13, to raise more money towards the climb.Entry costs £5 per person with a maximum team of six, with a range of prizes on offer for the winners. To book your team’s place at the event, call Gavin on 07966 511472. To sponsor Gavin’s trip up Kilimanjaro, visit http://www.justgiving.com/gavinstewart

British and Colonial Flags

“Poor is the Nation that has no Heroes, but beggared

is the Nation that has, and forgets them.”


Remembrance Sunday was a moving and emotional day for good people that come out in large numbers

We Did Remember them, Remembrance Sunday ceremony took place near the parish church at Remembrance Sunday was a moving and emotional day for good people that come out in large numbers

Remembrance Sunday in Newark-On-Trent

Remembrance day is a day to commemorate the sacrifices of members of the armed forces and civilians in times of war, specifically since the First World War. It is observed on 11 November to recall the end of World War I on that date in 1918. The observance is specifically dedicated to members of the armed forces who were killed during war.

File:RAF roundel.svg

FOR THEIR SAKE LET’S REMEMBER THEM

The work the Royal British Legion does helps so many people each year from those injured in action to the relatives of those who tragically died in conflict. Let’s give our support for the annual Poppy Appeal. This year’s campaign will focus on support for those wounded and bereaved from Afghanistan. Many thanks to the fallen for their bravery and for the honour with which we will Remember them. cllrlaurencegoffnewark@yahoo.co.uk

Corporal Ivano ‘Sean’ Violino our Heroes in memory of father of 2, who went to school in Newark and whose family still live in the town. He was killed in Helmand Province, southern Afghanistan, on September 17, 2007. RIP. His name has been added to the War Memorial to the fallen at Newark-On-Trent Cemetery off London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire, he will not be forgotten.

We will Remember

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/8348515.stm

http://www.the-soldiers.co.uk/

http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/

Poppies“Remembrance Sunday is a day not only to remember people, some of them close to us, who lost their lives defending their country, but it is also a time of reflection and allows us to think how it is that wars are still happening around the world today.”

They shall not grow old As we that are left grow old, Age shall not weary them Nor the years condemn, At the going down of the sun And in the morning – we will remember them.

FOR THEIR SAKE LET’S REMEMBER THEM

Polish serving our country during the 2nd World War, we will Remember them

All Souls Newark-On-Trent Cemetery We will

Remember them. Conflicts of long, long ago will not

be forgotten.

All Souls Newark-On-Trent Cemetery We will Remember them. Conflicts of long, long ago will not be forgotten by you.CLICK PICTURE FOR LARGER IMAGE

Friends of Newark Cemetery member visiting by you.

Newark-On-Trent Cemetery for the annual All Souls Day Service held on the last Sunday in October each year by you.Polish and British Union Flag is proudly flying at Newark Cemetery by you.

The Healers

In a vision of the night I saw them,
In the battles of the night.
’Mid the roar and the reeling
shadows of blood
They were moving like light,

Light of the reason, guarded
Tense within the will,
As a lantern under a tossing of boughs
Burns steady and still.

With scrutiny calm, and with fingers
Patient as swift
They bind up the hurts and
the pain-writhen
Bodies uplift,

Untired and defenceless; around them
With shrieks in its breath
Bursts stark from the terrible horizon
Impersonal death;

But they take not their courage from anger
That blinds the hot being;
They take not their pity from weakness;
Tender, yet seeing;

Feeling, yet nerved to the uttermost;
Keen, like steel;
Yet the wounds of the mind
they are stricken with,
Who shall heal?

They endure to have eyes
of the watcher
In hell, and not swerve
For an hour from the faith
that they follow,
The light that they serve.

Man true to man, to his kindness
That overflows all,
To his spirit erect in the thunder
When all his forts fall,

This light, in the tiger-mad welter,
They serve and they save.
What song shall be worthy
to sing of them
Braver than the brave?

By Laurence Binyon


Thanks For Your Life

They fight to live
They fight to die
To give us freedom
From land to sky.

They gave us a chance
To rule on our own
Now we live to show them
How strongly we’ve grown.

Thanks for your fight
Thanks for your life
We now live in Peace
Day and night.

By Jordan Pike

CLICK ICON CLICK BADGE ICON FOR 305 SQUADRON HISTORY

See full size imagecmoore@305squadron.com Witamy!  Welcome to the 305 Squadron Living History Group. We are a member unit of the WWII Polish Living History Group which is dedicated to educating the public about the deeds of the  armed forces of Poland during the Seond World War. Our goal in 305 Sqaudron is to honor and preserve the history of the PAF (Polish Air Force) that served in exile from 1939-1945.  We attend various living history events and air shows throughout the course of each year.  We focus on portraying 305 Polish Bomber Squadron, but occassionaly, depending on the event, we are able to represent many of the 14 other PAF Squadrons (15 squadrons total) that served in exile.


Back on the beaches for the last time D-Day heroes who still hear the cries of fallen comrades, we will Remember them


See full size imageSee full size image

See full size image

Back on the beaches for the last time: D-Day


See full size image

heroes who still hear the cries of fallen comrades

See full size image


In MemorySerene and beautiful and very wise,
Most erudite in curious Grecian lore,
You lay and read your learned books, and bore
A weight of unshed tears and silent sighs.
The song within your heart could never rise
Until love bade it spread its wings and soar.
Nor could you look on Beauty’s face before
A poet’s burning mouth had touched your eyes. Love is made out of ecstasy and wonder;
Love is a poignant and accustomed pain.
It is a burst of Heaven-shaking thunder;
It is a linnet’s fluting after rain.
Love’s voice is through your song;
above and under
And in each note to echo and remainA red rose is His Sacred Heart,
a white rose is His face,
And His breath has turned the barren
world to a rich and flowery place.
He is the Rose of Sharon,
His gardener am I,
And I shall drink His fragrance
in Heaven when I die.by Joyce Kilmer

The many flowers planted from bulbs 101_1878 by you.
The many flowers planted from bulbs thanks to friends of Newark-On-Trent Cemetery 2007-2009
The many flowers planted from bulbs 101_1882 by you.The many flowers planted from bulbs 101_1881 by you.

The many flowers planted from bulbs thanks to Friends of Newark Cemetery
2007-2009. Many people visit from all over the UK and the World with tresured memory.Let’s remember them as we pass by our Newark Cemetery. As you are now so once were many good people that are buried to all and see. You must not be forgotten, are you prepare to help and follow in my foot steps to help save guard our Newark Cemetery. Many trying to found a grave which might be unreadable or difficult to read.
We have a number of our graves at risk. We have obtained 50.000 Heritage Lottery funding of one of the Chapels which is a Grade II listed building. The restoration has start  and will finish in the next few month in 2010
Main Drive
The Chapel Interpretation Centre

The Heritage Lottery Fund grant (£50k) has been received and works have finished in the Chapel.  .  Technical documentation was prepared by our Architect, Ros Nicholson, for the works tender which was won competitively by Longthorne Limited of Derby.

The Chapel Interpretation Centre will now be fitted out with audio visual and interpretation boards, displays  presentations which will be designed by James Fountain of Bazzoo.  Text and ideas for display boards and leaflets etc are being provided by FoNC.  These design works have been running in parallel with the building works.  It is anticipated that the boards would show information and images on the history of the Cemetery and Chapels, origins of the practice of burials/cremations etc, famous people buried in, or associated with, the cemetery and flora and fauna in the cemetery.  It could also feature pieces regarding the polish connections (Air Bridge and General Sikorski), the commonwealth war graves commission, the travelling community and the memorial to the fallen.

Newark Cemetery First Open on the 30th October 1856
We will Remember them
FIRST MAP  COPY IN THE MAIN LODGE AT NEWARK CEMETERY UK 1856 by friendsofnewarkcemetery.
First picture of Newark Cemetery 1856

FIRST MAP COPY IN THE MAIN LODGE

AT NEWARK CEMETERY UK 1856

Newark Cemetery with photos and info by Laurence Goff for Friends of Newark Cemetery
A good place to visit all year aroundNEWARK CEMETERY UK by friendsofnewarkcemetery.
East side of Newark-On-Trent CemeteryPolish and Commonwealth  graves from the 2nd World War RIP by friendsofnewarkcemetery.

Wars graves at Newark Cemetery UK

Wars graves at Newark Cemetery UK by friendsofnewarkcemetery.Many Commonwealth helped like Australia,  and other Nations are buried from the 2nd World War at Newark Cemetery UK by friendsofnewarkcemetery.

Many Commonwealth helped like Australia, and other Nations are buried from the 2nd World War at Newark Cemetery UK
Photos are taken for friends of Newark Cemetery by Laurence Goff Newark UK
Newark Cemetery UK 2nd World War by friendsofnewarkcemetery.
The cemetery is also important internationally as it contains the Polish War Cemetery and was the historical burial place of General Sikorski ( the wartime leader of Poland ) whose body has now been retuned to Poland, but whose memorial remains. The Cemetery currently has both areas for burials and a Garden of Remembrance for cremated remains.
ON A LOVELY NOVEMBER DAY IN NEWARK CEMETERY UK by friendsofnewarkcemetery.
Garden of Remembrance for Cremated Remains.
Polish War graves from the 2nd World War RIP by friendsofnewarkcemetery.
War Graves in Newark  cemetery is also important internationally as it contains the Polish War Cemetery and was the historical burial place of General Sikorski ( the wartime leader of Poland ) whose body has now been retuned to Poland, but whose memorial remains.

ON A COLD NOVEMBER MORNING by friendsofnewarkcemetery.
Flowers were placed at the Memorial To The Fallen in Newark Cemetery on Saturday 29th November 2008. The Friends of Newark Cemetery have arranged for a vase to be incorporated into the memorial so fresh flowers can be put in place all year round.“This Memorial we shall remember them, but there was no indication that we were doing so, so we felt that flowers should be put there.” Representatives from the Friends of Newark Cemetery, the Newark branch of the Royal Air Forces Association, Newark Air Cadets, the Royal British Legion, Newark division of the Guides and Newark Sea Cadets put flowers on the memorial. These were later arranged in the vase. Any organisations that would like to become involved should contact the council’s environmental services manager, Mr James Radley, on 01636 680340.

WAR MEMORIAL TO THE FALLEN

NEWARK TOWN NOTTINGHAMSHIRE ENGLAND UK FROM THE FIRST WORLD WAR MEMORIAL TO THE FALLEN by friendsofnewarkcemetery.
It now also has a Memorial to the Fallen of Newark commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914. Let’s remember them as we pass by our Newark Cemetery UK. As you are now so once were many good people that are buried to all and see. You must not be forgotten, are you prepare to help and follow in my foot steps to help save guard our Newark Cemetery.
Representatives from the Friends of Newark Cemetery, the Newark branch of the Royal Air Forces Association, Newark Air Cadets, the Royal British Legion, Newark division of the Guides and Newark Sea Cadets put flowers on the memorial. These were later arranged in the vase.

SAMUEL BOYD QUIBELL Major 4th East Yorks T.F. Died of wounds during the First World War

THANKS TO THE NATIONAL LOTTERY FUND by friendsofnewarkcemetery.

The first instalment (£25k) of the Heritage Lottery Fund grant (£50k) has been received and works have commenced in the Chapel.  The cemetery has had already demolished the breeze block walls, the rotten wooden floor and the old wiring was also removed.  This then presented an empty building to a contractor to repair and fit out as appropriate.  Technical documentation was prepared by our Architect, Ros Nicholson, for the works tender which was won competitively by Longthorne Limited of Derby.

The Chapel Interpretation Centre will now be fitted out with audio visual and interpretation boards, displays and DVD presentations which will be designed by James Fountain of Bazzoo.  Text and ideas for display boards and leaflets etc are being provided by FoNC.  These design works have been running in parallel with the building works.  It is anticipated that the boards would show information and images on the history of the Cemetery and Chapels, origins of the practice of burials/cremations etc, famous people buried in, or associated with, the cemetery and flora and fauna in the cemetery.  It could also feature pieces regarding the polish connections (Air Bridge and General Sikorski), the commonwealth war graves commission, the travelling community and the memorial to the fallen.


We have a number of our graves at risk. We have obtained 50.000 Heritage Lottery funding of one of the Chapels which is a Grade II listed building. The restoration has start in 2009.

Wars graves at Newark Cemetery UK

Air Bridge Newark Cemetery UK taken 5th Feb 2009 by friendsofnewarkcemetery.

Polish War graves from the 2nd

World War

Polish War graves from the 2nd World War RIP by friendsofnewarkcemetery.
On the last Sunday in September each year the Airbridge special Memorial near the Polish War Graves takes place from members across the UK and Poland come to this annual visit.

All Souls is also an event that is held on the last Sunday in October each year organised by the Polish Air Force Association. This takes place at 3pm from London Road car park of the Newark Cemetery with a parade of standards With the Newark Town Mayor with members of the UK and Polish supporters with hundreds parading to the large Memorial cross to the Polish and Commonwealth War Graves Section.

During the 2nd Warld War there were a number of RAF stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for RAF burials and this is now the war graves plot for all to see from people across the UK , Poland and the world.
Many Commonwealth helped like Australia,  and other Nations are buried from the 2nd World War at Newark Cemetery UK by friendsofnewarkcemetery.

Many Commonwealth helped like Australia, and other Nations are buried from the 2nd World War at Newark Cemetery UK

On a lovely visit on a snowy day 5th Feb 2009 by friendsofnewarkcemetery.The Main Drive to Arch at Newark Cemetery UK taken 5th Feb 2009 by friendsofnewarkcemetery.

Newark Cemetery open all year, Winter Season.

If I can stop one heart from breaking,
I shall not live in vain:
If I can ease one life the aching,
Or cool one pain,
Or help one fainting robin
Unto his nest again,
I shall not live in vain.

Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) Amherst, Massachusetts

Prayer to Live With Grace

May we discover through pain and torment, the strength to live with grace and humor. May we discover through doubt and anguish, the strength to live with dignity and holiness. May we discover through suffering and fear, the strength to move toward healing. May it come to pass that we be restored to health and to vigor. May Life grant us wellness of body, spirit, and mind. And if this cannot be so, may we find in this transformation and passage moments of meaning, opportunities for love and the deep and gracious calm that comes when we allow ourselves to move on.

Above: The Friends of Newark Cemetery have been working on the restoration of the cemetery chapel. A 19th Century chapel in the grounds of Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire UK that was used as a storeroom has been fully restored. Part of it is being used as an interpretation centre open to the public.  The chapel was built in 1856 when the cemetery opened but has not been used for more than 30 years because it was considered unsafe. For many years it was used to store equipment and machinery. The east wing is to be used as an interpretation centre thanks to a £50,000 grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund.


Work on the fabric of the building is finished and display boards containing information about the cemetery, as well as screens and a table and benches will be installed later this year. The cemetery, on London Road, is owned by Newark Town Council but the Friends of Newark Cemetery Group will run the centre. The group plans displays on the history of the cemetery, famous people buried in the 20-acre site, and the Polish War Graves section. Visitors will also be able to use the centre as a place to relax and offers a support service when we move into  the former chapel. A lot of people come here every day and sit on the benches and they’ve got nowhere else to go. It is nice that they will be able to go in out of the rain.”The Friends work to help improve the services and facilities of the cemetery and promote the site. The  volunteers assist the town council with practical tasks such as litter-picking and offer help and information to visitors.

One of the group’s key tasks is organising a rota for local organisations, including the boys brigade, Scouts and Newark air cadets, to place fresh flowers on the Memorial to the Fallen to show that those who died serving their country are not forgotten. The group also plants and maintains the flower beds. Members produced a comfort book of poems available  from the cemetery former Chapel  displays, a nature trail, historical trail, war graves tour .

Obviously the main use of the cemetery is for burying the dead and the garden of remembrance, but it’s a beautiful part of nature here and the group has been trying to raise the awareness and enhance that side of it. The chapel will host  displays; a photographic exhibition by Mr Laurence Goff and an exhibition by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, which looks after the Polish war graves area. Friends of Newark Cemetery group needed more volunteers with one to two hours to spare every month. I find it rewarding,” he said. “I feel that what we have achieved has been worthwhile and with more volunteers we could achieve a lot more.

The Main Arch with the former  Chapels one at each end of Arch

Welcome to our Newark Cemetery open all year, Winter Months from 8am until 6pm by friendsofnewarkcemetery.The Memorial to the Fallen was unveiled by Richard Todd OBE. by you.

Laurencegoff took this snowy Cemetery Taken 5th February 2009

EVERY PERSON who lose their lives should be recognised remembered and honoured, they made important sacrifice in OUR gratitude

This website has been set up as a means of further promoting our cemetery and encouraging interested people to join the tribute. Together as a fitting tribute who resting place is at Newark Cemetery. These are my own views and do not represent Newark Town Council or others.

Laurence Goff

Chairman  Friends of Newark Cemetery

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

laurencegoff4newark@yahoo.co.uk

01636-681878
For
Friends of Newark Cemetery
newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/laurencegoff/

www.flickr.com/search/?q=NEWARK+CEMETERY

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Friends of Newark Cemetery

  The centre contains displays of the history of Newark cemetery, Commonwealth and Polish during the World War II.


This website has been set up as a means of further promoting our Newark Cemetery and encouraging interested people to join the tribute.

Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years. This memorial website is Laurence Goff personal views, I have put it together and do not represent Newark Town Council . It dedicated to the thousands of  people since 1856.  Many are happy to have a resting place at Newark Cemetery for all to see and view. Having a means of further promoting Newark cemetery, and encouraging interested people to join the tribute.

This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately, the content here is solely the responsibility of Laurence Goff.

Friends of Newark Cemetery AGM and Meeting 

Wednesday, 30th October 2013

To be held at Newark Town Hall in the Pickin Room

Arrival at 5:30pm for a cuppa

AGM – Meeting will start at 5:45pm 

www.facebook.com/cllrlaurencegoffnewark
www.flickr.com/photos/friendsofnewarkcemetery

Laurence Goff

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