If any of you have ever been to a military funeral in which taps was played; this brings out a new meaning of it

or over 150 years since 1856

Our Beautiful And Historic Newark Cemetery, London Road,

Newark-On-Trent

  Nottinghamshire

NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery Is Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm

October – March 8am-6pm

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsUS Flag - Follow Link to Download!Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsUS Flag - Follow Link to Download!Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsUS Flag - Follow Link to Download!Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

 

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsUS Flag - Follow Link to Download!Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsUS Flag - Follow Link to Download!Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately, the content here is solely the responsibility of Laurence Goff. As a fitting tribute to the people who resting place is at Newark cemetery. The views expressed our solely my own and do not reflect  Newark Town Council.

I have been walking around Newark cemetery since I was first  elected onto Newark Town Council in 2004. In 2005 we set up a group Friends Of Newark Cemetery, I have been Chairman for the last three years. I had an opportunity to have a blog for the last four years and I have had 29,500 visit across the UK, and the World. Many kind words which I really enjoy and appreciate from people that have contacted me. It has intrigues me, something that makes me want to look into who is buried and history going back to 1856, which has been fascinating.

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

When you receive this, please stop for a moment and if you are so inclined, feel free to say a prayer for our troops in the trouble spots around the world.

Newark Town Councillor Laurence Goff

Chairman

Friends of Newark Cemetery

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

Let’s Remember them, On the 11th hour, of the 11th Month in 1918 the First World War ended. Newark still wants to Remember those who have given and give today their lives for peace and Freedom.

If ye break faith with us who die,

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
in Flanders fields.

His poem has stuck with me since I first read it as a young lad, and I have always, when abroad, visited nearby war cemeteries to pay my respects to those that lay in a foreign field far from home.

I’m still a traditionalist and observe two minutes silence at 11 on the 11th of the 11th. Those, and sadly there are a few, that feel this is an inconvenience, fail to grasp that they are only here because of our forces.

Interestingly the idea of the two minutes silence was a very Commonwealth merging of ideas based on an old idea to a very solemn occasion.

The true originator of the Silence on Remembrance Day was an Australian reporter working in Fleet Street called Edward Honey, who wrote a piece about it.

This was subsequently read by Sir Percy Fitzpatrick, an astute South African statesman who contacted Lord Milner to put the proposal to King George the Fifth, who put the official seal on the idea and authorised its adoption. But the idea all started with a journalist … the power of the press.

Respect their sacrifice.

Today, the sale of poppies helps the Royal British Legion’s charitable work helping safeguard the welfare, interests and memory of those who are serving or who have served in our Armed Forces.

Regardless of which side, left or right, that you wear your poppy, just wearing one shows you remember and care. It’s when we stop remembering and caring that tyrants start to rear their ugly heads.

The whole object is to remember and endeavour as a people working together, to ensure that such losses never happen again, or at the very least every peaceful solution sought.

It is not to glorify war as some factions have tried to claim, but to honour the individual human as well as the forces as a whole, that have tried to defend mankind and democracy.

They have ensured our freedoms, and they and their memory, rightly deserves our respect.

 That is why we wear the poppy.

The colour of the poppy is red, as Colonel John McCrae saw them and the last three lines of his poem are:

IN FLANDERS FIELDS

by Colonel John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow 

Between the crosses, row by row, 

That mark our place,’ and in the sky
The larks still bravely singing fly,
Scarce heard among the guns below. 
We are the dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow – 
Loved and were loved,’ and now we lie
in Flanders Fields.
Take up our quarrel with the foe!
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch – Be yours to hold it high!
If ye break faith with us who die,
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
in Flanders fields.

When you wear your Poppy, it is not just for those that laid down their lives in what was the nightmare of carnage of the First World War; it is for all those brave men and women who have lost their lives in all the wars and conflicts, that we have had the unfortunate nature to be in.

Right or wrong their being in any war or conflict that is the fault of politicians who should, but sadly seldom are, be held accountable to

us the people. Our forces, built up of exceptional men and women, endeavour to protect our freedoms and this nation as a whole.

The immortal poem, ‘In Flanders Fields,’ was seeded from the simple Corn Poppy . It was brought to Europe from the Holy Land  and has now become the symbol of Remembrance of all those who died in the wars of this century.

In Flanders, the simple, yet beautiful little Corn Poppy grows everywhere. During the First World War, Colonel John McCrae, a Canadian veteran of the South African war, looked out from his water logged trench during a lull in the fierce fighting at the second battle of Ypres… His eyes met the sickening sight of makeshift crosses… rows and rows… the ghastly relics of the first battle which had drenched the battlefield with blood.

The Canadian Medical Officer was struck with admiration at the sight of the little red poppies… swaying gently in the breeze over the graves of the dead.

McCrae was so moved at the sight, he took out his note pad and pencil and wrote the poem…In Flanders Fields.

In 1918, Colonel John McCrae was severely wounded and he was moved from the makeshift front-line field hospital in a dugout to a rear-base hospital near Calais… he had asked to be moved to the coast area so that he could see the white cliffs of Dover from across the Channel.

On the third night he fought his last fight… he succumbed to his wounds… but in the last fleeting seconds before the Reaper called. Colonel McCrae whispered “Tell them this if ye break faith with us ho die…we shall not sleep.” And with that…the gallant Colonel was gone. That very night he was buried in the cemetery at Wimereux.

In November 1918… after four years of almost incessant fighting came the Armistice. The Great War was over… the terrible carnage was at an end. France had lost its life blood of youth for about seven million had perished.

After the misery of war… the truth that it was all for nothing became very clear when the disabled and shell-shocked Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen were cast-off overnight as unwanted. Touched by the plight of the war disabled, Madame Yvonne Guerin proposed that the women of France should make artificial red poppies and sell them throughout the world in order to raise money for the war disabled, for after all, it was they who had given them their freedom.

In England the idea caught on and Field Marshal Haig proposed a factory, where British Soldiers who, had been injured during the war, could be employed making red silk poppies. Sponsored by the British Legion it brought in much need money for the relief of those disabled in the war.

Today, millions of red poppies are sold throughout Britain. The red petals of the poppy signify the vast ocean of blood spilt, the yellow and blackcentre for the mud and desolation of the battlefields the green of the stem is symbolic of the fields where many brave Soldiers fell.

US Flag - Follow Link to Download!US Flag - Follow Link to Download!US Flag - Follow Link to Download!US Flag - Follow Link to Download!US Flag - Follow Link to Download!US Flag - Follow Link to Download!US Flag - Follow Link to Download!

Here is a quote from Theodore Roosevelt : “A man who is good enough to shed blood for his country is good enough to be given a square deal afterwards.”

I first heard Tap’s when I was at YMCA Camp Potawotami from  1976-1977 which is located  South Milford near

Fort Wayne Indiana USA, A former Camp Councillor

US Flag - Follow Link to Download!US Flag - Follow Link to Download!US Flag - Follow Link to Download!US Flag - Follow Link to Download!US Flag - Follow Link to Download!US Flag - Follow Link to Download!US Flag - Follow Link to Download!

Got this from my Uncle. I was aware that “Taps” originated during the Civil War, but is this a true story, does anyone know? 

Why “TAPS” is played..

If any of you have ever been to a military funeral in which taps were played; this brings out a new meaning of it.

Here is something Every North American should know.. Until I read this:

We in the North America have all heard the haunting song, “Taps”. It’s the song that gives us that lump in our throats and usually tears in our eyes.

But, do you know the story behind the song? If not, I think you will be interested to find out about its humble beginnings.

Reportedly, it all began in 1862 during the Civil War, when Union Army Captain Robert Ellicombe was with his men near Harrison’s Landing in Virginia. The Confederate Army was on the other side of the narrow strip of land.

During the night, Captain Ellicombe heard the moans of a soldier who lay severely wounded on the field. Not knowing if it was a Union or Confederate soldier, the Captain decided to risk his life and bring the stricken man back for medical attention.

Crawling on his stomach through the gunfire, the Captain reached the stricken soldier and began pulling him toward his encampment.

When the Captain finally reached his own lines, he discovered it was actually a Confederate soldier, but the soldier was dead

The Captain lit a lantern and suddenly caught his breath and went numb with shock. In the dim light, he saw the face of the soldier. It was his own son. The boy had been studying music in the South when the war broke out. Without telling his father, the boy enlisted in the Confederate Army.

The following morning, heartbroken, the father asked permission of his superiors to give his son a full military burial, despite his enemy status. His request was only partially granted.

The Captain had asked if he could have a group of Army band members play a funeral dirge for his son at the funeral. The request was turned down since the soldier was a Confederate. But, out of respect for the father, they did say they could give him only one musician.

The Captain chose a bugler. He asked the bugler to play a series of musical notes he had found on a piece of paper in the pocket of the dead youth’s uniform. This wish was granted.

The haunting melody, we now know as “Taps” used at military funerals was born.
The words are:

Day is done … Gone the sun

From the lakes … From the hills …
From the sky . All is well.

Safely rest .. God is nigh.

Fading light .. Dims the sight ..

And a star … Gems the sky

Gleaming bright From afar ..

Drawing nigh . Falls the night.
Thanks and praise … For our days .

Neath the sun … Neath the stars…

Neath the sky . As we go
This we know .. God is nigh

Our Heroes who have lost their lives this year 2010 in Afghanistan,  RIP to all those brave soldiers who have fallen in Afghanistan and around the World.

Full military British and American funerals for fallen soldiers

The funeral of the first British woman to die in active service in Afghanistan has been held at the church where she was married two years ago.

Funeral for killed woman soldier

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/cumbria/7492732.stm

A Tribute To Fallen Soldiers – Calling All Angels

Dave Rabbit honors the memories of all military men and women around the world who have paid the ultimate price for freedom …
funnyordie.com
 

Fallen Soldiers Tribute — I Am Still Here

Uploaded by devildoggirl07
fallen soldiers tribute
youtube.com

http://www.strimoo.com/video/10967233/Tribute-To-The-Wounded-Soldiers-Metacafe.html

  1. BARNSLEY CHRONICLE VIDEO REPORT –Full

    HUNDREDS lined the streets of Cudworth on Tuesday for the funeralof Capt Martin Driver, who died after being critically injured …
    youtube.com – Related videos
  2. Luton soldier honoured by military funeral

    A Luton soldier, killed on an exercise in Germany, was today, Friday, April 25, honoured by his comrades in a grand military
    youtube.com – Related videos
  3. Funeral for killed woman soldier

    The funeral of the first British woman to die in active service in Afghanistan has been held at the church where she was married …
    news.bbc.co.uk – Related videos
  4. BRITISH MILITARY FUNERAL ( misleading title 

    Various shots of dignitaries visiting military hospital – no funeral!
    britishpathe.com – Related videos
  5. BBC LOOK EAST BROADCAST- Funeral Of L/Cpl 

    In freezing temperatures and under gunmetal skies, another town hushed to a solemn standstill today to bury one of its sons killed in …
    youtube.com – Related videos

I vow to thee

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMP9GQapuOc&feature=related

Our hero, let’s pay tribute to the British and American soldier killed in Afghanistan

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1029755/Funeral-hero-Hundreds-pay-tribute-100th-British-soldier-killed-Afghanistan.html#ixzz15x2Uv1Wp

Military Funeral

6 min – 19 Oct 2006 – Uploaded by joftinac
Flag Ceremony, Taps, and Flag Presentation. Funeral for grandfather, Taps played by and flag received by grandson. Final flag …
youtube.com

God Bless America “the most emotionally moving event I may have ever witnessed and may ever witness in my life.”

Who have made the supreme sacrifice.

US Flag - Follow Link to Download!US Flag - Follow Link to Download!US Flag - Follow Link to Download!US Flag - Follow Link to Download!US Flag - Follow Link to Download!US Flag - Follow Link to Download!US Flag - Follow Link to Download!

usa-uk-flag

God Bless America and for those who gave their lives for Freedom, around the World with respects. May they Rest In Peace.


BATTLE HYMN OF THE US REPUBLIC

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cMxJBenigY&NR=1

Granted our fallen, from all conflicts around the World in serve for others.

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wcncgf_sGzQ&NR=1

Veterans Day 2010 IMAGE

“Daddy Come Home”
The Yeshiva Boys Choir
Featuring Yaakov Mordechai Gerstner

Song Composed, Arranged & Produced By Eli Gerstner (EG Productions)
Lyrics By Yossi Toiv & Eli Gerstner
Video Directed, Filmed & Edited By Mendy Leonorovitz (On Time Studios)
Music by The Yosis Orchestra
Choir Conducted By Yossi Newman
Vocals Recorded @ EG Studios By Yossi Newman & Eli Gerstner
Mastered By Larry Gates @ Gater Music
Mixed By Eli Gerstner @ EG Studios

Daddy’s been gone
Gone for so long
For him I pray 
He joined the Corps
Fighting a war
Somewhere far away

He promised me he’d return
When the Chanukah candles burn
So here I wait
The blessings I recite
By the candle-light
But it’s getting late

CHORUS:
Daddy come home
Stay with me
Let me hold your hand
Let me sit upon your knee
I see fear
In Mommy’s eyes
Every time she cries
And tries to comfort me

It’s scary here at home
My mind begins to roam
Have I lost you?
I hear the phone
Mommy’s mournful moan
It can’t be true!

CHORUS

Where has he gone?
How will I carry on?
Tell me what can I say?
I need to pray…
…Please hear my plea
Send my Daddy home to…

…Who’s that I hear
Calling my name
I run into his arms
Yes, my Daddy came
Home to me
He’s on his knees
Now he’s holding me
For all eternity 

Now, as night falls
We stand tall
Eight candles burning bright
And they’re lighting up the night
Home at last
Eyes aglow
I hug my Daddy tight
And I’m not letting go!

© Copyright Eli Gerstner 2010. All Rights Reserved.
For More Information About YBC: 
Please Call EG Productions @ 718-853-9403
www.theyeshivaboyschoir.com


Here is something Every American should know. Until I read this, I didn’t know, but I checked it out and it’s true: We in the   United States  have all heard the haunting song, ‘Taps…’ It’s the song that gives us the lump in our throats and usually tears in our eyes.

Who have made the supreme sacrifice.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7bMAlMAdmY

If any of you have ever been to a military funeral in which taps was played; this brings out a new meaning of it.

 

If any of you have ever been to a military funeral in which taps was played; this brings out a new meaning of it.

But, do you know the story behind the song?  If not, I think you will be interested to find out about its humble beginnings.

Reportedly, it all began in 1862 during the Civil War, when Union Army Captain Robert Elli was with his men near Harrison’s Landing in   Virginia  .  The Confederate Army was on the other side of the narrow strip of land.

During the night, Captain Elli heard the moans of a soldier who lay severely wounded on the field.  Not knowing if it was a   Union  or Confederate soldier, the Captain decided to risk his life and bring the stricken man back for medical attention. Crawling on his stomach through the gunfire, the Captain reached the stricken soldier and began pulling him toward his encampment..

When the Captain finally reached his own lines, he discovered it was actually a Confederate soldier, but the soldier was dead.

The Captain lit a lantern and suddenly caught his breath and went numb with shock.  In the dim light, he saw the face of the soldier. It was his own son. The boy had been studying music in the South when the war broke out..  Without telling his father, the boy enlisted in the Confederate Army.

The following morning, heartbroken, the father asked permission of his superiors to give his son a full military burial, despite his enemy status. His request was only partially granted.

The Captain had asked if he could have a group of Army band members play a funeral dirge for his son at the funeral.

The request was turned down since the soldier was a Confederate.

But, out of respect for the father, they did say they could give him only one musician.

The Captain chose a bugler.  He asked the bugler to play a series of musical notes he had found on a piece of paper in the pocket of the dead youth’s uniform.

This wish was granted.

The haunting melody, we now know as ‘Taps’ used at military funerals was born.

The words are:

Day is done.
Gone the sun.
From the lakes
From the hills.
From the sky.
All is well..
Safely rest.
God is nigh.

Fading light.
Dims the sight.
And a star.
Gems the sky.
Gleaming bright.
From afar.
Drawing nigh.
Falls the night.

Thanks and praise.
For our days.
Neath the sun
Neath the stars.
Neath the sky
As we go..
This we know.
God is nigh

I too have felt the chills while listening to ‘Taps’ but I have never seen all the words to the song until now.  I didn’t even know there was more than one verse .  I also never knew the story behind the song and I didn’t know if you had either so I thought I’d pass it along.

I now have an even deeper respect for the song than I did before.

Remember Those Lost and Harmed While Serving Their Country.

Also Remember Those Who Have Served And Returned; and for those presently serving in the Armed Forces.

Please send this on after a short prayer.

Make this a Prayer wheel for our soldiers.

please don’t break it.

I didn’t!

 

February 16, 2002 – Sergeant Andrew Russell, 33, was killed when the vehicle in which he was travelling struck a landmine in southern Afghanistan.

Australians killed in Afghanistan – ABC News (Australian

http://www.abc.net.au/news/events/afghanistan/casualties.htm

http://www.gruntsview.org/memorial.html

http://www.snopes.com/holidays/christmas/soldier.asp

http://footprintsinthesandsofiraq.blogspot.com/2007_12_01_archive.html

Mull Of Kintyre ~ Song “Mull Of Kintyre”

Smiles in the sunshire and tears in the rain still take me back where my memories remain

A heavenly choir – what a song – my desire – simply great – I have always loved this Mull of Kintyre this great song by Sir Paul Mccartney and wing


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4JPHNuAAZDE&feature=related

Edinburgh Military Tattoo 2008

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJ170Qm4X4w&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2Y6xFOPPW0


soldierxmas-title1.gif (21528 bytes)

http://www.dobhran.com/greetings/GRinspire319.htm

Profile picture

This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately. As such, it has no affiliation whatsoever with the Arm Forces, UK or United States Government. Accordingly, the content here is solely the responsibility of

Laurence Goff.

Newark, Nottinghamshire, England

www.facebook.com/laurencegoffnewark

www.flickr.com/photos/friendsofnewarkcemetery

LAURENCE GOFF

CHAIRMAN FRIENDS OF NEWARK CEMETERYUK (FoNC)


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s