A Time To Pray For Our Loss Friends at Cemetery London Road Newark on Trent

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsNewark Cemetery London Road, Newark,  Nottinghamshire  NG24 1SQ

Photo Taken by Laurencegoff

Newark -On-Trent

Photo Taken by Laurencegoff

Our Tribute at Memorial to the Fallen not just on Remembrance Day Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

Photo Taken by Laurencegoff

Memorial is located near the front gate on London Road, Newark Nottinghamshire NG231SQ

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Laurencegoff

Newark Cemetery Is Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm

October – March 8am-6pm

London Road, Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

maps.google.co.uk

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Photo Taken by Laurencegoff

Two Former Chapels One has been Change into the Chapel Interpretation Centre

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Photo Taken by Laurencegoff

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves, London Road, Newark on Trent

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Photo Taken by Laurencegoff

All Souls Day held each year at Newark Cemetery next date 26th October 2014

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Laurencegoff

Annual Air Bridge  Memorial Service, next Date Sunday 28th September 2014

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Photo Taken by Laurencegoff

Laurence Goff  has put this website  together and has dedicated it to the thousands who resting place is at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire since 1856. This website is my personal views and is not representative of Newark Town Council.

Photo Taken by Laurencegoff

The chapel was built in 1856 when the cemetery opened but has not been used for more than 30 years. The east wing is to be used as an interpretation centre thanks to a £50,000 grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Work on the fabric of the building is finished and display boards containing information about the cemetery, as well as screens and a table and benches will be installed later this year. These once beautiful building has been preserve.

Friends of Newark Cemetery Group will run the centre.The group plans displays on the history of the cemetery, famous people buried in the 20-acre site, and the Polish War Graves section.The Friends work to help improve the services and facilities of the cemetery and promote our local cemetery.

Laurencegoff

 The grave of Keith Couzin-Wood 

On 29th July 1942 the joy of these young Cadet to go up in an Airplane which was a bomber plane for the very first time with other cadets.

 I am sorry to say it crashed killing all it’s crew and both cadets all died during his very first flightwith 1260 Squadron during the 2nd World War

just age 16 Air Training Corps Keith P. Wood, RIP

Remembering all those who have fought and those who have died in the service for their country,

Laurencegoff

Air Cadet Keith Rollason Couzin-Wood, the young cadet killed buried in

Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

http://www.flickr.com/photos/newarkcemeteryuk/4847272393/sizes/l/in/photostream/

Honouring the past cadet

 

We would wish to acknowledge the generosity of the following local organization for their assistance in the production of this Comfort Book. The Grange House Hotel across from the London Road Cemetery Newark-On-Trent

E.Gill & Son Funeral Services, Newark

Lidsters of Worksop Ltd

Lincolnshire Co-Operative Funeral Service, Newark

Newark and Nottinghamshire Agricultural Society

If you would like to Sponsor our 5th order of this small book.  Support with reading of poems, quotations and passages from scriptures.

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

The new chapel Interpretation centre is being used by Friends of Newark  Cemetery. We are grateful that we can start using these once lovely building at the East side cemetery former chapel, which has stood empty since 1977. Anyone can volunteers young and old together as a family are most welcome. Will be open  by appointment each weekend, Monday-Tuesday for groups.

Contact Laurence Goff

01636-681878 (home)   (Mobile) 07794613879

 

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Memorial to Remember The Air Bridge  of 1944 over Poland

We will Remember them

Following the outbreak of the Second World War, General Sikorski took command of the Polish Army which was formed in France in late September 1939. On 30 September he was summoned by the Polish government in exile, which then had its headquarters in Paris. The government was recognised by the majority of European countries except Germany, with which Poland was at war, and the USSR, which had invaded Poland on 17 September. None the less, Sikorski supported the idea of normalising Polish-Soviet relations and began negotiations with Russia in the summer of 1941. On the grounds of an agreement signed in June by Sikorski and Ambassador Mayski for the Soviet Union, the one and a half million Poles who had been deported to the Soviet Union (mostly to Siberia) as a result of Soviet annexation of Polish territories in September 1939, were to be freed and both countries were to support each other in the fight against Hitler’s Germany. This agreement resulted in the creation of a Polish army on Soviet territory under the command of General Anders. Most of the men in this force were freed deportees to Siberia. In August 1942 this 70 thousand-strong Army left Soviet territory for Iran.  

In June 1943, Władysław Sikorski went to the Middle East to inspect the Polish units. On 4 July, during his return trip, his plane crashed over the Straits of Gibraltar a few minutes after take-off. His daughter Zofia, Chief of Staff General Klimecki, an English liaison officer and all the other passengers on board died with him. Only the Czech pilot survived the crash.

General Sikorski was buried in the Polish pilots’ cemetery in Newark, Great Britain. On 17 September 1993, his ashes were brought to Poland and laid to rest in Wawel Cathedral, the burial place for the most distinguished men and women of Poland.

Lasting Tribute at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

Lasting Tribute at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

Looking over at Cremated Remains at Newark Cemetery, we will Remember them

These being the darkest days during the 2nd World war when 29 men and 12 women died with another 165 that were injured. When 10 bombs were dropped with 5 exploded on that Friday the 7th March 1941. The Battle of Britain was not just won by our brave Airmen. Many thanks to the people around Newark that worked at Ransome & Marles Ball Bearings Factory which provided components to all three Armed Forces. They needed parts for our Spitfires, Hurricanes, Lancaster bombers and many other Aircrafts that played such a major part during the 2nd World war. These brave people were a great help to win the war thanks to the employees of R&M Factory that ensured our Aircrafts got the Ball Bearings and parts on time, a personal tribute.

These Website as a fitting tribute to the 41 killed and 165 injured at Ransome and Marles plant in memory during the bombing. These are my own views and do not represent Newark Town Council. It has been built as a means of further promoting our cemetery and encouraging interested people to join the tribute. Our courageous heroes that will live on in our memories with a Memorial that will be put in place at Newark Parish Church in time for the 70th Anniversary on 7th March 1941. These Aircrafts that played such a major part during the 2nd World war, thanks to the brave people that were a great help to win the war thanks also to the employees of R&M Factory that ensured our Aircrafts got the Ball Bearings and parts on time.

I have put these Website site together as a fitting tribute to the 41 killed and 165 injured at Ransome and Marles plant in memory during the bombing. I am happy to say a Memorial will be put in place at Newark Parish Church in time for the 70th Anniversary on 7th March 1941. These are my own views and do not represent Newark Town Council or Friends of Newark Cemetery. It has been built as a means of further promoting our cemetery and encouraging interested people to join the tribute. Our courageous heroes that will live on in our memories.

Laurence Goff

Newark Cemetery Volunteer

 

After his body was exhumed on 13th September 1993, General Sikoraki his was still wrapped in a British army blanket, with the Polish flag draped across a fresh coffin. Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene overnight, guarded by members of the RAF Regiment with reversed arms.

 

 

Newark-On-Trent Nottinghamshire

A time to Remember our loss friends and family at Newark cemetery
 

The aim of the Friends is to assist the Town Council with services and functions over and above what the Council can normally provide. The Friends of Newark Cemetery centre on London Road has been freshly refurbished,  eastern Chapel off the main driveway. £50,000 has been spent on bringing the neglected Chapel back into use if you have an interest in the Cemetery you are most welcome to join our small group. That interest may be through the history of the Town and Cemetery, the sites flora, fauna and wildlife, because you find the Cemetery a nice place to walk, because you have a loved one there, or for many other reasons.
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The aim of the Friends is to assist the Town Council with services and functions over and above what the Council can normally provide. Past projects have included helping members of the public, through trained bereavement councillors, the publishing of a book of poems and passages, called “The Comfort book”, assisting with tracing family graves, placing flowers on the Memorial to the Fallen, and providing support and information to enable the Chapel to be converted in to the Cemetery Interpretation Centre. It is hoped that the Centre itself will be manned, at least some of the time by the Friends, enabling visitors to the Cemetery to be able to read and perhaps understand a little more about the Cemetery, its history, the customs associated with bereavement, the famous people buried there and the plants and animals that can be found there.

Laurence Goff – Friends of Newark Cemetery Chairman.  We will hold our next meeting is on Wednesday 27th November 2013.  To be held at Newark town hall in the Pickin room, arrival at 5:30pm and will start at 5:45pm.

All welcome

Pat Alexander President

Laurence Goff  Chairman

Marian Quant – Secretary

Michael Wright – Treasurer

 

Laurence Goff Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery  Newark Cemetery has two former Chapels Which Were Open In 1856. New Place As An Interpretation Centre for Friends of Newark Cemetery Volunteer group.

www.facebook.com/laurencegoffnewark

At British Commonwealth and Polish War Grave since 2nd World War.  Polish forces around the world By the end of the Second World War there were nearly a quarter of a million Poles in the Polish Armed Forces serving under British command. Today the Commission cares for the graves of nearly 4,500 Polish servicemen and women in 35 countries around the world. The highest concentration of commemorations can be found in the United Kingdom, where over 2,100 Poles are commemorated from Scotland to Cornwall in 244 different locations. In particular, nearly 400 casualties are commemorated in Newark-upon-Trent. There were a number of RAF stations within a few miles of Newark from which several Polish squadrons operated, and a special plot on the eastern side Newark-upon-Trent Cemetery was set aside for RAF burials. The plot includes a memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here which was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. Both men subsequently died and were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial, until their remains were Newark-upon-Trent Cemetery repatriated back to Poland  on  14th September 1993.

Photo Taken by Laurencegoff

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Photos taken by Laurence Goff at Holy Trinity RC Church, Newark on Trent

Photo Taken by Laurencegoff

John Henry Green grave died at age 55 when Ransome and Marles’ Factory was Bombed, we will Remember the 41 that died in Newark-On-Trent with 29 men and 12 women were killed with a further 165 being injured. Newark was attacked regularly because of its significance to airfields and war work carried out within the area. The most significant attack was on Friday, 7th March 1941 when two German planes dropped a series of bombs on and around Ransome and Marles who made ball bearings for naval gun turrets. A total of 41 people were killed with a further 165 being injured.

From the Nottingham Evening Post ,Tuesday 6th June 2010 with Laurence Goff and Chris Grant who Father died when he was age 5 in the Ransome and Marles bombing. Newark was attacked regularly because of its significance to airfields and war work carried out within the area. The most significant attack was on Friday, 7th March 1941 when two German planes dropped a series of 10 bombs on and around Ransome and Marles who made ball bearings for naval gun turrets. A total of 41 people were killed with a further 165 being injured.

www.thisisnottingham.co.uk/

 

http://www.childrenforapeacefulworld.com/

OLD CROSS by friendsofnewarkcemetery.A LOVE OLD ANGLE AT NEWARK CEMETERY GRAVE by friendsofnewarkcemetery.

Lasting Tribute at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

JOSEPH GILTRAP by friendsofnewarkcemetery.

JOSEPH GILTRAP 1785-1869

Serving his home town on the Borough

council and a Newark  Magistrate was a joy.

He died age 84 on 15th March 1869

Newark-On-Trent

Elected Mayor 1838 and presented

with a portrait of himself which is in the town hall.

He died age 84 on 15th March 1869

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Our Tribute to General Wladyslaw Sikorski, he requested should he die while Poland was still occupied that would like to be buried alongside his men

in Newark Cemetery died 4th July 1943.

At British Commonwealth and Polish War Grave since 2nd World War. Polish forces around the world, by the end of the Second World War there were nearly a quarter of a million Poles in the Polish Armed Forces serving under British command. Today the Commission cares for the graves of nearly 4,500 Polish servicemen and women in 35 countries around the world. The highest concentration of commemorations can be found in the United Kingdom, where over 2,100 Poles are commemorated from Scotland to Cornwall in 244 different locations. In particular, nearly 400 casualties are commemorated in Newark-upon-Trent. There were a number of RAF stations within a few miles of Newark from which several Polish squadrons operated, and a special plot on the eastern side Newark-upon-Trent Cemetery was set aside for RAF burials. The plot includes a memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here which was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Wladyslaw Sikorski,

Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. Both men subsequently died and were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial, until their remains were Newark-upon-Trent Cemetery repatriated back to Poland  on the 14th September 1993. The United Kingdom and Commonwealth graves are marked by traditional Commission headstones, but special headstones to mark the Polish graves have been designed harmonise with the others and can be differentiated by their distinctive pointed tip.

 

polish20emblem2.jpg Polish Flag image by PolishAmericans

Tribute to General Wladyslaw Sikorski funeral 16th July 1943 at Holy Trinity RC Church will was located on Parliament Street, Newark-On-Trent

Thomas Earp lived amongst his Friends in Newark and Died 100 years ago 17th February 1910 Buried around his Friends  in Newark Cemetery. His  picture also hangs in Newark town hall chamber. Former Liberal member UK Parliament constituency {Newark} from January 31, 1874 – November 24, 1885. Newark town Mayor three times 1869, 1891 and 1892.

Laurence Goff

Stone angel by clcg28.


Polish war graves by clcg28.

Following the Burial Act of the early 1830’s the Cemetery Committee of Newark Town Council began the search for a piece of land for a cemetery by printing & distributing 200 Handbills “Wanted, in the neighbourhood of Newark, about 5 acres of land suitable for a burial ground.”  Eventually 9 acres of land were purchased from the Earl of Winchlesea and the Committee set up an open competition and invited designs in the forms of drawings and specifications for “roads & paths and laying out and planting a new burial ground containing 6.5 acres, enclosing the ground, building a lodge with entrance gates, building two chapels either separate or attached, with complete fitting and accommodation for not fewer than 50 persons, the total cost not to exceed the sum of £2000. The design incorporated the retention of the Haw – Haw, which was a ditch with one side being retaining wall, used to divide the land without defacing the landscape. This ensured that livestock did not encroach upon the residential environs of the lodge.

The design chosen was by Messers Bellamy & Hardy, Architects of Lincoln and their design was constructed in 1856 by the General Contractor, Mr Whitworth of Newark.

The first stone was laid on 23rd February of 1856

At 10 o’clock the members of the Corporation and Burial Board, ministers of religion and other officials assembled at the Town Hall and formed a procession, the order being, 12 scholars of the Grammar School, Rev J G Bussell (Vicar), Rev T Smith, Curate of Hawton, Rev J Smith, Curate of      St Mary’s, Rev J W K  Disney, Incumbent of Christ Church, four Dissenting Minister, the Chief Constable, Waterton, with the battle-axe, the Police, two Mace-bearers, the Mayor H. Sutton Esq. and J. Branston Esq, the Members of the Burial Board, Members of the Corporation, W. Newton Esq, Clerk to the Board and Town Crier. The procession crossed the Market Place and went by Bridge Street, Carter Gate and Beaumond Street to the Cemetery Site. The Vicar said suitable prayers, speeches were made and the stone laid by Joseph Branston. The first burial in the Cemetery was that of Charles John Nicholson, son of William Newzam Nicholson, Ironmonger of Market Place, Newark on 30th October 1856.

There have now been 39,000 burials within the cemetery with some Common Graves from the previous two centuries having up to 5 burials in each plot. The Cemetery was not just conceived and built as a memorial and resting place but also as a park for the people of Newark.  It has been extended several times since its opening over 150 years ago and now extends to over 15 acres.

It is also important internationally as it contains a War Graves Cemetery, which includes graves of many Polish airmen, and was the historical burial place of General Sikorski (the wartime leader of Poland) whose body has now been returned to Poland, but whose memorial remains. There is also a Memorial to the Fallen of Newark commemorating, by name, those local military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914.  A further monument to war time confilict is the Air Bridge Monument which remembers the aircrew who died, during world war two, supporting the popular uprising in Warsaw in 1944.  The Cemetery currently has both areas for burials and a Garden of Remembrance for cremated remains.


The Friends of Newark Cemetery

started their New Year in a new venue

The Friends of Newark Cemetery will open for groups by appointment on Weekend in the afternoon also Monday and Tuesday. The Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark cemetery  in London Road Cemetery’s freshly refurbished Chapel. This is the eastern Chapel from the main drive from London Road on the left. £50,000 has been spent on bringing the neglected Chapel back into proper use and this is the first time members will have the chance to inspect the work for themselves. The meeting is open to anyone, members or non members, who have an interest in the Cemetery. That interest may be through the history of the Town and Cemetery, the sites flora, fauna and wildlife, because you find the Cemetery a nice place to walk, because you have a loved one there, or for many other reasons.

The aim of the Friends is to assist the Town Council with services and functions over and above what the Council can normally provide. Past projects have included helping members of the public, through trained bereavement councillors, the publishing of a book of poems and passages, called “The Comfort book”, assisting with tracing family graves, placing flowers on the Memorial to the Fallen, and providing support and information to enable the Chapel to be converted in to the Cemetery Interpretation Centre. It is hoped that the Centre itself will be manned, at least some of the time by the Friends, enabling visitors to the Cemetery to be able to read and perhaps understand a little more about the Cemetery, its history, the customs associated with bereavement, the famous people buried there and the plants and animals that can be found there.

Newark Cemetery Interpretation Centre, just off the main drive of the Cemetery. Parking is available at the Lodge, just off London Road.

FRIENDS OF NEWARK CEMETERY

Lest We Forget.

From the British Commonwealth, The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), British Royal Air Force (RAF), Canadian (RCAF) New Zealand (RNZAF) and Polish squadrons were formed within the Royal Air Force. Many Polish Airmen were flying Spitfires fighters for Britain’s Royal Force some 423 Polish Airman WHO HAD been buried in Newark cemetery during the 2nd World War.


On 28th April 2007, Richard Todd OBE, officially unveiled the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery on London Road. FoNC has decided to see that the memorial has a display of fresh flowers throughout the year. This is planned to start in November; other local organisations, associated with the armed forces, have pledged their support to this initiative.

It now has a Memorial to the Fallen of Newark commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914 -1945 and the present day.

Friends of Newark Cemetery  (FoNC)  was started November 2005.  New members are most welcome to join us (FoNC) we will welcome you.

Let’s Remember them

Friends of Newark Cemetery {FoNC} are currently running  these initiatives:

Annual tours and walk about takes place which years by Volunteers.  Nottinghamshire. Friends of  Newark Cemetery 3rd annual open day with walks around the Cemetery by touring the many graves.  We will informing the public of the history of the Polish and Commonwealth War Graves. The history when the cemetery was first opened in 1856. One of our Chapels will be open for the first time since 1977  as a tours and information centre.

Let’s enjoy the beauty of Newark Cemetery grounds with nature and historical walks, displays and exhibition by the War Graves Commission. Plus Competitions name the flowers and birds etc found around our Newark Cemetery.

Throughout the year, Friends group have offered to those mourning loved ones and to other visitors to the Cemetery. Services include bereavement support, help with family history, grave location, history of the Cemetery etc. If you would like to take advantage of these services or if you would like to help provide these services, please contact the Town Council or Friends of Newark Cemetery.

A Comfort Book is being produced, containing poems, quotations and scriptural passages, designed to provide comfort and support to bereaving families. Members of the public have been asked to submit any poems they would like to be included and it is hoped to have the book ready by the end of the year. Any financial contributions towards the cost of printing would be appreciated.

Laurence Goff  Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire

At British Commonwealth and Polish War Grave since 2nd World War.  Polish forces around the world

By the end of the Second World War there were nearly a quarter of a million Poles in the Polish Armed Forces serving under British command. Today the Commission cares for the graves of nearly 4,500 Polish servicemen and women in 35 countries around the world. The highest concentration of commemorations can be found in the United Kingdom, where over 2,100 Poles are commemorated from Scotland to Cornwall in 244 different locations. In particular, nearly 400 casualties are commemorated in Newark-upon-Trent. There were a number of RAF stations within a few miles of Newark from which several Polish squadrons operated, and a special plot on the eastern side Newark-upon-Trent Cemetery was set aside for RAF burials. The plot includes a memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here which was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. Both men subsequently died and were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial, until their remains were Newark-upon-Trent Cemetery repatriated back to Poland  on the 17th September 1993. Polish headstones

The United Kingdom and Commonwealth graves are marked by traditional Commission headstones, but special headstones to mark the Polish graves have been designed harmonise with the others and can be differentiated by their distinctive pointed tip .


On 29th July 1942 the  joy of these young Cadet to go up in an Airplane which was a bomber plane for the very first time with other cadets. I am sorry to say  it crashed killing all it’s crew and  both  cadets all died during  his very first flight with 1260 Squadron during the 2nd World War just age 16 Air Training Corps Keith R. Couzin-Wood, RIP. 

Honouring lives of past cadets

 

 Fri Aug 01, 2008

Air cadet Joe Parkes (14) of Newark 1260 Squadron, lays a wreath at the grave of Keith Couzin-Wood, who was killed in a plane crash, aged 16, in 1942.

Two former air cadets from different eras were remembered during a service at Newark Cemetery


Fourteen members of 1260 Squadron Newark Air Training Corps marched to the war graves, where the Newark team curate, the Rev Tim Pownall-Jones, led a service at the grave of Keith Couzin-Wood.

The service followed research by the cadets into the plane crash that killed him, aged 16, on July 29, 1942.

Keith, who was on his first flight, was in an RAF Hampden bomber from 408 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force, when it stalled and crashed soon after take off from RAF Balderton.

The crew, who also included another cadet, Geoffrey Hughes of Chesterfield, and two flying officers, were all killed.

It is hoped the memorial service, on the Saturday closest to Keith’s death, could become an annual event.

Mr Pownall-Jones said: “Those young men stood out because of their uniform and what that uniform still represents.

“The young men and women here today are champions of the same core values of the services.”

He said the values were teamwork, initiative, dedication and being young at heart, and that the first letters of those words spelt tidy. He said when the cadets checked their uniforms were tidy they should think of those values.

Cadet Andrew Tallis (13) lays a wreath in memory of Sergeant Michael Patton. – 260708MAT2-5

During a minute’s silence flags were lowered by corporal Sam Parkes (16) and Mr Robert Doyle, the standard bearer for Newark Royal British Legion.

Mrs Karen Grayson, the mother of a current cadet, Kristian Grayson, read a poem called Somebody’s Darling.

Cadet Joe Parkes (14) laid a wreath.

The Mayor of Newark, Mr Harry Molyneux, said: “The youngsters wanted to serve their country but little did they know what could happen to them. They were very brave.”

Keith was from Leigh-on-Sea and his father’s family were from Southwell and Normanton. The cadets tracked down Keith’s nephew, who is in his seventies and lives in Australia.

One of the pallbearers at Keith’s funeral was Mr Jack Stringer (85) of Grosvenor Road, Balderton. He was unable to attend the ceremony due to illness and was represented by his wife, Mrs Irene Stringer (83).

She said her husband, who was a corporal in the RAF stationed at Balderton, was sorry he could not be there.

The cadets also honoured Sergeant Michael Patton, a former cadet of the Newark squadron, who died in September 1996 when he fell from an RAF helicopter during an exercise over south Wales.

Cadet Andrew Tallis (13) laid a wreath beside a memorial tree and plaque for Sergeant Patton near the London Road entrance to the cemetery.

Mr Patton’s niece, Miss Natalie Henstock (24) of Newark, represented his family.

She said her grandparents, Mr and Mrs Brian Patton, of Bathley, who are Mr Patton’s parents, and her mother, Ruth Hughes, of William Street, Newark, who is Mr Patton’s sister, were unable to attend.

Mr Patton’s father-in-law, Mr Chris Grant, of The Park, Newark, attended along with his wife, Mrs Doreen Grant.

The cadets, who meet at their Sherwood Avenue headquarters on Tuesdays and Thursdays, are looking for adult helpers.

Cadets prepare to mark anniversary

posted 17 Feb 2011 02:33 by web master   [ updated 14 Mar 2012 09:28 ]

Former members of a group first set up to help boys prepare for life in the RAF are being invited to help mark the movement’s 70th anniversary.
The Air Training Corps (ATC) was founded on February 5, 1941, and the Newark and Dstrict squadron was set up just over a month later, on March 18. The initial aim was to train boys from 16 years-old for service in the RAF and the Fleet Air Arm. At Newark, the commanding officer was the head of the Magnus Grammar School, the Rev Campbell Miller, MA and the squadron met at the school.
The squadron now meets in a building behind Sherwood House, Sherwood Avenue, and has evolvedMembers of Newark ATC planning to mark the group’s 70th anniversary are, left to right, Corporal Sonny Labrooy, Corporal Willem Lewis Henderson, 15, Cadet Jacob Hopewell, 14, Cadet Blake Chapman, 15, Cadet Sam Roberts, 14, Cadet Jonathan Blundell, 15, Cadet Rebecca Wright, 14, and Cadet Amy Moir, 14.to become a youth organisation, not just a way to prepare for the RAF, although that is still an aim for some ATC members. The chairman of the squadron’s civilian committee, Mr Graham Would, said: “It’s run as a charity so, although the Ministry of Defence supplies us and helps us with premises and uniforms and considers us a very good introduction before joining the RAF, the main aim is to help youth development.“The cadets get to do things like flying and gliding and they can do examinations in that, and we also run the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award scheme. We do lots of other activities as well so it’s not just learning about the Air Force.”The squadron’s executive officer, Flying Officer Nick Squire, said one of the main changes in the last 70 years was that girls could now join. He said: “Another main difference between the ATC then and now is that the range of activities we can offer youngsters has changed massively.”Flying Officer Squire said the ATC offered young people somewhere where they could be themselves. He said: “We tell them that if they think of something they really want to do we will try to help them to do it. “We are not an armed youth club. We are an organisation for air-minded youth and more.”James Beeching, 16, who became a cadet three years ago, said he hoped to join the RAF. He said: “I enjoy learning about the Air Force and just being here and getting the opportunities I do to shoot, fly and everything else. It’s also helped a lot with my confidence.”The squadron hopes to mark its anniversary in the summer with a service at Newark Parish Church followed by a reception at the Town Hall. Mr Would hoped as many former members as possible, plus current cadets and their families, would attend. The squadron is looking for pictures or memorabilia from the last 70 years, in particular the committee documents from the founding of the group.Anyone interested in attending the celebrations or who has memorabilia should contact the squadron through its website http://www.1260sqn.co.uk

Full story

CORNELIUS BROWN Former  History of Newark  writer, The Advertiser Editor for 33 years  CORNELIUS BROWN was born at Lowdham, Nottinghamshire, on March 5th, 1852. He chose the profession of journalism, and early in lifeentered theoffice of The Nottingham Daily Guardian. Here he came under the influence of men well known in the world of letters, and in daily contact with such literary mentors and friends, he possessed undoubted advantages, which his studious and observant nature enabled him to turn to good account. Antiquarian and historical subjects possessed an attraction for him, and he started in the Guardian a column of “Notes and Queries,” which he subsequently edited under the happy alliterative title, “Notes about Notts.” In 1874 Mr. Brown was appointed Editor of The Newark Advertiser, which he conducted up to the time of his death with marked ability and erudition. Of his literary work, besides special articles contributed to various journals, the following were issued in book form “Notes about Notts.” (1874), “The Annals of Newark” (1879), “The Worthies of Notts.” (1882), “An Appreciative Life of the Earl of Beaconsfield,”

“True Stories of the Reign of Queen Victoria” (1886), “A History of Nottinghamshire” (1891), and “A History of Newark” in two volumes (1905 and 1907). This last self-imposed task occupied all his spare time and energy for fifteen long years, and in his own words:

Thomas Earp Grave

THOMAS EARP LIVED IN THE WHITE HOUSE LOCATED AT 48 MILL GATE, NEWARK

NEAR HIS FORMER  NEIGHBOURS NEXT DOOR OF WILLIAM CUBLEY 50-52 MILL GATE AND JOSEPH GILSTRAPS WHO ALSO LIVED  NEAR BY AT 109 MILL GATE, NEWARK ALL THREE WERE MAYORS OF NEWARK

Street named after him near Magnus School

Thomas Earp Lived, worked and died in his  lovely  Town call Newark-On-Trent

THOMAS EARP FORMER GRAND OLD HOUSE AT 84 MILL GATE, NEWARK

LIVED IN THE WHITE HOUSE – 84  MILL GATE, NEWARK

THOMAS EARP DIED 100 YEARS AGO

Former Newark Town Mayor 3 times.  Died 17th February 1910, Accomplishing an aim or purpose. This distinguish gentleman of his time  lived next door to William Cubley 50-52 Mill Gate, Newark

William Cubley grand old house lived next door to to Thomas Earp at 50-52 Mill Gate, Newark

THOMAS EARP FORMER NEWARK MP NEWARK TOWN MAYOR BURIED IN NEWARK CEMETERY UK IN 1910 by friendsofnewarkcemetery

THOMAS EARP FORMER NEWARK MP FROM 1874-1885 – NEWARK TOWN MAYOR 1869, 1891 AND 1892. DIED  ON THE    17th  FEBRUARY 1910 AGE 79. BURIED 100 YEARS AGO IN NEWARK CEMETERY UK IN 1910

A former MP for Newark  and Town Mayor 3 times Mr Thomas Earp picture is found on the wall inside Newark town Hall Chambers.  He entered Parliament on 31 January 1874 — General election; Left Parliament on 18th November  1885. Died 17th February 1910 which coming up to 100 years buried in Newark  Cemetery among his friends.

Many Commonwealth helped like Australia, Canada and New Zealand with other Nations are buried from the 2nd World War at Newark Cemetery UK.

Website:    http://www.cwgc.org/

General Sikorski the wartime leader of the Polish Government in exile

met his death in an air crash at Gibraltar on the evening of 4th July 1943.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/stoke/content/articles/2006/03/14/polish_messageboard_feature.shtml

(FoNC) instigated and organised the 150th Anniversary of the Cemetery. The event took place on the 7th October 2006 and was opened by the Mayor of Newark. There were displays from Bereavement Groups and the War Graves Commission. There were historical trails and wildlife displays. FONC also hold a yearly Open Day to include both Historical and Wildlife Trails.

Snowy Newark Cemetery Thursday  5th February 2009

By the end of the Second World War there were nearly a quarter of a million Poles in the Polish Armed Forces serving under British command. Today the Commission cares for the graves of nearly 4,500 Polish servicemen and women in 35 countries around the world. The highest concentration of commemorations can be found in the United Kingdom, where over 2,100 Poles are commemorated from Scotland to Cornwall in 244 different locations. In particular, nearly 400 casualties are commemorated in Newark-upon-Trent. There were a number of RAF stations within a few miles of Newark from which several Polish squadrons operated, and a special plot on the eastern side Newark-upon-Trent Cemetery was set aside for RAF burials. The plot includes a memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here which was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. Both men subsequently died and were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial, until their remains were Newark-upon-Trent Cemetery repatriated back to Poland on the 17th September 1993.

On the last Sunday in September each year the Airbridge special Memorial near the Polish War Graves takes place from members across the UK and Poland come to this annual visit, starting at 1:30pm Main gate on London Road, Newark.

All Souls is also an event that is held on the last Sunday. October each year organised by the Polish Air Force Association. This takes place at 3pm from London Road car park of the Newark Cemetery with a parade of standards With the Newark Town Mayor with members of the UK and Polish supporters with hundreds parading to the large Memorial cross to the Polish and Commonwealth War Graves Section.

Many Polish Airmen were flying Spitfires fighters for Britain’s Royal Force during the Battle of Britain. Let’s paid tribute to the contribution made by Polish Airmen. By the end of the war, 17,000 Polish pilots and ground crew members had formed 14 squadron in RAF.

We will Remember them

Air Bridge Newark Cemetery UK taken 5th Feb 2009 by friendsofnewarkcemetery.

ON A LOVELY NOVEMBER DAY IN NEWARK CEMETERY UK by friendsofnewarkcemetery.

Newark Cemetery, Newark, Nottinghamshire 

NEWARK CEMETERY MAIN ARCH 1856 WITH TWO CHAPELS AT EACH END. 

NEWARK CEMETERY UK by laurencegoff.

Let’s remember them as we pass by our Newark Cemetery. As you are now so once were many good people that are buried to all and see. You must not be forgotten, are you prepare to help and follow in my foot steps to help save guard our Newark Cemetery. Many trying to found a grave which might be unreadable. FoNC have planted  Spring bulbs for the last few years around the Chapel, cleaned memorials and benches and have organised nature and historical tours of the Cemetery.

Holy Trinity RC Church, Newark on TrentSAM_1133

Holy Trinity RC Church, Newark on TrentSAM_1130

ON A LOVELY NOVEMBER AFTERNOON WITH MY CAMERA by friendsofnewarkcemetery.

Flowers, were plants from bulk seeds by Friends of Newark Cemetery for the last 4 years since 2005.

£50,000 from the Heritage Lottery Fund for the proposed Chapel Interpretation Centre, at the Cemetery, which would ultimately be the home of (FoNC) Friends of Newark Cemetery .

101_0120-2

On 28th April 2007, Richard Todd OBE, officially unveiled the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery on London Road. FoNC has decided to see that the memorial has a display of fresh flowers throughout the year. This is planned to start in November; other local organisations, associated with the armed forces, have pledged their support to this initiative.

We look forward to hearing from anyone interested in helping to improve the services and facilities of the cemetery. Members of the public are welcome to attend and register their willingness to join the friends group at our regular meetings.

Our next meeting  will be held on Wednesday 27th November 2013 at  Newark Town Hall Pickin Room   arrive for a cuppa  at 5:30pm 5:45pm 

You are most welcome to become a Friends of Newark Cemetery.

Newark Cemetery  group was set up by  few volunteers November 2005

Laurence Goff  

Chairman

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

http://www.facebook.com/laurencegoffnewark

FRIENDS OF NEWARK CEMETERY NOTTINGHAMSHIRE

http://www.facebook.com/groups/233752416933/

LAURENCE GOFF
Friends of Newark Cemetery  Chairman and Publicity


4 thoughts on “A Time To Pray For Our Loss Friends at Cemetery London Road Newark on Trent

  1. Hallo Laurence, just saw your film on youtube about Newark Cemy. My name is Doeke Oostra from the Netherlands.
    I am very interested in war graves of any nation and have actually written a book on the subject. In Dutch I’m afraid but we are trying to get an English edition published. I am currently working on a gazetteer of all Polish war graves of WW2 in NW Europe listing all relevant information on each Polish soldier, sailor and airman buried here that I can get hold of. Have just copied the registers of Polish servicemen and women in Scottish cemeteries from a website listing these. No such information is readily available on those in the rest of Britain such as Newark, Northwood, Morpeth and many of the smaller gravesites. Some I do have, like Brookwood, Baginton, Hunstanton and Ormskirk, and a few dozen of the smaller sites. Could you enlighten me please? In passing, try http://www.polishwargraves.nl which is a very informative site set up and maintained by my good friend Jos van Alphen. It is good to see you so involved with war graves in general and the Polish ones in particular. Many thanks. Cheers, Doeke

  2. At the library last week researching Thomas Earp I discovered there is no material available except from newspaper of the time. Also, due to the “cuts” Tim Warner only works there on odd days. All the material that used to be at the Appletongate museum has been moved to the new Resources Centre on the industrial estate. This is not convenient for elderly researchers, and in any case you have to ring up for an appointment. It seems as if “they” are eradicating the history of Newark. Thank you for your website.

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