Lance Sgt Nathan Cumberland completed the Newark-On-Trent Half Marathon

Ministry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

The Act Of Honouring The Memory As Our Fitting Tribute To Them

Lance Sgt Nathan Cumberland completed the Newark-On-Trent Half Marathon in 2.5

hours in the Summer 0f 2010

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Lance Sgt Nathan Cumberland completed the Newark-On-Trent Half Marathon in 2.5 hours 

Lance Sergeant Cumberland a former 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards and attended Newark High School. He now lives in Fernwood, Balderton near Newark, Nottinghamshire with his wife and young son. Severing his country and was six weeks into his third Afghanistan tour when he was wounded in Helmand.

Many thanks for your bravery, courage and determination.

Many soldiers killed in conflicts regularly appear on news bulletins, little is heard about the wounded until the good news about one brave Soldier, Lance Sergeant Nathan Cumberland, from Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire. He served with 1st Battalion of the Grenadier Guards when he was injured badly by a bomb blast just six weeks into his third tour of duty in Afghanistan, our Heroes. Welcome home.

Website by Laurence Goff

media-imagemedia-image

Lance Sergeant Nathan Cumberland lost both his legs in an explosion  in Afghanistan. This amazing man completed the course on prosthetic legs and by using a hand bike to finish the course.

Lance Sergeant Cumberland formerly of the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, lives in

Fernwood

Balderton near Newark, Nottinghamshire 

Lance Sergeant Nathan Cumberland, from Fernwood Newark-On-Trent

http://youtu.be/AT5G52YWcfk

Townsfolk urged to cheer hero soldier

Fri Jul 23, 2010

The people of Newark are urged to cheer on Grenadier Guardsman Lance-sergeant Nathan Cumberland as he attempts to complete the town’s half-marathon .

Lance-sergeant Nathan Cumberland on the track at the Grove Leisure Centre, Balderton, where he has been training for Newark Half-marathon.

Lance-sergeant Cumberland, 26, of Long Bennington, is training to tackle the course on Sunday, August 8, despite losing both legs in an explosion in Afghanistan less than nine months ago.

He will compete for as long as possible on prosthetic legs and switch to a hand bike if necessary.

His courage has been praised by the race secretary, Kate Else, of the organisers, Newark Athletic Club.

She said: “We hope the crowds will spur Nathan on. We are delighted he is taking part. It is another example, if one were needed, of how courageous he is.

“He has an army of fans in Newark. We are very proud of him and very proud of the achievements of all coalition forces in Afghanistan.”

Lance-sergeant Cumberland was just six weeks into his third tour of duty in Afghanistan, when he was caught in the blast radius of an improvised bomb, he believes was purposely triggered during a patrol in Helmand Province.

Despite his injuries, he continued to lead and direct his men.

Doctors said his month-long hospital stay was one of the shortest for anyone with injuries so severe.

“The half-marathon is my way of saying: ‘Thank you’ to everyone who has been so supportive,” Lance-sergeant Cumberland said. 

“Although I am setting myself goals — the main one still being to walk down the aisle on my wedding day in October — this one is less about the challenge and more about fundraising.

“It will be incredibly difficult. I use 300% more energy just in standing than people do in walking.

“I have no idea about distance, but I have managed about an hour on my new legs so far.”

Lance-sergeant Cumberland this week trained with Newark AC members, at the Grove Leisure Centre, Balderton, 

He will take part in the half-marathon to raise money for the Newark Patriotic Fund, which helps the families of wounded Servicemen and women, and Blesma — the British Limbless Ex Service Men’s Association.

The MP for Newark, Mr Patrick Mercer, a former Army officer, who helped to set up the patriotic fund, will signal the start of the race for Lance-sergeant Cumberland, at 9.30am, an hour before the main event begins.

He will be joined by up to 20 friends for the 13.1 miles, including soldiers from 3 Para who will carry 50lb backpacks.

His training has been hampered because he damaged the foot of one of his new legs in Thailand, while on a dive trip paid for by a fellow Grenadier Guardsman.

Company Sergeant Major “Ski” Miles ran 50 laps of his camp in Afghanistan with the money raised paying for Lance-sergeant Cumberland’s trip.

This week Lance-sergeant Cumberland revealed he was looking forward to becoming a father as his fiancée, Rachael Cryer, is due to give birth in February.

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Townsfolk-urged-to-cheer-hero-soldier

 

The Act Of Honouring The Memory As Our Fitting Tribute To Them

The Yeshiva Boys Choir – “Daddy Come Home”

Here’s the links  – Thank You!!): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xF7UVW6PLig.

“Daddy Come Home”
The Yeshiva Boys Choir
Featuring Yaakov Mordechai Gerstner

Song Composed, Arranged & Produced By Eli Gerstner (EG Productions)
Lyrics By Yossi Toiv & Eli Gerstner
Video Directed, Filmed & Edited By Mendy Leonorovitz (On Time Studios)
Music by The Yosis Orchestra
Choir Conducted By Yossi Newman
Vocals Recorded @ EG Studios By Yossi Newman & Eli Gerstner
Mastered By Larry Gates @ Gater Music
Mixed By Eli Gerstner @ EG Studios

Daddy’s been gone
Gone for so long
For him I pray 
He joined the Corps
Fighting a war
Somewhere far away

He promised me he’d return
When the Chanukah candles burn
So here I wait
The blessings I recite
By the candle-light
But it’s getting late

CHORUS:
Daddy come home
Stay with me
Let me hold your hand
Let me sit upon your knee
I see fear
In Mommy’s eyes
Every time she cries
And tries to comfort me

It’s scary here at home
My mind begins to roam
Have I lost you?
I hear the phone
Mommy’s mournful moan
It can’t be true!

CHORUS

Where has he gone?
How will I carry on?
Tell me what can I say?
I need to pray…
…Please hear my plea
Send my Daddy home to…

…Who’s that I hear
Calling my name
I run into his arms
Yes, my Daddy came
Home to me
He’s on his knees
Now he’s holding me
For all eternity 

Now, as night falls
We stand tall
Eight candles burning bright
And they’re lighting up the night
Home at last
Eyes aglow
I hug my Daddy tight
And I’m not letting go!

© Copyright Eli Gerstner 2010. All Rights Reserved.
For More Information About YBC: 
Please Call EG Productions @ 718-853-9403
http://www.theyeshivaboyschoir.com

Lance Sergeant Nathan Cumberland, for putting other people  first at all times Nathan  completed the Newark Marathon in 2.5 hours

Many thanks for your help and support in raising Money for Newark-On-Trent Patriotic fund for injured service personnels and families. Well done

When you receive this, please stop for a moment and if you are so inclined, feel free to say a prayer for our troops in the trouble spots around the world

Let’s Remember them, On the 11th hour, of the 11th Month in 1918 the First World War ended. Newark still wants to Remember those who have given and give today their lives for peace and Freedom.

If ye break faith with us who die,
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
in Flanders fields.

His poem has stuck with me since I first read it as a young lad, and I have always, when abroad, visited nearby war cemeteries to pay my respects to those that lay in a foreign field far from home.

I’m still a traditionalist and observe two minutes silence at 11 on the 11th of the 11th. Those, and sadly there are a few, that feel this is an inconvenience, fail to grasp that they are only here because of our forces.

Interestingly the idea of the two minutes silence was a very Commonwealth merging of ideas based on an old idea to a very solemn occasion.

The true originator of the Silence on Remembrance Day was an Australian reporter working in Fleet Street called Edward Honey, who wrote a piece about it.

This was subsequently read by Sir Percy Fitzpatrick, an astute South African statesman who contacted Lord Milner to put the proposal to King George the Fifth, who put the official seal on the idea and authorised its adoption. But the idea all started with a journalist … the power of the press.

Respect their sacrifice.

Today, the sale of poppies helps the Royal British Legion’s charitable work helping safeguard the welfare, interests and memory of those who are serving or who have served in our Armed Forces.

Regardless of which side, left or right, that you wear your poppy, just wearing one shows you remember and care. It’s when we stop remembering and caring that tyrants start to rear their ugly heads.

The whole object is to remember and endeavour as a people working together, to ensure that such losses never happen again, or at the very least every peaceful solution sought.

It is not to glorify war as some factions have tried to claim, but to honour the individual human as well as the forces as a whole, that have tried to defend mankind and democracy.

They have ensured our freedoms, and they and their memory, rightly deserves our respect.

 That is why we wear the poppy.

The colour of the poppy is red, as Colonel John McCrae saw them and the last three lines of his poem are:

IN FLANDERS FIELDS

by Colonel John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow 

Between the crosses, row by row, 
That mark our place,’ and in the sky
The larks still bravely singing fly,
Scarce heard among the guns below. 
We are the dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow – 
Loved and were loved,’ and now we lie
in Flanders Fields.
Take up our quarrel with the foe!
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch – Be yours to hold it high!
If ye break faith with us who die,
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
in Flanders fields.

When you wear your Poppy, it is not just for those that laid down their lives in what was the nightmare of carnage of the First World War; it is for all those brave men and women who have lost their lives in all the wars and conflicts, that we have had the unfortunate nature to be in.

Right or wrong their being in any war or conflict that is the fault of politicians who should, but sadly seldom are, be held accountable to

us the people. Our forces, built up of exceptional men and women, endeavour to protect our freedoms and this nation as a whole.

The immortal poem, ‘In Flanders Fields,’ was seeded from the simple Corn Poppy . It was brought to Europe from the Holy Land  and has now become the symbol of Remembrance of all those who died in the wars of this century.

In Flanders, the simple, yet beautiful little Corn Poppy grows everywhere. During the First World War, Colonel John McCrae, a Canadian veteran of the South African war, looked out from his water logged trench during a lull in the fierce fighting at the second battle of Ypres… His eyes met the sickening sight of makeshift crosses… rows and rows… the ghastly relics of the first battle which had drenched the battlefield with blood.

The Canadian Medical Officer was struck with admiration at the sight of the little red poppies… swaying gently in the breeze over the graves of the dead.

McCrae was so moved at the sight, he took out his note pad and pencil and wrote the poem…In Flanders Fields.

In 1918, Colonel John McCrae was severely wounded and he was moved from the makeshift front-line field hospital in a dugout to a rear-base hospital near Calais… he had asked to be moved to the coast area so that he could see the white cliffs of Dover from across the Channel.

On the third night he fought his last fight… he succumbed to his wounds… but in the last fleeting seconds before the Reaper called. Colonel McCrae whispered “Tell them this if ye break faith with us ho die…we shall not sleep.” And with that…the gallant Colonel was gone. That very night he was buried in the cemetery at Wimereux.

In November 1918… after four years of almost incessant fighting came the Armistice. The Great War was over… the terrible carnage was at an end. France had lost its life blood of youth for about seven million had perished.

After the misery of war… the truth that it was all for nothing became very clear when the disabled and shell-shocked Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen were cast-off overnight as unwanted. Touched by the plight of the war disabled, Madame Yvonne Guerin proposed that the women of France should make artificial red poppies and sell them throughout the world in order to raise money for the war disabled, for after all, it was they who had given them their freedom.

In England the idea caught on and Field Marshal Haig proposed a factory, where British Soldiers who, had been injured during the war, could be employed making red silk poppies. Sponsored by the British Legion it brought in much need money for the relief of those disabled in the war.

Today, millions of red poppies are sold throughout Britain. The red petals of the poppy signify the vast ocean of blood spilt, the yellow and blackcentre for the mud and desolation of the battlefields the green of the stem is symbolic of the fields where many brave Soldiers fell.

Brave beyond belief

 Fri Dec 04, 2009

http://www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Brave-beyond-belief

A Newark soldier has told how he continued to direct his men during a firefight with the Taliban, despite losing both legs in an explosion.

In an exclusive interview with the Advertiser Lance Sergeant Nathan Cumberland (25) said he believed he was deliberately targeted by the enemy because he was a section leader.

Lance Sergeant Cumberland of the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards is home after being discharged from Selly Oak Hospital, Birmingham, on Friday.

Doctors said his month-long hospital stay was one of the shortest for anyone with injuries as severe as his.

Lance Sergeant Cumberland, of Long Bennington, will be fitted with prosthetic legs. He lost his left leg below the knee and right leg above the knee when an improvised explosive device exploded.

The former Newark High School pupil plans to be walking in time for his wedding to Miss Rachael Cryer (24) next October.

He wants to stay in the Army and work in the welfare section of the Grenadier Guards helping other injured soldiers.

“They might be thinking it is the end of the world but I can show them it’s possible to have a normal life,” he said.

Lance Sergeant Cumberland was six weeks into his third tour of Afghanistan when he was injured on October 28.

Lance Sergeant Cumberland, who was in charge of eight men, was part of a reconnaissance platoon patrolling an area near where a bridge was being built outside the village of Shin Kalay.

“I was on patrol on a track running between a field of crops and a muddy field,” he said. “My front man went across the area and nothing happened. I walked across second and took the brunt of the blast.”

He said he believed it was an IED command wire pull — a device triggered by someone who was watching.

“I think they identified me as the commander because of my radio.

“My ears popped and I saw myself in the air. As I landed my first reaction was to check my groin and then my arms. I had a gash on my right arm that was gushing with blood.

“As the dust and debris cleared I saw my legs.

“My left leg was lying several metres away, the right was attached by muscle. My foot was pointing the wrong way and bone was sticking out.

“I didn’t feel any pain at first — the adrenaline kept it at bay. I was about to start screaming when the Taliban started firing at us.

“They were not very far away and I think they had been watching.”

Lance Sergeant Cumberland said his section was made up of young soldiers on their first tour.

“I directed them to get firing and said ‘you do this’ and ‘you do that’,” he said.

“I looked at my legs and I was not 6ft any more. My leg was pouring with blood so I got my tourniquet out and tied it round my right leg. The medic tied a tourniquet on my left leg and gave me morphine.

“A bit of shock set in and I was saying to the medic ‘I’m not going to make it. I’m going to die aren’t I mate?’”

He blacked out on a Chinook rescue helicopter and woke up in Camp Bastion from where, just hours after the attack, he was well enough to ring Miss Cryer.

Lance Sergeant Cumberland said he could have bled to death had he not used the tourniquet. He said it was that and the medic that saved his life.

There are eight pints of blood in the body. Lance Sergeant Cumberland received 32 pints in transfusions.

Lance Sergeant Cumberland said: “Our job was to make sure the area was clear from the Taliban. Unfortunately, it wasn’t.

“I said at the start that I was glad it was me and nobody else and I stick by that.

“The day after it happened I said to myself it was unfortunate but it was one of those things.

“I vowed not to let it get me down. That’s the way I have taken it.

“If I have felt sorry for myself or had a dip Rachael has pulled me back up but there have not been many times that has happened.

“I can’t wait to get my new legs and start doing things for myself.”

Lance Sergeant Cumberland has had several operations, including skin grafts, and procedures to clean and stitch his wounds.

He takes about 25 tablets a day. He experiences phantom pains and sensations.

“It feels like someone is sawing my leg or grabbing and squeezing it. Sometimes it feels like there is a spasm in my foot and my toes go weird,” he said.

He is due to go to Headley Court Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre in Surrey on December 15.

He will be home for Christmas and the new year before returning to Headley Court to start his rehabilitation on January 4. He said the length of time spent in Headley Court varied.

“It all depends on your self-belief and determination.

“You need to have that mentality of wanting to be the first one to walk from whoever turns up at the same time as you.

“Believe me — I’ll smash it.”

Lance Sergeant Cumberland thanked everyone who had sent their good wishes.

“It’s unbelievable. I thought ‘it’s only silly me’ and then I was on the front page of the Advertiser and pupils from the Magnus and Grove schools are sending me letters and get well soon cards. It’s overwhelming.

“Rachael has been my rock. She has kept me up there.

“From that and the support of my family to strangers writing letters and young kids saying you’re a hero and they can’t wait to meet you is phenomenal.”

Lance Sergeant Cumberland plans to attempt a marathon to raise money for charities like the British Limbless Ex-Service Men’s Association.

He said Balderton solider Lance Corporal Nick Davis, who had part of his right leg amputated after being injured in a blast while serving with the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards in Afghanistan in 2007, was providing advice and support.

Many thanks from our local Newark Advertiser 

Thinking of you

 Fri Nov 20, 2009

http://www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Thinking-of-you

Hundreds of letters, cards and poems from pupils at the Magnus Church of England School, Newark, have been delivered to Lance Sergeant Nathan Cumberland, who was seriously injured in Afghanistan.

It was the idea of Lance Sergeant Cumberland’s step-brother, Joe Cassidy (11) who is a pupil at the school.

A small group led by citizenship teacher Miss Sarah Sturgeon started the project, which spread throughout the school.

It was not long before about 300 items were collected.

Students are also recording voice and video messages.

Joe said: “It is really good what everyone has done and I think Nathan will appreciate it.”

Lance Sergeant Cumberland (25) of the Grenadier Guards, is in Selly Oak Hospital, Birmingham, where he is recovering from leg injuries received when an Improvised Explosive Device exploded on October 28.

Lance Sergeant Cumberland’s stepmother, Mrs Tracy Cumberland (40) of Wolsey Road, Newark, answered questions from pupils.

She said Lance Sergeant Cumberland was continuing to make good progress and sat in a wheelchair for the first time last week. She said he was tired from having several medical procedures carried out in theatre but was still smiling.

She said: “A lot of the children do not even know Nathan. It has opened their eyes that there is a war going on and it is helping them understand that those lads out there are fighting for us.

“It really touched me. Children often receive a bad press but coming here to see this is overwhelming.”

The head of school, Mr Ian Anderson, said: “It provided a focus for us on Remembrance Day.

“It brought home to the pupils that what happened to Nathan could have happened to any of our brothers or sisters. It really struck a chord with everyone.”

Mr Anderson said Lance Sergeant Cumberland was an ideal role model and hoped he would visit the school next year to talk to pupils.

The head boy, Garry Astle (17) said: “Nathan is very brave and an inspiration to everyone. We hope he is better soon.”

A pupil wrote: “Remember we are thinking of you every second, every hour, every minute of every day. Get well soon Nathan.”

Another said: “When we read in the newspaper that you are determined not to let this get you down, it makes us remember how lucky we are.”

A pupil wrote that Lance Sergeant Cumberland’s fiancée, Miss Rachael Cryer (24) was lucky to be marrying a brave man like him.

Many of the cards wished them well for their wedding day.

A girl said Lance Sergeant Cumberland’s injuries had not deterred her from wanting to join the Army.

Mrs Cumberland was presented with a bouquet and boxes of Heroes chocolates for Lance Sergeant Cumberland and the other injured soldiers on his ward.

Screen Shot 2013-04-08 at 13.34.54

World Exclusive Interview with Iraq VC winner Johnson Beharry

May 23, 2010 – Exclusive ReportsFront Page StoryLatestWorld War I & II – Tagged:  – no comments

TNT has been lucky enough to meet Johnson Beharry VC who won his award for two outstanding acts of bravery whilst in Iraq. In this ten minute TNT News Special…

– See more at:

http://tntnews.co.uk/?s=+Johnson++Beharry+VC#

 

  • Sergeant Johnson Gideon Beharry VC of the 1st Battalion, Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment, is a British Army soldier who, on 18 March 2005, was awarded the Victoria Cross, the highest military decoration 

James Ashworth Died at Age 23

A British soldier who gave his life to save his comrades is to be awarded the Victoria Cross for his bravery.

Lance Corporal James Thomas Duane Ashworth VC was a British recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. 

British soldier to receive posthumous VC for bravery in Afghanistan 

16 Mar 2013

A British soldier who gave his life to save his comrades is to be awarded the Victoria Cross for his bravery

 

Tribute to our Serving Soldiers in Afghanistan

Laurence Goff Flying the Flag in Tribute to people that Serving our Country.

Thanks to Lance Sergeant Nathan Cumberland for putting other people first. He Completed the Newark-On-Trent Half Marathon 2010.

Lance Sergeant Nathan Cumberland who completed the Newark-On-Trent Half Marathon in 2.5  Hours.

Tribute to  Serving Soldiers in Afghanistan

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls   Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls      Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls   Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls  

Tribute to  Lance Sergeant Nathan Cumberland, for putting other people  first at all times Nathan  completed the Newark Marathon in 2.5 hours raising MONEY for Newark

Patriotic fund for injured service personnels and families.

 Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls   Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls      Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls   Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls  

 

Giving a helping hand

WELCOME TO NEWARK-ON-TRENT

Lance Sgt Nathan Cumberland taking part in the Newark Half Marathon on 8th August 2010

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls   Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls      Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls   Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls  

Many soldiers killed in conflicts regularly appear on news bulletins, little is heard about the wounded until the good news about one brave Soldier, Lance Sergeant Nathan Cumberland, from Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire. He served with 1st  Battalion of the Grenadier Guards  when he was injured badly by a bomb blast  just six weeks into his third tour of duty in Afghanistan, our Heroes. Welcome home.

He count himself one of the lucky one to live compared to many of his friends. Despite his injuries he knew the best thing is to take charge and ordered his eight-man reconnaissance patrol from the 1st Battalion of the Grenadier Guards to take cover and return fire. They fought their way to safety, taking Nathan with them, and he was airlifted to the Army’s Camp Bastion base for emergency surgery.

Many thanks for your help  little one


Newark Patriotic fund for injured service personnels and families in and around our area

It’s Good to have Friends in Newark-On-Trent around the area and Nathan home of Balderton

Thanks Nathan For Giving a helping Hand To Others

Newark and around the area should be grateful  as Nathan put his heart into it and decided to tackle the half-marathon as his way of saying many thanks to everybody who had supported him.

 

Lance Sergeant Nathan Cumberland was with the 1st Battalion of the Grenadier Guards

Many thanks for your support, it’s lovely to have all these Friends.

Many Brave soldiers in conflicts Like Nathan

in  Afghanistan in their Memory

“We should be grateful and thankful that there are people out there of all ages that can put on something like this, and it can raise money for wounded soldiers in the Newark-On-Trent area”

Our Memorials Will Live on

Being PROUD to Support Our Brave Troops. Let’s stand as one, and show our Brave Troops, just how Proud of them we ALL are !! They ALL put their Precious Lives on the line 24/7/365 to ensure we remain living in Freedom. We can take this for granted, the least we can do, is show them how grateful we really are.

ALL, Love, Loyalty, Support, and most important of all our RESPECT and God Bless ALL our Troops together with friends and Allies, a massive thank you.

THANK YOU

http://www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/New-legs-for-marathon-aim

  1. Townsfolk urged to cheer hero soldier | Newark Advertiser

    http://www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk/…/Townsfolk-urged-to-cheer-hero-sold…

    23 Jul 2010 – The people of Newark are urged to cheer on Grenadier Guardsman Lancesergeant Nathan Cumberland as he attempts to complete the town’s 

  2. Newark Advertiser – News

    http://www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk/news/archive.asp?q=nathan+cumberland

    to Nathan could have happened to any of our brothers or sisters. It really 

  3. Last 30 days – Newark Advertiser – News

    http://www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk/…/archive.asp?…nathan+cumberland

    8 Sep 2011 – Sergeant Nathan Cumberland (25) of the Grenadier Guards was 

    Show more results from newarkadvertiser.co.uk

The Memorial at The National Memorial Arboretum, the UK’s Centre of Remembrance

James died in southern Afghanistan in June 2012 as he protected his colleagues from a grenade blast is to be awarded the Victoria Cross.

The UK’s top gallantry medal will go to L/Cpl James Ashworth, 23, was serving with 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards.

It is understood the announcement will not be made officially until next week.

The VC has been awarded 10 times to UK soldiers since World War II and only once before for bravery in Afghanistan.

L/Cpl James Ashworth was killed while on a reconnaissance patrol to disrupt insurgent activity in the Nahr-e-Saraj district in June 2012.

Speaking at the time the death was announced Capt Mike Dobbin, commander of Reconnaissance Platoon, Nijmegen Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, paid tribute to L/Cpl Ashworth’s actions.

L/Cpl James Ashworth to be awarded the Victoria Cross

James died in southern Afghanistan in June 2012 as he protected his colleagues from a grenade blast is to be awarded the Victoria Cross.

______________________________________________________

The UK’s top gallantry medal will go to L/Cpl James Ashworth, 23, was serving with 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards.It is understood the announcement will not be made officially until next week.

The VC has been awarded 10 times to UK soldiers since World War II and only once before for bravery in Afghanistan.

L/Cpl James Ashworth was killed while on a reconnaissance patrol to disrupt insurgent activity in the Nahr-e-Saraj district in June 2012.

Speaking at the time the death was announced Capt Mike Dobbin, commander of Reconnaissance Platoon, Nijmegen Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, paid tribute to L/Cpl Ashworth’s actions.

“He was killed while fighting his way through compounds; leading his fire team from the front, whilst trying to protect his men and he showed extraordinary courage to close on a determined enemy,” he said.

“His professionalism under pressure and ability to remain calm in what was a chaotic situation is testament to his character.”

The only other British soldier to be awarded the VC for bravery in Afghanistan was Corporal Bryan Budd, 29, of 3rd Battalion the Parachute Regiment, who was killed when he single-handedly stormed a Taliban position in Sangin in August 2006.

The last living person to receive the VC was L/Cpl Johnson Beharry, of the 1st Battalion the Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment, after he twice saved the lives of colleagues while under enemy fire in Iraq in 2004.

The VC is the British military’s highest recognition for gallantry and was first bestowed on troops during the Crimean war of 1854 and 1855.

The medal is made by London jewellers Messrs Hancock from the bronze of cannons captured from Russian troops at the siege of Sevastopol during the war.

Lieutenant Edward Drummond-Baxter and Lance Corporal Siddhanta Kunwar, both from 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles (1 RGR), were killed on Tuesday 30 October 2012 while on patrol in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand province. Both men were attached to 40 Commando Royal Marines.

Lieutenant Drummond-Baxter and Lance Corporal Kunwar were based in Checkpoint Prrang in the southern area of Nahr-e Saraj.

On 30 October they were participating in a shura (meeting) with Afghan Uniform Policemen inside the checkpoint.

On completion of the shura, they were shot and killed by a man wearing an Afghan police uniform who had been attending the meeting.

Lance Corporal Siddhanta Kunwar

Lance Corporal Siddhanta Kunwar deployed to Afghanistan on 3 October 2012 as a Sniper Section Commander in the acting rank of Lance Corporal. He was serving with A (Delhi) Company, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, attached to 40 Commando Royal Marines as part of Transition Support Unit Nahr-e Saraj. He was based in Checkpoint Prrang in the southern part of Nahr-e Saraj District, Helmand province. He was on his third operational tour of Afghanistan.

Lance Corporal Siddhanta was born on 19 June 1984 in Pokhara, Nepal, where he lived with his mother and father. He passed the arduous selection for the Brigade of Gurkhas on 17 December 2004 and having completed his year-long infantry training joined 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles in October 2005.

Very soon after his arrival in 1 RGR he deployed with the Battalion to Bosnia-Herzegovina in 2005-2006 as part of the European Union Force in support of the Bosnian Government. Lance Corporal Siddhanta then moved with 1 RGR to Brunei where he conducted extensive jungle training and qualified as a sniper in 2007.

In late 2007 and into 2008 he deployed to Afghanistan on Operation Herrick 7 where he served in Garmsir in southern Helmand Province. In 2009 he successfully passed a Junior NCO selection course and in 2010 returned to Afghanistan with 1 RGR on Operation HERRICK 12 to the Nahr-e Saraj area of Helmand province. It was during this tour more than ever that his calm good humour, sharp mind and huge operational experience became a touchstone for his fellow soldiers.

LCpl Siddhanta Kunwar was an outstanding soldier and a true Gurkha. He displayed the calmness of mind, cheerfulness in adversity and loyalty throughout his many operational tours – qualities that the Brigade of Gurkhas hold dear. He served with many of the Companies within the Battalion and his loss will be deeply felt throughout 1 RGR.

He leaves behind his mother, Krishna Maya Kunwar, his father, Shyam Kumar Kunwar, stepmother Chhali Devi Kunwar, his four sisters; Shova, Shyandya, Smita and Sardha Kunwar and his elder brother Bhupendra Kunwar.

The family of Lance Corporal Siddhanta Kunwar said:

“We are deeply shocked, disheartened and in disbelief that Siddhanta is no longer with us But we shall treasure all the good things he did. He enjoyed immensely of his profession and was fully committed towards it. He has made us proud. The whole family misses him dearly.”

Lieutenant Colonel David Robinson. Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurhka Rifles, said:

“Siddhanta Kunwar was a great character and a tough, professional Gurkha soldier with a proven and impressive operational record. Strong and highly experienced, he stood out from the crowd not only as a highly capable sniper but also for his smile and sense of fun, whatever the situation he found himself in.

“On this, his third tour of Afghanistan, he knew the dangers and understood better than most what it meant to do his job at the toughest end of soldiering. As such he was a role model for the younger soldiers around him. They, in turn, responded greatly to his guidance and experience but also to his caring nature. Away from operations, he loved his sport and was a great team player; he loved nothing more than having fun with his mates on the sports field.

“Siddhanta was a proud soldier and was immensely proud to be a Gurkha. He was one of the cornerstones of the Sniper Platoon where he was part of a close-knit team who were justifiably confident in their ability. He would have done anything to support his comrades and friends around him; I know they will miss him deeply.

“The Regiment has lost a fine young man who epitomised all that makes the Gurkhas so special. Living always so far from home, Gurkha units are particularly close-knit and the loss of Lance Corporal Siddhanta is a bitter blow, felt keenly by all ranks and families of 1RGR. We will mourn his tragic passing and our thoughts and prayers are with his family in Nepal and friends at this terrible time.”

Lieutenant Colonel Matt Jackson Royal Marines, Commanding Officer, 40 Commando Royal Marines, said:

“Lance Corporal Siddhanta Kunwar epitomised everything that a Gurkha should be; he was dedicated, professional and brave. This was his third deployment to Afghanistan and he was continuing to excel in everything that he did, but especially in his role as a sniper, where his field-craft skills were beyond reproach. It is clear that he thrived on the challenges that operations bring and enjoyed using the skills that he worked so hard to gain; he was never found wanting. He demonstrated the highest qualities of a Gurkha soldier and his legacy lives on in Delhi Company.

“It is a huge privilege for me personally to command a Company of Gurkhas and to have known Lance Corporal Siddhanta, however briefly. We took him, and have taken Delhi Company, into the Commando family as one of our own. His loss will therefore not only be felt by the Brigade of Gurkhas and Delhi Company but also by everyone serving within 40 Commando Group Royal Marines. His sacrifice will never be forgotten and he will always be in our thoughts.

“My thoughts and prayers go to his friends and family as they struggle to come to terms with his loss. I offer you small comfort in knowing that Siddhanta died in the company of those who loved him for everything he was and everything that he did. My thoughts are with them at this exceptionally difficult time.”

Major Dave Pack, Officer Commanding A (Delhi) Company, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, said:

“Lance Corporal Siddhanta was an integral part of the Sniper Platoon within Support (Medicina) Company and of A (Delhi) Company. He was an impeccable soldier with tremendous potential, who had already shown himself to be a leader of men. He excelled in his role as a sniper and as a junior commander. As a sniper he was out of the top draw; fit, robust and with outstanding marksmanship skills. As a NCO he was a shining example to the junior riflemen in his check point; always leading by example and consummately professional in all he did. He was the epitome of a Gurkha soldier.

“Lance Corporal Siddhanta was not only a talented soldier, but an incredibly likeable man. Everything about him was good: his cheerfulness, his enthusiasm, his attitude. His family, friends and colleagues should be incredibly proud of him. It was a privilege to know him and to have him fighting alongside me.

“I and all members of A (Delhi) Company are devastated; the pain and emptiness is indescribable. But this is nothing compared to the grief his family will be experiencing and our thoughts and prayers are with them. Their son will never be forgotten; he was a special man who made an indelible mark on everyone who knew him.”

Major Dhyan Prasad Rai, Gurkha Major, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, said:

“The untimely death of Lance Corporal Siddhanta Kunwar is extremely sad news for us in The Royal Gurkha Rifles and the wider Gurkha family. Having been a sniper since 2008, Siddhanta was of the best in the battalion. He was a supremely competent soldier who excelled in marksmanship and field-craft – the essence of our trade. He had proven himself time and again on operations. This was his third operational tour in Afghanistan. Siddhanta was also a fine sportsman whose natural ability at basketball and volleyball made him a fixture in the various competitions held regularly in battalion.

“His example is exactly in line with the best traditions of nigh on 200 years of dedicated Gurkha soldiering in the service of the United Kingdom. He has made us all extremely proud to have served alongside him.

“As he is a loss to us, so he is a terrible loss to his family in Nepal. Our thoughts at this time are with them who will bear this sad news the heaviest of all.”

Major Alex Biggs, Officer Commanding Support Company, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, said:

“Lance Corporal Siddhanta was an integral part of the Sniper Platoon within Support (Medicina) Company. An impeccable soldier of much potential, he had set an excellent foundation for his future career. An experienced sniper who has excelled in the harsh environment of Afghanistan, he was always forward leaning and utterly reliable.

“Very much a team player he was always keen to help and join in at both work and play. A keen sportsman he would always represent the Company whenever the opportunity arose. As a person Lance Corporal Siddhanta was a gentleman. Warm, friendly, emphatically polite and outgoing he was an integral part of both company and battalion. A man of quiet wit and good sense of humour he was very much part of the RGR family and will be sorely missed.”

Warrant Officer Class 2 Bishnu Thapa, Officer Commanding Sniper Platoon, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, said:

“Siddhanta was a very loyal, professional, fantastic, engaging and brave Gurkha soldier. He was popular and highly capable in his profession and was warm, witty, clever and kind. He was one of the finest snipers in the platoon. He was the veteran of HERRICK 7 and 12 and was clear in his motivation for returning on HERRICK 17.

“I am stunned by his unexpected passing. He was an immensely proud soldier. He epitomised the very best qualities expected from a true Gurkha soldier. He will be sorely missed by all within the platoon and his memory will endure in our hearts.

“Our prayer and thoughts go out to his family and relatives. May Goddess Durga give strengths to overcome at this very difficult time.”

Rifleman Tuljung Gurung, Support Company, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurhka Rifles, said:

“Everyone knows that we have to leave this world, leaving everything behind. Today we lost one of our close friends, Siddhanta Kunwar. It is a sad day for all of us. It’s too hard to explain in just a few sentences how special he was. He was one of the great ‘numberi’ (cohort of recruits) from my intake. He was very helpful to everyone no matter how hard the work was. He stood as a hero among us and inspired people by his performance.

“He had the ability to make people take him into their hearts in a short period of time. We came to Support Company together which gave me more opportunity to see how good he was. Looking to him I’m so proud to be one of his numberi and also so sad. We’ll miss him a lot, may his soul get peace in heaven.”

Rifleman Milan Rai, Delhi Coy, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurhka Rifles, said:

“Lance Corporal Siddhanta was my commander. I used to call him ‘Sid Dai’, which means he was like my elder brother. He was very keen, loyal and committed to his work as well an energetic and very disciplined soldier. He never shied away from any challenge and was caring and sharing with everyone.

“Wherever you are, Sid Dai, stay safe. I am going to miss you. You will always remain in our hearts and memories.”

Rifleman Rem Bahadur Gurung, 1 Platoon, A (Delhi) Company, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurhka Rifles, said:

“Lance Corporal Siddhanta Guruji was a great person. He was like a brother to me. He was an always cheerful person. He was one of the best Snipers. I will miss him so badly.”

The Secretary of State for Defence, Philip Hammond, said:

“I was deeply saddened to learn of the deaths of Lieutenant Edward Drummond-Baxter and Lance Corporal Siddhanta Kunwar. They have made the ultimate sacrifice whilst serving in Afghanistan on an operation which is vital to our national security. My thoughts are with the families, friends and colleagues of both of these brave men at this most difficult time.”

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls   Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls      Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls   Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls  

In their Memorial at The National Memorial Arboretum, the UK’s Centre of Remembrance

Our lasting Memorial at The National Memorial Arboretum, the UK’s Centre of Remembrance

Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

Tribute to Ivano Sean Violino | Lasting Tribute

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls   Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls      Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls   Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls  

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2010/08/06/tribute-to-ivano-sean-violino-lasting-tribute/

Townsfolk urged to cheer hero soldier | Newark Advertiser

23 Jul 2010 … The people of Newark are urged to cheer on Grenadier GuardsmanLancesergeant Nathan Cumberland as he attempts to complete the town’s …


Brave beyond belief | Newark Advertiser

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Lance Sergeant Nathan Cumberland. A Newark soldier has told how he continued to direct his men during a firefight with the Taliban, …
http://www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk/view.asp?id=cd02471e-3152-102d…

Tribute to our Serving Soldiers in Afghanistan

This website has been set up as a means of further promoting Newark and encouraging interested people to join the tribute.  These are my own views and do not represent Newark Town Council or others. 

Laurence Goff

Chairman  Friends of Newark Cemetery and Volunteer

Newark Town Councillor

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

Tribute to our Serving Soldiers in Afghanistan

 100_7456

  • Polish and Commonwealth War Graves in Newark During the Second World War there were a number of R.A.F. stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for R.A.F. burials and this is now the war graves plot, where all but ten of the 90 Commonwealth and all of the 397 Polish burials were made. The cemetery also contains 49 scattered burials of the First World War. A memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. When both men subsequently

    died, General Sikorski on 4th July 1943

    and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s remains were returned to Poland on 14th September 1993, but there is still a memorial to him at Newark.

     

Ministry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of Defence

2 thoughts on “Lance Sgt Nathan Cumberland completed the Newark-On-Trent Half Marathon

  1. Pingback: Newark, Nottinghamshire England is going back in time over the years since 1856 « Newark-On-Trent Cemetery UK

  2. Pingback: General Wladyslaw Sikorski « Newark-On-Trent Cemetery, Nottinghamshire UK

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