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Newark Remembers The Air Raid On Ransome And Marles Ball Bearings Factory

100_9945Chris Grant

Newark Remembers The 75th Anniversary on 7th March 1941 – 2016 an important date when Air Raid on Ransome And Marles (R&M) Ball Bearings Factory. This was Newark largest loss of life, their Sacrifice to work day and night in a dangerous place during the 2nd world war.  Its poignant that we hold this memorial to the workers at R&M who made a large contribution to the war effort they should be remembered.  Newark sacrifice our tribute in their memory when 41 died 29 Men and 12 Women were killed and further 165 were injured. We shall never forget them on this special anniversary year of commemoration over a number of days,  lets open our eyes and hearts by taking time to Remember them. The first commemoration in the heart of Newark Town Hall steps on Saturday 5th March at 1.30pm, Newark  Royal Air Force Association  (RAFA) will give a guard of honour – “Prayers led by Rev Stephen Morris, Priest in Charge of Newark Parish Church”.

On Sunday 6th March Newark Air Museum and Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene observance service during the evening at 5pm.

During the Month of March a display of photos and history of the bombing at Newark Library.


Trevor Frecknall Newark’s Black Friday on Ransome and Marles book that will be launched on Thursday 3rd March 2016 in Newark Library. Also Friday 4th March 2016 WHSmith Newark Market Place.

 

img160Ransome & Marles Ball Bearing factory now called NSK.

100_9601The Sacrifices Of War – Newark Commemoration

Newark Remembers  75th Anniversary

– Air Raid On Ransome And Marles R&M Ball Bearings Factory.

864_6106Its poignant that we hold this memorial to the workers at R&M, who made a large contribution to the war effort.

We should be grateful to them.             SAM_0027 will host two events, the first tribute will take place on Saturday 5th March 2016 on the steps of Newark Town Hall at 1.30pm.

000_0329Candles will also be lite in a shape of 41, Chris Grant a former Town Mayor who also loss his Father on that sad afternoon, will give a full account of the bombing and will call out each of the 41 names that were killed.

000_0328HMS Newark bell will toll after each name that were killed in the bombing.  The Last Post and Reveille by Roger Bryan – The Last Post by Roger Bryan – “Prayers led by Rev Stephen Morris, Priest in Charge of Newark Parish Church”.

 SAM_1250 Monday 7th March  2016                          75th Anniversary  at Newark Cemetery at the Sacrifice Cross up the main drive. Friends Of Newark Cemetery, School Children and the town will remember them once again at 1.30pm. Chris Grant will give a full account of the bombing –    l Children will call out each name that were killed and ring out School bell. Newark Royal Air Force Association  (RAFA) will give a guard of honour –      The Last Post and Reveille by Roger Bryan – Prayers.

2:30pm – 4:30pm
There will be tours of the graves and poppy Cross will be placed on each one. Also an exhibition of photos and history display at Newark cemetery Interpretation Centre.

100_3701At Newark Cemetery at the Sacrifice Cross up the main drive. Friends Of Newark Cemetery, School Children and the town will remember them once again at 1.30pm. Chris Grant will give a full account of the bombing.

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will call out each name that were killed and ring out School bell. The Last Post and Reveille by Roger Bryan – Prayers.

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Sunday 6th March 2016
Newark Air Museum will Remember the people that died during Ransome and Marles Bombing Commemoration event – Throughout the day re-enactors will be participating in a variety of commemorative activities at the museum to mark the 75th Anniversary of the Newark bearing factory being bombed.

SAM_0099The air raid is remembered with a permanent Memorial located at Newark Town Hall at the foot of the staircase when you walk into the Town Hall.

Ben Huthwaite and Chris Grant

 Friends Of Newark Cemetery and the town will remember them once again on the 75th Anniversary on 7th March 1941 – 2016. – they made a large contribution to the war effort, we should be grateful to them.

Holy Trinity RC School School gives a roll call of names that died

 HMS Newark Bell

Newark Parish Church                                 of St Mary Magdalene

Chris Grant Leads Newark Tribute In  The Heart Of The Town Centre

Air raid is remembered with a permanent Memorial located at Newark Town Hall at the foot of the staircase when you walk into the Town Hall.

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Roll Call of Names that died
1, George Harold Henry Adams, aged 45 *
2, Wilfred Evelyn Andrew, aged 39 *
3, Olive Ash, aged 31 * O
4, Bertie Augustus Ball, aged 18 * O
5, Ernest Patrick Beale, aged 27, Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment (Private) *
6, Edward Beaver, aged 26 (Buried in Mansfield) with no Tombstone
7, Harold Vincent Brown, aged 44 *
8, Vivian Maud Castle, aged 18 – Elston
9, Enid Winifred Hall Cooper, aged 30  Buried in Balderton St Giles Church Yard
10, Edna May Cottam, aged 19 *
11, Gladys Cummings, aged 21 *
12, William Joseph Dixey, aged 62 *
13, Frederick Fowler, aged 39 – Buried at St Sebastain’s Churchyard Great Gonerby, Grantham.
14, George William Godridge, aged 29 * O
15, Robert Barnsdale Grant, aged 47, his son Chris was only five when his Father died, he became Newark town mayor 50 years later in 1991-1992 *
16, John Henry Green, aged 55, Volunteer Home Guard, 11th Nottinghamshire (Newark) *
17, Horace Grocock, aged 47 ( Buried in Barnby in the Willow)
18, Albert Robert Gyde, aged 42*
19, Rose Ellen Hall, aged 30 * O
20, James Hazelby Hanger, aged 29 *
21, Thomas McHallam Hardie, aged 26 *
22, Sybil Harriet Hayden, aged 34 of Ivy Farm Cottage Kirklington Newark Notts buried at Hatfield Hyde Cemetery Hollybush Lane, Welwyn Garden City, Herts AL7 4JU – located
23, Joyce May Kirton, aged 18
24, Lily Lambert, aged 22 * O
25, George Felix Lambley, aged 39 *
26, Edith Makins, aged 21 ( Buried in South Collingham) – St John the Baptist Churcyard
27, Frederick William Mann, aged 46 * O – located
28, Frederick Markwell, aged 50 ( Balderton ?)
29, Claude Ware Hannah Martin, aged 36 *
30, Edward E. Martin, aged 46 *
31, Richard Naylor, aged 25 *
32, Frederick William Packwood, aged 52 *
33, William Thomas Pepper, aged 18 – Caunton
34, Frederick Richards, aged 32 *
35, Alfred Mayfield Ridge, aged 68 * O – located
36, Reginald William Senior, aged 35, died on the 8th March 1941 *
37, George Swanwick, aged 38 * O
38, Norah Trueblood, aged 34, *
39, Esther Evelyn Varney, aged 19, (her body was never found)
40, William Warner, aged 51 *
41, Arthur Worrell, aged 31 *

41 were killed 30 are buried in Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire* A Star Buried in Newark Cemetery 21 in total have a Tombstone. O is put after names that do not have a Tombstone.

Tribute can be found of the many civilians of the Commonwealth whose deaths were due to enemy action in the 1939-1945 War, the names of some 67,092 are commemorated in the Civilian War Dead Roll of Honour, located near St. George’s Chapel in Westminster Abbey, London.

We were happy to do our tribute, we will Remember the people that died during Ransome and Marles Bombing.

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Newark Cemetery

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Newark Remembers Them

 

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Ransome & Marles Ball Bearing factory now called NSK.

Newark Stanley Workers

Newark Remembers

The air raid is remembered with a permanent Memorial located at Newark Town Hall at the foot of the staircase when you walk into the Town Hall.

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41 Died 30 are Buried At

Newark Cemetery

Newark Remembers Them

We Will Remember Them

George Harold Henry Adams, aged 45 

Wilfred Evelyn Andrew, aged 39 

Olive Ash aged 31

Ernest Patrick Beale, aged 27,       Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment (Private)

Howard Vincent Brown, aged 44 


Enid Winifred Hall Cooper,                     aged 30 (Buried in Balderton                      in St Giles Church Yard)
 

Edna May Cottam, aged 19 

Gladys Cummings, aged 21

William Joseph Dixey, aged 62

Fowler R&MFrederick Fowler, aged 39 – Buried at        St Sebastain’s Churchyard Great Gonerby, Grantham

George William Godridge, aged 29

Robert Barnsdale Grant, aged 47, his son Chris was nearly five when his Father died, he became Newark town mayor 50 years later in 1991 – 1992

John Henry Green, aged 55

Albert Robert Gyde, aged 42

 

James Hazelby Hanger, aged 29

Thomas McHallam Hardie, aged 26 

Sybil Hayden of Ivy Farm Cottage Kirklington Newar Newark Notts buried          at Hatfield Hyde Cemetery Hollybush Lane, Welwyn Garden City,  Hertordshire AL7 4JU – aged 34

Lily Lambert, aged 22 George Felix Lambley, aged 39

Frederick William Mann, aged 46

Claude Ware Hannah Martin, aged 36                                                                

Edward E. Martin, aged 46

Richard Naylor, aged 25 

 William Packwood age 51

George William Godridge, aged 29

Frederick Richards, aged 32

 Reginald William Senior, aged 35

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George Swanwick, aged 38

Norah Trueblood, aged 34

William Warner,  aged 51

Arthur Worrell, aged 31

100_9601Newark Parish Church Of St Mary Magdalene

The first special tribute will hopeful take place on Saturday 5th March 2016 at 1:30pm next to Newark Town Hall steps. More information later, Newark Town Council is considering hosting an event.

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Newark will Remember the people that died during Ransome and Marles Bombing

Ben Huthwaite

41 were killed 30 are buried in Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire.

A retired journalist is appealing for help with his latest book that will tell the untold stories of those whose lives were affected by the bombing of a Newark factory during the second world war. Mr Trevor Frecknall of North Muskham, has written ten books, including Newark In The Great War and Lionel’s War.
His next will deal with the bombing of Ransome and Marles bearings factory on March 7, 1941.

 

A total of 41 people died and 165 more were injured when Luftwaffe bombers targeted the factory.
Mr Frecknall has received help with his research from local studies librarian Mr Tim Warner and an appeal through Facebook, but he is keen to hear from anyone with recollections.
“I want to include every angle of this story and make it a thorough tribute to all those involved” he said.
“I would love to hear from the families who lost their loved ones and from the families of those who were injured.
“I am hoping their children will remember and I would love to hear from them.”
Mr Frecknall said the day was known as Newark’s Black Friday.
“It must have been horrendous,” he said. “But 75 years later there are still many untold stories and I want to tell them for the first time.”

Ransome amd Marles bombing, I would like to give my personal thanks to Trevor Frecknall for giving his account on Radio Newark

https://www.flickr.com/search/?q=ransome%20and%20marles

 

 

 

 


The raid began when many workers were returning from lunch at about 1.40pm.
A low-flying Heinkel bomber approached the factory from the south along the railway line.
Two bombs landed in the factory, another on the street and a fourth on an air raid shelter next to nearby Stanley Street.
The plane then passed over again and dropped a further bomb, which did not explode.
There was another attack at 2.25pm, when five bombs were dropped. One exploded and wounded many of the rescue workers. Mr Frecknall hopes his book will be ready in time for the 75th anniversary of the bombing, which will be commemorated next year.

Monday 7th March 2016
The Friends of Newark Cemetery will lead tribute at Newark Cemetery at 1.30pm. We are inviting survivors, witnesses and descendants of those affected to take part.
The planned events will include roll calls on the steps of Newark Town Hall and Newark Cemetery of those killed, and a church service.
Anyone with information for Mr Frecknall Author and former journalist should contact him at tfrecknall@hotmail.com oracle 01636 702200.

Bert Emerson helped rescue other survivors of the bombing at Ransome and Marles Newark-On-Trent on 7th March 1941

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“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old. Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them”

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Newark Remembers

Roger Bryan Newark Town Band

The 41 That Were Killed At Ransome and Marles  Factory On 75th Anniversary

 

Bert Emerson  worked at Ransome and Marles Ball and Roller Bearing Factory,  on that Friday afternoon 7th March 1941

 

 

 

 

 

ransomemarles

Ben Huthwaite, age 11, from John Blow Primary School Collingham read an imaginative story he wrote about Ransome and Marles

Newark in the Second World War records the events surrounding the bombing of the Ransome and Marles bearing factory at Newark-on-Trent. On Friday 7th March 1941 the most well known of all the raids on [Newark-On-Trent] took place when Ransome and Marles factory was bombed. The type of work carried out at the factory made it an obvious target for the Germans. The raid commenced at about 1.40pm. Many workers were returning from their lunch break when the alert sounded at 1.35pm. A few minutes later a single Heinkel III bomber – flying so low that those on the ground could see its markings – approached from the south, following the railway line. As it neared Ransome and Marles it was fired on from several different points but still managed to drop four high explosive bombs. Two of these landed in the works, one on the road at the side of the factory and the other on an air raid shelter adjacent to Stanley Street. The plane also machine-gunned the site before circling, passing over the factory again and dropping another bomb. Fortunately this one did not explode. According to German reports the aircraft flew over for a third time in order to take photographs. The Raiders Passed siren was sounded and rescue parties went immediately into action. Various ambulances transported casualties to hospital and the Home Guard helped to close the roads around the works. The First Aid posts and the Womens Voluntary Service canteen were also kept busy. At 2.24pm the alert sounded again. Another enemy aircraft approached and dropped five more bombs but only one exploded. This was near the road and caused more damage and casualties, many of those hurt being rescue workers. Raiders Passed was sounded again at 2.51pm. As a result of the raid 29 men and 12 women were killed. One young woman was never found and presumed dead. Amongst those killed, were a young woman who had planned to get married the following weekend and a man who had recently been discharged from the army. Sixty-five people were admitted to Newark Hospital and 100 more were treated at the works own underground hospital. The official German communiqué of the raid stated that A daring low level attack took place on an armament factory at Newark causing heavy damage in the workshops. The bombers were under the command of Lietenant Knaut and Lieutenant Randolf. Local papers were severely restricted in what they could report. The day after the raid the Newark Herald reported that A single German plane came out of the low-lying clouds yesterday and dropped a number of bombs on an East Midlands town. An hour later the same or another raider dropped more bombs in the same locality. There were a number of casualties, some being fatal. The official report from which much of this information comes was not made public until the end of the war. The day became known locally as Black Friday. After the raid the two paired Lewis guns which were mounted in sand-bagged positions on Clay Lane Bridge were replaced by a Bofors 40mm anti-aircraft gun mounted on a proper gun platform. Fortunately the factory was not attacked again. We will Remember them

To The Works That Died At Ransome and Marles Bombing Air Raid of 1941

This article is about the Luftwaffe’s air-raid on the Beacon Hill factory of Ransome & Marles, as witnessed. There is also a link to a list of the names of the people killed as a result of that raid.

Ransome and Marles Stanley factory (later RHP and now owned by NSK),
During WWI women replaced many factory workers – in Newark women worked in Ransome & Marles and Wothington & Simpsons factories making munitions, Mumby & Sons doing uniforms and Coopers parachutes.

Ransome & Marles
Ransome and Marles Stanley factory (later RHP and now owned by NSK), although outside of Coddington’s parish border on Beacon Hill, is very close and has undoubtedly played a large part in the life of many Coddington people.

 

During WWI women replaced many factory workers – in Newark women worked in Ransome & Marles and Wothington & Simpsons factories making munitions, Mumby & Sons making uniforms and Coopers making parachutes.

 

 

 

The Ransome Brass Band was formed on the 1st November 1937 as the works band of Ransome and Marles. In 1939 the Ransome and Marles Band made the first of over 500 radio broadcasts –  many were broadcast direct from the works canteen via a BBC direct radio link. These popular broadcasts included favourites such as “Music While You Work”, “Workers’ Playtime”, “Friday Night Is Music Night” and “Strike Up the Band”. See Charlotte Hall’s oral history, and the band’s website:

Eyewitness / Oral History accounts of the raid by Coddington residents

Michael Sellars (People/Oral Histories)
The day Ransome & Marles (R&M) was bombed I was at home because I was sick. In the early afternoon I was lying in bed and heard a plane. I looked out of the window to-wards Newark and saw a plane flying low and heard a ‘crump’ sound, followed by another. I went downstairs to tell my mother that I thought the plane was dropping bombs but my mother told me not to be silly and sent me back upstairs to bed.
A while later, a neighbour called in to tell us that there had in fact been an air raid. My mother came upstairs to apologise and just then, we heard another plane go over. We looked out of the front bed-room window just in time to see a man, who was cycling to-wards Coddington, leap off his bicycle and take cover in the ditch which ran the down the side of the road. It would not have been a pleasant experience for him, if he landed in the water, because some houses up the road had arranged for the effluent from their cesspits to flow into the ditch so that they did not have to pump them out. The area was provided with a sewer main in mid 1951.
The neighbour then called in again to advise us that the R&M factory had been hit and my mother became concerned because my father at the time was spending part of his work time at R&M Newark and the rest at R&M Bunny, which was in the process of being established. She also had concerns about my grandmother who lived on Beacon Hill, not far from the factory.
As with most people, we did not have a phone in those days and the only way my mother could find out if my father and grandmother were all right was to go and find out. She asked me to get dressed and then, with my little brother in the pram, we walked to my grandmother’s house. It was about 5 p.m. by about this time and, just as we arrived at my grandmothers, a car pulled up at her neighbour’s house and a woman who was sobbing got out. The sobbing lady had just been advised that her husband had been killed in the raid. (This was presumably the wife of Frederick Richards ( Beacon Hill Rd, aged 32) or of Alfred Mayfield Rudge (84 Beacon Hill, aged 68).
My mother left my brother and myself with our grandmother while she went down to the entrance of the works but she was unable to learn anything. It was not until after 10 pm on that sad evening  when someone father came home. He had been at Bunny when the first raid took place and he had been called back to Newark to help make the bombed areas safe from further roof collapse and to cover over the machinery exposed by the raids in case it rained.
A few weeks later, in May 1941, we moved to Bunny so that my father could concentrate on helping to establish the new factory. We only stayed at Bunny until November 1942 when we moved to Dundee in Scotland, where R&M took over three former jute factories.  This person returned to the Coddington area in May 1949 but it was not until November that we were able to take possession of our house at 123 Beacon Hill Road because the tenants had been reluctant to leave and my parents had to go to court to settle the matter. Keen to pursue engineering as a career, in mid 1951, after taking my GCE ‘O’ level examinations, I went to work for R&M, but continued my studies at Newark and Nottingham Technical Colleges, on a part-time basis.


During 1956 ? 1958 I did my two years National Service in the RAF. After training as a radar technician, I was posted to Cyprus and Jordan. On completion of my National Service, I went back to R&M and continued studying part-time. By 1961 this person was a Graduate Member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers and I was offered a three years contract in Sydney with R&M Australia, which I accepted …   Around this period, having now completed all the educational and industrial experience requirements for full membership of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, I was admitted as a Member and at the same time, became a Chartered Mechanical Engineer. When the contract ended I was asked to stay on with R&M Australia, which I did. However, by 1971, it became increasingly obvious that Ransome Hoffmann Pollard (as R&M had become) had no chance of being able to compete with the Japanese bearing companies and I looked around for an alternative position.

 

 

Maureen Andrews (People/Oral Histories)
Maureen remembers the air raid over Newark in the 2nd World War when Ransome and Marle’s Factory was bombed, she lost her uncle Wilfred Andrews amongst the fatalities. Another of Maureen’s uncles, Albert Thompson, was injured in Normandy and died in England from his wounds. He was the only soldier from Coddington to be killed in the 2nd World War….

John Kirton (People/Oral Histories)
I don’t remember a lot about the war as I was only 8 when it started, but I do remember bombs being dropped on Stapleford Woods as the Germans thought that it was a camouflaged munitions factory of course what they were looking for was Ransome and Marle’s at the bottom of the hill. They did bomb the factory in 1940, I actually saw them drop the bombs, myself and Ken Maltby –we were going home for dinner, as there were no school dinners in those days. We came out of school and this airplane came in low across the spinney, heading towards Newark. Ken said, ” that is a bloody funny Blenhiem” (that was a type of plane) and then we saw the markings and we realized it was a German plane. We went home as quickly as we could. We didn’t hear any bangs and it wasn’t until a little time later that we heard, they had bombed Ransome and Marles. We had incendiaries dropped in the village, I can show where one landed in the stackyard. ..
Our Dad did not have to join up being a farmer, but to do his bit, he joined the A.R.P. (Air Raid Precaution) and he was an A.R.W. Air Raid Warden. They practiced running up and down the street with a barrel on a trolley to see how fast they could reach a fire. The oldest member of the crew was Jack Ingram. They patrolled the village in pairs my Dad pared with Uncle Walter. We always joked that they would be no good, but when the incendiary bombs landed in the stack yards they got there and put the fires out. Reverend Bully took his turn and did very well. Jack lived on Main Street and his house was Ist Aid Headquarters. The kids of the village helped with Sunday First Aid Practice. We were given tags on our wrists to say what injuries we were to be treated for. Well if the injuries were too severe we would be whipped into the ambulance and taken down to the hospital on London Road. We quite enjoyed that as we were given a biscuit and a bottle of pop as well as our ride in the ambulance.

Nancy Sleight  (People/Oral Histories)
She remembers the war when not very much happened until the two German planes flew over and dropped bombs on the Ransome and Marle?s factory which was making munitions. The children saw the planes from the school and were more excited than afraid.

Colin Smith remembers going on to these sites at weekends to help father …   When war came in 1939 Len (Smith) was too old to be called up but his war effort was to build ‘gun turrets’ for the ministry of defence around Newark. ‘Bofors’ anti-aircraft guns were placed on these gun sites, they made a terrific noise when fired. Unfortunately they did not stop the German bombers bombing Ransom and Marle,s on the 7th March 1941. At the time Len was building a new canteen for the company…
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Is this out of Der Adler ? Although the date is in English and transcript in German. English language ones were printed for the US ( pre 1942 ) and for the captured Low Countries.there was a radio report Wehrmachtbericht on the Reichs-Rundfunk-Gesellschaft about the raid , the names and report would have been sanctioned by the Oberkommando der Luftwaffe later on in the war members of the armed forces received The Honour Roll Clasp paper award first but after 1944 it came in metal for being mentioned.

John Henry Green photoJohn Henry Green RIP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ben Huthwaite

https://www.facebook.com/laurencegoffnewark/media_set?set=a.10208560963527301.1073742080.1405133581&type=3&pnref=story

 

https://www.flickr.com/search/?q=newark%20cemetery

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Ransome And Marles Bombing – Image Results

 

 

Friends of Newark Cemetery
come and join us

The group will hold a public meeting on 
17th  February 2016 at 2pm. This will be held at Newark Town Hall – Pickin Room arrive for a cuppa at 1.45pm and anyone interested in become a member,  volunteering or put an exhibition at the Cemetery Centre.
 
  I do not receive payment or services for any reviews or editorial. The views expressed are solely my own.  It dose not reflect the views of Newark Town Council.
Friends of Newark Cemetery  website  was created by Laurence Goff .

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Taken by Amateur Photographer Laurence Goff
Newark Resident since 1997
Printed and promoted by Laurence Goff

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HMS Hood Was The Last Battlecruiser 75th Anniversary 24th May 1941 – 2016

 

Tribute to Kenneth Duckworth and  others that died on HMS HOOD

24th May 1941

We Will Remember Them

Hood Crew

Ministry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of Defence

Ministry of Defence

Kenneth Duckworth

Keith Duckworth

Kenneth Duckworth

Keith Duckworth Bother

Hood Crew

H.M.S. Hood Association logo

Ministry of Defence

Ministry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of Defence He took his naval exams after leaving School and trained on Ganges.  He joined HMS Iron Duke and

 HMS Hood Ship

Keith Duckworth Brother

Buzz Beurling

 Richard NewmanH.M.S. Hood Association

Kenneth Duckworth joined HMS Hood where he spent almost 4 years before loosing his life on 24th May 1941 – 2016.The chairman of the Friends of Newark Cemetery, Mr Laurence Goff, at the cemetery with pupils from the Mount Church of England Primary School, from left, Sandra Peerland, 9, Phoebe Walker-Price, 7, and Alan Bialaszczyk, 7.

Youngsters from a Newark school visited the town’s cemetery as part of a topic on the second world war.
Groups of year three and four pupils from the Mount Church of England primary on Monday laid wreaths at the Memorial To The Fallen before visiting the Polish war graves.
The visit was organised by the chairman of the Friends of Newark Cemetery, Mr Laurence Goff.
“I gave each child a card on with someone’s name and picture on it and they were tasked with finding them on the war memorial,” Mr Goff said.
“The card also had information about the person and how long they served for.
“It is important for young children to learn about the war.”
The children learnt about Kenneth Ramsey Rawson Duckworth as a case study.
Kenneth, who was born in Newark, died at the age of 19. He was one of 1,415 sailors killed when the battle cruiser HMS Hood was sunk on May 24, 1941.
His sister-in-law, Mrs Joyce Duckworth, of north Lincolnshire, told the Adver-tiser: “He died the same year my husband, Keith, was born, but we knew a lot about him through letters and photographs.
“Keith’s parents were too upset to talk about him but Keith found out a lot about Kenneth through their sister, Norah.”
Although Kenneth moved to Doncaster at a young age, the children often visited their grandparents in Newark. He joined the Royal Navy on January 5, 1937.
In May this year there will be a commemoration in Portsmouth to mark the 75th anniversary of the loss of HMS Hood.
Last year the bells from the vessel were recovered from the North Atlantic. They are being restored and will be displayed at an exhibition in May at the Portsmouth Historic Dockyard.
Mrs Rebecca Lax, assistant head at the Mount school, said: “We have been learning about how past events have had an impact on the modern days by looking at the second world war.
“We have a large percentage of our pupils from Poland and it has been important for the children to understand the impact their country had on the community, so this has also been a study of locality along with history.
“We have looked at evacuation and the children were fascinated to learn that people in Newark were evacuated when the town was bombed.”
The Friends of Newark Cemetery are holding a ceremony to remember those who died during an air raid at the Ransome and Marles factory on March 7, 1941, in which 41 people died and 165 were injured.
Schools that would like to take part in world war-related activities at the cemetery can contact Mr Goff on 01636 681878.

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/zbmnlq919JYXhlpfI1RzdgEdiyKaqbUrRPn2m6aFbohCz

Kenneth Duckworth  HMS Hood Ship

Keith Duckworth

Buzz Beurling

Joyce And Keith Duckworth

Allan Holderness

Keith Duckworth And Others Are Remembered

Portsmouth Naval War Memorial, Southsea

Keith Johnson

Southsea remembrance — at Portsmouth Naval War Memorial, Southsea

Portsmouth Naval War Memorial, Southsea

Honza Vendiš

Portsmouth Naval War Memorial, Southsea

Keith Johnson

Portsmouth Naval War Memorial, Southsea

Keith Johnson

Portsmouth Naval War Memorial, Southsea

Keith Johnson

Portsmouth Naval War Memorial, Southsea

Here lies HMS Vanguard. It is a war grave for those who did not return. There is a diving exclusion zone of 100 mtrs. — at Portsmouth Naval War Memorial, Southsea

Pete C Cleverley

Portsmouth Naval War Memorial, Southsea

Kenneth Duckworth And

Keith Duckworth Parents Wedding Day In Newark Nottinghamshire

Kenneth And Keith Duckworth Parents and Grand-ma and Grand-dad

The sinking of H.M.S. Hood on Empire Day, 24th May 1941, resulted in the single largest loss of life for the Royal Navy during World War II: 1,415 were lost.

There were absolutely no traces of any crewmen, living or dead, save the three survivors, Ted Briggs MBE the last one to died in 2008, William Dundas and Bob Tilburn.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Richard Newman H.M.S. Hood Association

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Newark Cemetery War Memorial Kenneth Duckworth Name Is Added

Portsmouth Naval War Memorial, Southsea

Michael Nottage

 Duncan Macdonald-heaney H.M.S. Hood Association

Anyone who wishes to attend the london event is more than welcome.

 

Allan Holderness

Allan Holderness

Allan Holderness

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Portsmouth-Naval-War-Memorial-Southsea/142050465896694

Kenneth was born in Newark Upon Trent Nottinghamshire

Allan Holderness‎

H.M.S. Hood Association

 

 

 

 

Samuel Mater H.M.S. Hood Association

Clive Fouché

 

  Tribute to the Royal Navy in honour for all that have served

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Royal Navy HMS Newark Bell

His family moved to Doncaster when he was a young Child.

His Sister Norah was born there they used to visit and stay at grandma Duckworths they both went to Doncaster Grammar. School https://www.facebook.com/laurencegoffnewark/posts/10208626932936495?pnref=story

 HMS Hood
Admiral-class battlecruiser
HMS Hood was the last battlecruiser built for the Royal Navy. Commissioned in 1920, she was named after the 18th-century Admiral Samuel Hood.
Length: 262 m
Construction started: September 1, 1916
Launched: August 22, 1918
Weight: 47,430 tons
Builder: John Brown & Company
Commissioned: May 15, 1920

http://www.hmshood.com/

  • Rolls of Honour

German battleship Bismarck took on HMS Hood which was sunk with the loss of 1415 lives RIP. There were only 3 survivors the last of whom Ted Briggs passed away in 2008.

Memorials to Men Lost in the Sinking of Hood, 24th May 1941

We will remember them

Chainbar divider

http://www.hmshood.org.uk/photos/duckworth/Duckworth.htm

In Remembrance of
KENNETH RAMSEY RAWSON DUCKWORTH

Photo of Able Seaman Kenneth Ramsey Rawson Duckworth, courtesy of Keith Duckworth, 2001Hood Crew

Service: Royal Navy
Rank: Able Seaman
Service Number: P/JX 151617
Date Joined Hood: 01 October 1938
Biographical Information: Ken was born on 03 July 1921 at 11 Friary Rd, Newark on Trent, Nottinghamshire. He was the first of three children born to John William and Alice May Duckworth. During his early childhood, his family lived in Newark, but they then moved to Doncaster. It was in Doncaster that his sister Norah was born in 1926. His brother Keith was born in Bradford, Yorkshire in 1941.

Ken attended Doncaster Grammar School and worked as an errand boy until joining the Navy on 05 January 1937. He was trained at H.M.S. Ganges until 10 June 1938. At that time, he joined H.M.S. Iron Duke. He remained at Iron Duke until 01 October 1938 when he was assigned to the battle cruiser Hood.

Upon joining Hood, Ken was a Boy 1st Class. He was subsequently promoted to Ordinary Seaman on 01 January 1939. He was promoted to Able Seaman the following January.

SAM_1125 ... British Navy Ensign Table Flag - 3.95 x 5.9 inch - best-buy-flags.co Hood CrewWe Remember

HMS Hood

Allan HoldernessWW2 Britain and the Commonwealth at War 1939 to 1945

 

Allan Holderness WW2 Britain and the Commonwealth at War 1939 to 1945

 

Allan Holderness

WW2 Britain and the Commonwealth at War 1939 to 1945

Cover Photo

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kenneth only 19 years old at the time of his death. RIP

 

 

Commemoration, Honouring His Memory

As Our Fitting Tribute

To Them all on HMS Hood. RIP

Anyone who wishes to attend the London event is more than welcome. https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10153209009277461&set=gm.10153919270614901&type=3

 

100_3713Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Ken was born in Newark-On-Trent

He might have departed this life, we will remember him

 

 

A time to remember – that you will never forget


Memorial Information
Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Panel 47, Column 3 (click to view panel)
Also memorialised at
Hood Chapel, Church of St John the Baptist, Boldre, Hampshire

http://hmshood.com/crew/memorial/d/DuckworthKRR.htm

Additional Photographs

http://www.hmshood.org.uk/photos/duckworth/Duckworth.htm

Cover PhotoHood Crew

 http://hmshood.com/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/32969647859/?fref=ts

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https://www.facebook.com/groups/hmshood/?fref=ts

We Remember ThemHood Crew

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KRR Duckworth Name Is On The War Memorial To The Fallen At Newark Cemetery – 3rd one down in the middle

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https://www.facebook.com/keith.duckworth.9

Kenneth Duckworth younger brother

Hood Crew
 http://www.hmshood.org.uk/photos/duckworth/Duckworth.htm

http://www.hmshood.com/http://www.hmshood.com/

Allan HoldernessWW2 Britain and the Commonwealth at War 1939 to 1945

 

SAM_1082

 The views expressed are solely my own.  It dose not reflect the views of Newark Town Council.
Friends of Newark Cemetery  website  was created by Laurence Goff .

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2016/01/03/newark-remembers-the-air-raid-on-ransome-and-marles-ball-bearings-factory/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/

http://www.friendsofnewarkcemeteryuk.weebly.com/

                                                                  https://www.facebook.com/groups/newarkransomeandmarles/?fref=ts

https://www.facebook.com/groups/friendsofnewarkcemetery/?fref=ts

http://www.facebook.com/laurencegoffnewark

laurencegoff4newark@yahoo.co.uk

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

http://www.newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/

http://www.youtube.com/user/laurencegoff

https://twitter.com/Friendsofnewark

                                                                                http://www.facebook.com/laurencegoffnewark

http://www.flickr.com/photos/friendsofnewarkcemetery

http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=newark%20cemetery%20

Taken by Amateur Photographer Laurence Goff
Newark Resident since 1997
Printed and promoted by Laurence Goff

 Friends Of Newark Cemetery

 14 The Osiers Newark Nottinghamshire NG24 4TP

 

Remembering those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

The 4th of August 2014 is the 100th anniversary of the declaration of the 1st World War.

4th August 1914

In response to a German invasion of Belgium the United Kingdom declared war on Germany.

Men from Newark and the surrounding villages flocked to enlist in the new Eighth Battalion of The Sherwood Foresters Regiment.

10th August 1914

A rally was held in Newark Market Place by the new Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters Regiment.

They were marched that day to Radcliffe-on-Trent. After an overnight stay they marched on to Derby on the next leg of their journey that would take them through training camp and eventually to the trenches in France.

 

Newark Remembers 8th Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters Regiment leaving Newark in front of Town Hall 10th August 1914

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

HT Trader R&M 2014

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls 

Honouring Their Memory As A Fitting Tribute To Them

 A time to remember – they will never be forgotten

Laurencegoff

Remembrance Day, for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

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Remembering those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

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2014-09-18 09.47.13

 “William” W. Pride name has been added on War Memorial To The Fallen located at Main Gate on London Road NG24 1SQ 

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Laurencegoff

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Laurencegoff

Newark Cemetery Memorial

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsSAM_0357

Laurencegoff

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

 Remembering  the outcome of the First World War 4th August 1914 -2014

Laurencegoff

The phrase ‘When you go home tell them of us’ is from the epitaph carved on the memorial of the 2nd British Division in the Kohima cemetery for the Allied war dead. The full inscription on the epitaph reads, (When You Go Home, Tell Them Of Us And Say, For Their Tomorrow, We Gave Our Today). The verse is said to have been inspired by the epitaph written by Simonides to honour the Greek who fell at the Battle of Thermopylae in 480 BC and is attributed to

John Maxwell Edmond.

 Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

Two minutes

Two minutes isn’t much to give, To those who fought and died, And not forgetting loved ones, Who Till this day have cried.

To Flanders fields where poppies grow, Our thoughts return to long ago, And in remembrance they still live, Two minutes isn’t much to give

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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Laurence Goff and Pete Stevens From The Commonwealth War Grave Comission

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

A short introduction to the National Memorial Arboretum, the grounds

have over 300 memorials 

The National Memorial Arboretum is the UK’s year-round centre of Remembrance. It is part of The Royal British Legion family of charities. http://t.co/ukIImVbz

http://www.thenma.org.uk/gallery/videos/a-short-introduction/

 The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

Laurencegoff

The Armed Forces Memorial at the National Memorial Arboretum

The National Memorial Arboretum honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world.

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

Laurencegoff

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

Remembering those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

SAM_0071

 

 The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire, an uplifting visit for all ages

Honours the fallen all year round

www.thenma.org.uk

 

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

info@thenma.org.uk

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

Memorial Arboretum @Nat_Mem_Arb

Laurencegoff

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

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Laurencegoff

Newark Cemetery Memorial

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Laurencegoff

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

Each year many visitors ask about the location of the Shot at Dawn Memorial in the Arboretum, it seems appropriate that it should be on the eastern edge where dawn strikes, the six trees facing the posts represent the firing squad, all aiming for the medal around the statue’s neck and none of them knowing who had the fatal bullet, it must have been very traumatic for them too, having to shoot one of their own. The Campaign For a Pardon After the 75 year Secrecy Act was lifted, Members of the Shot at Dawn Organisation started Campaigning for a Pardon.

The campaign commenced in 1992 and was led by Janet Booth who sought a pardon for her grandfather, Private Harry Farr, janet’s grandmother had lived with the shame and stigma of her husband being shot for cowardice in 1916. She believed he was wrongly convicted and actually suffering from shellshock. Harry Farr’s family took the Ministry of Defence to the high court and won, in 2006 a posthumous pardon was granted for Private Harry Farr and the other men that were Shot at Dawn.

 

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Laurencegoff

This being the centrepiece is a statue of a young man ­ age 17 Private Herbert Burden of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliess who was the first to be shot. He was blindfolded and strapped to a post, surrounded by 306 other posts, each with the name, age and ­regiment of a man who was executed.

Conceived as a place of national remembrance not only for the fallen, but also for those who have served the nation. There are over 300 memorials the centrepiece of which is The Armed Forces Memorial. There is also a memorial to those who were ‘Shot at Dawn’ over three hundred men who were shot as cowards, but many we would now recognise as suffering from post traumatic stress disorder. The first  being Private Herbert Burden, of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, was shot at Ypres, Belgium on 21st July 1915 aged 17. 

The memorial was modelled on the likeness of  Private Herbert Burden, who lied about his age to enlist in the armed forces and was later shot for desertion. It is surrounded by a semicircle of stakes on which are listed the names of every soldier executed in this fashion.

 There are over 20 memorials here with links to WW1. The thought-provoking Shot at Dawn memorial commemorates the 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers who were shot during the war for cowardice or desertion. The names of those shot, now pardoned, are inscribed on posts surrounding a statue of a young soldier, blindfolded, awaiting his fate. It is located in the east of the Arboretum so that it is the first point to be touched by the light of dawn each day. Visit  Featured Memorials page to learn more about The Shot at Dawn Memorial and others.

 

During World War One, around 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers were shot for desertion or cowardice, most of them were sentenced after a short trial at which no real opportunity for defence was allowed, this would have been sad for many families. At last it is recognised that several of them were under age when they volunteered and that many of them suffering from shell shock or post traumatic stress disorder, Andy Decomyn’s statue shot at dawn is modelled on Private Herbert Francis Burden, of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, who was shot at dawn at Ypres on 21st July 1915, aged 17.

The names of Herbert Francis Burden and those others who suffered the fate of being shot at dawn are listed on the stakes arranged in the form of a greek theatre around the statue, symbolising the tragedy that these events signify, many of the posts say Age unknown and this is because many young men lied about their age in order to enlist, some of them had no representation at court-martial because most of the officers had been killed when they went over the top, first (the average life expectancy of an officer on the front line was 10 weeks) We know of these 306 soldiers, sadly to this day we do not know the total figure because between 80pc and 90pc of those sentenced to die had their sentences commuted and were probably sent to jail or hard labour.

The Shot at Dawn Memorial is a British Monument at the National Memorial Arboretum near Alrewas, in StaffordshireUK. It memorialises the 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers executed after courts-martial for cowardice or desertion during World War I.

The mass pardon of 306 British Empire soldiers executed for certain offences during the Great War was enacted in section 359 of the Armed Forces Act 2006, which came into effect on royal assent on 8th November 2006. 

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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Laurencegoff

The memorial portrays a young British soldier blindfolded and tied to a stake ready to be shot by a firing squad. The memorial was modelled on the likeness of 17-year-old Private Herbert Burden, who lied about his age to enlist in the armed forces and was later shot for desertion. It is surrounded by a semicircle of stakes on which are listed the names of every soldier executed in this fashion. These include:

  • Private John Abigail, 8/Norfolk Regiment

  • Private George Ainley, 1st/4th Battalion, Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

  • Private James Archibald, 17th Battalion, Royal Scots

  • Lance Serjeant H. Ashton, 11th Battalion, Cameronians

  • Private William Baker, 26th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers

  • Rifleman R. L Barker, 6th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers

  • Private Joseph Bateman, 2/South Staffs Regiment

  • Sapper Robert Bell, 123 Field Company, Royal Engineers

  • Private J. Bennett, 1st Battalion, Hampshire Regiment

  • Private D. J. Blakemore, 8th Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment

  • Private Albert Botfield, 9th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment

  • Private William Bowerman, 1/East Surrey Regiment

  • Private Thomas Brigham, 1/10th Battalion, Manchester Regiment

  • Private C. Britton, 1/5th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment

  • Private F. Broadrick, 11th Battalion, Warwickshire Regiment

  • Private A. Brown, 10th Battalion, Black Watch

  • Private Archibald Browne, 2nd Battalion, Essex Regiment

  • Private Herbert Francis Burden, 1st Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers

  • Private Robert Burton, 6th Battalion, South Lancashire Regiment

  • Private J. Byers, 1st Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers

  • Private Herbert H. Chase, 2nd Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers

  • Rifleman F. W. Cheeseman, 18th Kings Royal Rifle Corps

  • Private G. E. Collins, 1st Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment

  • Private J. Crampton, 9th Battalion, Yorks & Lancs Regiment

  • Rifleman James Crozier. 9th Battalion, The Royal Irish Rifles

  • Private J. J. Daly, 1st Battalion, Connaught Rangers

  • Private Edward Delargy, 1st/8th Battalion, Royal Scots

  • Private Thomas Docherty, 2nd Battalion, King’s Own Scottish Borderers

  • Rifleman Thomas Donovan, 16th Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps

  • Private Walter Dossett, 1st/4th Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment

  • Private Thomas Downey, 6th Leinster Regiment

  • Private Thomas Downing, 6th South Lancashire Regiment

  • Sub Lieutenant Edwin Dyett, Nelson Battalion, Royal Naval Division

  • Private A. Evans, 1st Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers

  • Private Alfred E. Eveleigh, 1st Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment)

  • Private G. Everill, 1st Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment

  • Private Harry Farr, 1st Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment

  • Private Ernest Fellows, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Lance Corporal J. S. V. Fox, 1st Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment, attached 3rd Division Cyclists’ Company

  • Private A. Frafra, Gold Coast Regiment

  • Private Evan Fraser, 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots

  • Private J. W. Fryer, 12th Battalion, Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment

  • Private Robert Gawler, 1st Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment)

  • Private D. Gibson of 12th Battalion, Royal Scots

  • Lance Corporal Peter Goggins, 19th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry

  • Private F. C. Gore, 7th Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment)

  • Private Thomas Harris, 1st Battalion, Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent Regiment)

  • Private Bert Hartells, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private T. Hawkins, 7th Battalion, Royal West Surrey Regiment (Queen’s)

  • Private Thomas Highgate, 1st Battalion, Royal West Kent Regiment

  • Lance Corporal James Holland, 10th Cheshire Regiment

  • Private R. Hope, 1st Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

  • Private Thomas Hope, 2nd Battalion, Leinster Regiment

  • Private H. Hughes, 1st/5th Battalion, Yorks and Lancs Regiment

  • Private William Hunt, 18/Manchester Regiment

  • Private William Hunter, 1/Loyal North Lancashire Regiment

  • Private J. J. Hyde, King’s Royal Rifle Corps

  • Private Albert Ingham, 18/Manchester Regiment (Attd. 90th Coy. MGC)

  • Corporal Frederick Ives, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private W. Jones, 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers

  • Private C. La Liberte, 3rd Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force

  • Driver Alexander Lamb, 21st Battery, 2nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery

  • Private Ernest Lawrence, 2nd Battalion, Devonshire Regiment

  • Private F. Loader, 1/22nd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers

  • Private Alfred Longshaw, 18/Manchester Regiment[2][8]

  • Lance Corporal Allassan Mamprusi, Gold Coast Regiment

  • Rifleman Samuel McBride, 2nd Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles

  • Private Charles McColl, 1st/4th Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment

  • Private John McFarlane, 4th Battalion, King’s Liverpool Regiment

  • Private B. McGeehan, 1/8th Battalion, King’s Liverpool Regiment

  • Private J. S. Michael, 10th Battalion, Cameronians

  • Private L. Mitchell, 8th Battalion, Yorks and Lancs Regiment

  • Private Thomas Lionel Moles, 54th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force

  • Private H. Morris, 6th Battalion, British West Indies Regiment

  • Private Joseph Nisbet, 1st Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment

  • Private A. Parry, 2nd Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment

  • Private Louis Phillips, 6th Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry

  • Private Albert Henry Pitts, 2nd Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment

  • Second Lieutenant Eric Skeffington Poole, 11th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment

  • Corporal George Povey, 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment

  • Private Albert Rickman, 1st Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

  • Sergeant John Robins, 5th Wiltshire Regiment

  • Private John Robinson, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private George Ernest Roe, 2nd Battalion, King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

  • Private William Scotton, 4th Battalion, Middlesex Regiment

  • Private J. Seymour, 2nd Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

  • Private W. H. Simmonds, 23rd Battalion, Middlesex Regiment

  • Rifleman F. N. Slade, 2/6th Battalion, London Regiment

  • Private James Smith, 17th Battalion, The King’s (Liverpool Regiment)

  • Private W. Smith, 3/5th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers

  • Private Victor Manson Spencer, 1st Battalion, Otago Regiment of the New Zealand Division

  • Private J. Steadman, Machine Gun Corps

  • Private R. Stevenson, 1/4th Battalion, Loyal North Lancashire Regiment

  • Private Stanley Stewart, 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers

  • Private Alfred Thompson, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private R. T. Tite, 13th Battallion, Royal Sussex Regiment

  • Private Frederick Turner, 6th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers

  • Private William J. Turpie, 2nd Battalion, East Surrey Regiment

  • Sergeant J. T. Wall, 3rd attalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private G. Watkins, 13th Battalion, Welsh Regiment

  • Private A. H. Westwood, East Surrey Regiment

  • Private J. H. Wilson, 4th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force

  • Private W. Wycherley, 2nd Manchester Regiment

  • Private R. Young, 11th Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shot_at_Dawn_Memorial

The Shot at Dawn Memorial is a British Monument at the National Memorial Arboretum near Alrewas, in StaffordshireUK. It memorialises the 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers executed after courts-martial for cowardice or desertion during World War I.

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Laurencegoff

All 306 soldiers of the First World War who were shot at dawn for cowardice or desertion have be granted posthumous pardons 90 years later

Shot at Dawn

During the First World War some 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers were shot for desertion or cowardice; the real cause for their offences was often a psychological reaction to the stresses of war which today would be diagnosed as post-traumatic stress syndrome or combat stress reactionShot at Dawn is modelled on Private Herbert Burden, of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, who was shot at Ypres in 1915 aged 17.

The Shot at Dawn Memorial is a British Monument at the National Memorial Arboretum near Alrewas, in Staffordshire

Laurencgoff

During the First  World War 306 who were shot now have a trees planted with the person name put on a metal plate. The British Monument at the National Memorial Arboretum near Alrewas, in Staffordshire.

National Memorial Arboretum my uplifting visit by Laurence Goff

The National Memorial Arboretum honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world.

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/102746358

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/britain_wwone/shot_at_dawn_01.shtml

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

Laurencegoff

The National Arboretum Croxall Road, in the village of Alrewas, Staffordshire UK

 

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum

http://www.thenma.org.uk

Laurencegoff

http://www.thenma.org.uk

SAM_1251

Laurencegoff 

Laurencegoff

Laurencegoff

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

Laurencegoff

http://www.thenma.org.uk Laurencegoff

General Sikorski Cap

POLISH ARMED FORCES WAR MEMORIAL

Dedicated: 19 September 2009

Commemorates: The Polish men and women who gave their lives in World War II. Designed as a tribute to the fallen and also as an educational aid for visitors not familiar with the history of the allied Polish Forces.

 

http://www.thenma.org.uk

 Laurencegoff

Polish armoured Forces 

The National Memorial Arboretum honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world.

www.thenma.org.uk

 Laurencegoff

Polish armoured Forces

 

The National Memorial Arboretum honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world.

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

RAIL INDUSTRY MEMORIAL

On the top of the plinth is a black granite replica Class 8 Freight Locomotive.
The rear panel has an etching montage showing life on the railways through the ages.

 

QUAKER SERVICE MEMORIAL

Dedicated: 20 April 2013

Commemorates: Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) wartime service.  

The Quaker Service Memorial Trust commissioned the memorial to honour the vital humanitarian role undertaken by members of the Friends Ambulance Unit (FAU), an independent body enabling conscientious objectors to undertake wartime civilian service, and the Friends Relief Service (FRS), the official relief body of the Religious Society of Friends, which worked at home and in mainland Europe to help civilians in distress.

Designed by Staffordshire sculptor and Quaker, Rosemary Barnett, it features six texts carved onto four stone benches. The seats are arranged in an open circle – as are many Quaker meetings for worship – symbolic of unity and equality.

GCHQ

Dedicated: 13 July 2012

Commemorates: GCHQ

The memorial is a sphere of rose coloured granite; and the plaque to anonymous code breakers at the National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire reads: “To commemorate all British and Allied personnel whose work with Signals Intelligence and Communications Security has supported HMG in war and peace since 1914”. The sphere was sculpted by the artist Nick Johnson.

The memorial features two pieces of code; a line of Morse code G C C S representing the “Government Code and Cypher School” the forerunner of GCHQ, and a line of binary code representing the numbers 7 3 8 17, the position of the letters G C H Q in the alphabet.BASRA MEMORIAL WALL

Dedicated: 11 March 2010

Commemorates: The 178 UK Service personnel and one MOD civilian who lost their lives on combat operations in Iraq. It also lists members of Coalition Forces who were killed while under UK command during six years of conflict.

The original memorial was built in Basra in 2006 and stood outside the front of the Headquarters of the Multi-National Division (South East). Following the end of operations, the Basra Memorial Wall was brought back to the UK and rebuilt. The original wall was built, dismantled, and reconstructed at the Arboretum by British soldiers from 37th Armoured Engineer Squadron in a personal gesture to commemorate their fallen comrades.

The brass plaques on this memorial are the originals placed on the wall when it was in situ in Basra, Iraq.

 

ROYAL AIR FORCE ASSOCIATION REMEMBRANCE GARDEN

Dedicated: 28 September 2009

Commemorates: All those who have served in the RAF and Commonwealth air.

Inspiration for the garden comes from the RAF Association’s dedication, the last line of which is “we will remember them”. The central feature is the RAF Association emblem – a magnificent stainless steel eagle sitting on top of a globe. The eagle is made up of over 1,000 hand-forged feathers and is surrounded by a segmented RAF roundel, which is separated into four quarters to depict the RAF Association at the heart of RAF welfare. The RAF Association provides friendship, help and support for any members of the RAF past and present, and their families. It is the largest single-service membership organisation in the UK, with around 74,000 members and almost 500 branches.

 

POLISH ARMED FORCES WAR MEMORIAL

Dedicated: 19 September 2009

Commemorates: The Polish men and women who gave their lives in World War II. Designed as a tribute to the fallen and also as an educational aid for visitors not familiar with the history of the allied Polish Forces

ARMED FORCES MEMORIAL

Dedicated: 12 October 2007

Commemorates:  The men and women of our Armed and Merchant Services who have lost their lives in conflict, as a result of terrorist action or on training exercises since the end of WW2. Unlike the World War memorials in towns and villages across the Nation, there is nowhere else that records over 16,000 names of those who have been killed on duty in recent times.

Dedicated in the presence of Her Majesty The Queen on 12 October 2007, the Armed Forces Memorial is a nationally significant focus for Remembrance, providing recognition and thanks for those who have given their lives in the service of the country.

The Memorial is a stunning piece of architecture designed by Liam O’Connor, inspired by the ancient landscapes of prehistoric Britain and the classical forms of ancient Rome.

 

THE FAR EAST PRISONERS OF WAR MEMORIAL BUILDING

Dedicated: 15 August 2005

Commemorates: The 55,000 Far East Prisoners of War from World War II. It not
only remembers those who died, but also encompasses the whole story of events during this unprecedented chapter in British history. The memorial roll contains the name and rank of all British Servicemen taken prisoner during the South East Asia conflict and embraces the story of their treatment and the thousands who died as well. The building houses an exhibition which reveals clearly the life and experiences of these prisoners, aided by archive video footage and interviews. It was opened on the 60th Anniversary of VJ Day, the end of World War II in the Pacific.

Close by is the original lychgate from the cemetery at Changi Jail in Singapore, built by prisoners as a memorial to their comrades who died.

THE MERCHANT NAVY CONVOY

Dedicated: 1 October 2003

Commemorates: Over 46,000 British merchant seafarers and fishermen lost in conflict during the 20th Century, including two World Wars, Falklands, Kuwait, Vietnam, Iran, Iraq and others.

31,908 seafarers perished in World War II, proportionately more than any of the Armed Services. 2,535 trees represent the British vessels lost at that time.

 

SHOT AT DAWN MEMORIAL

Unveiled: 21 June 2001

Commemorates: 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers who were shot for desertion or cowardice during World War I. Most were sentenced after a short trial at which no real opportunity for defence was allowed. Today it’s recognised that many of them were underage and suffering from shell-shock. Andy Decomyn’s statue is modelled on Private Herbert Burden, of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, who was shot at Ypres in 1915 aged 17. In 2006 a posthumous pardon was granted.

STILLBIRTH AND NEONATAL DEATH CHARITY MEMORIAL

Dedicated: June 2001

SANDS was founded in 1978 by a small group of bereaved parents devastated by the death of their babies and by a complete lack of acknowledgement and understanding of the significance and impact of their loss. It aims to support anyone affected by the death of a baby; to work with health professionals to improve the quality of care and services provided to bereaved parents and families and to promote changes that could help to reduce the loss of babies’ lives.

THE CHILDREN’S WOODLAND

Dedicated: 2001

Commemorates: Sponsored by the Midlands Co-operative Society Limited and planted with 2,640 native British trees, the Children’s Woodland was designed to combine arboriculture and wildlife education with Remembrance.

Individual trees have been sponsored by families and schools and dedicated to babies and children who have passed away. In the nearby shelter are large child-sized wooden figures of the characters from ‘The Wind in the Willows’ by Kenneth Grahame. They were carved by the Essex Woodcarvers under the supervision of Peter Benson of the British Woodcarvers Association.

The children’s activity area and picnic area was funded by Staffordshire Aggregates Levy Grant Scheme (SALGS). It is a purpose-built wooden environment for children aged between 7-13 years.

MILLENNIUM CHAPEL OF PEACE AND FORGIVENESS

Dedicated: 2 November 2000

The Chapel represents a desire for, and is dedicated to, peace and forgiveness. It is also a celebration of the beginning of the third Millennium. It is the only place within the UK where the Act of Remembrance is observed every day of the year. Visitors to the Chapel and surrounding areas are invited to stop and observe the Silence at 11am to remember those who have lost their lives in conflict.

The Chapel’s wood construction is supported on twelve trunks of Douglas fir, each one representing one of the twelve apostles on whose witness the early church was built. Douglas fir was selected to pay tribute to David Douglas, the great plantsman, the 200th anniversary of whose birth coincided with the beginning of work on the Chapel. Each pillar has a carving by Jim Heath of one of the apostles.

Remembrance Day, for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

https://www.facebook.com/greatwarcentenary

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Newark Cemetery War Memorial

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Newark Cemetery War Memorial

First World War, wartime service burials were not strongly regulated and many of those who died in this country were laid to rest in locations chosen by their families, often in family graves scattered throughout Newark cemetery grounds. A team from Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) have been restoring the graves stones in Newark Cemetery and location around Europe.

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Let’s Remember them, On the 11th hour, of the 11th Month in 1918 the First

World War ended. Newark still wants to Remember those who have given and give today their lives for peace and Freedom

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Church of St. Mary Magdalene, Newark-on-Trent

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Bell from HMS Newark

Remembrance Day, for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

https://www.facebook.com/greatwarcentenary

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First World War 1914-1918 total from Newark Killed  455

Remembrance Day, for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

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 Newark Cemetery Memorial To The fallen

 located on London Road Newark Notts NG24 1SQ

Sunday 9th November 2014

 Remembrance Day, for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom  

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Memorial to the Fallen of Newark-On–Trent Remembrance Day at Newark Cemetery

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Memorial to the Fallen  Newark Cemetery,  A Lasting tribute to mark the ultimate sacrifice made by Newark’s fallen heroes Newark-On-Trent, London Road, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

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War Memorial Newark Cemetery

London Road

Newark, Notts  

9th November 2014

Remembrance Sunday at 11am

Newark Cemetery Remembrance Day 

 Sunday 9th November 2014 at 11am, at War Memorial to the Fallen

 located on London Road, Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ   

Let’s commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914

 

First World War 1914-1918 total from Newark Killed  456

Second World War 1939-1945 total from Newark  killed 144

One from West Africa 1961 total  killed 1

One from Malaya 1962 total killed  1

One from Afghanistan 2007 total  killed 1

Total 603

We will Remember them, RIP 

  Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

Laurencegoff

Our Historic Newark Cemetery

Newark 

London Road

Nottinghamshire

 NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery Is Open All Year Round 

April – September 8am – 8pm

October -March 8am – 6pm

 

We will Remember them

Spitfire Flying Over Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

It was heard over Newark on Sunday morning to mark the  Anniversary of the Battle of Britain.

These Spitfire Flying Over Newark to Remember The Battle of Britain

Laurencegoff

This Memorial Plaque which is dedicated to the thousands of men and women from the 2nd World War. I found this posted on the Nat West Bank on Stodman Street, Newark near the town hall

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

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 Remembrance Day, for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom  

Ministry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of Defence

Ministry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of Defence

 

Remembering them, On the 11th hour, of the 11th Month in 1918 the First World War ended. We still wants to Remember those who have given their lives for peace and Freedom.

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

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Remembrance Tuesday 11th November 2014

11 day 11 Hour 11 Month

at

11am outside Newark Town Hall steps

Let’s remember those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

A Lasting tribute to mark the ultimate sacrifice made by Newark’s fallen heroes

  

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   Remembering them On the 11th hour

 at

Newark Cemetery Memorial to the Fallen

We still wants to Remember those who have given their lives for peace and Freedom.

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

Friends of Newark Cemetery would like more volunteers to help with events during the  2014. We would welcome interested people and groups at our public meeting to plan events.  Volunteers will welcome groups and visitors to an exhibition of the First world war display during the summer of 2014. If we can find more volunteers to make this a memorable and successful event it will mark the 100th anniversary of the declaration of the 1st World War which started on 4th August 1914.

More Information Laurence Goff 07794613879 01636-681878 friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/

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Remembrance Day Monday 11th November 2013 11am outside Newark Town Hall steps

for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

  Memorial to the Fallen Newark-On-Trent

Ministry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of Defence

Ministry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of Defence

 

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Memorial located in Newark Cemetery

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Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery on London Road, Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Young people in Newark-On-Trent Cemetery Flowers were placed at the Memorial to the Fallen

The Amazing Spitfire Flying For Our Freedom

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A Fly-past of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight’s Lancaster Bomber

 

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History and Exhibition 

  A name and photographs of our fallen heroes will be on display inNewark  

 Many have found the pictorial project to honour Newark’s – Balderton war dead very interesting.

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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 Ministry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls
Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsSAM_0548Remembrance Day, for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

Remembering them, On the 11th hour, of the 11th Month in 1918 the First World War ended. We still wants to Remember those who have given their lives for peace and Freedom.

Our Historic Newark Cemetery

Newark

 NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery Is Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm

October – March 8am-6pm

For over 150 years since 1856

We Will Remember Them

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There, has always been an interest to many as it seems to exemplify the heights of human heroism coupled with the depths of folly and horrors that only war can bring, we will Remember them

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The 2nd World Wartime air raid on Ransome & Marles the date to Remember is 7th March 1941 on that Friday afternoon. This was a big part of our history during the 2nd Word War, with the most loss of life with 41 killed and another 165 that were injured. It was a huge event we most remember them.

Ransome and Marles  bombing 30 Are Buried in Newark Cemetery. 

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag 

Nottingham also Remembering  out come of the First World War 4th August 1914 -2014 

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Since 1914 To The Present Day

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https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/10/10/a-few-good-heroes-we-will-remember-them/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/10/10/a-few-good-heroes-we-will-remember-them/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/10/10/a-few-good-heroes-we-will-remember-them/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/10/10/a-few-good-heroes-we-will-remember-them/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/10/10/a-few-good-heroes-we-will-remember-them/

Newark Cemetery  Uk Remembering Them

Remembering Him

Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

We Will Remember Them

Kenneth Ramsey Rawson Duckworth, from Newark, 19 years old

who was lost in the sinking of HMS Hood, 24th May 1941

Richard JonesHMS Hood

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

Can you help us track down Coventry artist John Curry? Here is his amazing painting of HMS Hood… (Producer Kerry)

https://www.facebook.com/photo.phpfbid=696711720349820&set=a.191674027520261.42827.177089518978712&type=1&theater

http://www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk/  2011

Note this Newark Advertiser story is over three years old.

We must not forget those of the Commonwealth and Polish airmen, they fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinchSAM_1250

 

http://www.hmshood.com/crew/memorial/d/DuckworthKRR.htm

We will Remember Them

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

 

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

Zawolnosc nasza i wasza / For our freedom and yours

Memorial to the Fallen Newark-On-Trent

On 28th April 2007, Richard Todd OBE, officially unveiled the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery on London Road. Around 200 VIP guests plus Newark’s general public attended a Service  

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

First World War 1914-1918 total from Newark Killed  456

Second World War 1939-1945 total from Newark  killed 144

One from West Africa 1961 total  killed 1

One from Malaya 1962 total killed  1

One from Afghanistan 2007 total  killed 1

Total 603

We will Remember them, RIP

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Memorial To The Fallen at Newark-On-Trent Cemetery – YouTube

 Uploaded by laurencegoff There are 603 names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen atNewark Cemetery, located off London Road

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

First World War 456 Killed Came From Newark-On-Trent

Memory to the Fallen

Let’s Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagBehind the Remembrance Poppy

This is the story of how the red field poppy came to be known as an internationally recognized symbol of Remembrance.

From its association with poppies flowering in the spring of 1915 on the battlefields of Belgium, France and Gallipoli this vivid red flower has become synonymous with great loss of life in war.

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Yet the scope of the poppy and its connection with the memory of those who have died in war has been expanded to help the living too. It was the inspiration and dedication of two women who promoted this same “Memorial Flower” as the means by which funds could be raised to support those in need of help, most especially servicemen and civilians suffering from physical and mental hardship as a result of war.

If ye break faith with us who die, We shall not sleep, though poppies grow in Flanders fields.

His poem has stuck with me since I first read it as a young lad, and I have always, when abroad, visited nearby war cemeteries to pay my respects to those that lay in a foreign field far from home.

I’m still a traditionalist and observe two minutes silence at 11 on the 11th of the 11th. Those, and sadly there are a few, that feel this is an inconvenience, fail to grasp that they are only here because of our forces.

Interestingly the idea of the two minutes silence was a very Commonwealth merging of ideas based on an old idea to a very solemn occasion.

The true originator of the Silence on Remembrance Day was an Australian reporter working in Fleet Street called Edward Honey, who wrote a piece about it.

This was subsequently read by Sir Percy Fitzpatrick, an astute South African statesman who contacted Lord Milner to put the proposal to King George the Fifth, who put the official seal on the idea and authorised its adoption. But the idea all started with a journalist … the power of the press.

Let’s Respect their sacrifice.

Today, the sale of poppies helps the Royal British Legion’s charitable work helping safeguard the welfare, interests and memory of those who are serving or who have served in our Armed Forces.

Regardless of which side, left or right, that you wear your poppy, just wearing one shows you remember and care. It’s when we stop remembering and caring that tyrants start to rear their ugly heads.

The whole object is to remember and endeavour as a people working together, to ensure that such losses never happen again, or at the very least every peaceful solution sought.

It is not to glorify war as some factions have tried to claim, but to honour the individual human as well as the forces as a whole, that have tried to defend mankind and democracy.

They have ensured our freedoms, and they and their memory, rightly deserves our respect.

 That is why we wear the poppy.

The colour of the poppy is red, as Colonel John McCrae saw them and the last three lines of his poem are:

Ben ParkinsonBen ParkinsonGiant flagGiant flagBen ParkinsonBen ParkinsonGiant flagGiant flag

IN FLANDERS FIELDS

by Colonel John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row by row, That mark our place,’ and in the sky The larks still bravely singing fly, Scarce heard among the guns below. We are the dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow – Loved and were loved,’ and now we lie in Flanders Fields. Take up our quarrel with the foe! To you from failing hands we throw The torch – Be yours to hold it high! If ye break faith with us who die, We shall not sleep, though poppies grow in Flanders fields.

When you wear your Poppy, it is not just for those that laid down their lives in what was the nightmare of carnage of the First World War; it is for all those brave men and women who have lost their lives in all the wars and conflicts, that we have had the unfortunate nature to be in.

Right or wrong their being in any war or conflict that is the fault of politicians who should, but sadly seldom are, be held accountable to us the people. Our forces, built up of exceptional men and women, endeavour to protect our freedoms and this nation as a whole.

Ministry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Ministry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

29th July 1942-2012 We will Remember them

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Honouring-lives-of-past-cadets

Honouring lives of  2 past cadets

Air cadet Joe Parkes (14) of Newark 1260 Squadron, lays a wreath at the grave of Keith Couzin-Wood, who was killed in a plane crash, aged 16, in 1942. Two former air cadets from different eras were remembered during a service at Newark Cemetery .

                                                                                                                                                 Keith Couzin-Wood

Honouring Lives Of Past Cadets | Newark Advertiser

1st Aug 2008

 Fourteen members of 1260 Squadron Newark Air Training Corps marched to the war graves,  led a service at the grave of Keith Couzin-Wood. Plaque for Sergeant Patton near the London Road entrance to the cemetery.

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Honouring-lives-of-past-cadets

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Laurencegoff

Ministry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Ministry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of Defence Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsHe was just 16 

Air Cadet Keith Rollason Couzin-Wood, the young cadet killed buried in

Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

http://www.flickr.com/photos/newarkcemeteryuk/4847272393/sizes/l/in/photostream/

Honouring lives of past cadets

Air cadets, led by, left, Flight-lieutenant Mark Edwards and Pilot Officer Nick Squire, of the Newark squadron, march to the war graves section at Newark Cemetery.  

Fourteen members of 1260 Squadron Newark Air Training Corps marched to the war graves, where the Newark team curate, the Rev Tim Pownall-Jones, led a service at the grave of Keith Couzin-Wood.The service followed research by the cadets into the plane crash that killed him, aged 16, on July 29, 1942.Keith, who was on his first flight, was in an RAF Hampden bomber from 408 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force, when it stalled and crashed soon after take off from RAF Balderton.The crew, who also included another cadet, Geoffrey Hughes of Chesterfield, and two flying officers, were all killed.It is hoped the memorial service, on the Saturday closest to Keith’s death, could become an annual event. Mr Pownall-Jones said: “Those young men stood out because of their uniform and what that uniform still represents.“The young men and women here today are champions of the same core values of the services.”He said the values were teamwork, initiative, dedication and being young at heart, and that the first letters of those words spelt tidy. He said when the cadets

checked their uniforms were tidy they should think of those values.

Cadet Andrew Tallis (13) lays a wreath in memory of Sergeant Michael Patton. 

During a minute’s silence flags were lowered by corporal Sam Parkes (16) and Mr Robert Doyle, the standard bearer for Newark Royal British Legion.

Mrs Karen Grayson, the mother of a current cadet, Kristian Grayson, read a poem called Somebody’s Darling.

Cadet Joe Parkes (14) laid a wreath. 

The Mayor of Newark, Mr Harry Molyneux, said: “The youngsters wanted to serve their country but little did they know what could happen to them. They were very brave.”

Keith was from Leigh-on-Sea and his father’s family were from Southwell and Normanton. The cadets tracked down Keith’s nephew, who is in his seventies and lives in Australia.

One of the pallbearers at Keith’s funeral was Mr Jack Stringer (85) of Grosvenor Road, Balderton. He was unable to attend the ceremony due to illness and was represented by his wife, Mrs Irene Stringer (83).

She said her husband, who was a corporal in the RAF stationed at Balderton, was sorry he could not be there. 

The cadets also honoured Sergeant Michael Patton, a former cadet of the Newark squadron, who died in September 1996 when he fell from an RAF helicopter during an exercise over south Wales. 

Cadet Andrew Tallis (13) laid a wreath beside a memorial tree and plaque for Sergeant Patton near the London Road entrance to the cemetery.

Mr Patton’s niece, Miss Natalie Henstock (24) of Newark, represented his family. 

She said her grandparents, Mr and Mrs Brian Patton, of Bathley, who are Mr Patton’s parents, and her mother, Ruth Hughes, of William Street, Newark, who is Mr Patton’s sister, were unable to attend. 

Mr Patton’s father-in-law, Mr Chris Grant, of The Park, Newark, attended along with his wife, Mrs Doreen Grant.

The cadets, who meet at their Sherwood Avenue headquarters on Tuesdays and Thursdays, are looking for adult helpers.

July 2008

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Honouring-lives-of-past-cadets

Ben Parkinson

The 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month marks the signing of the Armistice, on 11th November 1918, to signal the end of World War One. At 11 am on 11th November 1918 the guns of the Western Front fell silent after more than four years continuous world war from 1914 – 1918

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Ben ParkinsonBen ParkinsonGiant flagGiant flag

Ben Parkinson

 

Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom

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Newark-On-Trent

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 The 4th of August 2014 is the 100th aniversary of the declaration of war by Great Britain on Germany

Children Did Remember Them

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Remembrance Day is on 11 November. It is a special day set aside to remember all those men and women who were killed during the two World Wars and other conflicts. At one time the day was known as Armistice Day and was renamed Remembrance Day

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When you receive this, please stop for a moment and if you are so inclined, feel free to say a prayer for our troops in the trouble spots around the world

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Let’s Remember them, On the 11th hour, of the 11th Month in 1918 the First World War ended. Newark still wants to Remember those who have given and give today their lives for peace and Freedom.

Behind the Remembrance Poppy

This is the story of how the red field poppy came to be known as an internationally recognized symbol of Remembrance.

From its association with poppies flowering in the spring of 1915 on the battlefields of Belgium, France and Gallipoli this vivid red flower has become synonymous with great loss of life in war.

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Memorial to the Fallen of Newark-On–Trent commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914. 

Newark Cemetery has 49 First World War graves that are scattered throughout, and not in one place. Let’s commemorate our local War died during the First – Second World Wars and to the present day.

WWI soldier ‘should be on memorial’

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/WWI-soldier-should-be-on-memorial-

SAM_1918

A decision not to allow the name of a first world war soldier to be added to Newark’s war memorial has been branded a scandal.

Mr Pete Stevens at the grave of William Pride, marked by a Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone.

Mr Pete Stevens, who works for the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, says William Pride’s name should be on the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery.

William, a Royal Engineers sapper, who lived in Newark, committed suicide following frontline service.

His Army record and the coroner’s report show he took his own life “whilst of unsound mind.”

Mr Stevens has been told William does not fit the criteria for inclusion on the memorial.

Mr Stevens said the Commonwealth War Graves Commission had categorised William as a casualty of war with one of its headstones, so his name should be added.

William operated hospital barges that were under constant attack as they transported casualties.

Mr Stevens believes the stigma that would have been attached to William’s suicide was why his name wasn’t included on the 1921 town Roll of Honour.

It was common to omit from war memorials the names of those who took their own lives or were shot for cowardice when they were actually shell-shocked or battle-fatigued — the condition is now recognised as post-traumatic stress disorder.

William’s name was not on the list agreed by Newark Town Council and the Royal British Legion in 2007 when plans for the Memorial to the Fallen were being considered.

“The scandal is not his suicide but the refusal to add him to the Memorial to the Fallen and right that wrong,” said Mr Stevens, of Balderton.

He discovered the omission of William Pride from the memorial by chance during research on another project.

“One can only imagine the noise, the smell and the constant cries of the wounded and the toll this would have taken on a man,” he said.

“I feel it was these horrors and the worsening of William’s disability that drove him to take his own life.

“No one understood post-traumatic stress disorder back then but we do now.

“The Government pardoned those shot for not going over the top and their names have been added to their local memorials, so why not William Pride? We must demonstrate we have moved on.”

Mr Geoff Meakin, from the Newark branch of the Royal British Legion, said: “Mr Pride doesn’t fit the criteria to go on the memorial so will not be added.

“You have to have lived or been living in the old borough of Newark and to have fallen in battle — that’s the difficulty.

“His suicide does not come into it.

“I sympathise and it’s often a contentious issue.

“If you relax the criteria for one, it opens the floodgates. These are the criteria and we must stick to them.”

Mr Stevens said there were 29 graves in Newark Cemetery of men whose names were on the memorial who did not die in battle but from wounds or other effects of their service.

“There is one man whose name appears who died in the sanatorium at Radcliffe in 1925,” said Mr Stevenson

William Pride was an engine driver and fireman with the Trent Navigation Company.

He lived on Bowbridge Road, Newark, with his wife and five children when he was called up for service on September 18, 1916 at the age 40.

He was enlisted into the Water Transport Corps of the Royal Engineers and, 19 days later he was on his way to Mesopotamia where he operated hospital barges ferrying wounded soldiers away from the front.

The barges operated under constant shell-fire.

William developed arthritis in both knees that got so bad he was invalided to India, arriving back in England on June 6, 1918.

He was sent to a camp in Kent and placed on light duties. He was found on September 11, 1918 with his throat cut and a razor in his hand.

Comrades reported he had been depressed.

The clerk to Newark Town Council, Mr Alan Mellor said: “We are and will be looking into this and will be speaking with all appropriate interested parties.”

First World War, wartime service burials were not strongly regulated and many of those who died in this country were laid to rest in locations chosen by their families, often in family graves scattered throughout Newark cemetery grounds. A team from Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) have been restoring the graves stones in Newark Cemetery and location around Europe.

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We Did Remember Them

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Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom

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Newark-On-Trent

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 The 4th of August 2014 is the 100th aniversary of the declaration of war by Great Britain on Germany

We have memorials, but that is all they are just names I think it would be fantastic to put faces to as many names as we can. Names on a memorial mean little to the younger generation, But if we can put faces to these names and find a place to display them then they will be remembered for ever. This will be a mammoth task to achieve in our interest with your help and support. I believe it can be done.

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Pete Stevens his project has been launched to match photographs to all the names on the Newark and Balderton war memorials. There are 603 names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen at Newark Cemetery, of whom 456 are first world war casualties. Another 144 are from the second World War, one died in West Africa in 1961, one in Malaya in 1952 and one in Afghanistan in 2007. There are 45 names from the first World War on the memorial in St Giles’ Church, Balderton, and a further 13 from 2nd World war.

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 immortal poem, ‘In Flanders Fields,’ was seeded from the simple Corn Poppy . It was brought to

Europe from the Holy Land  and has now become the symbol of Remembrance of all those who died in the wars of this century. In Flanders, the simple, yet beautiful little Corn Poppy grows everywhere. During the First World War, Colonel John McCrae, a Canadian veteran of the South African war, looked out from his water logged trench during a lull in the fierce fighting at the second battle of Ypres. His eyes met the sickening sight of makeshift crosses… rows and rows… the ghastly relics of the first battle which had drenched the battlefield with blood.

The Canadian Medical Officer was struck with admiration at the sight of the little red poppies… swaying gently in the breeze over the graves of the dead.

McCrae was so moved at the sight, he took out his note pad and pencil and wrote the poem…In Flanders Fields.

In 1918, Colonel John McCrae was severely wounded and he was moved from the makeshift front-line field hospital in a dugout to a rear-base hospital near Calais… he had asked to be moved to the coast area so that he could see the white cliffs of Dover from across the Channel.

On the third night he fought his last fight… he succumbed to his wounds… but in the last fleeting seconds before the Reaper called. Colonel McCrae whispered “Tell them this if ye break faith with us ho die…we shall not sleep.” And with that…the gallant Colonel was gone. That very night he was buried in the cemetery at Wimereux.

In November 1918… after four years of almost incessant fighting came the Armistice. The Great War was over… the terrible carnage was at an end. France had lost its life blood of youth for about seven million had perished.

After the misery of war… the truth that it was all for nothing became very clear when the disabled and shell-shocked Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen were cast-off overnight as unwanted. Touched by the plight of the war disabled, Madame Yvonne Guerin proposed that the women of France should make artificial red poppies and sell them throughout the world in order to raise money for the war disabled, for after all, it was they who had given them their freedom.

In England the idea caught on and Field Marshal Haig proposed a factory, where British Soldiers who, had been injured during the war, could be employed making red silk poppies. Sponsored by the British Legion it brought in much need money for the relief of those disabled in the war.

Today, millions of red poppies are sold throughout Britain. The red petals of the poppy signify the vast ocean of blood spilt, the yellow and black centre for the mud and desolation of the battlefields the green of the stem is symbolic of the fields where many brave Soldiers fell.

We Will Remember them

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We Will Remember Them, our Airmen from The Commonwealth and Poland  who“Made the Ultimate Sacrifice” In An Extremely Patriotic & Heroic Devotion To Our Country By Giving Up His Life During The 2nd World War.

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We Will Remember Them

 

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Newark Cemetery can boast of having lot’s of impressive benefactors  since 1856. An array of  names and servicemen going back to 1914 to the present day are buried in Newark-On-Trent.

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Commonwealth and Polish War Grave located at Newark Cemetery, London Road Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire, England

Zawolnosc nasza i wasza / For our freedom and yours

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Lance Corpoal ”Sean” Ivano Violino Our Hero. We departed this life into the next. Though they are hidden in the shadow of Death. Their lives for other in the love of freedom that never dies. In Memory of our Fallen Heroes, greater love hath no person give than they lay down there life for his friends.War Memorial to the Fallen, 603 names from former residents that died in wars since 1914 to the present day who came from Newark-On-Trent.

 Newark Cemetery can boast of having lot’s of impressive benefactors  since 1856. An array of  names and servicemen going back to 1914 to the present day are buried in Newark-On-Trent.

We Remember them on this day which is dedicated to all those who gave their lives between 1914-2011 in defence of this nation; for liberty, democracy, justice and truth. To those who died for King or Queen and Country; to those who gave their lives yesterday in order that we may enjoy today and a thousand tomorrows. Honour and respect are due to you, and we bow our heads in memory of your sacrifice. 

The poppy is a remembrance not only of the millions who have died, but of what they died for.

Lest we forget our liberty, traditions, faith and democracy, we will remember them.

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Newark-On-Trent is also important internationally, as it contains the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

The cemetery also contains 49 scattered burials of the First World War. A memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski in 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s remains were returned to Poland in 1993, but there is still a memorial to him at Newark. 

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsThe Chapel  Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery, will  also open by appointment  for groups. New volunteers are most welcome and can be put on a rota.

Come and see what you will find

 Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery.

We will have volunteers on site from the

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

The Friends of Newark Cemetery

Also we will provide help

In finding a specific grave location and are

Offering a general tour of the Cemetery.

A highlight within the Centre Will be a

Display of over 150 Photographs from the Newark & Balderton Memorial to the Fallen Photo Project by Pete Stevens.

Chapel Interpretation Centre,

Newark Cemetery.

Organised by the Friends of Newark Cemetery

The Chapel  Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery, will  open  by appointment for groups on Monday and Tuesday and weekends. Please give plenty of notice.

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

The Friends of Newark Cemetery meeting, to be held at Newark Town Hall in the Pickin Room  on Wednesday 5th March 2014. Arrive at 5:30pm for a cuppa meeting will start at 5:45pm.

All most welcome

Laurence Goff Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery

THE MAIN ARCH AT NEWARK CEMETERY NOTTINGHAMSHIRE UK

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70th Anniversary tribute to Dambusters

70th Anniversary tribute to Dambusters

“They went with songs to the battle, they were young, Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow. They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted; They fell with their faces to the foe. They shall not grow old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them.” From For the Fallen by Laurence Binyon

Remembrance Day Poppy

WEAR YOUR POPPY WITH PRIDE

War Memorial Newark-On-Trent. On the 11th hour, of the 11th Month in 1918 the First World War ended. Newark still wants to Remember those who have given and give today their lives for peace and Freedom. Many thanks the School Children in Newark who on the eve of Remembrance Day laid wreathes beside Newark War Memorial next to The Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene, Newark.

Remembrance Day in Newark-On-Trent

A very special thank you to all the men and women of our armed forces who have made the ultimate sacrifice.  Wear  a poppy and remember those who have died in service to our country.

Lance Corpoal ”Sean” Ivano Violino Our Hero. He was deservedly promoted to Lance Corporal in October 2004. Lance-corporal Ivano Violino (29) known in Newark as Sean Sutcliffe, of the Royal Engineers, who died in the blast from a roadside bomb in Helmand. We departed this life into the next. Though they are hidden in the shadow of Death. Their lives for other in the love of freedom that never dies. In Memory of our Fallen Heroes, greater love hath no person give than they lay down there life for his friends.

THE RED POPPY

A History

Synonymous with War Memorials are the red poppies worn on Remembrance Day, Nov.11th ( originally known as Armistice Day ). The origin of the poppy tradition rests with three people, Major John McCrae* a Medical Officer with the 1st.Canadian Contingent at the battle of the Ypres salient in May 1915. Miss Moira Michael, Secretary of the American YMCA and Madam Guerin, Secretary French YMCA.

Apalled at the slaughter caused by the seventeen day Ypres battle Major McCrae wrote the following poem:

In Flanders’ Fields

In Flanders’ Fields the poppies blow Between the crosses, row on row, That mark our place; and in the sky The larks, still bravely singing, fly Scarce heard amid the guns below. We are the dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, Loved, and were loved, and now we lie In Flanders’ Fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe: To you from failing hands we throw The torch; be yours to hold it high. If ye break faith with us who die We shall not sleep, though poppies grow In Flanders’ Fields.

Published in the London magazine ‘Punch’ December,1915, it received wide publicity.

Miss Moira Bell Michael, a teacher,was so impressed with the poem she wrote the following:

“We Shall Keep The Faith”

Oh! You who sleep in Flanders’ fields, Sleep sweet – to rise anew; We caught the torch you threw; And holding high we kept The faith with those who died. We cherish, too, the Poppy red That grows on fields where valour led. It seems to signal to the skies That blood of heroes never dies, But lends a lustre to the red Of the flower that blooms above the dead In Flanders’ Fields. And now the torch and poppy red Wear in honour of our dead Fear not that ye have died for naught We’ve learned the lesson that ye taught In Flanders’ Fields.

and made a decision to always wear a Flanders poppy “to keep the faith”.

In November 1918 Madame Guerin attended a convention of YMCA Secretaries from the Allied Nations and met Miss Michael, greatly impressed with Miss Michael’s idea of the Flanders poppy as a badge of remembrance she took the idea back to France from where it quickly spread amongst the Allies of WW1. In 1919 the newly formed British Legion adopted the Flanders Poppy as it’s official badge of remembrance followed by the Australian RSL in 1921. In 1922 a factory for the manufacture of poppies for distribution in Britain and Northern Ireland was established in the Old Kent Road, London under the supervision of Major George Howson MC to provide employment for disabled soldiers. As demand increased larger premises were required so in 1925 a move was made to premises in Petersham Rd., Richmond, SW London where it remains to the present day. At one time the factory employed some 365 people producing 45 million poppies per annum; today, with improved production methods, 44 people are employed at the factory with another 90 home workers,only ex-Service persons or their relatives qualify for employment. Production for the 2006 ceremony will be 36 million poppies ( 650,000 buttonhole type) 105,000 wreaths 750,000 crosses 5 million petals In addition to the above the factory also produces a special corsage of five poppies for the Queen to wear and wreaths for the Special Air Services Regiment, the SAS wreaths differ from the norm having a central plaque of the SAS badge surrounded by dark and light blue leaves interspersed with white carnations

“Worn to remember the nation’s war dead, the red poppy is a widely recognised emblem. Millions of poppies were sold last year and the appeal raised £30m for the Royal British Legion’s charitable work. But what is the etiquette of wearing one? 1. Should you wear one? The poppy commemorates those who have died in war. The tradition was started by American teacher Moina Bell Michael, who sold silk poppies to friends to raise money for the ex-service community. In 1920 the poppy was proclaimed the national emblem of remembrance in the US, and in the UK, the first poppy day was in 1921. Last year Britons bought 26m poppies, but others choose not to. Channel 4 newsreader Jon Snow famously refuses to wear one on air, reportedly saying he does not want to bow to “poppy fascism” 2. What colour to wear – red, white or purple? Red is most popular, but the lesser-seen white poppy dates from 1933, when the Women’s Co-operative Guild wanted a lasting symbol for peace and an end to all wars. But the Royal British Legion refused to be associated with their manufacture, and so the Co-operative Wholesale Society took on production. The intention was not to offend the memory of those who died in the Great War, but many veterans felt white poppies undermined their contribution and the lasting meaning of the red poppy. Feelings ran so high that some women lost their jobs in the 1930s for wearing white poppies. Critics argue the red poppy already encompasses the sentiments of white one, which they say also diverts funds for the Royal British Legion. Then there are purple poppies, worn to remember the animal victims of war and sold by animal charities. 3. When to start wearing one? Many people think poppies should be worn from 1 November until Armistice Day on 11 November. Others pin one on only in the week running up to Remembrance Sunday – 13th November this year. A Royal British Legion spokesman says they can be worn from the launch of the poppy appeal in October. Organisations like the BBC usually choose a day for presenters to start wearing one.  

4. When not in uniform, where should you pin your poppy – left or right. Some people say left, as it’s worn over the heart. It is also where military medals are worn. Others say only the Queen and Royal Family are allowed to wear a poppy on the right, which isn’t true. Then there is the school of thought that says men should wear theirs on the left and women on the right, as is the traditional custom with a badge or brooch. The Royal British Legion spokesman says there is no right or wrong side “other than to wear it with pride”. 5. What size should\b0 it be? The traditional poppy is roughly 7cm from red tip to the bottom of its green stalk and 4cm wide. But other sizes are worn.”(extract from BBC Magazine Oct.2009)

In adopting the Poppy of Flanders’ Fields as the Memorial Flower to be worn by all Returned Soldiers on the above mentioned day, we recognise that no emblem so well typifies the Fields whereon was fought the greatest war in the history of the world nor sanctifies so truly the last resting place of our brave dead who remain in France” excerpt from RSL declaration of 1921.

In spite of the sentiments expressed above the “Poppies” supplied by the WA RSL for sale to the public since 2003 do not replicate Flanders Poppies, having more in common with minature multi petalled roses

Col. John McCrae died of wounds in France, 1918

 

WOOLFITT, Philip

Canadian Btn

88th Btn., and 43rd Btn.,

Born 1897, Died 1916

During the First World War, both local newspapers, the Newark Advertiser and the Newark Herald ran extensive coverage on local casualties, which are of great interest and value for those researching their family history from this period.

The following articles appeared in each newspaper:

NEWARK HERALD – 4th November 1916 

PTE PHILIP WOOLFITT DIES OF WOUNDS 

The many friends of Mr & Mrs W P Woolfitt of New Balderton, will learn with much regret and sympathy of the death from wounds of their eldest son, Pte. Philip Woolfitt, of the gallant Canadians.  Pte. Woolfitt, who was only 19 years of age in August last, was an old Magnus boy, and upon leaving school went out to Victoria, British Colombia,  five years ago, to his grandfather, Mr Tomlinson.  For the last two years before enlisting he was learning surveying and was engaged with his uncle, Mr Nowell Johnson, working under government.  As soon as he had turned the age of 19, and had finished his engagement, he joined the 88th Battalion of Canadians at Victoria in December last and came over to England in June when he had a few days leave and re-joined his parents at New Balderton near Newark. 

Returning to camp he volunteered to join a draft and was transferred to the 43rd Canadians, being sent to France early in August.  He was in the firing line about a month when he was severely wounded on October 9th, being wounded through the right arm, left hand, slight wound in the head, and a severe shrapnel wound in the hip, which caused complications.  He arrived in England on 17th and was sent to King George’s Hospital, London where he underwent several operations.  He was treated with the best medical skill possible and with every care and attention, but owing to septic poisoning and haemorrhage, no hopes were entertained of saving the young life and his parents were sent for and they were able to be present when he passed away most peacefully, practically in his sleep, at 10.15 on Wednesday night. 

The greatest sympathy is extended to Mr and Mrs Woolfitt in their great loss. 

The funeral, which will be of a military character, will take place this afternoon.  There was a service in the Parish Church at 2.30pm, and the interment was at Newark Cemetery at 3.20pm.

NEWARK ADVERTISER – November 8th 1916 (p.5)

MILITARY FUNERAL AT NEWARK  CEMETERY

 Pte Philip Woolfitt: died of wounds. 

 With full military honours, the mortal remains of Pte. P Woolfitt (eldest son of Mr & Mrs W P Woolfitt, New Balderton) who died of wounds sustained in France, were laid to rest in Newark Cemetery on Saturday.  Deceased, who was 20 years of age, was an old Magnusian, having won a scholarship from the Mount School. 

After leaving school he went out to Victoria, British Columbia, to his grandfather, Mr J H Tomlinson.  During the last two years of his stay in the Colonies he was learning surveying with his uncle, Mr Norwell Johnson.  As soon as he was 19 years of age he joined a Canadian Battalion, and came over to England in June.  Early in August he was drafted out, and after being about a month in the firing line he was badly wounded in the right arm, left hand, slightly in the head, and severely in the hip. 

He arrived in England on 17th and was sent to King George’s Hospital London where he underwent several operations.  Owing to septic poisoning and haemorrhage, no hopes were entertained of his recovery, and his parents were sent for.  He passed away practically in his sleep at 10.15pm on Wednesday night, 1st November 1916 on All Souls’ Night.

THE FUNERAL 

The funeral service was conducted by the Vicar of Newark (Canon W Paton Hindley), and the obsequies were attended by a firing party, bugle and drum and fife band of the Royal Engineers.  The first part was in the Parish Church, where the hymn “How those glorious spirits shine” was sung.  Mr W T Wright, A.R.C.O., presided at the organ. 

The chief mourners were Mr & Mrs W P Woolfitt (father and mother), Misses Eva and Nora Woolfitt (sisters), Masters Donald and Albert Woolfitt (brothers), Mrs F E Hoe (aunt), Mr and Mrs W H Tomlinson and Mr H S Whiles.  Amongst those also present were Rev. H Gorse (headmaster), and scholars from the Magnus Grammar School, Mr G B Friend, Ald. J C Wright, Ald. L Priestley, Mr C H Whitehouse, Mr and Mrs T A Watford, Mr G B Heading, Mr F Allott, Mrs. Garner (Commandant of the VAD Hospital, Lombard Street, Newark), Miss Garner, Mrs M H Colton, Mr E Winter Rose, and others. 

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'WOOLFITT, Philip' page

The cortege, as it wended its way towards the Cemetery, was headed by the Royal Engineers band playing the Dead March.  Then came the firing party, walking with arms reversed.  When near the Cemetery gates the band played “Abide with me”, and lined up each side of the entrance to allow the body, enclosed in an oak coffin, on which was the Union Jack and deceased’s cap, to pass through to the burial place.  After the Vicar had concluded reading the burial service, the customary three volleys were fired over the grave, and the buglers sounded the “Last Post”. 

In addition to the family wreaths, beautiful floral tributes were sent as follows:

With deepest sympathy from Uncle Albert, Auntie Jane and Auntie Fanny.

In loving remembrance of dear Phil., from Aunty Lill and Uncle Billy (Hoveringham).

In loving sympathy from J W P Hall.

From Mr and Mrs E Harker and family, with deepest sympathy.

With deepest sympathy from Mr and Mrs Otter and family.

In loving sympathy from Mrs Heppenstall and Miss Heppenstall.

With deepest sympathy from Mr and Mrs B Newbound.

With sincere sympathy from Mrs Wright and the Misses Parnham.

With kind remembrance and deep sympathy from Mr and Mrs Vason

With love from Mrs H M Coles.

In affectionate remembrance from Lieut. and Mrs J H W Ford and family.

From Elizabeth Anderson “Blessed are the pure in heart for they shall see God”

With deepest sympathy for a dear friend – Frank Slater.

With deepest sympathy from Mrs H M Colton and family, South Scarle Hall.

With deepest sympathy for a young life nobly sacrificed for his country’s cause, from a few friends at the Brewery Office.

With pride in an old schoolfellow and in deepest sympathy, from the boys of the Magnus Grammar School.

TOUCHING TRIBUTE 

In the course of his sermon on Sunday morning, the Vicar (Canon W Paton Hindley) made a touching allusion to the death of Pte. Woolfitt.  He quoted from a letter written by the Chaplain of King George’s Hospital, who said: “He died at 10 p.m. last night, and all of us who have come in touch with the dear boy have felt that it was fitting that he should be called away on All Saints’ Day.  His sheer goodness has inspired us all.  His patience and cheerfulness were wonderful all through for he has been suffering much pain.  On Sunday morning he received Holy Communion with much joy and devotion – we have lost a lot of boys since July, but in no case do I remember such a wide-spread feeling of sorrow and sympathy in the Hospital as was felt today.

Private Philip Woolfitt – 1897-1916 – who had gone to Canada and enlisted in the Canadian Infantry (Manitoba Regiment) and died on 1st November of 1916 aged 19.  He is buried with his parents William and Emma, in Newark cemetery, and was the elder brother of Sir Donald Wolfit (1902-1968), the actor (who changed the spelling of his name later in his career).  The family lived on London Road, Balderton, where a plaque to Donald was erected in 1974.

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From the 1st World War, RIP

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

 

We will Remember them

To have the Desert Poppy adopted by the British Legion in remembrance of UK Armed Forces personnel who lost their lives in Afghanistan and Iraq

The Royal British Legion

The Royal British Legion Charity Registration No. 219279

It is the UK’s leading charity providing financial, social and emotional support to millions who have served and are currently serving in the British Armed Forces and their dependents.

“WE WILL REMEMBER THEM”

Our Heroes who have lost their lives in Afghanistan,  RIP to all those brave soldiers who have fallen in Afghanistan and around the World.

We will Remember them all year round.

Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom

Smiles in the sunshire and tears in the rain still take me back where my memories remain

A heavenly choir – what a song – my desire – simply great – I have always loved this Mull of Kintyre this great song by Sir Paul Mccartney and wing

www.youtube.com/watch?v=4JPHNuAAZDE&feature=related

  1. Tags
  2. British Remember remembrance Armed Forces Iraq Afghanistan War Army Navy Marines RAF UK Great Britain

“WE WILL REMEMBER THEM”

Remembrance of UK Armed Forces personnel who lost their lives in Afghanistan and Iraq

Let’s Remember our UK Armed Forces personnel who lost their lives in Afghanistan and Iraq, RIP

 

Wreaths were laid at Newark Cemetery War Memorial to the Fallen

British Commonwealth and Polish War Graves Newark Cemetery

Click on Links

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/category/general-sikorski/

General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Prime Minister of Poland’s London …

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/friends-of-newark-cemetery-fonc/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/08/13/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/category/general-sikorski/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/03/13/tribute-to-ivano-sean-violino-lasting-tribute/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/09/26/we-must-not-forget-those-of-the-commonwealth-and-polish-airmen-they-fought-for-freedom-against-the-enemy-and-didn’t-flinch/

www.coddington.org.uk/index.php/20th-century/175-ransome-a-marles-air-raid-1941

Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom

Annual Air Bridge Commemoration Service, will be held at Newark Cemetery London Road, Nottinghamshire. Held on the Last Sunday in September each year. In Remembrance of the casualties of the 1944 Warsaw Uprising which will start  at 1:45pm when Standard Bearers assemble at Main Gate. 2pm Procession to the Air Bridge Memorial.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Held on the last Sunday in October each year. Annual All Souls Day Service, is held on the Sunday in October each year. From 3pm Procession moves off from Newark Cemetery Main Gate, London Road, Newark-On-Trent,  Nottinghamshire.

Lighting of candles will be lit on each of the Polish graves at Newark Cemetery. During the service, conducted in both Polish and English, to mark All Souls Day.

Polish Embassy, London

During the Second World War there were nearly a quarter of a million Poles in the Polish Armed Forces serving under British command.

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2010/09/06/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

Annual Air Bridge  held on the last Sunday each year,   1.45pm Guests and Standard Bearers assemble at Newark Cemetery Main Gates on London Road, Newark-On-Trent Nottinghamshire.

Today the Commission cares for the graves of nearly 4,500 Polish servicemen and women in 35 countries around the world. The highest concentration of commemorations can be found in the United Kingdom, where over 2,100 Poles are commemorated from Scotland, Newark-On-Trent to Cornwall in 244 different locations. In particular, over 400 casualties are commemorated in Newark-upon-Trent.

From the British Commonwealth, The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), British Royal Air Force (RAF), Canadian (RCAF) New Zealand (RNZAF) and Polish squadrons were formed within the Royal Air Force. Many Polish Airmen were flying Spitfires fighters for Britain’s Royal Force some 397 Polish Airman that died and are buried in Newark Cemetery during the 2nd World War.

There were a number of RAF stations within a few miles of Newark from which several Polish squadrons operated, and a special plot on the eastern side Newark-upon-Trent Cemetery was set aside for RAF burials.

Memorial cross to the Polish buried here was erected in the plot and unveiled on 14th July 1941

President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander in Chief of the Polish Forces and war-time Prime Minister.

When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski (aged 62) in 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial.  It contains a memorial to Poland’s exiled war leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski, who died when the aeroplane he was travelling in crashed over Gibraltar. General Sikorski was buried at Newark in July, 1943, and it was his dying wish that his body should be returned to Poland when it was a free country. His remains were returned in 1993. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for RAF burials and this is now the war graves for people to see across the UK and the World. Former Airmen choosing to be buried since staying in England after the 2nd World War. Newark Cemetery also contains graves from the 1st world war scattered around the Cemetery.

The plot includes a memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here which was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. Both men subsequently died and were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial, until their remains were Newark-upon-Trent Cemetery repatriated back to Poland on 14th September 1993.

Airman from British Commonwealth and Polish Air Force that were killed during the 2nd World War and more since choose to be buried in Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire, England.

General Sikorski the wartime leader of the Polish Government in exile met his death in an air crash at Gibraltar on the evening of 4th July 1943 General Sikorski was buried in the Polish part of cemetery in Newark on 16th July, 1943 for 50 years later left Newark after a Mass service on 14th September 1993, his remains were brought back to Poland.

This Memorial Plaque is dedicated 2nd World War

Each year British and Polish servicemen honoured at Newark service, candles lit to honour the fallen on the last Sunday in October starting at 3pm from the main gate of Newark Cemetery UK. War veterans and civic dignitaries attended a service on Sunday to honour the Polish servicemen who died during the 2nd World War. Lighting of candles were lit on each of the Polish graves at Newark Cemetery. During the service, conducted in both Polish and English, to mark All Souls Day.

Memorial At The Former  General Sikorski Grave

Newark-On-Trent

Each year British and Polish servicemen honoured at Newark service, candles lit to honour the fallen on the last Sunday in October starting at 3pm from the main gate of Newark Cemetery UK. War veterans and civic dignitaries attended a service on Sunday to honour the Polish servicemen who died during the 2nd World War.

The dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth that join up with the RAF that were killed and there resting place is Newark Cemetery 6 ARAF- Australian, 44 British Servicemen, 17 CRAF- Canadian and 3 RNZAF- New Zealand plus 44 British Servicemen,.

During the 2nd World War that were killed and are buried Newark Cemetery from the British Commonwealth  6 ARAF- Australian, 44 British Servicemen, 17 CRAF- Canadian and 3 RNZAF- New Zealand.

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2010/08/10/tribute-to-ivano-sean-violino-lasting-tribute/

Amongst the many well-known local people that are buried in Newark Cemetery include  among the many graves are Memorials to some of Newark’s greatest benefactors and people who have helped shape Newark

Thursday 30th October 1856. The Church of England portion of the new Cemetery was consecrated by the Bishop of Lincoln. Soon after the ceremony took place, the very first burial was made for the family of W.N. Nicholson, Ironmonger, Market Place, Newark. Their three year old son Charles John.

On 23rd February 1856 . At 10 O’clock the members of the Corporation and Burial Board together with Ministers of Churches from the area. The Town Mayor Henry Sutton, Chief Constable, Waterton, with the battle-axe and the Police, W.Newton the Clerk to the Board, Town Crier with Two Mace-bearers, 12 scholars from the Grammar School and other officials assembled at the Town Hall. The procession crossed the Market Place and went by Bridge Street, Carter Gate and Beaumont Street to the New Cemetery site. The corner-stone of the new buildings was laid by Joseph Branston Esq.

NEWARK CEMETERY, NOTTINGHAMSHIRE, ENGLAND UK SINCE 1856

Remembering those who made the

Supreme Sacrifice

“Every day, every month, not just in November”

In Flanders field the poppies blowBetween the crosses, row on row,That mark our place; and in the skyThe larks, still bravely singing, flyScarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days agoWe lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,Loved and were loved, and now we lieIn Flanders fields. Take up our quarrel with the foe:To you from failing hands we throwThe torch; be yours to hold it high.If ye break with us who dieWe shall not sleep, though poppies growIn Flanders fields.

Let’s enjoy the beauty of Newark Cemetery grounds

From the British Commonwealth, The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), British Royal Air Force (RAF), Canadian (RCAF) New Zealand (RNZAF) and Polish squadrons were formed within the Royal Air Force. Many Polish Airmen were flying Spitfires fighters for Britain’s Royal Force some 423 Polish Airman WHO HAD been buried in Newark cemetery during the 2nd World War.

Lance Corporal Ivano “Sean” Violino

is one of our Heroes let’s say thanks in his memory, he was a brave person of courage. He was killed in Helmand Province, southern Afghanistan, on September 17, 2007. RIP. His name has been added to the War Memorial to the fallen at Newark-On-Trent Cemetery He will not be forgotten, we will not forget him and to others, RIP.

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2010/07/01/tribute-to-ivano-sean-violino-lasting-tribute/

 

SAM_7119

Laurencegoff

This Memorial Plaque which is dedicated to the thousands of men and women from the 2nd World War. I found this posted on the Nat West Bank on Stodman Street, Newark near the town hall

 

To The Fallen in Newark Cemetery

Our

Comemoraton

A

Fitting tribute

Ransome & Marles factory bombing Newark

A Roll call of 41 names at 1:30pm at Newark Cemetery 7th March 2014. Arrive near the former Chapel and Main Arch

We Will Remember the Ransome and Marles Bombing, 41 were killed 30 are buried in Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire

A complete listing of names “Roll Call of Honour

* A Star Buried   in  Newark   Cemetery   O  is  put after names that do not have a Tombstone )

1, George Harold Henry Adams, aged 45 *

2, Wilfred Evelyn Andrew, aged 39 *

3, Olive Ash, aged 31 * O

4, Bertie Augustus Ball, aged 18 * O

5, Ernest Patrick Beale, aged 27, Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment (Private) *

6, Edward Beaver, aged 26 (Buried in Mansfield) with no Tombstone

7, Harold Vincent Brown, aged 44 *

8, Vivian Maud Castle, aged 18

9, Enid Winifred Hall Cooper, aged 30 ( Buried in Balderton in St Giles Church Yard)

10, Edna May Cottam, aged 19 *

11, Gladys Cummings, aged 21 *

12, William Joseph Dixey, aged 62 *

13, Frederick Flowler, aged 39

14, George William Godridge, aged 29 * O

15, Robert Barnsdale Grant, aged 47, his son Chris was only five when his Father died, he became Newark town mayor 50 years later in 1991-1992 *

16, John Henry Green, aged 55, Volunteer Home Guard, 11th Nottinghamshire (Newark) *

17, Horace Grocock, aged 47 ( Buried in Barnby in the Willow)

18, Albert Robert Gyde, aged 42*

19, Rose Ellen Hall, aged 30 * O

20, James Hazelby Hanger, aged 29 *

21, Thomas McHallam Hardie, aged 26 *

22, Sybil Harriet Hayden, aged 34

23, Joyce May Kirton, aged 18

24, Lily Lambert, aged 22 * O

25, George Felix Lambley,  aged 39 *

26, Edith Makins, aged 21 ( Buried in South Collingham)

27, Frederick William Mann, aged 46 * O

28, Frederick Markwell, aged 50 ( Balderton ?)

29, Claude Ware Hannah Martin, aged 36 *

30, Edwin E. Martin, aged 46 *

31, Richard Naylor, aged 25 * 

32, Frederick William Packwood, aged 52 *

33, William Thomas Pepper, aged 18

34, Frederick Richards, aged 32 * O

35, Alfred Mayfield Ridge, aged 68 * O

36, Reginald William Senior, aged 35, died on the 8th March 1941 *

37, George Swanwick, aged 38 * O

38, Norah Trueblood, aged 34, *

39, Esther Evelyn Varney, aged 19, (her body was never found)

40, William Warner, aged 51 *

41, Arthur Worrell, aged 31 *

‘Gone but not forgotten’

They Played their part were factories and their workers who were pushed to the limit as they turned out the components that kept the war machine running.

Friday the 7th March 1941

 Ransome and Marles Ball Bearing Factory

This was the darkest days during the 2nd World war when 29 men and 12 women died with another 165 that were injured. When 10 bombs were dropped with 5 exploded on that sad day.

Details are sought on the Ransome are Marles bombing which took place on Friday 7th March 1941. If you have any information  or documents about the attack when a total of 41 people were killed and 165 injured. The  72th Anniversary 2013.

Laurence Goff

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Ransome and Marles former factory workers Remembered

This pretty 21 year old Red Head Edith was working at Ransome & Marles when she was tragically killed in the air raid. She had been engaged to be married to a sailor. Her sister Jean still has Edith’s collection for her “Bottom Draw” plus the one remaining item

 

In Loving Memory Of Edith Makins Who Died March 7th 1941 Newark’s “Black Friday

Edith Makins A Civilian Casualty of the Air Raid

A old Photo Of Edith’s Purse With Her Bus Fare Home. Even after over 60 years the Purse Still Has The Smell of the Factory on it.

The Headstone to Edith can be seen in the churchyard of St John the Baptist South Collingham.

Edith Makins was a Civilian Casualty of the Air Raid on the Ransome Marles factory

Collingham The Makins Cottage Where Edith Lived

The Ransome and Marles factory is still on the same site, beside the railway line which led the single Heinkel bomber right to the factory gates.But even small towns and obscure locations were targeted by German bombers. In the market town of Newark in Nottinghamshire, a memorial has been unveiled to 41 workers killed when a ball bearing factory was flattened in a daylight raid. The exact number of deaths will never be known but many workers were killed.

The initial devastating attack was followed up by a second bomber later in the day.

“Marker table” On 7th March 1941 a Friday afternoon thousands of workers at the Ransome and Marles factory in Newark heard the warning sirens. Most made for the shelters and the secret underground hospital on the site.

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

SAM_0718

Laurencegoff

A fly-past of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight’s Lancaster Bomber

 Ransome and Marles former factory workers Remembered

Edith Makins, aged 21 ( Buried in South Collingham)

Newark ball bearing factory raid remembered

The 75th anniversary of the Blitz on London and the attacks on strategic industrial cities and ports attracted widespread coverage in 2010.

But even small towns and obscure locations were targeted by German bombers. In the market town of Newark in Nottinghamshire, a memorial has been unveiled to 41 workers killed when a ball bearing factory was flattened in a daylight raid. The exact number of deaths will never be known but many workers were killed.

The factory is still on the same site, beside the railway line which led the single Heinkel bomber right to the factory gates.

The initial devastating attack was followed up by a second bomber later in the day.

“Marker table” On 7th March 1941 a Friday afternoon thousands of workers at the Ransome and Marles factory in Newark heard the warning sirens. Most made for the shelters and the secret underground hospital on the site.

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Bert Emerson and Laurence Goff

Bert was a survivor of the Ransome and Marles bombing and helped rescue others

Bert Emerson, 90

Bert Emerson

During the raid workers dived underneath a huge metal marking table in one of the engineering workshops. Chris Grant, son of one of the workers, said: “Apparently my dad always said that if there was a raid they felt they were always going to be safer getting under this very heavy marking table rather that running out in to the open to go to the air raid shelters.

“But the first bomb to be dropped actually was a direct hit on that marker table.” Many more died as the bomb tore through the workshops. Most of the victims were buried in Newark Cemetery and the funerals lasted four days.

Ransome and Marles was targeted because it made ball bearings for the defence industry – and many ended up in the gun turrets of battleships. The company is now known as NSK and is owned by a Japanese firm.

“Absolutely horrific” Bert Emerson, who will be 90 in 2011, is one of the few survivors of the attack. He said “My wife was a typist in one of the offices and I stopped to speak to her when the first bombs dropped.

“I pushed her to the ground and laid on top of her. All the walls came down – we were covered in glass but we both got up without a scratch.

Continue reading the main story

“Start Quote It’s difficult to realise that it actually happened here in Newark – we didn’t think we were that important.”

Ernest Matchett Eyewitness “If I’d have carried on to the tool room I could have been there when a bomb dropped, so I think I’m one of the luckiest people alive.” Mr Emerson was one of the first-aid workers and after helping survivors he had the task of recovering bodies – and body parts – the next day. “It was really horrifying. It wasn’t until you got home and you sat down and thought about it. “It’s something I wouldn’t want to go through ever again. I was only 19 years old and I’d never seen anyone dead before. “But in those days there was no counselling – you just had to get on with it.”

Another Newark resident who remembers that day is Ernest Matchett, now 85. He said: “It had a terrific impact, there’s no doubt about that. It was absolutely horrific. “It’s difficult to realise that it actually happened here in Newark – we didn’t think we were that important. Things like that never really happen around here – not even during the war.”

For years the only memorial to the 41 workers was a plaque and a tree on the factory site. A memorial incorporating the names of those who died and a piece of wreckage salvaged from the bombed factory was unveiled at Newark Town Hall. Chris Grant, who is a former mayor of Newark, said it had taken some years for the campaign to bear fruit. Many had felt it wrong that members of the armed forces who died were commemorated on a memorial but not those who died making a valuable contribution to the war effort, he said.

“At long last they will be remembered,”

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These 41 flags are to Remember the 41 workers that were killed at Ransome and Marles factory. They are no less deserving of acknowledgement with this memorial website page at which everyone can pay their respects 

 https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/03/08/ransome-and-marles-former-factory-workers-will-be-remembered-with-a-permanent-memorial-in-newark-on-trent-in-2011/

  Many all of those brave workers at Ransome and Marles  whatever the circumstances of their death, and may their families and friends find comfort in the knowledge that they were decent, honourable people simply serving their country.

See full size image In Memory of Our Fallen Heroes Greater Love Hath No Person Give Than They Lay Down There Life For His Friends See full size image

Lance Corpoal Ivano Violino Name is on Newark-On-Trent War Memorial to the Fallen. He was a very brave person putting people first. This Fighting Men that have defend our Freedom around the World, we should not forget this.

May all of these brave British personnel rest in peace, whatever the circumstances of their death, and may their families and friends find comfort in the knowledge that they were decent, honourable people simply serving their country. These are the names of those killed in action in southern Afghanistan.

Captain Jim Philippson of 7 Parachute Regiment RHA died at Sangin on Sunday 11 June 2006.

Captain David Patten of the Special Reconnaisance Regiment died at Sangin on 27 June 2006.

Sergeant Paul Bartlett of the Special Boat Service died at Sangin on 27 June 2006.

Corporal Peter Thorpe of 14 Signal Regiment died at Sangin on Saturday 1 July 2006.

Lance Corporal Jabron Hashmi of 14 Signal Regiment died at Sangin on Saturday 1 July 2006.

Private Damien Jackson of 3 Battalion, the Parachute Regiment died at Sangin on Wednesday 5 July 2006.

Captain Alex Eida, of 7 Parachute Regiment RHA died at Musa Qala on Tuesday 1 August 2006.

2nd Lieutenant Ralph Johnson of the Life Guards died at Musa Qala on Tuesday 1 August 2006.

Lance Corporal Ross Nicholls of the Blues and Royals died at Musa Qala on Tuesday 1 August 2006.

Private Andrew Barrie Cutts of 13 Air Assault Support Regiment died at Musa Qala on Sunday 6 August 2006.

Lance Corporal Sean Tansey of the Life Guards died at Sangin on Saturday 12 August 2006.

Corporal Bryan James Budd of 3 Battalion, the Parachute Regiment died on Sunday 20 August 2006 of wounds sustained at Sangin.

Lance Corporal Jonathan Peter Hetherington of 14 Signal Regiment died at Musa Qala on Sunday 27 August 2006.

Ranger Anare Draiva of the Royal Irish Regiment died at Musa Qala on Friday 1 September 2006.

Flight Lieutenant Steven Johnson of the RAF died at Chil Khor on Saturday 2 September 2006.

Flight Lieutenant Leigh Anthony Mitchelmore of the RAF died at Chil Khor on Saturday 2 September 2006.

Flight Lieutenant Gareth Rodney Nicholas of the RAF died at Chil Khor on Saturday 2 September 2006.

Flight Lieutenant Allan James Squires of the RAF died at Chil Khor on Saturday 2 September 2006.

Flight Lieutenant Steven Swarbrick of the RAF died at Chil Khor on Saturday 2 September 2006.

Flight Sergeant Gary Wayne Andrews of the RAF died at Chil Khor on Saturday 2 September 2006.

Flight Sergeant Stephen Beattie of the RAF died at Chil Khor on Saturday 2 September 2006.

Flight Sergeant Gerard Martin Bell of the RAF died at Chil Khor on Saturday 2 September 2006.

Flight Sergeant Adrian Davies of the RAF died at Chil Khor on Saturday 2 September 2006.

Sergeant Benjamin James Knight of the RAF died at Chil Khor on Saturday 2 September 2006.

Sergeant John Joseph Langton of the RAF died at Chil Khor on Saturday 2 September 2006.

Sergeant Gary Paul Quilliam of the RAF died at Chil Khor on Saturday 2 September 2006.

Lance Corporal Oliver Simon Dicketts of 1 Battalion, the Parachute Regiment, part of the Special Forces Support Group, died at Chil Khor on Saturday 2 September 2006.

Marine Joseph David Windall of the Royal Marines, attached to the Special Boat Service, died at Chil Khor on Saturday 2 September 2006.

Lance Corporal Paul Muirhead of the Royal Irish Regiment died on 6 September 2006 of wounds sustained at Musa Qala.

Lance Corporal Luke McCulloch of the Royal Irish Regiment died at Sangin on 6 September 2006.

Corporal Mark Wright of the 3 Battalion, Parachute Regiment, died at Kajaki on 6 September 2006.

Marine Gary Wright of 45 Commando, Royal Marines, died at Lashkar Gah on 20 October 2006.

Marine Jonathan Wigley of 45 Commando, Royal Marines, died at Garmsir on 5 December 2006.

Marine Richard Watson of 42 Commando, Royal Marines, died at Nowzad on 12 December 2006.

Lance Bombardier James Dwyer of 29 Commando Regiment, Royal Artillery, died at Garmsir on 27 December 2006

Marine Thomas Curry of 42 Commando, Royal Marines, died at Kajaki on 13 January 2007

Lance Corporal Mathew Ford of 45 Commando, Royal Marines, died at Garmsir on 15 January 2007

Lance Bombardier James Dwyer of 29 Commando Regiment, Royal Artillery, died at Garmsir on 14 February 2007

Marine Jonathan Holland of 45 Commando, Royal Marines, died at Sangin on 21 February 2007

Lance Bombardier Ross Clark of 29 Commando Regiment, Royal Artillery, died at Sangin on 3 March 2007

Lance Bombardier Liam McLaughlin of 29 Commando Regiment, Royal Artillery, died at Sangin on 3 March 2007

Marine Benjamin Reddy of 42 Commando, Royal Marines, died at Kajaki on 6 March 2007.

WO2 Michael Smith of 29 Commando Regiment, Royal Artillery, died at Sangin on 8 March 2007.

Private Chris Gray, 1 Battalion, The Royal Anglian Regiment, died at Nowzad on 13 April 2007.

Guardsman Simon Davison, 1 Battalion, The Grenadier Guards, died at Garmsir on 3 May 2007

Lance-Corporal George Russell Davey, 1 Battalion, The Royal Anglian Regiment, died at Sangin on Sunday 20 May 2007

Guardsman Daniel Probyn, 1 Battalion, The Grenadier Guards, died at Garmsir on 26 May 2007

Corporal Darren Bonner, 1 Battalion, The Royal Anglian Regiment, died near Hyderabad on 28 May 2007

Corporal Mike Gilyeat, the Royal Military Police, died at Kajaki on 30 May 2007

Lance-Corporal Paul Sandford, 1 Battalion, The Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters, died at Gereshk on 6 June 2007

Guardsman Neil “Tony” Downes, 1 Battalion, The Grenadier Guards, died at Sangin on 9 June 2007

Drummer Thomas Wright, 1 Battalion, The Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters, died at Lashkar Gah on 24 June 2007

Captain Sean Dolan, 1 Battalion, The Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters, died at Sangin on 30 June 2007

Sergeant Dave Wilkinson, 19 Regiment Royal Artillery, died at Gereshk on 1 July 2007

Guardsman Daryl Hickey, 1 Battalion, The Grenadier Guards, died at Gereshk on 12 July 2007

Lance-Corporal Alex Hawkins, 1 Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, died at Sangin on 25 July 2007

Guardsman David Atherton, 1 Battalion, The Grenadier Guards, died at Mirmandab on 26 July 2007

Sergeant Barry Keen, 14 Signals Regiment, died at Mirmandab on 27 July 2007

Lance-Corporal Michael Jones of the Special Boat Service died in Nimruz on 29 July 2007

Private Tony Rawson, 1 Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, died at Sangin on 10 August 2007

Captain David Hicks of 1 Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, died at Sangin on 11 August 2007

Private Aaron James McClure, 1 Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, died at Kajaki on 23 August 2007

Private Robert Graham Foster, 1 Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, died at Kajaki on 23 August 2007

Private John Thrumble, 1 Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, died at Kajaki on 23 August 2007

Senior Aircraftman Christopher Bridge, 51 Squadron Royal Air Force Regiment, died at Kandahar on 30 August 2007

Private Ben Ford, 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment (Worcesters and Foresters), died north of Lashkar Gah on 5 September 2007

Private Damian Wright, 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment (Worcesters and Foresters), died north of Lashkar Gah on 5 September 2007

Sergeant Craig Brelsford, 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment (Worcesters and Foresters), died at Garmsir on 8 September 2007

Private Johan Botha, 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment (Worcesters and Foresters), died at Garmsir on 8 September 2007

Lance Corporal Ivano Violino, 36 Engineer Regiment, died at Gereshk on 17 September 2007

Colour Sergeant Phillip Newman, 4th Battalion, The Mercian Regiment, died at Gereshk on 20 September 2007

Private Brian Tunnicliffe, 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment (Worcesters and Foresters), died at Gereshk on 20 September September 2007

Major Alexis Roberts, 1st Battalion, The Royal Gurkha Rifles, died at Kandahar on 4 October 2007

Lance-Corporal Jake Alderton, 36 Engineer Regiment,  died at Sangin on 9 November 2007

Captain John McDermid, The Royal Highland Fusiliers, 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, died at Sangin on 14 November 2007

Trooper Jack Sadler, The Honourable Artillery Company, died at Sangin on 4 December 2007

Sergeant Lee Johnson, 2nd Battalion, The Yorkshire Regiment (Green Howards), died at Musa Qala on 8 December 2007

Corporal Darryl Gardiner, the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, died at Musa Qala on 20 January 2008

Corporal Damian Lawrence, the 2nd Battalion, The Yorkshire Regiment, died at Kajaki on 17 February 2008

Corporal Damian Mulvihill, 40 Commando, Royal Marines, died at Sangin on 20 February 2008

Lieutenant John Thornton, 40 Commando, Royal Marines, died at Kajaki on 30 March 2008

Marine David Marsh, 40 Commando, Royal Marines, died at Kajaki on 30 March 2008

Senior Aircraftman Graham Livingston, Royal Air Force Regiment, died at Kandahar on 13 April 2008

Senior Aircraftman Gary Thompson, the Royal Auxiliary Air Force Regiment, died at Kandahar on 13 April 2008

Trooper Robert Pearson, the Queen’s Royal Lancers, died at Camp Bastion on 21 April 2008

Trooper Ratu Babakobau, the Household Cavalry Regiment died north of Nowzad on 2 May 2008

Trooper James Thompson, 23 SAS Regiment died at Musa Qala on 19 May 2008

Marine Dale Gostick, 3 Troop Armoured Support Company, Royal Marines, died at Sangin on 25 May 2008

Private Nathan Cuthbertson, 2 Battalion, the Parachute Regiment, who died in the Upper Sangin Valley on 8 June 2008

Private Daniel Gamble, 2 Battalion, the Parachute Regiment, who died in the Upper Sangin Valley on 8 June 2008

Private Charles David Murray, 2 Battalion, the Parachute Regiment, who died in the Upper Sangin Valley on 8 June 2008

Private Jeff Doherty, 2 Battalion, the Parachute Regiment, who died in the Upper Gereshk Valley on 12 June 2008

Lance-Corporal James Batemen, 2 Battalion, the Parachute Regiment, who died in the Upper Gereshk Valley on 12 June 2008

Corporal Sarah Bryant, Intelligence Corps, who died in Lashkar Gah on 17 June 2008

Corporal Sean Robert Reeve, 23 SAS Regiment, who died in Lashkar Gah on 17 June 2008

Lance-Corporal Richard Larkin, 23 SAS Regiment, who died in Lashkar Gah on 17 June 2008

Lance-Corporal Paul Stout, 23 SAS Regiment, who died in Lashkar Gah on 17 June 2008

WO2 Michael Williams, 2 Battalion, The Parachute Regiment, who died in the Upper Sangin Valley on 24 June 2008

Private Joe Whittaker, 4 Battalion, The Parachute Regiment, who died in the Upper Sangin Valley on 24 June 2008

Warrant Officer 2nd Class Dan Shirley, Air Assault Support Regiment, who died near Camp Bastion on 27 June 2008

Lance-Corporal James Johnson, 5 Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Scotland, who died at Lashkar Gah on 28 June 2008

Corporal Jason Barnes, the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, who died at Kajaki on 22 July 2008

Lance-Corporal Kenneth Rowe, the Royal Army Veterinary Corps, who died in the Upper Sangin Valley on 24 July 2008

Sergeant Jonathan Matthews, 4 Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Scotland, who died at Lashkar Gah on 28 July 2008

Private Peter Joe Cowton, 2 Battalion, The Parachute Regiment, who died at Musa Qala on 29 July 2008

Corporal Barry Dempsey, 2 Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Scotland, who died at Gereshk o 18 August 2008

Ranger Justin Cupples, 1 Battalion, The Royal Irish Regiment, who died at Sangin on 4 September 2008

Warrant Officer 2nd Class Gary O’Donnell, 11 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Regiment, who died at Musa Qala on 10 September 2008

Private Jason Rawstron, 2 Battalion, The Parachute Regiment, who died at Gereshk on 12 September 2008

Lance-Corporal Nicky Marshal, 2 Battalion, The Parachute Regiment, who died at Kajaki on 13 September 2008

Trooper James Munday, D Squadron, The Household Cavalry Regiment, who died north of Garmsir on 16 October 2008

Rifleman Yubraj Rai, 2 Battalion, The Royal Gurkha Rifles, who died at Musa Qala on 4 November 2008

Marine Neil Dunstan, UK Landing Force Command Support Group died in Garmsir on 12 November 2008

Marine Robert Joseph McKibben, UK Landing Force Command Support Group died in Garmsir on 12 November 2008

Colour Sergeant Krishnabahadur Dura, 2 Battalion, The Royal Gurkha Rifles died at Musa Qala on 15 November 2008

Marine Alexander Lucas, 45 Commando Royal Marines died at Kajaki on 24 November 2008

Marine Tony Evans, 42 Commando Royal Marines died at Lashkar Gar on 27 November 2008

Marine Georgie Sparks, 42 Commando Royal Marines died at Lashkar Gar on 27 November 2008

“They went with songs to the battle, they were young, Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow. They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted; They fell with their faces to the foe. They shall not grow old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them.” From For the Fallen by Laurence Binyon

Let’s Remember them, On the 11th hour, of the 11th Month in 1918 the First World War ended. Newark still wants to Remember those who have given and give today their lives for peace and Freedom.

If ye break faith with us who die, We shall not sleep, though poppies grow in Flanders fields.

His poem has stuck with me since I first read it as a young lad, and I have always, when abroad, visited nearby war cemeteries to pay my respects to those that lay in a foreign field far from home.

I’m still a traditionalist and observe two minutes silence at 11 on the 11th of the 11th. Those, and sadly there are a few, that feel this is an inconvenience, fail to grasp that they are only here because of our forces.

Interestingly the idea of the two minutes silence was a very Commonwealth merging of ideas based on an old idea to a very solemn occasion.

The true originator of the Silence on Remembrance Day was an Australian reporter working in Fleet Street called Edward Honey, who wrote a piece about it.

This was subsequently read by Sir Percy Fitzpatrick, an astute South African statesman who contacted Lord Milner to put the proposal to King George the Fifth, who put the official seal on the idea and authorised its adoption. But the idea all started with a journalist … the power of the press.

Respect their sacrifice.

Today, the sale of poppies helps the Royal British Legion’s charitable work helping safeguard the welfare, interests and memory of those who are serving or who have served in our Armed Forces.

Regardless of which side, left or right, that you wear your poppy, just wearing one shows you remember and care. It’s when we stop remembering and caring that tyrants start to rear their ugly heads.

The whole object is to remember and endeavour as a people working together, to ensure that such losses never happen again, or at the very least every peaceful solution sought.

It is not to glorify war as some factions have tried to claim, but to honour the individual human as well as the forces as a whole, that have tried to defend mankind and democracy.

They have ensured our freedoms, and they and their memory, rightly deserves our respect.

 That is why we wear the poppy.

The colour of the poppy is red, as Colonel John McCrae saw them and the last three lines of his poem are:

IN FLANDERS FIELDS

by Colonel John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow 

Between the crosses, row by row,  That mark our place,’ and in the sky The larks still bravely singing fly, Scarce heard among the guns below.  We are the dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow –  Loved and were loved,’ and now we lie in Flanders Fields. Take up our quarrel with the foe! To you from failing hands we throw The torch – Be yours to hold it high! If ye break faith with us who die, We shall not sleep, though poppies grow in Flanders fields.

When you wear your Poppy, it is not just for those that laid down their lives in what was the nightmare of carnage of the First World War; it is for all those brave men and women who have lost their lives in all the wars and conflicts, that we have had the unfortunate nature to be in.

 

 Our forces, built up of exceptional men and women, endeavour to protect our freedoms and this nation as a whole.

The immortal poem, ‘In Flanders Fields,’ was seeded from the simple Corn Poppy . It was brought to Europe from the Holy Land  and has now become the symbol of Remembrance of all those who died in the wars of this century.

In Flanders, the simple, yet beautiful little Corn Poppy grows everywhere. During the First World War, Colonel John McCrae, a Canadian veteran of the South African war, looked out from his water logged trench during a lull in the fierce fighting at the second battle of Ypres… His eyes met the sickening sight of makeshift crosses… rows and rows… the ghastly relics of the first battle which had drenched the battlefield with blood.

The Canadian Medical Officer was struck with admiration at the sight of the little red poppies… swaying gently in the breeze over the graves of the dead.

McCrae was so moved at the sight, he took out his note pad and pencil and wrote the poem…In Flanders Fields.

In 1918, Colonel John McCrae was severely wounded and he was moved from the makeshift front-line field hospital in a dugout to a rear-base hospital near Calais… he had asked to be moved to the coast area so that he could see the white cliffs of Dover from across the Channel.

On the third night he fought his last fight… he succumbed to his wounds… but in the last fleeting seconds before the Reaper called… Colonel McCrae whispered… “Tell them this… if ye break faith with us who die…we shall not sleep.” And with that…the gallant Colonel was gone. That very night he was buried in the cemetery at Wimereux.

In November 1918… after four years of almost incessant fighting… came the Armistice. The Great War was over… the terrible carnage was at an end. France had lost its life blood of youth for about seven million had perished.

After the misery of war… the truth that it was all for nothing became very clear when the disabled and shell-shocked Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen were cast-off overnight as unwanted. Touched by the plight of the war disabled, Madame Yvonne Guerin proposed that the women of France should make artificial red poppies and sell them throughout the world in order to raise money for the war disabled, for after all, it was they who had given them their freedom.

In England the idea caught on and Field Marshal Haig proposed a factory, where British Soldiers who, had been injured during the war, could be employed making red silk poppies. Sponsored by the British Legion it brought in much need money for the relief of those disabled in the war.

2014 millions of red poppies are sold throughout Britain. The red petals of the poppy signify the vast ocean of blood spilt… the yellow and black centre for the mud and desolation of the battlefields…the green of the stem is symbolic of the fields where many brave Soldiers fell.

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 Great Britain on Germany

If ye break faith with us who die,

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow in Flanders fields.

His poem has stuck with me since I first read it as a young lad, and I have always, when abroad, visited nearby war cemeteries to pay my respects to those that lay in a foreign field far from home.

I’m still a traditionalist and observe two minutes silence at 11 on the 11th of the 11th. Those, and sadly there are a few, that feel this is an inconvenience, fail to grasp that they are only here because of our forces.

Interestingly the idea of the two minutes silence was a very Commonwealth merging of ideas based on an old idea to a very solemn occasion.

The true originator of the Silence on Remembrance Day was an Australian reporter working in Fleet Street called Edward Honey, who wrote a piece about it.

This was subsequently read by Sir Percy Fitzpatrick, an astute South African statesman who contacted Lord Milner to put the proposal to King George the Fifth, who put the official seal on the idea and authorised its adoption. But the idea all started with a journalist … the power of the press.

Respect their sacrifice.

Let’s helps the Royal British Legion’s charitable work helping safeguard the welfare, interests and memory of those who are serving or who have served in our Armed Forces.

Regardless of which side, left or right, that you wear your poppy, just wearing one shows you remember and care. It’s when we stop remembering and caring that tyrants start to rear their ugly heads.

The whole object is to remember and endeavour as a people working together, to ensure that such losses never happen again, or at the very least every peaceful solution sought.

It is not to glorify war as some factions have tried to claim, but to honour the individual human as well as the forces as a whole, that have tried to defend mankind and democracy.

They have ensured our freedoms, and they and their memory, rightly deserves our respect.

 That is why we wear the poppy.

The colour of the poppy is red, as Colonel John McCrae saw them and the last three lines of his poem are:

IN FLANDERS FIELDS

by Colonel John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow 

Between the crosses, row by row,  That mark our place,’ and in the sky The larks still bravely singing fly, Scarce heard among the guns below.  We are the dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow –  Loved and were loved,’ and now we lie in Flanders Fields. Take up our quarrel with the foe! To you from failing hands we throw The torch – Be yours to hold it high! If ye break faith with us who die, We shall not sleep, though poppies grow in Flanders fields.

SAM_0907

When you wear your Poppy, it is not just for those that laid down their lives in what was the nightmare of carnage of the First World War; it is for all those brave men and women who have lost their lives in all the wars and conflicts, that we have had the unfortunate nature to be in.

 Our forces, built up of exceptional men and women, endeavour to protect our freedoms and this nation as a whole.

The immortal poem, ‘In Flanders Fields,’ was seeded from the simple Corn Poppy . It was brought to Europe from the Holy Land  and has now become the symbol of Remembrance of all those who died in the wars of this century.

In Flanders, the simple, yet beautiful little Corn Poppy grows everywhere. During the First World War, Colonel John McCrae, a Canadian veteran of the South African war, looked out from his water logged trench during a lull in the fierce fighting at the second battle of Ypres… His eyes met the sickening sight of makeshift crosses… rows and rows… the ghastly relics of the first battle which had drenched the battlefield with blood.

The Canadian Medical Officer was struck with admiration at the sight of the little red poppies… swaying gently in the breeze over the graves of the dead.

McCrae was so moved at the sight, he took out his note pad and pencil and wrote the poem…In Flanders Fields.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

 

In 1918, Colonel John McCrae was severely wounded and he was moved from the makeshift front-line field hospital in a dugout to a rear-base hospital near Calais… he had asked to be moved to the coast area so that he could see the white cliffs of Dover from across the Channel.

On the third night he fought his last fight… he succumbed to his wounds… but in the last fleeting seconds before the Reaper called… Colonel McCrae whispered… “Tell them this… if ye break faith with us who die…we shall not sleep.” And with that…the gallant Colonel was gone. That very night he was buried in the cemetery at Wimereux.

In November 1918… after four years of almost incessant fighting… came the Armistice. The Great War was over… the terrible carnage was at an end. France had lost its life blood of youth for about seven million had perished.

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In Flanders, the simple, yet beautiful little Corn Poppy grows everywhere. During the First World War, Colonel John McCrae, a Canadian veteran of the South African war, looked out from his water logged trench during a lull in the fierce fighting at the second battle of Ypres… His eyes met the sickening sight of makeshift crosses… rows and rows… the ghastly relics of the first battle which had drenched the battlefield with blood.

The Canadian Medical Officer was struck with admiration at the sight of the little red poppies… swaying gently in the breeze over the graves of the dead.

McCrae was so moved at the sight, he took out his note pad and pencil and wrote the poem…In Flanders Fields.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

In 1918, Colonel John McCrae was severely wounded and he was moved from the makeshift front-line field hospital in a dugout to a rear-base hospital near Calais… he had asked to be moved to the coast area so that he could see the white cliffs of Dover from across the Channel.

On the third night he fought his last fight… he succumbed to his wounds… but in the last fleeting seconds before the Reaper called… Colonel McCrae whispered… “Tell them this… if ye break faith with us who die…we shall not sleep.” And with that…the gallant Colonel was gone. That very night he was buried in the cemetery at Wimereux.

In November 1918… after four years of almost incessant fighting… came the Armistice. The Great War was over… the terrible carnage was at an end. France had lost its life blood of youth for about seven million had perished.

After the misery of war… the truth that it was all for nothing became very clear when the disabled and shell-shocked Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen were cast-off overnight as unwanted. Touched by the plight of the war disabled, Madame Yvonne Guerin proposed that the women of France should make artificial red poppies and sell them throughout the world in order to raise money for the war disabled, for after all, it was they who had given them their freedom.

In England the idea caught on and Field Marshal Haig proposed a factory, where British Soldiers who, had been injured during the war, could be employed making red silk poppies. Sponsored by the British Legion it brought in much need money for the relief of those disabled in the war.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Today, millions of red poppies are sold throughout Britain. The red petals of the poppy signify the vast ocean of blood spilt… the yellow and black centre for the mud and desolation of the battlefields…the green of the stem is symbolic of the fields where many brave Soldiers fell.

After the misery of war… the truth that it was all for nothing became very clear when the disabled and shell-shocked Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen were cast-off overnight as unwanted. Touched by the plight of the war disabled, Madame Yvonne Guerin proposed that the women of France should make artificial red poppies and sell them throughout the world in order to raise money for the war disabled, for after all, it was they who had given them their freedom.

In England the idea caught on and Field Marshal Haig proposed a factory, where British Soldiers who, had been injured during the war, could be employed making red silk poppies. Sponsored by the British Legion it brought in much need money for the relief of those disabled in the war.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

SAM_0907

Millions of red poppies are sold throughout Britain. The red petals of the poppy signify the vast ocean of blood spilt… the yellow and black centre for the mud and desolation of the battlefields…the green of the stem is symbolic of the fields where many brave Soldiers fell.

We Will Remember them

Let’s also Remember the many Polish Airmen that were flying Spitfires fighters with the Royal Air Force during the Battle of Britain. Let’s paid tribute to the contribution made by Polish Airmen. By the end of the 2nd world war, 17,000 Polish pilots and ground crew members had formed 14 squadron in RAF 2.000 were killed with 423 that were buried in Newark Cemetery plus  6 ARAF- Australian,  44 British Servicemen,  17 CRAF- Canadian and  3 RNZAF- New Zealand are also buried in Newark Cemetery.

In 1943 General Wladyslaw Sikorski died on July 4th 1943, when a Royal Air Force aircraft he was travelling aboard plunged into the sea seconds after take-off from Gibraltar.

General Wladyslaw Sikorski wishes were remembered and on Thursday 15, July 1943, his body arrived in Newark and was taken to Holy Trinity RC Church on Parliament Street Newark, NottinghamshireEngland. A Requiem Mass was held and the Catholic Church was guarded overnight.General Wladyslaw Sikorski wishes were remembered and on Thursday 15, July 1943 , his body arrived in Newark and was taken to Holy Trinity RC Church on Parliament Street Newark , Nottinghamshire England. A Requiem Mass was held and the Catholic Church was guarded overnight.The following morning was Friday 16, July 1943 early Masses were held and members of the public were allowed to file past the coffin to pay their respects. Outside the Catholic Church, reporters from across theUK and BBC representatives set up their equipment on top of a nearby air raid shelter. A large crowd gathered in the Newark Streets to see the funeral procession.

Newark Town Mayor, a guard of honour from the Polish Air Force

The history of Polish heroism and support for the British people is long and glorious. During our darkest hours in World War Two, when the Battle of Britain hung in the balance, the contribution of Polish airmen helped tip the balance in the Allies’ favour. Eight Polish fighter squadrons formed within the RAF shot down 629 Axis aircraft by May 1945, with the Polish 303 Fighter Squadron claiming more kills than any other squadron during the war.

 

File:Wladyslaw Sikorski 2.jpg

Thursday 15th July 1943 General Sikorski body was taken to the former Holy Trinity RC Church on Parliament Street, Newark for an Requiem Mass. His boby stayed overnight. General Sikorski was buried at Newark Cemetery 16th July, 1943. His remains were returned to Poland when it was a free Country 14th September 1993.

All Souls Day, a holiday to remember deceased loved ones. In many devoutly Catholic, people will spend time at  Newark cemetery  remembering loved ones. War veterans and civic dignitaries were among about 100 people at the annual All Souls’ Day service at Newark Cemetery on Sunday. A candle was lit on each of the Polish graves at the service, which honours  Polish Servicemen who died during the second world war. The service was conducted in both English and Polish.

At 3pm there was a procession, led by uniformed Polish war veterans with standards, to the Polish war memorial. The master of ceremonies was the chairman of the Nottingham branch of the Polish Air Force Association, Mr Kazimierz Jablonski.

We will Remember them

The service was opened by Mr Eugeniusz Borysiuk, a representative of the Polish Air Force Association Charitable Trust. He said it was right and proper that the annual All Souls’ Day service took place to remember the 2,000 Polish airmen who lost their lives 423 were buried in Newark Cemetery during the 2nd world war and many more over the years.

Mr Borysiuk said it was also important to remember those who perished but did not have graves, as well as those who survived. Mr Jacek Gajewski, the representative of the Polish Ambassador, said: “Today, it is our duty to remember. To remember them all and we will remember, remember, remember.”

Many thanks to services such as the All Souls’ service  on the last Sunday in October each year that people remembered what the Servicemen did. Mr Gajewski said this was especially important for younger generations.

Let’s thank those people who preserved the Polish graves for over 70 years.

“We are proud to have such strong links with the Polish community and to have the Polish war graves within our cemetery. There is always such a feeling of tranquillity in this area.”

The mayor said that a group of cadets from the Polish Air Force Academy visited the graves earlier this year. She said: “They were all so moved to see first-hand what they had previously been able only to read about and I know it left them thinking not only about the past but also the future.

“Today is such an important commemoration and we must thank all those who continue to ensure the tradition continues.”Father Wlodzimierz Skoczen, of the church of Our Lady of Czestochowa, Nottingham, read prayers, before The Last Post sounded as the standards were lowered. Mr Borysiuk read the roll of honour, first in Polish and then in English, before a minute’s silence that ended with the sounding of Reveille. Wreaths were laid by Mr Gajewski, the chairman of Newark and Sherwood District Council,  town mayor of Newark and Mr Borysiuk.

Mr Marian Soroko laid a wreath in memory of the late president Wladyslaw Raczkiewicz, Mr Adam Ostrowski laid a wreath in memory of the late president Stanislaw Ostrowski and Colonel Zdzislaw Picheta laid a wreath on behalf of the Federation of the Polish Armed Forces Association. About 30 wreaths were laid in total.

This Annual Service of Remembrance On the 4th Sunday in October each year we remember all who have died next date 26th October 2014 .

All Souls this take place on  at 3pm. This annual event that is held on the last Sunday in October each year organised by the Polish Air Force Association. This will start from London Road car park of the Newark Cemetery with a parade of standards With the Newark Town Mayor with members of the UK and Polish supporters with hundreds parading to the large Memorial cross to the Polish and Commonwealth War Graves Section.

Readings:  1st Samuel 15: 34 – 16:13 / 2 Corinthians 5: 6-10 / Mark 4: 26-34

And into that gate they shall enter, and in that house they shall dwell, where there shall be no cloud nor sun, no darknesse nor dazzling, but one equall light, no noyse nor silence, but one equal musick, no fears nor hopes, but one equal possession, no foes nor friends, but one equall communion and identity, no ends nor beginnings, but one equall eternity.

John Donne, Whitehall 1628

The little poem/reflection I read was by John Donne, who was a very famous poet and dean of St. Paul’s Cathedral in London from the 1600’s.  Through these words, Donne tries to capture the magnitude or the fullness that lies on the other side of the grave.  He does so not in an attempt to diminish our grief or loss, but in a way that gets us thinking about the transition and awakening of our souls that will occur when one finds themselves in the presence of God.

Many Polish Airmen were flying Spitfires fighters for Britain’s Royal Force during the Battle of Britain. Let’s paid tribute to the contribution made by Polish Airmen. By the end of the war, 17,000 Polish pilots and ground crew members had formed 14 squadron in RAF. Let’s Remember that 2.ooo Polish  airmen were killed during the 2nd world war with 397 had been buried in Newark Cemetery. More have be added since.

If it hadn’t been for the brave Polish Air Force we could have struggled and things could have turned very differently. The  Polish airmen helped us win the war for Freedom.  Not enough credit is given to the Polish pilots who went out of there way to helping us in the dark days of the 2nd World war. They never let us down.

“For Your Freedom and Ours”

“The  Forgotten Heroes of World War II”

During the 2nd World War there were a number of RAF stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for RAF burials and this is now the war graves plot for all to see from people across the UK Poland and the world.

Many Polish airmen could not return home and, with the help of local people, settled down and became active in communities such as Newark.  Let’s expressed our gratitude for Polish pilots that are buried in Newark Cemetery.  He believed that our triangle of friendship would help us to avoid the mistakes of the past and create a better tomorrow.

Many all of those brave from the British, Commonwealth, Polish, servicemen, and others whatever the circumstances of their death, and may their families and friends find comfort in the knowledge that they were decent, honourable people simply serving their country.

We will Remember

SAM_0061

Newark Cemetery open in  1856

First stone was laid by Mr Joseph Branston, and  the layout was designed by Lincoln architects Bellamy and Hardy.

On 23rd February 1856 . At 10 O’clock the members of the Corporation and Burial Board  together with Ministers of Churches from the area.  The Town Mayor H. Sutton, Chief Constable, Waterton, with the battle-axe  and the Police, W.Newton the Clerk to the Board, Town Crier with Two Mace-bearers, 12 scholars from the Grammar School and other officials assembled at the Town Hall. The procession crossed the Market Place and went by Bridge Street, Carter Gate and Beaumont Street to the New Cemetery site. On Thursday 30th October 1856 The Church of England portion of the new Cemetery was consecrated by the Bishop of Lincoln. Soon after the  ceremony took place, the very first burial was made for the family  of  W.N. Nicholson, Ironmonger, Market Place, Newark of their three old son Charles John. First stone was laid by Mr Joseph Branston, and  the layout was designed by Lincoln architects Bellamy and Hardy.

The very first burial was made for the family  of  W.N. Nicholson, Ironmonger, Market Place, Newark. Their  three old son Charles John back in 1856.

 

Many people visit from all over the UK and the World with Treasured  Memories. Let’s remember them as we pass by our Newark Cemetery. As you are now so once were many good people that are buried to all and see. You must not be forgotten, are you prepare to help and follow in my foot steps to help save guard our Newark Cemetery.

Well-known local people are buried at Newark cemetery include  among the many graves are memorials to some of Newark’s greatest benefactors and people who have helped shape Newark. Cornelius Brown (1852-1907) a historian and editor of the Newark Advertiser for 33 years, Mr Cornelius Brown, (plot WM59) was born in Lowdham, Notts, and also lived in Southwell and Newark. The author of seven major books, including the massive two-volume “The History of Newark”. Joseph Gilstrap, 1786–1869, owner of the most successful malting firm of the time on Northgate, is buried here. Born in 1785, Joseph Gilstrap spent a long and active life in his native Town of Newark, being elected in 1835 to the Town Council and as Town Mayor in 1838. Newark mayor  father of Sir William Gilstrap (brewer) and innkeeper of the ‘Hotel’ in Kirkgate and Cafferata family, plaster and brick manufacturers.

The Quibell’s and Blatherwick’s family have been Mayor’s of Newark.

Thomas Earp 1830–1910, Benefactor and Brewer (co-founder of Gilstrap & Co); William H Cubley, 1816–1896, artist; William Newzam Nicholson, Agricultural implement maker and Benefactor, MP for Newark; Sir William Newzam Prior Nicholson, 1872–1949, artist, Another Mayor, he will go down in history like another Londoner who moved to Newark and was Mayor seven times  Alderman  Becher Tidd Pratt who died one hundred years ago December 1908 and resting place is in Newark Cemetery. Newark mayor  Douglas  Pursey Blatherwick and 48 of his family are buried in Newark cemetery, Oliver Quibell , The list goes on.

It has always been  a enjoy going around  Newark Cemetery taking these photos for all to see.

 

At British Commonwealth and Polish War Grave since 2nd World War.  Polish forces around the world.By the end of the Second World War there ere nearly a quarter of a million Poles in the Polish Armed Forces serving under British command. Today the Commission cares for the graves of nearly 4,500 Polish servicemen and women in 35 countries around the world. The highest concentration of commemorations can be found in the United Kingdom, where over 2,100

Poles are commemorated from Newark – Scotland 

At British Commonwealth and Polish War Grave since 2nd World War.  Polish forces around the world.By the end of the Second World War there ere nearly a quarter of a million Poles in the Polish Armed Forces serving under British command. Today the Commission cares for the graves of nearly 4,500 Polish servicemen and women in 35 countries around the world. The highest concentration of commemorations can be found in the United Kingdom, where over 2,100 Poles are commemorated from Scotland to Cornwall in 244 different locations. In particular, nearly 400 casualties are commemorated in Newark-upon-Trent. There were a number of RAF stations within a few miles of Newark from which several Polish squadrons operated, and a special plot on the eastern side Newark-upon-Trent Cemetery was set aside for RAF burials. The plot includes a memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here which was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. Both men subsequently died and were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial, until their remains were Newark-upon-Trent Cemetery repatriated back to Poland  on the 17th September 1993. The United Kingdom and Commonwealth graves are marked by traditional Commission headstones, but special headstones to mark the Polish graves have been designed harmonise with the others and can be differentiated by their distinctive pointed tip .

Laurence Goff Chairman Friends of Newark CemeteryNewark-On-Trent cemetery we will Remember them

We will Remember Them

On Sunday 28th September 2014 the Airbridge special Memorial near the Polish War Graves takes place from members across the UK and Poland come to this annual visit, starting at 2:00pm Main gate on London Road, Newark.

All Souls is also an event that is held on the last Sunday in October each year organised by the Polish Air Force Association. This takes place at 3pm from London Road car park of the Newark Cemetery with a parade of standards With the Newark Town

Mayor with members of the UK and Polish supporters with hundreds parading to the large Memorial cross to the Polish and Commonwealth War Graves Section.

TO THE FALLEN by friendsofnewarkcemetery.

It now has a Memorial to the Fallen of Newark commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914 – 1945 and the present day.

The Memorial to the Fallen was unveiled by Richard Todd OBE. by you.SAM_1270

 Laurence Goff  Friends Of Newark Cemetery

Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery on London Road.

Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire Saturday 28th April 2007. The Memorial to the Fallen was unveiled by Richard Todd OBE. Sir Andrew Buchanan Lord Lieutenant of Nottinghamshire read official message from Queen Elizabeth II .

On 28th April 2007, Richard Todd OBE, officially unveiled the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery on London Road. FoNC has decided to see that the memorial has a display of fresh flowers throughout the year. This is planned to start in November; other local organisations, associated with the armed forces, have pledged their support to this initiative.

We will Remember them

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You will not be forgotten

British Commonwealth, The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), British Royal Air Force (RAF), Canadian (RCAF) New Zealand (RNZAF) are buried in Newark Cemetery. During the 2nd World War there were a number of RAF stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for RAF burials and this is now the war graves plot for all to see from people across the UK , Poland and the world. You can see that we have British Commonwealth and  Polish tombstone were made and posting there names, more have been added over the last few year former Polish choosing to be buried since staying  in England after the 2nd World War. Newark Cemetery also contains  graves from the 1st world war  scattered around the  Cemetery . A Memorial Cross which is in Remembrance to the 423 Polish Airmen that were buried 12 remains from the Polish side have been return home. Airmen from the Commonwealth are also  buried, The Royal Australian Air Force  6 , British servicemen 44 (RAF), Canadian 17 (RCAF) New Zealand 3 (RNZAF) and Polish squadrons were formed within the Royal Air Force. Many Polish Airmen were flying Spitfires fighters for Britain’s Royal Force.  Let’s remember  423 Polish  servicemen  and Airman that were killed and are buried from the 2nd World War in Newark cemetery. Many airmen married lived around Newark and since are also buried in Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire, England. General Sikorski the Polish war time leader was visiting Newark Cemetery in 1941 during the 2nd World War. General Sikorski the wartime leader of the Polish Government in exile met his death in an air crash at Gibraltar on the evening of 4th July 1943 and was buried in Newark Nottinghamshire. General Sikorski was buried in the Polish part of cemetery in Newark on 16th July, 1943 50 years later his remains was returned back to Poland  on the 14th September 1993, his ashes were brought back to Poland. Each year British and Polish servicemen honoured at Newark service, candles lit to honour the fallen on the last Sunday in October starting at 3pm from the main gate of Newark Cemetery UK. War veterans and civic dignitaries attended a service on Sunday to honour the Polish servicemen who died during the 2nd World War. Lighting of candles were lit on each of the Polish graves at Newark Cemetery during the service, conducted in both Polish and English, to mark All Souls Day.

Royal Australian Air Force 9th April 1943 just age 22, fighting for freedom

Royal Canadian Air Force  have 17 buried in Newark Cemetery

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101_2716 by laurencegoff100_0209[1].JP%202nd%20chapel%20arch%202007 by laurencegoff101_2728 by laurencegoff105_1265 by laurencegoff101_1558 by laurencegoff105_2974 by laurencegoff
We will Remember Them

Newark Cemetery UK our first snow for many years which looks lovely. The Main Arch with two former Chapels at each end 1856.

British Commonwealth are also were killed and are buried in Newark Cemetery

17 RCAF Canadian, 4 RAAF Australian and 3 RNZAF  killed during the 2nd World War and are buried in Newark Cemetery

At British Commonwealth and Polish War Grave since 2nd World War.  Polish forces around the world.By the end of the Second World War there ere nearly a quarter of a million Poles in the Polish Armed Forces serving under British command. Today the Commission cares for the graves of nearly 4,500 Polish servicemen and women in 35 countries around the world. The highest concentration of commemorations can be found in the United Kingdom, where over 2,100 Poles are commemorated from Newark-On-Trent to Scotland. 

POLISH WAR GRAVE NEWARK CEMETERY UK by you.Newark-On-Trent Cemetery grounds Nottinghamshire by you.

General Wladyslaw Sikorski

Prime Minister of Polish Government in exile during World War Two.  In July 1941, he visited Newark to unveil a Memorial Cross dedicated to Polish Serviceman who died fighting alongside the British. He requested should he die while Poland was still occupied that would like to be buried alongside his men in NewarkCemetery.

Died when the plane he was travelling in crashed over Gibraltar4th July 1943. Whilst returning from visiting Polish soldiers in the Middle East.

Thursday 15th July 1943 General Sikorski body was taken to Holy Trinity RC Church on Parliament Street, Newark for a Requiem Mass.His body stayed overnight.

General Sikorski  was buried at NewarkCemetery

16th July, 1943. His remains were returned to Poland when it was a free Country 14th September 1993.

At British Commonwealth and Polish War Grave since 2nd World War.  Polish forces around the world.By the end of the Second World War there were nearly a quarter of a million Poles in the Polish Armed Forces serving under British command. Today the Commission cares for the graves of nearly 4,500 Polish servicemen and women in 35 countries around the world. The highest concentration of commemorations can be found in the United Kingdom, where over 2,100 Poles are commemorated from Scotland to Cornwall in 244 different locations. In particular, nearly 400 casualties are commemorated in Newark-upon-Trent. There were a number of RAF stations within a few miles of Newark from which several Polish squadrons operated, and a special plot on the eastern side Newark-upon-Trent Cemetery was set aside for RAF burials. The plot includes a memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here which was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. Both men subsequently died and were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial, until their remains were Newark-upon-Trent Cemetery repatriated back to Poland  on the 17th September 1993. It contains a memorial to Poland’s exiled war leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski, who died when the aeroplane he was travelling in crashed over Gibraltar. General Sikorski was buried at Newark on Friday 16th July, 1943, and it was his dying wish that his body should be returned to Poland when it was a free country. His remains were returned on 14th September 1993.

The Friends of Newark Cemetery have arranged for a vase to be incorporated into the memorial so fresh flowers can be put in place all year round.

Let’s remember them as we pass by our Newark Cemetery UK. As you are now so once were many good people that are buried to all and see. You must not be forgotten, are you prepare to help and follow in my foot steps to help save guard our Newark Cemetery.

NEWARK TOWN NOTTINGHAMSHIRE ENGLAND UK FROM THE FIRST WORLD WAR MEMORIAL TO THE FALLEN by friendsofnewarkcemetery.The many flowers planted from bulbs 101_1882 by you.

Spring  flowers around the old ChapelsThe many flowers planted from bulbs 101_1881 by you.

Friends of Newark Cemetery have planted over 4000 Spring bulbs around the Chapel, cleaned memorials and benches and have organised nature and historical tours of the Cemetery. A Comfort Book has being produced, containing poems, quotations and scriptural passages, designed to provide comfort and support to bereaving families.  Any financial contributions towards the cost of printing would be appreciated.

Our spiritual being believed to act for us

at Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire

England

NEWARK CEMETERY UK by you.

Trying to found a grave which might be unreadable or difficult to find.

The first instalment (£25k) of the Heritage Lottery Fund grant (£50k) has been received and works have commenced in the Chapel.  The cemetery staff had already demolished the breeze block walls, the rotten wooden floor and the old wiring was also removed.  This then presented an empty building to a contractor to repair and fit out as appropriate.  Technical documentation was prepared by our Architect, Ros Nicholson, for the works tender which was won competitively by Longthorne Limited of Derby.

Friends of Newark Cemetery

The former Cemetery Chapel will be turned into Interpretation Centre. The Newark town council have obtained 50.000 Heritage Lottery funding of one of the Chapels which is a Grade II listed building. The restoration has finished it now be fitted out with audio visual and interpretation boards, displays.  Text and ideas for display boards and leaflets etc are being provided by FoNC.  Has  images on the history of the Cemetery and Chapels, origins of the practice of burials/cremations etc, famous people buried in, or associated with, the cemetery and flora and fauna in the cemetery.  It  also feature pieces regarding the polish connections (Air Bridge and General Sikorski), the commonwealth war graves commission, the travelling community and the memorial to the fallen.

Newark Cemetery Main Arch with two former Chapels at each end 1856.

Memorial to the Fallen of Newark commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914.

On 28th April 2007, Richard Todd OBE, officially unveiled the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery on London Road. FoNC has decided to see that the memorial has a display of fresh flowers throughout the year. This is planned to start in November; other local organisations, associated with the armed forces, have pledged their support to this initiative.

 

I arise today

Through the strength of heaven;Light of the sun, Splendor of fire, Swiftness of wind,Depth of the sea, Stability of earth, Firmness of rock.

I arise today

Through God’s strength to pilot me;

God’s might to uphold me, God’s wisdom to guide me, God’s hand to guard me.

Afar and anear, Alone or in a multitude.

Christ shield me today Against wounding:

Christ with me, Christ before me, Christ behind me,

Christ on my right,

Christ on my left,

Christ beneath me, Christ above me, Christ in me.

I arise today Through the mighty strength Of the Lord of Creation

They shall not grow old as we who are left grow old. Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning,

THANKS TO THE NATIONAL LOTTERY FUND by friendsofnewarkcemetery.Spring at Newark Cemetery by you.

The Cemetery currently has both areas for burials and a Garden of Remembrance for cremated remains.

Anyone is welcome to become a Friend of Newark Cemetery; please contact Friends of Newark Cemetery member

Laurence Goff

Newark Cemetery is located on London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1FQ

Following the Burial Act of the early 1830’s the Cemetery Committee of Newark Town Council began the search for a piece of land for a cemetery by printing & distributing 200 Handbills “Wanted, in the neighbourhood of Newark, about 5 acres of land suitable for a burial ground.”

Newark Cemetery  has now been over 39,000 burials within the cemetery with some Common Graves from the previous two centuries having up to 5 burials in each plot.

The Cemetery lies close to the Town Centre on London Road and was not just conceived and built as a memorial and resting place but also as a park for the people of the town.

The cemetery is also important internationally as it contains the Polish War Cemetery and was the historical burial place of General Sikorski ( the wartime leader of Poland ) whose body has now been retuned to Poland, but whose memorial remains.

Friends of Newark cemetery have obtained 50.000 Heritage Lottery funding of one of the Chapels which is a Grade II listed building. The restoration has started in 2009 and was finish in 2010.

Annual tours and walk about takes place by Volunteers.  Friends of  Newark Cemetery 3rd annual open day with walks around the Cemetery by touring the many graves.  We will informing the public of the history of the Polish and Commonwealth War Graves. The history when the cemetery was first opened in 1856. One of our Chapels has open for the first time since 1977  as a tours and information centre  in 2010.

 

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/category/general-sikorski/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

Amongst the many well-known local people that are buried in Newark Cemetery include  among the many graves are Memorials to some of Newark’s greatest benefactors and people who have helped shape Newark

Thursday 30th October 1856. The Church of England portion of the new Cemetery was consecrated by the Bishop of Lincoln. Soon after the ceremony took place, the very first burial was made for the family of W.N. Nicholson, Ironmonger, Market Place, Newark. Their three year old son Charles John.

On 23rd February 1856 . At 10 O’clock the members of the Corporation and Burial Board together with Ministers of Churches from the area. The Town Mayor Henry Sutton, Chief Constable, Waterton, with the battle-axe and the Police, W.Newton the Clerk to the Board, Town Crier with Two Mace-bearers, 12 scholars from the Grammar School and other officials assembled at the Town Hall. The procession crossed the Market Place and went by Bridge Street, Carter Gate and Beaumont Street to the New Cemetery site. The corner-stone of the new buildings was laid by Joseph Branston Esq.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

 

Laurence Goff

Let’s Remember the many that are buried in Newark cemetery, Nottinghamshire UK

 

NEWARK-ON-TRENT CEMETERY

“A wonderful place to reflect and to remember them, but never forgotten.”

 The National Memorial Arboretum, the UK’s Centre of Remembrance

National Memorial Arboretum – The Royal British Legion.

www.britishlegion.org.uk › Remembrance

The National Memorial Arboretum is the UK’s year-round centre of Remembrance.

Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom

Memorial at the National Arboretum

This is part of the Royal Artillery Memorial at the National Arboretum

VISIT OVER 200 MEMORIALS Set in 150 acres of trees and gardens, located in the heart of the countrywithin the National Forest near Lichfield

If I Knew

If I knew it would be the last time That I’d see you fall asleep, I would tuck you in more tightly and pray the Lord, your soul to keep. If I knew it would be the last time that I see you walk out the door, I would give you a hug and kiss and call you back for one more. If I knew it would be the last time I’d hear your voice lifted up in praise, I would video tape each action and word, so I could play them back day after day. If I knew it would be the last time, I could spare an extra minute to stop and say  “I love you,” instead of assuming you would KNOW I do. If I knew it would be the last time I would be there to share your day, well I’m sure you’ll have so many more,

I can’t let just this one slip away. For surely there’s always tomorrow

to make up for an oversight, and we always get a second chance to make everything just right.There will always be another day to say “I love you,”

And certainly there’s another chance to say our “Anything I can do?”

But just in case I might be wrong, and today is all I get, I’d like to say how much I love you and I hope we never forget. Tomorrow is not promised to anyone, young or old alike, And today may be the last chance you get to hold your loved one tight. So if you’re waiting for tomorrow, why not do it today? For if tomorrow never comes, you’ll surely regret the day, That you didn’t take that extra time for a smile, a hug, or a kiss and you were too busy to grant someone, what turned out to be their one last wish. So hold your loved ones close today, and whisper in their ear, Tell them how much you love them and that you’ll always hold them dear Take time to say  “I’m sorry,” “Please forgive me,” “Thank you,” or “It’s okay.” And if tomorrow never comes, you’ll have no regrets about today.

–Anonymous from the Internet

File:Wladyslaw Sikorski 2.jpg

Thursday 15th July 1943 General Sikorski body was taken to the former Holy Trinity RC Church on Parliament Street, Newark for an Requiem Mass. His boby stayed overnight. General Sikorski was buried at Newark Cemetery 16th July, 1943. His remains were returned to Poland when it was a free Country 14th September 1993.

Remember of the Sad death of General Sikorski at age 62

On this date 4th July 1943 which is a significant date to remember the sad death of General Wladyslaw Sikorski Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Prime Minister death 69 years ago. He dies when his plane crashes less than a mile from take off from Gibraltar. The General was buried in Newark-On-Trent  Cemetery on 16th July 1943 until 13th September 1993, when he was exhumed. The next day after a Holy Mass service which was held at Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene.

Re-turned home to Poland after 50 years.

 Next year will mark the 70th anniversary of his death, I believe we should Remember him, RIP.

Here is a quote from Theodore Roosevelt : “A man who is good enough to shed blood for his country is good enough to be given a square deal afterwards.”

We Will Remember Them For Our Tomorrow They Gave Their Today Newark Cemetery is located on the south side of London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire. The main entrance, small car park near the main gate on London Road, Newark.

Chapel Interpretation Centre is open by The Friends of Newark Cemetery volunteers  by appointment for groups Weekends  or during the week. Please contact Chairman Laurence Goff 01636-681878 (Home) friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery {left side on the main drive off London Road} is opened  by appointment.  Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856. This memorial website is Laurence Goff personal views, I have put it together. It dedicated to the thousands of  people since 1856.  Many are happy to have a resting place at Newark Cemetery for all to see and view. Having a means of further promoting Newark cemetery, and encouraging interested people to join the tribute.

Polish War Graves

The highest concentration of commemorations can be particularly found in Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire.  Our local cemetery with nearly 400 Polish Airmen that died, and are buried in special plot on the east side. You can park for free at the Main Gate parking lot at Newark Cemetery, It is location on London Road – Elm Avenue, Newark-On-Trent.

Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

  Contact:

Friends Of Newark Cemetery Chairman  Laurence Goff

Newark Town Hall, Market Place, Newark, Notts, NG24 1DU

01636-680333 (Town Hall)

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

Newark Town Councillor Laurence Goff 01636-681878 (Home)

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

Remembrance Day, for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

 
Laurencegoff

Remembrance Day Remembrance Day Remembrance Day

WWI soldier ‘should be on memorial

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/WWI-soldier-should-be-on-memorial-

A decision not to allow the name of a first world war soldier to be added to Newark’s war memorial has been branded a scandal.

Mr Pete Stevens at the grave of William Pride,

marked by a Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone.

Locating a grave have a look at this Map, walking up the Main Drive numbers start low and high at the other end of  cemetery. Please note E side stand for East and W side for West . The graves are numbered from A the next one will be B, C, D, E, and so on going outward on either side East or West. All new tombstone are black with the information on the back has  E for East then the letter for the row then the number, looking something like this E B 100 or West side W E 200.

 

 

 

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Laurence Goff

   Friends of Newark Cemetery

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/category/general-sikorski/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

Air Bridge Commemoration, On the last Sunday in September the Annual Warsaw Air Bridge Memorial Ceremony takes place from the main gate and parking lot London Road, Newark. Members to join the Polish Ambassador, Newark town Mayor, Chairman of Newark and Sherwood District Council, The Royal British Legion and other distinguished guests at the annual ceremony – service. The Warsaw Air Bridge memorial, which reads” In tribute to the 250 men of Britain, the Commonwealth and Poland who sacrificed their young lives in desperate attempts to fly from distant RAF bases in Italy with essential supplies for the front line city of Warsaw during the 1944 uprising.

Laurence Goff Friends of Newark Cemetery this tragedy of the Warsaw Uprising lies not only in the bloody 63 day struggle but also in the immediate and long term aftermath. The Germans were the first to punish Warsaw and its people for daring to defend its freedom. Hitler ordered the city to be all but wiped off the face of the earth and special units were brought in to systematically detonate any building of the remotest importance to Polish culture. The city was effectively destroyed block by block, and when the Russians finally crossed the Vistula to liberate the city, they inherited only ruins.

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/10/10/a-few-good-heroes-we-will-remember-them/

Remember those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

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This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately, the content here is solely the responsibility of  Laurence Goff. The opinions and views expressed our solely are entirely my own, and do not represent of reflect the views of Newark Town Council who have possibility of Newark Cemetery. As a fitting tribute to the people who died during the War. Disclaimer In the public interest I accept no responsibility for the accuracy of the information contained on this website.   of Newark Town Council who have possibility of Newark Cemetery.Newark Town Council, Town Hall/Market Place, Newark-on-Trent NG24 1DU Phone: 01636 680333  http://newark.gov.uk  post@newark.gov.uk Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish their Sacrifice  The dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth and Polish who also join up with the RAF

 

Taken by Laurencegoff

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10202314251443403&set=o.153850701312504&type=3&theater

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/03/07/ransome-and-marles-former-factory-workers-will-be-remembered-with-a-permanent-memorial-in-newark-on-trent-in-2011/

Ransome and Marles Newark-On-Trent attack Friday 7th March 1941

www.youtube.com/watch?v=seTeC-8JKLM

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Bert Emerson and Laurence Goff

Bert  helped rescue other survivors of the bombing at Ransome and Marles Newark-On-Trent on 7th March 1941.

Laurencegoff

Laurence Goff

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laurencegoff

During the 2nd World War there were a number of RAF stations within a few miles of Newark many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for RAF burials and this is now the war graves for people to see across the UK  and the World.  Former Airmen choosing to be buried since staying  in England after the 2nd World War. Newark Cemetery also contains  graves from the 1st world war  scattered around the  Cemetery . Many airmen married lived around Newark and since died and are also buried in Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire, England. Newark-On-Trent also contains  graves from the 1st world War  scattered around the  Cemetery.

 

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This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately.  Accordingly, the content here is solely the responsibility of Newark resident Laurence Goff, Newark Nottinghamshire, England.

Our Historic Newark Cemetery

Newark

 NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery Is Open All Year Round 

April – September 8am-8pm

October – March 8am – 6pm

Friends Of Newark Cemetery Public Meeting

Next meeting: 20th January 2016 the Pickin Room, Newark Town Hall.

Arrive for cuppa at 1.45pm – meeting 2pm.

SAM_6076Ministry of Defence

Street name honour plan for VC hero

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Street-name-honour-plan-for-VC-hero

Newark’s only holder of the Victoria Cross could have a street named in his honour.

Members of Newark Town Council suggested a street on a new residential development should be named after William Thomas Marshall.The planning committee was asked to put forward names for the site off Parker Street. Mr Tony Roberts said: “I think someone from the town who won a VC would be fitting.”William Marshall is Newark’s only resident to have been awarded the VC. His citation in the London Gazette of May 21, 1884, said that on February 29 of that year he received Britain’s highest military honour for conspicuous bravery in a cavalry charge at the battle of El Teb during the British Sudan campaign. His commanding officer, Lieutenant-colonel Barrow, of the 19th Hussars, was surrounded by the enemy, severely wounded and on the ground.“Quartermaster-sergeant Marshall seized his hand and dragged him through the enemy back to the regiment. Had Lt-col Barrow been left behind he must have been killed,” said the citation. William Marshall was born in Newark on December 5, 1854, at Cherry Holt Lane.He joined the Army as a private and was promoted through the ranks to later become a lieutenant-colonel. He commanded the Territorial Army in Fife during the first world war and died on September 11, 1920

William Thomas Marshall who was born 5th December 1854 in Newark, Nottinghamshire SERVED: 19th Hussars (Prince of Wales Own) He was 29 years old, and a Quartermaster-Sergeant in the 19th Hussars, British Army, during the Mahdist War, when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.  He later became Quartermaster and Captain in the 19th Hussars. In 1905, as a Major, he became Camp Quartermaster of Aldershot. He retired in 1907. In 1918 he was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. DATE OF GAZETTE: 21th May 1884  V.C. CITATION: On 29th February 1884, at El Teb, Sudan, the Commanding Officer Lt Col Percy Burrow was severely wounded; his horse was killed and he was surrounded on the ground by the enemy; Quartermaster Sergeant Marshall rode to his assistance, seized his hand and dragged him through the enemy back to the Regiment, saving him from certain death.  DIED: 11th September 1920 BURIED: Kirkcaldy Cemetery, Fife, Scotland. Members of the Light Dragoons Regimental Association (Scottish Branch) hold an annual reunion and, during the day, they attend a ceremony in memory of Lt. Col. Marshall.  His Victoria Cross is displayed at the 15th/19th King’s Royal Hussars Museum in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England In 1914 he was living at 54 Bowbridge Road, Newark, with his wife Mary and six children, and she was expecting number seven.He enlisted in the 1/8 Battalion Sherwood Foresters Notts and Derbys Regiment on November 26, 1914. On June 28, 1915, 3383 Private Marshall was at the Western Front. He had been in France only 50 days. His children were Florence, Elsie, Alice, May, Frank, Frederick, Edna and Harold who was born on April 28, 1915. William had two brothers, Herbert and Edgar. Edgar was also killed in action. I believe he had five sisters, Kate, Gertrude, Emily, Ethel and Minnie.Medals Awarded to Newark’s only Victoria Cross Recipient William Thomas MarshallVictoria Cross Medal without Bar.pngBorn 5th December 1854 

NewarkNottinghamshire

Died 11th September 1920 (aged 65) KirkcaldyFife Buried at Bennochy Road Cemetery, Kirkcaldy Allegiance United Kingdom Service/branch British Army Years of service 1873–1907 Rank Lieutenant-Colonel Unit 19th Hussars Battles/wars 1882 Anglo-Egyptian War Mahdist War Second Boer War Awards Victoria Cross

 

Lieutenant-Colonel William Thomas Marshall

BORN   5th December 1854

Victoria Cross Won  29th February 1884   AGE   29

Place Victoria Cross Won   El-Teb, Sudan

War/Campaign  Mahdi Rebellion

 Victoria Cross Issue No.   399   Awards   VC

Victoria Cross was Presented   3rd July 1884, Queen Victoria, Windsor Castle, Berkshire, England

Regiment   19th Hussars

Later

Now   Light Dragoons

Rank VC Won   Quartermaster-Sergeant

Rank End Of Career   Lieutenant-Colonel & Quartermaster

Place Of Birth   Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire, England

DIED   11th September 1920  AGE   65

Place Of Death   Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland

Buried/Location Ashes   Kirkcaldy Cemetery, Bennochy Road, Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland

Date Buried/Cremated

Headstone   Headstone (CWGC)   Plot/Grave no.   Lair 23

Gazetted   21 May 1884

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Remembering those who have given up their lives for our Freedom 

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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Laurencegoff

Remembrance Tuesday 11th November 2014

11 day 11 Hour 11 Month

at

11am outside Newark Town Hall steps

Let’s remember those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

A Lasting tribute to mark the ultimate sacrifice made by Newark’s fallen heroes

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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Laurence Goff Friends of Newark Cemetery and Pete Stevens Commonwealth War Graves Commission  with  Newark, Nottinghamshire Display

 Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag 

Laurencegoff

The 4th of August 2014 is the 100th aniversary of the declaration of war by Great Britain on Germany. We have around 500 names on the 2 memorials, but that is all they are just names I think it would be fantastic to put faces to as many names as we can. Names on a memorial mean little to the younger generation, But if we can put faces to these names and find a place to display them then they will be remembered for ever. It will be a mammoth task to achive this but with your support I believe it can be done.

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Laurencegoff

Pete Stevens has started on this project  which has been launched to match photographs to all the names on the Newark and Balderton war memorials. There are 603 names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen at Newark Cemetery, of whom 456 are first world war casualties. Another 144 are from the second World War, one died in West Africa in 1961, one in Malaya in 1952 and one in Afghanistan in 2007. There are 45 names from the first World War on the memorial in St Giles’ Church, Balderton, and a further 13 from 2nd World war.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag 

Laurencegoff

Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery Newark, Nottinghamshire  NG24 1sQ

On 28th April 2007, Richard Todd OBE, officially unveiled the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery on London Road.

Commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914

First World War 1914-1918 total from Newark Killed  457

Second World War 1939-1945 total from Newark killed 144

One killed from West Africa 1961

One killed from Malaya 1962

One killed from Afghanistan 2007

Total 604

We will Remember them, RIP

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag 

 

Laurencegoff

Servicemen who died and Came From Newark-On-Trent

Memory to the Fallen located at Newark Cemetery

First World War 1914-1918 Second World War 1939-1945 

 West Africa 1961 

Malaya 1962 

Afghanistan 2007 

 Total 604

We will Remember them, RIP

 Newark  has 49 First World War graves that are scattered throughout, and not in one place. Let’s commemorate our local War died during the First – Second World Wars and to the present day.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

 

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

Pete Stevens of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, who lives in Balderton, has made it a project to try to produce a photo of Fallen.

 457  WWI Fallen who are came from Newark-On-Trent

MEMORIAL TO THE FALLEN ONE MORE NAME HAS BEEN ADDED THAT OF SAPPER “WILLIAM” W. PRIDE ON THE 11TH SEPTEMBER 2014. THIS BEING THE SAME DATE MARKING HIS 96TH ANNIVERSARY HIS DEATH. FRIENDS OF NEWARK CEMETERY WERE HAPPY TO REMEMBER OUR BRAVE SOLDIERS DURING THE ANNIVERSARY OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR BY FLAGS AND CROSSES ON EACH GRAVE. 

ROLL CALL OF HONOUR NEWARK REMEMBERS 457 NAMES ON MEMORIAL TO THE FALLEN AT NEWARK CEMETERY

SURNAME CHRISTIAN NAMES RANK NUMBER BATTN. REGIMENT/CORPS DATE DIED AGE BURIED LOCATION

PRIDE WILLIAM WR/350517 – SAPPER ROYAL ENGINEERS – 11th Sept 1918 – Newark Cemetery {His name was added on 11th Sept 2014}

ADDY HAROLD WALTER PTE 12284 – 1ST NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 12thMAR 1915  –  AGE 20- LE TOURET MEMORIAL PANEL 26 AND 27.
ALLISON ERNEST PTE 13043 – 6TH LINCOLNSHIRE – 9th AUG 1915 – AGE 21 – HELLES MEMORIAL PANEL 44 TO 46.
ANDREW ALBERT BERNARD SGT 25657 – 16TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 19th OCT-1917  -AGE 32 – PERTH CEMETERY (CHINA WALL) IV. E. 8.
ANSELL WILLIAM EDWARD PTE 201725 – 1/4TH LINCOLNSHIRE – 1st JUL 1917 – AGE 21 – LOOS BRITISH CEMETERY X1X B 17
ARNOLD CHARLES WILLIAM L/CPL 8691 – 3RD NORTHAMPTONSHIRE  – 1st NOV 1914 ?
ARNOLD JOHN RICHARD PTE G/50523  – 4TH MIDDLESEX – 31st JUL 1917 ?
ASH SYDNEY ABLE SEAMAN R/722 – ROYAL NAVAL VOLUNTEER RESERVE – 2nd MAY 1921 ?
ASH WILLIAM QUINNINGBOROUGH PTE 268748 – 16TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 21st MAR 1918 – AGE 26 POZIERES MEMORIAL PANEL 52 TO 54.
ASHER THOMAS SAPPER 215960 ROYAL ENGINEERS 16th APR 1917 AGE 23 NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY R. C. “C.” 278.
ASLING EDWARD HOSMER PTE 306008  – 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS), ATT’D 2/4 ROYAL BERKSHIRE 9th MAY 1918 AGE 30 ROBECQ COMMUNAL CEMETERY 23.
ASMAN JOSEPH PTE. 3094 / 71434  –  2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – OCT-1918 ?
ASMAN SAMUEL STOKER 304832 ROYAL NAVY TORPEDO BOAT NO. 11 10th JUN 1915 AGE? CHATHAM NAVAL MEMORIAL 11.
ATKINSON ARTHUR PTE 275439 NOTTS YEOMANRY (SHERWOOD RGRS) 23rd SEP 1916
AYTO JOHN HENRY L/CPL 305830 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 19th JUN 1917 ?
BACKHOUSE SEPTIMUS GEORGE PTE 10393 – 1ST NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 17th NOV 1914 ?
BAGSHAW GEORGE PTE 9181  – 2ND NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 29th AUG1916 AGE 31 HAMBURG CEMETERY III. G. 2.
BAILY JOHN FRANCIS CPL 528190  – 54TH DIV. SIGNAL CO. ROYAL ENGINEERS 20th NOV 1918 AGE 29 BEIRUT WAR CEMETERY 182.
BAINES GEORGE HENRY PTE 13304  – 1ST GRENADIER GUARDS 16th DEC 1916 ?
BAKER ROWLAND JAMES DRUMMER 1392 –  8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 28th SEP 1914 – AGE 22 NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY WEST M. C. “C.” 299.
BALL THOMAS PTE 72373 7TH QUEEN’S (ROYAL WEST SURREY) 23rd AUG 1918
BANTON GEORGE ALFRED PTE. 10735  – 1ST NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 20th JUN 1915 ?
BARKS GEORGE WILLIAM L/CPL 2793 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 26th APR 1916 – AGE 19 BALDERTON (ST. GILES) CHURCHYARD P.19.                                                                                                                                        BARLING HAROLD  – 2ND/LT 8TH LEICESTERSHIRE 15th JUN 1916 ?

BARLOW HARRY L/CPL 305916 – 1ST NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 24th JUN 1918 – AGE 20  – SISSONNE BRITISH CEMETERY H. 19.
BARTON ERNEST PTE 292118 B CO., 1/7TH NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS 14th NOV 1916 AGE 26 THIEPVAL MEMORIAL PIER AND FACE 10 B 11 B AND 12 B.
BEARDMORE RICH ALFRED PTE 25746 ROYAL DEFENCE CORPS 22nd MAY 1918 AGE 47 NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY WEST G. C. “C.” 19.
BECKETT WILLIAM HENRY PTE 50417 – 10TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 23rd APR 1917 – AGE 31 – ARRAS MEMORIAL BAY 7
BEESTON THOMAS PTE 24094 – 2ND GRENADIER GUARDS – 19-NOV-1918 – AGE 22 -AWOINGT BRITISH CEMETERY III. G. 29.
BELL JOHN ROBERT PTE 52213 1ST EAST YORKSHIRE  6th OCT 1918 ?
BELTON JOHN CECIL PTE 306709 –  2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 27th APR 1917 – AGE 22 – LA CHAPELETTE BRITISH AND INDIAN CEMETERY, PERONNE II. A. 10. 
BINGLEY GEORGE ARCHIBALD PTE 3147  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 20th JUN 1916 – AGE 19 – FONCQUEVILLERS MILITARY CEMETERY I. F. 32.
BIRKETT ERNEST ‘DICK’ PTE M2/053826 – ARMY SERVICE CORPS 21st OCT 1917 ?
BLAGG SYDNEY  – 2ND/LT NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) ATT’D 1/4 ROYAL BERKSHIRE  – 29th JUL 1918 ?
BOND ERNEST PTE 10536  – 9TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 16th JUN 1917 ?
BOND HENRY STK 1ST CLASS 289995 H.M.S. BULWARK 26th NOV 1914 ?
BONESS RALPH RIFLEMAN A/2835 – 7TH KING’S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS. 18th SEP 1917 ?
BOOTH HARRY DRIVER T/438905 – 666 HT CO ARMY SERVICE CORPS 14th NOV 1918 ?
BOOTH JOHN SGT 79535 – 164TH SIEGE BATTERY ROYAL GARRISON ARTILLERY  – 14th APR 1918 – LOCRE HOSPICE CEMETERY II. C. 15.
BOULTON FREDERICK WILSON PTE 203142 – 2/4TH LINCOLNSHIRE 26th SEP 1917 – Age 25 – TYNE COT MEMORIAL Panel 35 to 37 and 162 to 162A.
BOWN GEORGE CPL 306040  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 22nd JUL 1920 ?
BOWERS THOMAS PTE 3387 – 8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 9th OCT 1914 ?
BRADLEY CHARLES B. PTE 9122 – 8TH FD AMB AUSTRALIAN ARMY MEDICAL CORPS – 21st SEP 1917 ?
BRADLEY ROBERT WILLIAM PTE 306288 – 9TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 4th NOV 1918 ?
BRANCH LEWIS PTE 60800 – 23RD LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS – 27th SEP 1918 ?
BREWSTER WILLIAM PTE 12292 – 1ST NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 9th MAY 1915 ?
BRITTEN CHARLES MATTHEW CPL 53307 MACHINE GUN CORPS  – 22nd AUG 1918 Age 21 NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY P. C. “C.” West 245.
BROCKLEBANK GEOFFREY PTE 52909 C CO. –  9TH ROYAL FUSILIERS – 28th FEB 1917 ?
BROCKTON GEORGE PTE T/206932 –  7TH QUEEN’S (WEST SURREY) 10th AUG 1917  – Age 19 – YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 11 – 13 and 14.
BROMPTON GEORGE E. PTE 73931 2ND NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 26th MAY1918 ?
BROUGHTON EDWARD PTE 68114 –  2ND DEVON – 24th APR 1918 ?
BROUGHTON SYDNEY PTE 1829  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 15th OCT 1915 ?
BROWN ANDREW PTE 306253  – 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 25th JUN 1917 ?
BROWN JOHN HARRY CPL 22600 – 1ST NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 25th APR 1919  Age 18 SOUTHWELL MINSTER (ST. MARY) CHURCHYARD Near West entrance.
BROWN THOMAS PTE 25380  – 2ND LINCOLNSHIRE  – 23rd OCT 1916 – ?
BROWN WILLIAM PTE 203348  – 1/5TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 11th MAR 1917  Age 20 – WIMEREUX COMMUNAL CEMETERY II. F. 1A.
BRYAN ALFRED SGT 8950 – 1ST LINCOLNSHIRE – 21st MAR 1918 – Age 26 – POZIERES MEMORIAL Panel 23 and 24.
BRYAN ERNEST PTE 49382 – 2/6TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 2nd NOV 1917
BRYAN FRED PTE 2146  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 15th OCT 1915 – LOOS MEMORIAL  Panel 87 to 89. 

BRYAN GEORGE ERNEST PTE 49779  – 2ND LINCOLNSHIRE – 18th APR 1918 – Age 29 – MENDINGHEM MILITARY CEMETERY X. A. 23.
BRYAN THOMAS PTE – 2ND CHESHIRE ?
BRYAN WALTER LEONARD PTE 78838  – 2ND DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  – 22nd APR 1918 – Age 19 BRANDHOEK NEW MILITARY CEMETERY NO.3 II. O. 21.
BUCKLER HORACE PTE 306315  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) –  23rd JUN 1917 – Age 17 LOOS BRITISH CEMETERY XIX. A. 14.
BULMAN WALTER L/CPL 306344  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 28th JUL 1917 ?
BURGIN CHRISTOPHER COLLINS PTE 6058 – 20TH AUSTRALIAN INFANTRY FORCE – 3rd JUL 1917  – Age  33 BALDERTON (ST. GILES) CHURCHYARD
BURNS JOSEPH DOBSON (THE REVEREND) CHAPLAIN ATTACHED ROYAL GARRISON ARTILLERY –  7th JUN 1918 – EBBLINGHEM MILITARY CEMETERY II. D. 11.
BURROWS ERNEST PTE 12059 – 7TH LEICESTERSHIRE  – 1st OCT 1917 – TYNE COT MEMORIAL Panel 50 to 51
BUSH HENRY CHRISTOPHER PTE PS/8717  – 23RD ROYAL FUSILIERS  – 24th OCT 1918 – ?
BUSSELL JOHN GARRATT CAPT – 7TH ROYAL SUSSEX  – 28th JUN 1915 – ?
CAFFERATA CLEMENT CHAMBERLAIN SGT 645028  – CANADIAN FORESTRY CORPS  – 8th FEB 1919 – Age 38 – NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY B. A. “R.C.” 207.
CANT CHARLES WILLIAM CO.SGT-MAJ 7897 –  2ND YORKSHIRE 1st JUL 1916
CARR HARRY PERCY CPL 203285  – 1/5TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 8th JUN 1918
CARTER FRANK JAMES SAPPER 89960 89 FIELD CO. ROYAL ENGINEERS 18th MAY 1917
CARTER THOMAS ‘TOM’ CLAUDE SGT  – 31762  – 27 SIEGE BATTERY ROYAL GARRISON ARTILLERY-  6th MAR 1916
CARTWRIGHT CHARLES PTE 52951  – 2ND PRINCE OF WALES (WEST YORKSHIRE) –  28th MAR 1918
CARTWRIGHT GEORGE WILLIAM PTE 2999  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 30th AUG 1915
CATLEY THOMAS CSM 305839  – 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 26th SEP 1917
CATLEY WILLIAM PTE 306521  – 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 7th APR 1917
CAVEY JOHN WILLIAM PTE 10921 –  7TH LEICESTERSHIRE 14th JUL 1916
CHAPMAN JESSE SGT 5335 – 2ND LINCOLNSHIRE 29th OCT 1916
CHAPPELL ARTHUR RECKLESS RIFLEMAN 473998  – 1/12TH LONDON (THE RANGERS) – 23rd SEP 1918
CHAPPELL HARRY PTE 27501  – 10TH ROYAL WARWICKSHIRE 29th OCT 1916
CHARLESWORTH JESSE PTE 55011  – 15TH LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS – 15th NOV 1918
CHESHAM H.
CHILVERS ERNEST PTE 3286  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) –  27th OCT 1915
CHRISTIE JAMES ALLAN 2/LT – 6TH QUEEN’S (ROYAL WEST SURREY) –  6th NOV 1917
CLARRICOATES GEORGE HENRY PO STOKER 306293  – H.M.S. GOOD HOPE 1st OV 1914
CLAYTON GEORGE H. PTE 47660 – 19TH WELSH 28th JUL 1917
CLIFFE CECIL HENRY PTE 3182  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 2nd DEC 1915
CLIFTON HUBERT EVERARD  – 2ND/LT  – 1ST DEVONSHIRE 4th OCT 1916
COBB ALFRED CPL 68478 A BTTY, –  298TH BDE. ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY 4th OCT 1917
COBB CHARLES PTE 18943  – 8TH LINCOLNSHIRE 28th APR 1917
COBB GEORGE RIFLEMAN R/8279 7TH KING’S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS 19th AUG 1916
COLLETT GEORGE WILLIAM PTE 3279 – 1/8TH ROYAL WARWICKS 18th JUL 1916
COLLINS WALTER F. SAPPER 126116 I.W.T. ROYAL ENGINEERS 6th FEB 1917
COLTON MICHAEL HERBERT EDMONDS PTE (ST-BR) – 1715 A SQN NOTTS YEOMANRY (SHERWOOD RGRS) 22ndAUG 1915
COLTON STANLEY EDMONDS – 2ND/LT –  1ST NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS 28th MAR 1918
COMBES ROLAND PTE 306150  – 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 7th APR 1917
COOK FRANK PTE G/13614 – 7TH QUEEN’S (ROYAL WEST SURREY) 23rd MAR 1918
COOPER HAROLD PTE 15511  – 2ND COLDSTREAM GUARDS 16th SEP 1916
COPE HENRY PTE 14460  – 2ND BEDFORD 25th SEP 1915
COPE JAMES L/CPL 305813 – 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 7th APR 1917
COPE THOMAS PTE 2832  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 24th JUN 1916
COPLEY WILLIAM RICHARD PTE 2263 –  1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 13th APR 1915
COULBY GEORGE THOMAS HAROLD PTE 36559  – 7TH KING’S SHROPSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRY 2nd SEP 1918
COULSEY GEORGE EDMUND HAROLD PTE 29590  – 14TH HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY 14th JUN 1916
COX ARTHUR EDWARD CPL 305159  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 24th APR 1917
COX CHARLES ENOS SGT 2071  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 14th OCT 1915
COY EDWIN CECIL SGT 77472  – 15TH CANADIAN INF. (CENTRAL ONTARIO REGT.) 21st MAY 1915
CRAGG FRANCIS MARK PTE 892270  – 8TH CANADIAN INFANTRY 9th AUG 1918
CRAGG JOHN THOMAS ‘JACK’ PTE 49386 1ST NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 12th APR 1917
CRAGG THOMAS WILLIAM PTE 275599  – 1ST/1ST NOTTS YEOMANRY (SHERWOOD RANGERS) 12th MAR 1919
CRAMPTON CHARLES PTE 3000  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 5th AUG 1915
CREE JOHN T. PTE 49387 –  1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 1st AUG 1917
CROSS ERNEST CPL 306071  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 28th APR 1918
CROWDER CHARLES WILLIAM SGT 10876  – 2ND NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 12th OCT 1916
CROWDER GEORGE PTE 37059 –  2ND LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS 12th OCT 1916
D’ASCANIO DOMENICO CPL 487892 – ROYAL ENGINEERS 5th DEC 1919
DARE MAURICE HENRY PIONEER 41941  – 68TH CO. ROYAL ENGINEERS 15th AUG 1915
DAVIS WILLIAM HENRY PTE 3623  – 1ST NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 31stAUG 1916
DAVISON WILLIAM PTE 305831  – 2/7TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 26th SEP 1917
DAY ARTHUR PTE 12353  – 3RD LEICESTERSHIRE 13-FEB-16
DAY JOHN THOMAS PTE 62422  – 16TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 21st FEB 1917
DEAN ARTHUR L/CPL 305800  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 9th DEC 1917
DENCH ALFRED CHARLES SGT 13714  – 1ST GRENADIER GUARDS 29th SEP 1915
DENT CHARLES PTE 14009  – 1ST LINCOLNSHIRE 16th APR 1918
DERRY WILLIAM PTE 3286 –  1ST AUSTRALIAN INFANTRY 21st JUL 1916
DICKINSON ERNEST COOK GUNNER 20489 D BTY, –  91ST BDE ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY 2nd AUG 1917
DICKINSON FREDERICK JOHNSON PTE 325738  – 13TH ROYAL SCOTS 22nd AUG 1917
DIXEY HENRY CHARLES CSM 2454 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 27th APR 1916
DIXON FREDERIC ARTHUR PTE 25919 9TH KING’S OWN (ROYAL LANCASTER) 3rd JAN 1919
DOLMAN ROBERT GUNNER 9990 B BATTERY, 73RD BDE. ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY 26th SEP 1915
DONCASTER PERCY PTE 18534 1ST COLDSTREAM GUARDS 31st JUL 1917
DRABBLE PERCY WILLIAM PTE 235141 13TH KING’S (LIVERPOOL) 12th DEC 1917
DUKE ARTHUR JAMES PTE 306258 DEPOT NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 14th DEC 1918
DURHAM HERBERT LESLIE L/CPL 24101 1ST LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS 6th SEP 1915
EAST RICHARD PTE 2133 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 24th APR 1915
EAST TOM DAKIN PTE 49403 10TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 21st SEP 1917
EDLIN GEORGE SANDERS PTE 16585 12TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 7th JUN1917
ELLIS ARTHUR HAROLD PTE 1096 2ND ROYAL WARWICKSHIRE 25th OCT 1914
ELLIS CHARLES ERNEST PTE 2275 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 28th MAR 1916
ELSON RICHARD PEARSON PTE 49145 7TH LEICESTERSHIRE 8th OCT 1918
EMPSON ARTHUR L/CPL 48700 13TH KING’S (LIVERPOOL) 28th MAR 1918
ESAM GEORGE PTE 27530 10TH ROYAL WARWICKS. 8th MAY 1918
EWIN ARTHUR LT & QM 9TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  11th AUG 1915
FARMER JAMES INGLEBY ‘BOB’ 2ND/LT 2ND KING’S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS. 9th MAY 1915
FARRANCE OLIVER PTE G/11179 8TH QUEEN’S OWN (ROYAL WEST KENTS) 15th JUL 1916
FELL ARTHUR PTE 10529 1ST LINCOLNSHIRE 01-JUL-16
FIENNES-CLINTON EDWARD HENRY PTE 2649 51ST AUSTRALIAN INFANTRY 17th AUG 1916
FINCHAM ROBERT PTE 71295 33RD MACHINE GUN CORPS 19th FEB 1918
FOOTITT FRED PTE 3004 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 21-MAR 1916
FOOTITT HARRY PTE 3883 1ST NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS 27th MAR 1916
FOOTITT JOHN L/CPL 1995 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 18th APR 1916
FORD ALFRED COQMSGT 15718 866 HT COY ARMY SERVICE CORPS 10th OCT 1918
FORD ARCHIBALD GORDON SAPPER 2451 1ST FIELD CO. 1/1ST WEST RIDING DIV., FIELD CO. ROYAL ENGINEERS 21-JUL-16
FORD JAMES ERNEST CAPT 1ST KING’S OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS 04-OCT-17
FOSTER WALTER PTE 267418 15TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 04-APR-18
FOX ARTHUR PTE 47725 15TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 02-MAY-18
FOX ARTHUR SGT 32561 15TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 20-OCT-18
FOX JAMES HAROLD PTE 306305 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 26-JUN-17
FRANCIS HENRY L/CPL 7799 3RD KING’S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS 04-APR-17
FREEDMAN JOSEPH PTE 235130 9TH KING’S OWN YORKSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRY 04-OCT-17
FREEDMAN MAURICE PTE 25410 7TH EAST YORKSHIRE 31-MAR-18
FRESHNEY ANSCOMBE STEWART PTE 307789 15TH TANK CORPS 09-AUG-18
FRETWELL WILLIAM PTE 19845 2ND WILTSHIRE 18-OCT-16
FRISBY ERNEST WILLIAM CPL 275012 NOTTS YEOMANRY (SHERWOOD RANGERS) 28-NOV-17
FROST JOHN STUART ASSISTANT PAYMASTER R.N.R. H.M.S. RUSSELL 27-APR-16
GABBITAS CHARLES EDWIN PTE 15937 11TH ROYAL WARWICKS 26-AUG-16
GABBITAS LORRAINE RSM 9094 10TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 23-MAR-18
GABBITAS TOM PTE 201903 B CO., 2ND ROYAL SCOTS 04-MAY-18
GARDNER HARRY PTE 41451 1/5TH DUKE OF CORNWALL’S LIGHT INFANTRY 17-JUN-18
GARNET GROSVENOR 2ND/LT 3RD LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS 09-OCT-17
GARROD HENRY ‘HARRY’ PTE 305777 11TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 30-SEP-17
GASCOIGNE CHARLES RICHARD ABLE SEAMAN SS/940 H.M.S. MOTH 17-NOV-16
GASCOIGNE EDWARD SGT 32407 17TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 20-SEP-17
GELSTHORPE WILFRED L/CPL 10572 1ST LINCOLNSHIRE 11-APR-17
GENT JOHN HENRY GNR 231349 251ST BATTERY ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY 27-MAY-18
GEORGE ARTHUR WILLIAM JAMES CPL G/1956 8TH QUEEN’S (ROYAL WEST SURREY) 25-SEP-15
GIBSON JOHN AUCHENLOSH 2ND/LT 116 SIEGE BY ROYAL GARRISON ARTILLERY 27-MAY-18
GIBSON JOHN HARRY PTE 35441 2ND YORKSHIRE 25-APR-18
GILBERT CHRISTOPHER CHOWLER LT. 11TH ATTD 8TH DUKE OF WELLINGTON’S (WEST RIDING) 29-SEP-16
GILL RICHARD PTE 9496 2ND NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 09-AUG-15
GODFREY WILLIAM PTE 879 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 24-APR-15
GODSON EDWARD PTE 54921 / 29329 SOUTH STAFFS (TFR TO LABOUR CORPS) 15-SEP-17
GOLLAND EVELYN EDGAR PTE 492200 1/13TH LONDON 16-AUG-17
GRAHAM HENRY 2ND/LT 74TH ATT 67TH PUNJABIS 28-JUN-17
GRAHAM ROBERT MIDSHIPMAN R.N.R. H.M.S. VIVID 02-OCT-18
GRANDORGE MATTHEW WILLIAM PTE 41001 6TH SOUTH WALES BORDERERS 09-APR-18
GRANT ALMA ADOLPHUS L/CPL 3194 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 27-JUN-1916 AGE 20 FONCQUEVILLERS MILITARY CEMETERY I. F. 22.
GRANT ARNOLD HENRY PTE 2957 1/4TH LINCOLNSHIRE 13th OCT 1915 AGE 20 LOOS MEMORIAL PANEL 31 TO 34.
GRAVELL JOHN JAMES PTE 6140 2ND REGT SOUTH AFRICAN INFANTRY 15th JUL 1916
GRAVENEY ALBERT EDWARD JOHN SGT 305824 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 07-JUN-17
GRAVES ARTHUR D. PTE 4325 1ST ROYAL WARWICKSHIRE 17th OCT 1916
GRAVES PERCY PTE 3436 1/4TH NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS 15th SEP 1916
GRAY HENRY PTE 203367  – 10TH LINCOLNSHIRE 28th APR 1917
GRAY JOHN HENRY PTE 52716 – 1ST EAST YORKSHIRE 26th AUG 1918
GREEN ARTHUR SHOEING SMITH 42412 68TH BRIGADE ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY 12th JAN 1916
GREGORY HARRY PTE 3404 2ND NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 7th APR 1915
GRIFFIN BASIL WALKER 2ND/LT  – 2ND LINCOLNSHIRE 2nd DEC 1917
GROCOCK ARTHUR H. CPL 50420 –  17TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 12th MAY 1917 ?
GROCOCK GEORGE SGT 200917  – 6TH LINCOLNSHIRE 3nd NOV 1918 ?
GROCOCK WILLIAM T. PTE 15376  – 8TH DUKE OF WELLINGTON’S (WEST RIDING) 14th SEP 1916 ?
GROSSE ALFRED PTE 302079  – 2ND ROYAL SCOTS 02-MAY-18
GROSSE JOSEPH PTE 65511 – 14TH NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS 02-DEC-18
GROSSE THOMAS PTE 307709 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 23rd JUN 1917
GUMSLEY HARRY PTE 43088  – 1ST LINCOLNSHIRE 18th DEC 1917
GUMSLEY THOMAS FREDERICK PTE 2451  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 8th AUG 1915
GUMSLEY WILLIAM L/CPL 241310  – 1/5TH NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS 26th OCT  1917
GUY JOHN ARTHUR PTE 275404  – D SQN. QUEEN’S OWN OXFORDSHIRE HUSSARS 8th NOV 1918
GUY WILLIAM HENRY PTE 16732  – 12TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 26th SEP 1915
HAINES CHARLES LIONEL RICHARD SGT 43159 –  73 FIELD CO. ROYAL ENGINEERS 10th OCT 1915
HALL JOHN HENRY PTE 23904 17TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 15th SEP 1917
HALL THOMAS PTE 10084 –  1ST NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 14th JAN 1915
HALLAM THOMAS PERCY PTE 17827  – 25TH CO. MACHINE GUN CORPS 16th AUG 1917
HAMMOND JAMES WALTER PTE 12794 –  6TH KING’S SHROPSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRY 12th FEB 1916
HANSON WALTER SAPPER 140416 –  Z SPECIAL COMPANY ROYAL ENGINEERS 6th MAY 1917
HARDY ADOLPHUS PTE 6412 10TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 14th FEB 1916
HARDY GEORGE HENRY PTE 64633  – 2/5TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 7th OCT 1918
HARDY JOSEPH EDWARD PTE 305917  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 26th SEP 1917
HARDY THOMAS PTE 2268 –  1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 24th MAY 1915
HARDY TOM PTE 306015  – 7TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 31st MAR 1918
HARPER JAMES H. PTE 12063  – 8TH LEICESTERSHIRE 15th JUL 1916
HARRISON CHARLES EDGAR L/CPL 2064  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 5th OCT 1915
HARRISON CYRIL SIDNEY PTE 26027 –  1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 14th OCT 1915
HARRISON JOSEPH HENRY L/CPL 26027  – 16TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 6th AUG 1917
HARRISON THOMAS WALTER LIEUTENANT –  1/4TH LINCOLNSHIRE 10th OCT 1918
HARROP ERNEST E. PTE 57625  – 2ND WORCESTERSHIRE 29th SEP 1918
HARSTON SIDNEY LT 204 SQN ROYAL AIR FORCE 29th JUN 1918
HART MATTHEW WILLIAM PTE 9837  – 6TH LINCOLNSHIRE 9th DEC-15
HARVEY GEORGE NICHOLAS PTE 5039  – 1/7TH KING’S (LIVERPOOL) 10th AUG 1916
HAWARDEN JOHN JOSEPH PTE 6248 –  1ST QUEEN’S (ROYAL WEST SURREY) 29th JUN 1917
HAYES GEORGE PTE 203776 1ST  – LEICESTERSHIRE 22-MAR-18
HAYWOOD JOHN GEORGE PTE 57718  – 18TH KING’S (LIVERPOOL) 4th DEC 1917
HEALD JOHN HENRY PTE 9707 B CO.,  – 1ST LEICESTERSHIRE 2nd JAN-15
HELLIWELL THOMAS HERBERT TROOPER 2922 –  1ST LIFE GUARDS 20th NOV 1914
HENDERSON GEORGE MARTIN RIFLEMAN R/4717 13TH KING’S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS 14th NOV 1916
HENTON ALFRED PTE 60418 22ND NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS 11th APR1918
HERON JOHN MAXWELL MAJOR 5TH ESSEX 26-MAR-17
HICKMAN FRED PTE 81286 15TH DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY 24th APR-18
HICKSON JOSEPH EDWARD GUNNER 79925 15TH BDE. ROYAL HORSE ARTILLERY 12th AUG 1917
HILL ARTHUR RIFLEMAN R/16819 9TH KING’S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS 21st MAR 1918
HILL ERNEST ALFRED PTE 2978 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 5th APR 1916
HILL GEORGE W. PTE 50447 14TH FIELD AMBULANCE ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS 6th NOV 1917
HINDLEY ROBERT MUIR PAYMASTER R.N.R. H.M.S. CULLIST 11th FEB 1918
HITCHCOCK FREDERICK PTE 22532 11TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 9th OCT 1918
HITCHCOX FRANCIS CECIL PTE 203674 1ST ROYAL SCOTS FUSILIERS 7th APR 1918
HOE JOHN ARTHUR L/CPL 305566 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 29th SEP 1918
HOGG CHARLES HOLMES KINGSTON AIRMAN 7470 6 SQN ROYAL FLYING CORPS 18th SEP 1917
HOLBERRY HARRY PTE 7271 1ST LINCOLNSHIRE 12th NOV 1914
HOLLAND SIDNEY PTE 21585 12TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 27th MAR 1918
HOLLIS LAWRENCE ALFRED PTE 82342 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 27th SEP 1917
HOLLIS WILLIAM EDWARD PTE 23186 7TH NORTH STAFFORDSHIRE 26th JAN 1917
HOLMES FREDERICK PTE 78974 1/7TH DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY 13th APR 1918
HOLWELL JAMES PTE 305848 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 23rd APR 1917
HOLWELL WALTER PTE 11009 1ST LINCOLNSHIRE 31st JAN 1915
HOUGH DAVID PTE 70264 61ST MACHINE GUN CORPS 26th JUN 1918
HOUGH JOHN THOMAS PTE 25851 6TH KING’S OWN YORKSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRY 28th AUG 1916
HOWITT GEORGE WILLIAM PTE 17904 11TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 1st JUL 1916
HUCKERBY ROBERT PTE 1858 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 30st JUL 1915
HUCKERBY THOMAS CARTER PTE 235380 1ST LEICESTERSHIRE 19th SEP 1918
HUNT GEORGE HENRY JOSEPH PTE 71907 27TH CANADIAN INFANTRY (MANITOBA REGT.) 15th SEP 1916
HUNT HARRY LAWFORD 2ND/LT SIEGE GUNS ROYAL MARINE ARTILLERY 29th MAY 1918
HUNT SYDNEY WHEELER 122839 T BATTERY, 13TH BDE. ROYAL HORSE ARTILLERY 17th DEC 1916
HUNT WALTER PTE 1396 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 24th APR 1915
HURST HENRY SGT 24946 15TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 11th JUL 1917
HURST WILLIAM PTE 6425 1ST NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 15th JAN 1915
HUTCHINSON ARTHUR PTE 201938 13TH ROYAL SCOTS 22nd AUG 1917
HYDE WILLIAM TRIMMER 2970/TS(PO) R.N.R. H.M. TRAWLER “SWAN III” 5th MAR 1917
HYDES GEORGE STANLEY L/CPL 1491 8TH LINCOLNSHIRE 6th APR 1918
INGAMELLS CHARLES FREDERICK PTE 532537 484TH AGRICULTURAL CO. LABOUR CORPS 18th FEB 1919
INGAMELLS REUBEN PTE 25898 10TH ROYAL WARWICKSHIRE 26th MAR 1918
INWARDS RALPH JOSEPH SGT 8424 1ST LINCOLNSHIRE 28th MAR 1915
JACKSON GEORGE DAVID ABLE SEAMAN 215550 H.M.S. PARTRIDGE 12th DEC 1917
JACKSON HENRY LAWRENCE CO. QM. SGT. 10222 9TH NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS 26th JUL 1916
JAMES HENRY JAMES 2ND/LT. 24TH NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS 9th APR 1917
JARMAN ERNEST WILLIAM PTE 42887 1/1ST CAMBRIDGESHIRE  5th SEP 1918
JARMAN HAROLD PTE 42888 1/1ST CAMBRIDGESHIRE 5th SEP 1918
JEPSON FREDERICK HARRY PTE 37102 2ND LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS 13th OCT 1916
JENKINSON BERTIE PTE 39473 2/4TH KING’S OWN YORKSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRY 28th JUL 1918
JOHNSON ALBERT PTE 51797 8TH LINCOLNSHIRE 08-OCT-18
JOHNSON BERTRAM L/CPL 31144 2/6TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 21st MAR 1918
JOHNSON ERIC L/CPL 305899 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 22nd JUN 1917
JOHNSON GEORGE HENRY PTE 242600 1/6TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 28th NOV 1917
JOHNSON GEORGE HENRY PTE 61979 25TH DURHAM LIGHT INF / LABOUR CORPS 10th MAR 1919
JOHNSON MOUNTNA PTE 3414 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 26th JUN 1916
JOHNSON THOMAS PTE 16595 12TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 21st JUL 1919
JOLLANDS ALBERT CPL 1336 2/1ST SOUTH NOTTS HUSSARS 24th AUG 1915
JONES EDWARD PTE 1st-JUL 1917
GROCOCK EDWARD OWEN PTE 203403 1/5TH SHERWOOD FORESTERS 1st JUL 1917
JOYNES ALFRED PTE CH/3(S) CHATHAM BATT’N ROYAL MARINES LIGHT INFANTRY 1st MAY 1915
JUDSON ERNEST PTE 4268 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 26th JUN 1916
JUDSON JOHN CHARLES PTE 5004 16TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 3rd SEP 1916
JUDSON JOHN THOMAS PTE G/72327 7TH QUEEN’S (ROYAL WEST SURREY) 21st SEP 1918
KAY WILLIAM HENRY PTE 40486 18TH WEST YORKS (PRINCE OF WALES OWN) 29th APR 1917
KEELEY GEORGE ARTHUR PTE 268865 16TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 8th FEB 1918
KEETLEY GEORGE L/CPL 305759 10TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 1st NOV 1918
KEETLEY HENRY SAPPER 48842 87 FIELD COMPANY ROYAL ENGINEERS 9th AUG 1917
KELHAM ERNEST GUNNER RMA /13448 R.M.A. H.M.S. INVINCIBLE 31st MAY 1916
KELLY JOSEPH PTE 15765 1ST LINCOLNSHIRE 14th JUN 1918
KELSALL FREDERIC WILLIAM JAMES PTE 11697 1ST NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 17th AUG 1918
KENT GEORGE PTE 30906 1/5TH LINCOLNSHIRE 22nd JUN 1918
KEY HERBERT CHARLES L/CPL 306353 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 12th SEP 1917
KIRK CHARLES PTE 235153 2/5TH NORTH STAFFORDSHIRE 3rd APR 1918
KIRK HERBERT PTE 2155 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 8th MAY 1915
KITCHEN ALBERT JAMES PTE 2855 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 26th APR 1916
KNEE REGINALD PTE 4018 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 24th JAN 1917
KNIGHT ARCHIBALD LANGRISH PTE 306793 2/6TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 24th FEB 1918
KNIGHT EDWARD ALEXANDER PTE 275017 1/1ST NOTTS YEOMANRY (SHERWOOD RGRS) 18th OCT 1918
KNIGHT LEWIS L/CPL 3481 45TH AUSTRALIAN INFANTRY 12th OCT 1917
KNOTT JOHN WILLIAM CPL 305763 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 7th APR 1917
KNOWLES JOHN GUNNER 63066 26 BATTERY, 17TH BDE. ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY 11th AUG 1917
LACEY ARTHUR PTE 66367 1/6TH NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS 10th APR 1918
LACEY GEORGE WILLIAM PTE 15686 2ND NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 19th JAN 1918
LAMBERT GEORGE PTE 29465 2ND LINCOLNSHIRE 17th JUL 1917
LANE JAMES HENRY PTE 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) APR 1919
LAWRENCE WALTER PTE M2/ 156231 612 MT COMPANY ROYAL ARMY SERVICE CORPS 13th FEB 1919
LAWSON HARRY
LEACH HARRY L/CPL 849 1ST ROYAL WARWICKS 8th SEP 1914
LEADER ALFRED PTE 305762 8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 18th APR 1918
LEADER REGINALD JOHN CAREY ‘JACK’ 2ND/LT 14TH DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY 28th APR 1916
LINSEY ARTHUR CPL 8772 2ND LEICESTERSHIRE 22nd FEB 1917
LORD WINIFRED JANE WORKER 47981 QUEEN MARY’S ARMY AUX. CORPS 5th NOV 1918
LOWE FREDERICK J. L/CPL 2376 8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 18th OCT 1915
LUNN GEORGE A/BOMB 58758 63 SIEGE BATTERY ROYAL GARRISON ARTILLERY 2nd NOV 1917
LUNN JOHN PTE 19373 1ST NORTHAMPTONSHIRE 24th DEC 1915
MACRAE JOHN NIGEL CAPT. 83 SQN ROYAL AIR FORCE 11th APR 1918
MCKEARS HARRY NEWMAN PTE 44835 2/9TH MANCHESTER 9th OCT 1917
MCNAUGHT-DAVIS JAMES WALDEN FORTUNE LT. 1ST SOUTH WALES BORDERERS 17th JAN 1915
MABBOTT ERNEST PTE 45938 1ST LEICESTERSHIRE 22nd MAR 1918
MANTERFIELD WILLIAM PTE 29910 7/8TH KING’S OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS 09-APR 1917
MARKWELL ERNEST L/CPL 1387 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 30-APR 1915
MARRIOTT CHARLES PTE 305891 5TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 18-JAN 1918
MARSDEN BENJAMIN PTE 883128 50TH CANADIAN INFANTRY (ALBERTA REGT.) 25-AUG 1917
MARSDEN THOMAS PTE 28423 2ND CHESHIRE 03-OCT-15
MARSHALL EDGAR GUNNER 283719 186 SIEGE BATTERY ROYAL GARRISON ARTILLERY 15th OCT 1917
MARSHALL WILLIAM THOMAS PTE 3383 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 16th SEP 1915
MARTIN GEORGE PTE 59454 10TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 12th OCT 1917
MARTIN GEORGE WALTER PTE 17933 1ST LINCOLNSHIRE 25-DEC 1916
MARTIN LESLIE HENRY PTE 41014 5TH SOUTH WALES BORDERERS 24th OCT 1917
MASSEY TOM PTE 2274 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 6th JUN-15
MATTHEWS ARTHUR ROBERT PTE 44271 1/1ST CAMBRIDGESHIRE 5th SEP 1918
MAULL JOSEPH RIFLEMAN R/12769 2ND KING’S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS 10th JUL 1917
MAWSON ALBERT PTE 305532 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 22nd JUN 1917
MAWSON WALTER PTE 107457 42ND MACHINE GUN CORPS 26-SEP-18
MAY WILFRED R/MAN A/200168 17TH KING’S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS 02-JAN-17
MEASHAM WILLIAM HENRY JACKSON PTE 24740 7TH NORTH STAFFORDSHIRE 25-JAN 1917
MENDHAM HEZEKIAH PTE 203426 11TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 5th OCT 1918
MIDDLETON JIM PTE 12380 A CO. 6TH LINCOLNSHIRE 11th DEC 1915
MILLS WILLIAM PTE 3137 1/4TH NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS 15th SEP 1916
MILTHORP EDWARD ARTHUR EYRE SGT 16144 B COY 7TH EAST SURREY 13-AUG 1916
MOORE HERBERT PTE 2461 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 7th AUG 1915
MOORE WALTER GILBERT CPL 1560 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 26th JUN 1916
MORGAN JOHN LEWIS PTE 32171 13TH GLOUCESTERSHIRE 4th APR 1918
MORLEY CHARLES EUSTACE PTE 18973 1ST NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS  9th APR 1918
MORLEY GEORGE PTE 203833 16TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 19th OCT 1917
MORT ALEXANDER JOHN L/CPL 36605 10TH WEST YORKS (PRINCE OF WALES OWN) 17th OCT 1918
MOUNTNEY ERNEST PTE 10479 D CO., 19TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 3rd AUG 1916
MUNTON JAMES EDWARD SGT 20815 18TH MACHINE GUN CORPS 21st OCT 1916
MURDEN DAVID PTE 13520 3RD GRENADIER GUARDS 11th APR 1916
MUSGROVE ARTHUR GEORGE PTE 40822 18TH MANCHESTER 29th JUL 1917
MUTTON EDWARD HARRY PTE 2775 8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 17th APR 1916
NAYLOR JOSEPH SGT 12396 9TH LEICESTERSHIRE 12th DEC 1916
NEAL FRANK STOKER 5797(S) R.N.R. H.M.S. VICTORY 29th JAN 1915
NEAL HARRY CPL. 28802 1054 M.T. COMPANY ROYAL ARMY SERVICE CORPS 9th DEC 1919
NEWBOLD JOHN THOMAS PTE 42846 4TH NORTH STAFFORDSHIRE 15th APR 1918
NEWBOUND WALTER PTE 201405 1ST ROYAL SCOTS FUSILIERS 26th SEP 1917
NEWSTEAD FRANCIS ‘FRANK’ SGT 20844 1ST GARRISON EAST YORKSHIRE 27th MAY 1919
NEWSTEAD J.
NEWSTEAD JAMES EDWARD L/CPL 21247 12TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 8th JUL 1916
NEWSTEAD THOMAS PTE 34418 4TH WEST YORKS (PRINCE OF WALES OWN) 23rd AUG 1916
NICHOLSON JOSEPH HENRY PTE 305543 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 26th APR 1917
NORCOTT WILLIAM MAULE PTE 69005 1/4TH NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS 4th JUN 1918
NORMAN JOHN WILLIAM H. PTE 242073 1/5TH LINCOLNSHIRE 19th JUN 1917
NORTHEN FREDERICK HERBERT CPL 36925 6TH ROYAL BERKSHIRE 12th AUG 1917
NORTON FREDERICK PTE 23194 7TH NORTH STAFFORDSHIRE 13th JAN-17
OLPHERT FREDERICK JOHN CAPT. 940TH AREA EMP CO. ROYAL ENGINEERS 19th MAY 1918
OVERTON ISAAC ‘WILLIE’ L/SIG 225837 H.M.S. PEMBROKE 3rd JUL 1917
PAGE ALBERT VICTOR PTE 42909 1/1ST CAMBRIDGESHIRE 5th SEP 1918
PAGE GEORGE HERBERT PTE 268747 2/7TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 21st MAR 1918
PAINE HERBERT WILLIAM GROSS CPL 32534 2ND WELLINGTON REGT., NZ EXPED. FORCE 16th MAY 1918
PAMMENT JOSEPH RIFLEMAN B/203113 9TH RIFLE BRIGADE 3th MAY 1917
PARISH WALTER PTE 31858 2ND SOUTH STAFFORDSHIRE 28th APR 1917
PARKER FRED PTE 305116 10TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 26th AUG 1918
PARKER FREDERICK PTE 2448 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 30th JUL 1915
PARKER WILFRED ERNEST 2ND/LT 15TH ROYAL WARWICKSHIRE 8/ 9th MAY 1917
PARKER WILLIAM FREDERICK PTE 32783 16TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 20th SEP 1917
PARR ALFRED PTE 355241 7TH LONDON 11th MAR 1918
PARR ALFRED L/CPL 2670 1/5TH KING’S OWN YORKSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRY 5th JUL 1916
PARR ARTHUR PTE 22845 1ST LONDON (ROYAL FUSILIERS) 28th NOV 1917
PEET HERBERT PTE 268059 1/5TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 30th AUG 1918
PETHRICK PHILLIP ALGERNON CPL 12992 B CO., 8TH LEICESTERSHIRE 19th OCT 1918
PILGRIM GEORGE HENRY PTE 10355 9TH QUEEN’S LANCERS 27th MAR 1918
PILSWORTH GEORGE HENRY L/CPL 31771 17TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 3rd SEP 1916
POND JOHN PTE 4848 B CO., 1ST NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 5th JUL 1915
POOLE GEORGE HENRY PTE 55579 11TH NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS 27th OCT 1918
PORTER FREDERICK DAVID PTE 81322 15TH DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY 27th MAY 1918
POWELL F.J.
POWELL FRANK JOHN PTE 265512 4TH LINCOLNSHIRE 26th OCT 1917
POWERS BERT PTE 44768 LABOUR CORPS 21-DEC-17
POYNTON HARRY PTE 42910 1/1ST CAMBRIDGESHIRE 5th SEP 1918
PRATT PERCY CHARLES PTE. (SIGNALLER) 305132 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 7th APR 1917
PRESTON THOMAS EUSTACE SAPPER 50954 15TH SIGNAL. CO. ROYAL ENGINEERS –  19th FEB 1915
PRICE GEORGE WILLIAM AB J/19338 H.M.S. QUEEN MARY – 31st MAY 1916
PRICE MICHAEL PTE 9466 5TH LINCOLNSHIRE – 21st MAR 1918
PRIDE ERNEST L/CPL 2942 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 13th JUL 1916

PRIDE WILLIAM WR/350517 – SAPPER ROYAL ENGINEERS – 11th Sept 1918 – Newark Cemetery

PRIESTLEY ALFRED L/CPL 1389  – 8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 10th MAY 1915

PRIESTLEY ERNEST PTE 3096  – 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 20th JUN 1916 AGE NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY WEST
PROBERT EDWARD JOHN PTE 10622 –  4TH SOUTH WALES BORDERERS – 22nd AUG 1917
PROCTOR DAVID PTE 12385  – 6TH LEICESTERSHIRE 16-JUL-16
PULFORD ALFRED EDWARD PTE 3028 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) –  20th JUN 1916
PYKETT WILLIAM E. PTE  – 11615 8TH LINCOLNSHIRE 08-DEC-15
QUIBELL SAMUEL BOYD – MAJOR 4TH EAST YORKSHIRE 5th FEB 1916 – AGE 25 – LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY II. A. 31.
RAGSDALE ARTHUR GUARDSMAN 20463 – COLDSTREAM GUARDS  – 17th FEB 1919
RAINE CHARLES PTE 32530  – 5TH OXFORDSHIRE & BUCKS LIGHT INFANTRY – 14th OCT 1917
RANDALL HARRY CHARLES LAWTON PTE 62209  – 15TH WEST YORKS (PRINCE OF WALES OWN) – 19th JUL 1918
RANSLEY ALFRED SGT 275001  – NOTTS YEOMANRY (SHERWOOD RGRS)  – 28th NOV 1917
RAWDING JOHN FRANCIS CSM 305007 – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 30th SEP 1918
RAWSON JOHN PTE 58520 – DEPOT NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 27th FEB 1920
RAYNOR F OR H ?
REDMILE CHARLES PTE 864  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) –  24th APR 1915
RENSHAW JOHN WILLIAM PTE 2940  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 15th OCT 1915
REVILL HAROLD PTE 235132  – 25TH NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS – 9th APR 1917
REVILL ROBERT PTE 9116  – 1ST BORDER 08-MAY-15
RICH EDWARD JOHN RODWELL PTE 24746  – 8TH NORTH STAFFORDSHIRE –  7th JUN 1917
RICHARDSON GEORGE PTE 1743  – 8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 16th JUN 1915
RICHARDSON ROBERT RONALD PTE 16098  – 6TH YORK & LANCASTER 29th AUG 1915
RICHARDSON WILLIAM PTE 2460  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 16th JUN 1915
RICHMOND ARTHUR CECIL PTE 265945  – 1/7TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 1st JUL 1916
RIDLEY WILLIAM HECTOR MATHERS LT. D CO., 2ND NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) –  9th AUG 1915
RILEY JAMES PTE 15416  – 2ND DUKE OF WELLINGTON’S (WEST RIDING) –  19th MAY 1917
ROBB ARCHIE PTE 14814  – 6TH KING’S OWN (ROYAL LANCASHIRE) 26th OCT 1915
ROBINSON ALBERT EDWARD SAPPER 94892  – 171ST TUN’L CO. ROYAL ENGINEERS  – 29th OCT 1915
ROBINSON HASSELL ERNEST L/CPL G/11707  – 7TH QUEEN’S OWN (ROYAL WEST KENTS) –  13th JUL 1916
ROBINSON ROBERT PTE 12400 –  7TH LEICESTERSHIRE  – 3rd MAY 1917
ROBINSON WILLIAM PTE 242117  – 5TH BORDER  – 24th APR 1917
ROE JOHN ROBERT PTE 2357 –  1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 5th OCT 1915
ROGERSON HERBERT NOEL PTE 29339 2ND EAST LANCASHIRE  – 31st JUL 1917
ROSE ALBERT RIFLEMAN 7322 –  3RD KINGS ROYAL RIFLE CORPS –  30th APR 1915
ROSE THOMAS PTE 292 – 4TH GUARDS MACHINE GUN REGT. 17th AUG 1917
ROUSTON HARRY L. PTE 39827  – 7TH SOUTH STAFFORDSHIRE – 13th NOV 1918
SALMON ELIJAH PTE 305238  – 2/7TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 21st MAR 1918
SANDERS ROBERT PTE 8450  – 1ST NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) –  11th MAR 1915
SANDERSON ERNEST STANLEY PTE 27035 –  4TH SOUTH WALES BORDERERS  – 13th MAY 1916
SANDERSON HARRY PTE S/15453  – 1ST GORDON HIGHLANDERS  – 14th JUN 1917
SAVAGE ALFRED PTE 11863  – 9TH LEICESTERSHIRE  – 22nd SEP 1915
SCALES EDWIN HERBERT  – LT ARMY SERVICE CORPS  – 11th OCT 1918
SCALES EDWARD LIONEL CAPT  – 4TH MIDDLESEX ATT’D KING’S AFRICAN RIFLES – 11th NOV 1918
SCRATON ROBERT PTE 128677  – 47TH BN. MACHINE GUN CORPS  – 3rd JUN 1918
SEAGRAVE GEORGE PTE 4255 1/5TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 1st JUL 1916
SEAGREAVES CHARLEY PTE 14004 – 4TH GRENADIER GUARDS  – 13th APR 1918
SEFTON CECIL PTE 5605  – 20TH ROYAL FUSILIERS 5th JUL 1916
SEFTON CHARLES C. CPL 90762  – 2/5TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 31st MAR 1918
SEFTON PERCY 2ND/LT  – 13TH EAST LANCASHIRE 22nd  AUG 1918
SELBY FRANK PALMER PTE 2848  – 1/4TH ROYAL BERKSHIRE  – 25th AUG 1915
SELBY FRANK PTE 306754 –  2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 29th SEP 1917
SENTANCE JOHN PTE 235055 –  8TH SUFFOLK 31st JUL 1917
SENTANCE FRED CPL 9827  – 2ND NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) –  31st MAR 1915
SHARDLOW NORMAN MARRISON PTE  – 71274 2ND NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 5th APR 1917
SHARP AARON PTE 305866  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 26th SEP 1917
SHARP EDGAR PTE 307703  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) –  2nd NOV 1917
SHARPE WILLIAM PTE 55405 12/13TH NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS  – 28th MAR 1918
SHAW FRANK WILLIAM L/CPL  – 55086 194TH CO. MACHINE GUN CORPS – 17th OCT 1917
SHAW JOHN WILLIAM H. PTE 9360  – 3RD LINCOLNSHIRE 31st MAY 1915
SHELBOURN JESSE TATEM SAPPER 167674  – 92 FIELD CO. ROYAL ENGINEERS  – 6th AUG 1918
SHERRY ALBERT GEORGE PTE 235182  – 17TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) –  1st AUG 1917
SHORT LEONARD PTE 41474  – 1ST NORFOLK  – 12th OCT 1918
SIBCY LEVI PTE 2850 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 15th JAN 1915 – AGE 16 – NEWARK-UPON-TRENT CEMETERY WEST E. “C”. 154.
SIMPSON ARTHUR PTE 43204 9TH PRINCESS VICTORIA’S (ROYAL IRISH FUSILIERS)  – 28th APR 1918
SIMPSON JOHN HENRY PTE 47807 11TH ROYAL SCOTS 7th DEC 1917
SIMPSON LEONARD GEORGE L/CPL G/40132 12TH MIDDLESEX – 26th SEP 1916
SINGLETON BERTIE CPL 9903 2ND YORK & LANCASTER 23rd OCT 1914
SKETCHLEY HERBERT PTE 1859 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 22nd APR 1915
SLATER CYRIL DAVID APPRENTICE S.S. WAVERLEY 20th DEC 1917 –  Age 19 – TOWER HILL MEMORIAL
SLATER WILLIAM CLARENCE CPL 11426  – 2ND NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  –  20th OCT 1914 – PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL Panel 7.
SMEDLEY ROBERT HENRY PTE 357549 1/10TH KING’S (LIVERPOOL) 9th MAY 1918
SMITH ALFRED SH-SM CPL 98853 ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY (23RD DIVISION AMMUNITION COLUMN) – 20th SEP 1916 – Age 40 –  MILLENCOURT COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION D. 1.
SMITH ARTHUR PTE 40102  – 1/8TH MANCHESTER  – 6th NOV 1918 – Age 21 –  HARGNIES COMMUNAL CEMETERY, NORD In North-East part.
SMITH CHARLES W.L. SGT 265752 –  2ND NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 1st APR 1917 – Age 22 –  THIEPVAL MEMORIAL Pier and Face 10 C 10 D and 11 A
SMITH CHARLES WILLIAM SGT 27582 – 17TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 1st AUG 1916
SMITH EDWARD PTE 14587 4TH GRENADIER GUARDS 21-OCT-15
SMITH ERNEST FREDERICK PTE 5083 2ND NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 26th AUG 1916
SMITH F. PTE 1ST LINCOLNSHIRE
SMITH FRED PTE. 40697 9TH ESSEX 5th APR 1918
SMITH FRANK PTE 25834 8TH LEICESTERSHIRE 13th APR 1917
SMITH FRANK HANDLEY SGT 45580 17TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 23rd OCT 1917
SMITH GEORGE PTE 31862 8TH SOUTH STAFFORDSHIRE 16th SEP 1917
SMITH GEORGE WILLIAM PTE 11034 B CO., 1ST NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 22nd NOV 1914
SMITH GEORGE WILLIAM HARCOURT AVONDALE L/STOKER K/30288 H.M.S. BLACK PRINCE  – 31st MAY 1916
SMITH HARRY PTE 235222 11TH SUFFOLK 28th APR 1917
SMITH HARRY EDWARD L/CPL 305571 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 10th JUL 1918
SMITH J.H.
SMITH JOHN ROBERT L/CPL 189510 4TH (RES) FM 18TH CANADIAN INFANTRY (WESTERN ONTARIO)  – 3rd FEB 1919
SMITH JOSEPH PTE 61054 17TH SHERWOOD FORESTERS 4th AUG 1917
SMITH ROLAND HADFIELD DRIVER 10541 BRITISH RED CROSS SOCIETY – 1st DEC 1916
SMITH THOMAS PTE 31165 2ND KING’S OWN YORKSHIRE LIGHT INF. 15th OCT 1918
SMITH THOMAS ROWLAND 2ND/LT NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) ATTACHED IMPERIAL CAMEL CORPS  – 30th MAR 1918
SMITH WALTER LANCE/SGT 305868 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 7th APR 1917
SMITH WILLIAM DRIVER 90958 106 FIELD CO. ROYAL ENGINEERS – 12th JUL 1915
SOOLEY JAMES WILLIAM MARSTON PTE 71626 C CO. 2ND NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 10th MAR 1917
SOUTHERINGTON ALFRED ERNEST PTE 270089  – 5/6TH ROYAL SCOTS  – 14th OCT 1917
SOUTHERINGTON GEORGE BROWN PTE 306137  – 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 26-SEP-17
SPICER HERBERT PTE 48822  – 2ND WORCESTERSHIRE 9th SEP 1918
SQUIRES ALFRED PTE 9883  – 2ND CAMERONIANS (SCOTTISH RIFLES)  – 29th NOV 1914
SQUIRES HARRY PIONEER 358209 G DEPOT CO. ROYAL ENGINEERS 23rd APR 1918
STAMPER ARTHUR PTE 32542  – 2/4TH OXFORDSHIRE & BUCKS LIGHT INFANTRY  – 22nd AUG 1917
STANLEY GEORGE FOOTIT PTE 40103  – 21ST MANCHESTER 10-JAN-17
STATHAM CHARLES WILLIAM PTE 31515  – 14TH YORK & LANCASTER – 26-SEP-17
STEEL LEONARD GEORGE LT 62 WING ROYAL AIR FORCE 22-JUL-18
STEPHENSON WILLIAM PTE 3069  – 24TH ROYAL FUSILIERS 1st JUL 1916
STEVENETTE BERTRAM RIFLEMAN Z/2977  – 12TH RIFLE BRIGADE 30th JUN 1916
STEVENSON ALBERT CPL 5153 2ND NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 17th OCT 1917
SWABY SYDNEY CPL 31045  – 17TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 8th DEC 1916
SWANN LARRY H. PTE 3597  – 9TH LONDON (QUEEN VICTORIA’S RIFLES)  – 4th SEP 1915
SWANN WILLIAM SGT 1651 A SQN.  – 1ST NOTTS YEOMANRY (SHERWOOD RGRS)  – 23th SEP 1916
TAILBY JOHN JAMES PTE 105696  – 10TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 4th NOV 1918
TALBOT GEORGE PTE 2857  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 6th JUL 1916
TAYLOR CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM PTE 1723 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 21st JUL 1915
TAYLOR GEORGE HENRY PTE 40393  – 15TH WEST YORKS (PRINCE OF WALES OWN) – 10th  JAN 1917
TAYLOR HERBERT L/CPL 305888 1ST NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 4th AUG 1917
TAYLOR ROBERT PTE 19829  – 2ND WELSH  – 9th MAY 1915
TAYLOR THOMAS ARCHIBALD PTE 50305 – 2/6TH NORTH STAFFORDSHIRE  – 15th APR 1918
TAYLOR VINCENT O. R. PTE 53491  – 15TH DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY – 9th APR 1917
TAYLOR WILLIAM BARRON L/CPL 5629  – 9TH ROYAL FUSILIERS – 3rd MAY 1917
THACKER WILLIAM WRIGHT PTE 17852  – 2ND NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 24th MAR 1917
THEAKER WILLIAM HENRY PTE 3/5441 – 2ND LINCOLNSHIRE  – 7th JUL 1916
THOMPSON FRANK D. R/MAN R/37781  – 17TH KING’S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS  – 12th NOV 1917
THORNTON RICHARD LACEY PTE 49325  – 11TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 7th JUN 1917
THORPE JOHN THOMAS CPL 4855 – 10TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 18th AUG 1918
THORPE JOHN SOMERLED MAJOR  – 2ND SCOTS GUARDS – 15th SEP 1916
THURMAN FREDERICK WILLIAM PTE 9109  – 1ST NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 8th JUL 1916
TILLIN ARTHUR ERNEST GERALD PTE 49104  – 1ST LEICESTERSHIRE – 8th OCT 1918
TINKLER JOHN EDWARD PTE 26162  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 29th SEP 1918
TINSLEY HERBERT FREDERICK JENKINS PTE 95002  – ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS ATTACHED DDMS 19th MAR 1918
TITCHENER CHARLES FREDERICK PTE 40397  – 16TH WEST YORKSHIRE (PRINCE OF WALES OWN) – 13th NOV 1916
TODER PERCY WALTER ‘JACK’ PTE 242617  – FORMERLY 3143 / 20025 2/5TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 10th DEC 1918
TOMLINSON CHARLES THOMAS ‘TOM’ PTE 31531  – 1/5TH YORK & LANCASTER – 11th APR 1918
TOURNAY THOMAS PTE 7028  – 2ND NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 25th AUG 1915
TOWLSON HERBERT PTE 268754 2/7TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 21st MAR 1918
TOWNSEND WALTER SGT 111948  – 11TH EAST YORKSHIRE – 17-JUN-16
TREGIDGO FREDERICK HAVELOCK PETER PIONEER 86972 82 FIELD CO. ROYAL ENGINEERS –  29th SEP 1916
TRICKETT HENRY ‘HARRY’ PTE 2712 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 20th APR 1915
TURGOOSE FREDERICK BIRKETT P.O. 180665 H.M. TORPEDO BOAT NO. 11  – 7th MAR 1916
TURNER GEORGE WILLIAM L/CPL 305761  – 10TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 29th AUG 1918
TURNER HAROLD SAPPER 48338 85 FIELD CO. ROYAL ENGINEERS  – 7th NOV 1915
TURNER IRA WILLIAM L/CPL 11672  – 2ND KING’S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS  – 10th SEP 1918
TURNER JOHN WILLIAM PTE 330606 15TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 23th OCT 1917
TURNER JOSEPH ERNEST CPL 43023  – 11TH LEICESTERSHIRE  – 22th MAR 1918
TURNER TOM PTE 242821 2/5TH KING’S OWN YORKSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRY – 3rd MAY 1917
TWIDALE LESLIE FRANCIS PTE 4649 2/5TH LINCOLNSHIRE  – 10th MAY 1918
TYE FRANK PTE 12470 C CO., 1ST EAST YORKSHIRE  – 25th FEB 1917
TYE HAROLD PTE 6333  – 1ST EAST YORKSHIRE 4th JUN 1916
TYE JOHN W. PTE 3/6332 1ST EAST YORKSHIRE –  1st JUL 1916
TYERS ARTHUR SGT 8761 D CO.,  – 1ST LEICESTERSHIRE  – 23rd JUL 1917
TYERS FREDERICK CPL 9107  – 1/5TH LEICESTERSHIRE  – 24th SEP 1918
TYERS LESLIE PTE 2366 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) –  20th JUN 1916
VACEY ROBERT L/CPL 305887 – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) –  23rd APR 1917
VACEY WALTER GUNNER 58260 Z/30TH TRENCH MORTAR BATTERY ROYAL GARRISON ARTILLERY – 6th SEP 1916
WAKEFIELD LEONARD THOMAS CPL 11941  – 15TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 19th AUG 1917 – Age 22 – THIEPVAL MEMORIAL Pier and Face 10 C 10 D and 11 A.
WALKER ALBERT PERCY PTE 19104 SUFFOLK 15th MAY 1919
WALKER GEORGE HENRY RIFLEMAN B/203128  – 9TH RIFLE BRIGADE  – 3rd MAY 1917
WALKER JOHN EDWARD LANCE-SGT 15655  – 1ST LINCOLNSHIRE  – 4th OCT 1917
WALKER WILLIAM PERCY PTE 357483 A CO. –  2/10TH KING’S (LIVERPOOL)  – 30th JUN 1917
WALL H.
WALSH ARCHIBALD PTE 3796 –  1ST COLDSTREAM GUARDS – 29th OCT-14
WALSHAM ARTHUR PTE 2628  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 14th AUG 1915
WALSTER FRANK PTE 2186  – 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 30st JUL 1915
WALTON CHARLES BELFIELD PTE 36599  – 7TH KING’S SHROPSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRY – 2nd OCT 1918
WALTON WIFRED THOMPSON PTE 40646 10TH ESSEX 14th MAR 1917
WALTSTER FRANK PTE 2186 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 30th JUL 1915
WALSTER R. THOMAS L/CPL L/10885  – 4TH ROYAL FUSILIERS 28th OCT 1914
WARD FREDERICK SGT 25040 11TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 6th OCT 1918 
WARNER FRED PTE 201007 – 8TH LINCOLNSHIRE  – 3rd NOV 1918
WARNEFORD WALTER KEMEYS FRANCIS CAPT ROYAL AIR FORCE – 5th JUL 1919
WARRINER WILLIAM PTE 7145  – 1ST ROYAL SCOTS FUSILIERS  -10th FEB 1915
WATSON WALTER JOHN MOWBRAY LT –  MACHINE GUN CORPS  –  Age 24 – 22nd AUG 1917 RAILWAY DUGOUTS BURIAL GROUND (TRANSPORT FARM) Valley Cottages Cem. Mem. H. 7.
rd WEIGHTMAN WILLIAM HENRY ACT/BOMB 113253 – 133 SIEGE BATTERY ROYAL GARRISON ARTILLERY – 13th JAN 1918
WELCH ROBERT PTE 15784 6TH LINCOLNSHIRE  – 9th SEP 1916
WEST ARTHUR L/CPL 20811 6TH WILTSHIRE – 2nd JUL 1916
WHITE ARTHUR PTE 16094 1/6TH SOUTH STAFFORDSHIRE – 31st MAY 1918
WHITE PERCY PTE 23005 26TH ROYAL FUSILIERS  – 18th SEP 1916
WHITE THOMAS PTE 203469 1/5TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 1st JUL 1917
WHITEHEAD JOHN HENRY PTE 305893 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 8th JUN 1917
WHITELOCK JAMES JOHN ‘JIM’ ACT/L/CPL 10573 6TH LINCOLNSHIRE  – 9th AUG 1915
WIGGINS HERBERT PTE 12286 2ND NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  – 20th NOV 1917
WILKINSON HORACE PTE 2365 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 14th OCT 1915
WILKINSON WILLIAM
WILLIAMSON JOHN PTE. 23207 8TH NORTH STAFFORDSHIRE – 22nd MAR 1918
WILLINGHAM SOMERFIELD R. DRUMMER 306126 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 26th JUN 1917
WILLIS OSCAR POTTER CPL 305348 A CO. 8TH ROYAL WARWICKSHIRE – 1st JUL 1916
WILLOWS JAMES PTE 267713 4TH SEAFORTH HIGHLANDERS  -21st SEP 1917
WILMORE GEORGE THOMAS PERCIVAL SGT 1892 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) 21-APR-15
WILSON ALBERT HENRY PTE 24102 1/5TH BORDER  – 25th APR 1917
WILSON ARTHUR L/CPL 12381 9TH LEICESTERSHIRE – 3rd MAY 1917
WILSON FREDERICK L/CPL G/1717 10TH QUEEN’S (ROYAL WEST SURREY)  – 20th SEP 1917
WILSON JOHN SGT 24069 A BATTERY ROYAL HORSE ARTILLERY – 2nd SEP 1918
WILSON JOSEPH ARTHUR PTE 16591 2/7TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 6th DEC 1917
WINDEY CECIL PTE 306526 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  –  26th SEP 1917
WINN CHRISTOPHER L/SGT 4820 MACHINE GUN CORPS (INF) – 26th AUG 1916
WITHERS SAMUEL PTE 32067 17TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) –  3rd SEP 1916
WOOD ALBERT EDWARD PTE 4031 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 17th MAY 1916
WOOD FRANK 2/LT 8TH NOTTS & DERBYS (SHERWOOD FORESTERS), ATTACHED 86TH CO., MACHINE GUN CORPS – 23rd OCT 1917
WOODHEAD HAROLD L/CPL 2160 1/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 14th OCT 1915
WOOLFITT PHILIP PTE 180165 43RD CANADIAN INFANTRY (MANITOBA REGT.) – 1st NOV 1916
WOOLLEY ERNEST PTE 981 1ST NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS – 14th -NOV 1914
WRIGHT ABRAHAM PTE 124007 27 DEPOT CO. MACHINE GUN CORPS – 17th FEB 1918
WRIGHT FRED WILLIAM PTE 35796 27TH NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS – 28th APR 1917
WRIGHT REGINALD JOHN PTE 1619 1/4TH DUKE OF WELLINGTON’S (WEST RIDING)  – 19th DEC 1915
YOUNG GEORGE RICHARD PTE 202532 2/7TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS)  -26th SEP 1917
YOUNG CHARLES CPL 305875 2/8TH NOTTS & DERBY (SHERWOOD FORESTERS) – 31-OCT 1917
YOUNG CHARLES WILLIAM L/CPL 275042 NOTTS (SHERWOOD RANGERS) YEOMANRY – 28 NOV 1917

and 

144 from WWII

Pete Stevens his project has been launched to match photographs to all the names on the Newark and Balderton war memorials There are 602 names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen at Newark Cemetery, of whom 455 are first world war casualties.Another 144 are from the second world war, one died in West Africa in 1961, one in Malaya in 1952 and one in Afghanistan in 2007. There are 45 names from the first world war on the memorial in St Giles’ Church, Balderton, and a further 13 from the second world war.

 

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As a fitting tribute to them,  The views expressed our solely my own and do not reflect  Newark Town Council.

I have been walking around Newark cemetery since  2004. In 2005 we set up a Friends Of Newark Cemetery Group, I have been a member for the last  11 years. I had an opportunity to have this website  with  39,000 visits across the UK, and the World. Many kind words which I really enjoy and appreciate from people that have contacted me. It has intrigues me, something that makes me want to look into who is buried and history going back to 1856, which has been fascinating.

 

Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery will only open by appointment for groups .

 by Contact Laurence Goff  01636-681878  Mobile 07794613879 or leave a message at Newark Town Hall 01636-680333 or by Email: friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk  

Friends of Newark Cemetery would like more volunteers to help with events in 2014. We would welcome interested people and groups at our public meeting to plan events. 

Volunteers They will welcome groups and visitors for events for the Newark  exhibition of the First world war display during April – November 2015 for Schools and other groups by appointment.

  • Tours of the 49 graves at Newark Cemetery

  • Cemetery War Memorial to the Fallen (Main Gate London Road)

We had  a memorable and successful event, to mark the 100th anniversary of the declaration of the 1st World War which started on 4th August 1914.

We look forward to hearing from you with your input.

RSVP if you can attend our meeting.

 

Laurence Goff

Friends Of Newark Cemetery 

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Friends of Newark Cemetery would like more volunteers to help with events in 2015. We would welcome you at our meeting on Wednesday 20th January 2016, 2pm at Town Hall Newark in the Pickin room.

Volunteers

Newark exhibition and display during

2016

Tours of war graves at Newark Cemetery

 Cemetery War Memorial to the Fallen (Main Gate London Road)

We maked this a memorable and successful event, it the 100th anniversary of the declaration of the 1st World War which started on 4th August 1914.

We look forward to hearing from you with your input.

 They are needing to found more Volunteers to welcome visits to Newark Cemetery by  showing around our exhibition, serving refreshments giving tours or help locate a grave for visitors April  – October 2015. 

 friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

   Location of Cemetery Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Newark Nottinghamshire, England

 

Many Polish Squadrons joined With The Royal Air Force Nearly 400 Where Killed, They Are Buried At Newark Cemetery

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Newark Cemetery Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

Open all year round

April – September 8am-8pm

October – March 8am-6pm

For over 150 years since 1856

Newark Cemetery

London Road Newark NG24 1SQ

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During the Second World War there were a number of RAF. stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for RAF. burials and this is now the war graves plot, where all but ten of the 90 Commonwealth and all of the 397 Polish burials were made. The cemetery also contains 49 scattered burials of the First World.

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W czasie II wojny światowej było wiele RAF stacje w ciągu kilku kilometrów od Newark, z których wiele działa eskadry lotnictwa polskiego.Specjalne działki przeznaczono na cmentarzu w Newark RAF Pogrzeby i teraz jest to wojna, gdzie groby działkę niemal dziesięciu z 90 Rzeczypospolitej i wszystkich 397 polskich pochówków dokonano.Cmentarz zawiera również 49 rozproszone pochówki Pierwszego Świata.

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The Polish War Memorial is just inside Newark boundaries, an important enough to merit this website. Following the fall of Poland to German and Soviet forces in 1939, many Poles left their homeland to continue the fight from other countries. By the summer of 1940 Britain was facing the axis powers alone, but with the help of men from other European countries. Not the least of these were the Poles. Among the RAF squadrons at Northolt, there were a number of Polish squadrons based there in 1940-1943. During the Battle of Britain in the late summer of 1940, the 303rd (Warsaw) squadron saw service at Northolt, flying Hurricane fighter aircraft. They were replaced in October by the 302nd (Poznan) squadron after the Battle of Britain had been won. Others serving from the aerodrome were the 304th, 306th, 308th, 305th, 315th and 317th squadron. Some of them returned to the airfield for another tour of duty here. Thirty Polish airmen, a fifth of their number, were killed in the Battle of Britain, and of these, five had been flying from Northolt.After the war was over, the Polish armed forces in Britain were disbanded. A group of Polish air force officers decided to form the Polish Air Force Association. One of their first decisions was to erect a memorial for their former comrades. A committee under Air Vice Marshal Izycki started a public appeal for funds (most of which were contributed by British people), and the work soon began.The memorial was unveiled on 2 November 1948 by Lord Tedder, RAF Marshal and chief of the air staff. It is made from Portland stone, with bronze lettering and is topped by a bronze Polish air force eagle. The craftsman was Miecystam Lubelski, who had been recently liberated from a labour camp. The names of 1,243 Poles who died in the war were inscribed on the memorial.Viscount Portal of Hungerford made a speech before the unveiling. He said that it was a sad blow that many Polish veterans were unable to return home, as their country had been occupied by the Soviet Union. He added that it would be to the mutual advantage of Britons and Poles that the latter were to make their home in Britain.In 1991, the first post-war democratically elected Polish president, Lech Walesa, laid a wreath at the memorial. By this time it had been realised that further work was needed. Repair work was necessary, as were extensions in order to accommodate a further 659 names that had not been included hitherto. An appeal was made in 1994 and the memorial was rededicated in 1996 in the presence of the Duke of Gloucester, British and Polish military and civil dignitaries.The memorial remains as a monument to the men of the fighter and bomber squadrons and as an expression of Anglo-Polish friendship.

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Polski War Memorial jest tylko wewnątrz granic Newark, na tyle ważne, aby zasłużyć na tej stronie. Po upadku Polski do wojsk niemieckich i radzieckich w 1939 roku, wielu Polaków opuściło ojczyznę, aby kontynuować walkę z innych krajów. W lecie 1940 roku Wielka Brytania była skierowana uprawnienia osi sam, ale z pomocą ludzi z innych krajów europejskich. Nie najmniejszym z nich byli Polacy. Wśród eskadry RAF w Northolt, było wiele polskich dywizjonów tam z siedzibą w 1940-1943.During Battle of Britain w późnym latem 1940 roku, 303-gie (Warszawa) dywizjon zobaczył usługi w Northolt, latające Hurricane myśliwców. Ich miejsce w październiku przez 302-gi (Poznań) eskadry po bitwie o Anglię została wygrana. Inne serwujące z lotniska były 304, 306 i 308-gie, 305-ci, 315 i 317 dywizjonu. Część z nich wróciła na lotnisko na kolejny placówkę tutaj. Trzydzieści Polscy lotnicy, piąta ich liczby, zginęło w bitwie o Anglię, a wśród nich pięć leciał z Northolt.After wojna na polskie siły zbrojne w Wielkiej Brytanii zostały rozwiązane.Grupa polskich oficerów sił powietrznych postanowił utworzyć Polski Związek Sił Powietrznych. Jednym z ich pierwszych decyzji było wznieść pomnik dla swoich byłych towarzyszy.Komitet w ramach Air Vice Marshal Izycki rozpoczął apel publicznego dla funduszy (w większości zostały wniesione przez Brytyjczyków), a prace szybko began.The Pomnik został odsłonięty 02 listopada 1948 przez Pana Marszałka RAF, Tedder i szefa personelu lotniczego , Jest wykonana z kamienia portlandzkiego, z brązu napisami i jest zwieńczona brązu polskiego lotnictwa orła.Rzemieślnik był Miecystam Lubelski, który został niedawno uwolniony z obozu pracy. Nazwiska 1243 Polaków, którzy zginęli w czasie wojny zostały wpisane na memorial.Viscount Portal Hungerford wygłosił przemówienie przed premierą. Powiedział, że to smutne, że wielu polskich cios weterani byli w stanie wrócić do domu, ponieważ ich kraj został zajęty przez ZSRR. Dodał, że byłoby to z obopólną korzyścią dla Brytyjczyków i Polaków, że te ostatnie były, aby ich domu w Britain.In 1991, pierwszy powojenny demokratycznie wybrany prezydent Polski, Lech Wałęsa, złożył wieniec pod pomnikiem. W tym czasie został on sobie sprawę, że niezbędne są dalsze prace. Prace naprawcze były konieczne, ponieważ były rozszerzenia w celu dostosowania się do kolejnych 659 nazw, które nie zostały włączone do tej pory.Apel powstał w 1994 roku i pomnik został rededicated w 1996 roku w obecności księcia Gloucester, brytyjskich i polskich wojskowych i cywilnych pomnik dignitaries.The pozostaje jako pomnik ludzi z eskadr myśliwców i bombowców, a jako wyraz angielsko-polska przyjaźń.

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Memorial Service to the Polish aircrew will take place at Newark Cemetery NG241SQ

The Prime Minister at the time Winston Churchill speaking about the Battle of Britain in 1940 said, “Never was so much owed by so many to so few.” By the beginning of 1941 there was a fully fledged Polish Air Force operating alongside the RAF. With 14 Squadrons it was larger than any other of the Air Force from en-occupied Europe that had joined the Allies. Over 17,000 men and women passed through the ranks of the Polish Air Force while it was stationed in the UK. They shot down 745 enemy aircraft, with a further 175 unconfirmed. They dropped thousands of bombs and laid hundreds of mines, flying 102,486 sorties notching up a total of 290,895 operation flying hours. They achieved this at a cost of 1,973 killed and 1,388 wounded. They received 342 British gallantry awards. A Question of Honour is the gripping, little-known story of the refugee Polish pilots who joined the RAF and played an essential role in saving Britain from the enemy, only to be betrayed by the Allies after the war. Second World War, the story of millions of young men and women who gave everything for freedom and in the final victory were let down.

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Premier w czasie Winston Churchill mówi o bitwie o Anglię w 1940 roku powiedział: “Nigdy nie było tak wiele zawdzięczało tak wiele tak nielicznym”. Na początku 1941 roku nie było działających pełnoprawnym obok Polskich Sił Powietrznych RAF. Z 14 eskadr był większy niż jakikolwiek inny Sił Powietrznych z en-okupowanej Europie, który dołączył do aliantów. Ponad 17.000 mężczyzn i kobiet, przeszedł w szeregach Polskich Sił Powietrznych podczas gdy był stacjonujących w Wielkiej Brytanii. Zestrzelili 745 samolotów wroga, a dalsze 175 niepotwierdzonych. Spadły tysiące bomb i położył setki kopalń, latające 102,486 lotów bojowych dystansie łącznie 290.895 operacji godzin lotu. Są to osiągnąć kosztem 1,973 zabitych i rannych 1388. Otrzymali 342 brytyjskich nagród galanterią. Pytanie Honorowa jest chwytanie, mało znana historia o uchodźców polskich pilotów, którzy dołączyli do RAF i odegrały kluczową rolę w ratowaniu Brytanię przed wrogiem, tylko być zdradzony przez aliantów po zakończeniu wojny. Druga wojna światowa, historia milionów młodych mężczyzn i kobiet, którzy oddali wszystko, o wolność i ostatecznego zwycięstwa były zawiedzeni

.  

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We Will Remember Them

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General Sikorski

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Memorial At Newark Cemetery Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

Inscription

(On Plinth) Za Wolnosc – For Freedom 1940 – 1945/

(On Front Of Cross) To The Memory Of Fallen Polish Airmen/ I Have Fought A Good

Fight, I Have Finished My Course,

I Have Kept The Faith

Physical Description

These Very Tall Latin Cross, Decorated With 12 Cross And Polish Eagle Devices On The Front Face. On Two Stage

Cmentarz Pomnik Na Newark Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire

napis

(Na Listwa) Za Wolność – Za Wolność 1940/45 /

(Na froncie Krzyża) pamięci poległych lotników polskich / Walczyłem Dobry

Walka, I bieg ukończyłem,

I wiarę zachowałem

Opis fizyczny

Te bardzo wysoki krzyża łacińskiego, Ozdobione 12 krzyżem i orłem polskim urządzeń na przedniej powierzchni. Na dwustopniowym

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Plinth Time to emphasized the Heroism, Bravery, Valour and Determination for our Freedom. We must not forget the Polish Airman and the Commonwealth they fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch. They fought to the end and then carried on the fight, we should be grateful. We certainly owe them a great deal of credit that they so rightly deserve.

Cokół Czas podkreślił bohaterstwa, odwagi, za odwagę i determinację, za naszą wolność. Nie wolno nam zapomnieć polskiego lotnika i Rzeczypospolitej walczyli o wolność przeciwko wrogowi i nie drgnął. Walczyli do końca, a następnie odbywa się na walce, powinniśmy być wdzięczni. Z pewnością zawdzięczam im wiele kredytów, że słusznie zasługują.

20150709_165134For our freedom and yours 

Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

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Laurence Goff

Six Polish crew of Wellington HX384 were killed on 11th August 1942 Buried in Newark Cemetery.

Sześć polska załoga Wellington HX384 zginęli w dniu 11 sierpnia 1942 r Pochowany na cmentarzu w Newark.

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Two tribute events took place on at the same time one by aviation historian group, of Marloes Dale Pembrokeshire West Wales and another one at Newark Cemetery.

The Crashed after takeoff into the sea

The crew of six Polish nationals perished in the crash. The wreckage was found on 21st September 1991 by divers from the Llantrisant Sub Aqua Club.

A propeller from a World War 2 bomber which crashed 73 years ago is to go on display at The Heritage Centre, Dale, Pembrokeshire, where it will be unveiled as the final part of Ceremony which will commence with a Memorial Service dedicated to the six Polish aircrew who lost their lives in the crash.

The propeller is currently being refurbished at Valero Oil Refinery, Pembroke, and will be a poignant memorial to the Polish aircrew Sgt. Drozdziok (wirless operator); Sgt. Wojtowicz (airgunner); Sgt. Modrzewski (airgunner); Sgt. Omieljaszko (pilot); P/O Maslanka (navigator); F/O Siuzdak (pilot) who were killed in August 1942 when their Wellington Mk.1c aircraft serial number HX384 of 304 (Polish) Squadron R.A.F. crashed into the sea during a night take-off from R.A.F. Dale, Pembrokeshire. The aircrew lie buried at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire. No. 304 (Polish) Squadron was a Polish manned unit within the Royal Air Force’s Coastal Command.

It was in 1991 that divers of the Llantrisant Diving Club, Glamorganshire, found the aircraft wreck and salvaged the two propellers one of which was later transported, together with a machine gun recovered at the same time, to Poland and is prominently displayed at the Polish War Museum in Warsaw. The other propeller, now destined for Dale, was for several years part of a small museum in Abergavenny. Recently recovered from a garden the Abergavenny propeller has been gifted by Mr. Steve Jones to the Heritage Centre where it will go on permanent display accompanied by a brief history of 304 Squadron; a description of the Wellington bomber; details of the crash and photographs of the crew who perished when the aircraft crashed.

The Memorial Service to the six aircrew will take place at Marloes Church followed by the acceptance of the propeller at the Heritage Centre, Dale, which will take place on 12th August 2015. We would like to acknowledge the Coastlands Local History Group in West Wales, who are organising this Service with support from Malcolm Cullen.

A laying of poppy crosses on the graves of the six airmen by members of Newark RAFA Club with support during a short service of remembrance to coincide with the service at Marloes Church, West Wales.

The following message from History Group in Wales will be read out by Vice Chairman of the Newark RAFA branch Allen Brooke. “We, at Coastlands Local History Group, are immensely touched that so many of you are joining us to commemorate the crew of Wellington Bomber HX384. We feel it is very fitting that at both the Memorial in St Peters Church, Marloes, to all the Polish Aircrew who gave their tomorrows, and at the grave of individual Airmen in Newark, The Act of Remembrance will be enacted at the same time. It is very reassuring to know so many people still feel the need to make the effort to attend such a ceremony. If any of you are ever in Dale we would be delighted to welcome you to The Old Stables Heritage Centre, where the propeller from HX384 will be in pride of place”.

Dwa wydarzenia tribute odbyła się w tym samym czasie jeden po lotnictwa grupy historyk, od Marloes Dale Pembrokeshire West Wales i drugi na cmentarzu w Newark.

Po starcie rozbił się w morzu

 Załoga sześciu polskich obywateli zginęło w katastrofie. Wrak został znaleziony w dniu 21 września 1991 roku przez nurków z Klubu Sub Llantrisant Aqua.

Śmigło z 2 wojny światowej bombowiec, który rozbił się 73 lat temu, aby przejść na wystawie w The Heritage Centre, Dale, Pembrokeshire, gdzie zostanie odsłonięty w końcowej części ceremonii, które rozpoczną się w Służby Pamięci poświęconej sześciu polskich załogi samolotów, którzy stracili życie w katastrofie.

Śmigło jest obecnie odnowiony w Valero Rafinerii, Pembroke, i będzie wzruszający pomnik polskiego sierż załogi samolotu. Drozdziok (operator wirless); Sgt. Wojtowicz (airgunner); Sgt. Modrzewski (airgunner); Sgt. Omieljaszko (pilot); P / O Maślanka (nawigator); F / O Siuzdak (pilot), którzy zginęli w sierpniu 1942 roku, gdy ich samolot Wellington Mk.1c numerem seryjnym HX384 z 304 (polski) Squadron RAF rozbił się w morzu podczas nocnego startu z RAF Dale, Pembrokeshire. Kłamstwo załogami samolotów pochowany na cmentarzu w Newark, Nottinghamshire. Nr 304 (Polski) Eskadra była polska jednostka załogowych ciągu Coastal Command Królewskich Sił Powietrznych.

To było w 1991 roku, że nurkowie z Diving Club Llantrisant, Glamorganshire, znaleziono wrak samolotu i uratowała dwie śruby napędowe, z których jeden został później transportowane wraz z karabinem maszynowym odzyskanego w tym samym czasie, w Polsce i jest w widocznym miejscu na polskim Muzeum Wojny w Warszawie. Drugi śmigło, teraz przeznaczone dla Dale, był przez kilka lat część małego muzeum w Abergavenny. Ostatnio odzyskane z ogrodem śmigło Abergavenny został obdarowany przez Pana Steve Jones z Heritage Centre, gdzie będzie go na stałej ekspozycji wraz z krótką historią 304 Squadron; opis bombowca Wellington; szczegóły katastrofy i fotografie załogi który zginął, gdy samolot rozbił się.

Serwis Pamięci do sześciu załóg odbędzie się w Marloes Kościoła następnie akceptacji śmigła w Centrum Dziedzictwa, Dale, który odbędzie się 12 sierpnia 2015. Chcielibyśmy potwierdzić Coastlands lokalnej historii Grupy w zachodniej Walii, którzy organizują tę usługę ze wsparcia z Malcolm Cullen.

Budownictwa maku krzyże na grobach sześciu lotników przez członków Klubu z Newark RAFA wsparcie podczas krótkiej służbie pamięci w czasie z usług w Marloes Kościoła, West Wales.

Poniższa wiadomość z Grupy Historia w Walii będą czytane przez Wiceprezesa branży Newark RAFA Allen Brooke. “My, w Coastlands lokalnej historii Grupy, są ogromnie wzruszony, że tak wielu z was dołączy do nas, aby upamiętnić załogę Wellington Bomber HX384. Uważamy, że to bardzo dobrze, że zarówno na Memorial w St Peters Church, Marloes, do wszystkich Polskie załogi samolotów, którzy oddali swoje jutra, a na grobie poszczególnych lotników w Newark, Ustawa Pamięci zostaną uchwalone w tym samym czasie. Jest to bardzo pocieszające wiedzieć, tak wiele osób wciąż czują potrzebę starań, aby uczestniczyć w takiej Ceremonia. Jeżeli ktoś z was kiedykolwiek w Dale będziemy z przyjemnością powita Państwa w The Old Stables Heritage Centre, gdzie śmigło z HX384 będzie w honorowym miejscu “.

304 Squadron The Polish 304 Squadron was created on 22nd August 1940 and was declared ready for operations with Vickers Wellington medium bombers on 25th April 1941. On 7th May 1942 it was transferred to RAF Coastal Command along with the Wellingtons.

304 Squadron 304 Squadron Polski powstała w dniu 22 sierpnia 1940 roku i został uznany za gotowy do operacji z bombowce Vickers Wellington średnich 25 kwietnia 1941. W dniu 7 maja 1942 roku został przeniesiony do RAF Coastal Command wraz z kalosze.

20150709_164525Crashed after takeoff into the sea. The crew of six Polish nationals perished in the crash. The wreckage was found on 21st September 1991 by divers from the Llantrisant Sub Aqua Club.

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A propeller from a World War 2 bomber which crashed 73 years ago is to go on display at The Heritage Centre, Dale, Pembrokeshire, where it will be unveiled as the final part of Ceremony which will commence with a Memorial Service dedicated to the six Polish aircrew who lost their lives in the crash.

20150709_164457The propeller is currently being refurbished at Valero Oil Refinery, Pembroke, and will be a poignant memorial to the

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Polish aircrew Sgt. Drozdziok (wirless operator); Sgt. Wojtowicz (airgunner); Sgt. Modrzewski (airgunner); Sgt. Omieljaszko (pilot); P/O Maslanka (navigator); F/O Siuzdak (pilot) who were killed in August 1942 when their Wellington Mk.1c aircraft serial number HX384 of 304 (Polish) Squadron R.A.F. crashed into the sea during a night take-off from R.A.F. Dale, Pembrokeshire. The aircrew lie buried at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire. No. 304 (Polish) Squadron was a Polish manned unit within the Royal Air Force’s Coastal Command.

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It was in 1991 that divers of the Llantrisant Diving Club, Glamorganshire, found the aircraft wreck and salvaged the two propellers one of which was later transported, together with a machine gun recovered at the same time, to Poland and is prominently displayed at the Polish War Museum in Warsaw. The other propeller, now destined for Dale, was for several years part of a small museum in Abergavenny. Recently recovered from a garden the Abergavenny propeller has been gifted by Mr. Steve Jones to the Heritage Centre where it will go on permanent display accompanied by a brief history of 304 Squadron; a description of the Wellington bomber; details of the crash and photographs of the crew who perished when the aircraft crashed.

20150709_164542The Memorial Service to the six aircrew will take place at Marloes Church followed by the acceptance of the propeller at the Heritage Centre, Dale, which will take place on 12th August 2015. We would like to acknowledge the Coastlands Local History Group in West Wales, who are organising this Service with support from Malcolm Cullen.

20150709_164601Newark Cemetery A laying of poppy crosses on the graves of the six airmen will be preformed by members of Newark RAFA Club with support from the Polish Community and Friends of Newark Cemetery during a short service of remembrance to coincide with the service at Marloes Church, West Wales.

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Laurence Goff at RAF Northholt Remembering The 2165 Polish Airmen Who Died And Their Sacrifice During The 2nd World War

The Polish Air Force in Great Britain was formed in 1940, Royal Air Force station Northolt, which was the main base for the Polish fighter squadrons during the Battle of Britain.

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All Souls’ Day At Newark Cemetery 2016 – Over 400 candles were placed by the graves of fallen Polish and Commonwealth servicemen

All Souls’ Day Sunday 30th October 2016 The annual All Souls’ Day ceremony of homage and remembrance.

Lighting of lanterns in the Commonwealth and Polish war graves also up the driveway during the evening.

Newark Cemetery will remain open in the evening until 8:00pm – 20:00pm

Zaduszki Na cmentarzu w Newark 400 świece zostały umieszczone przez grobach poległych żołnierzy polskich i Wspólnoty.

Dzień niedziela 25 Zaduszny października 2015 Na corocznym dni ceremonii Zaduszny hołdu i pamięci, będziemy zapalać latarnie w Rzeczypospolitej i grobów wojennych również się polsko podjeździe. Newark Cmentarz wieczorem pozostanie otwarte do 20:00 – 20:00pm

After Poland fell to the enemy, thousands of Polish pilots, soldiers, and sailors escaped to England. Devoted to liberating their homeland, some would form the RAF’s 303  squadron, known as the Kosciuszko squadron, after the elite unit in which many had flown back home. There thrilling exploits and fearless flying made them celebrities in Britain, where they were “adopted” by socialites and seduced by countless women, even as they yearned for news from home. During the Battle of Britain, they downed more German aircraft than any other squadron, but in a stunning twist at the war’s end, the allies rewarded their valor by abandoning Poland to Joseph Stalin. This moving, fascinating book uncovers a crucial forgotten chapter in world war 11–and Polish–history. To the Polish volunteers who were to fly and fight so brilliantly and tenaciously throughout the Battle of Britain, the United Kingdom was justifiably known as ‘last hope island’. GIL_UK LONDON_ENTERR SIKORSKI_22 Many Polish airmen lost their lives, over 400 are buried  during and 2nd world war. Many Polish servicemen choose to be buried or  cremated in Newark Cemetery after the war. Polish achieved honours for bravery with war medals awarded for their courageousness. This book is a tremendous account of their contribution in those hectic days before the RAF began to take the offensive across the channel. Summer of 1940 and the Battle of Britain — the darkest days during ww11. Great Britain stood alone, fighting for its life against the powerful German war machine. The celebrated squadron of Polish fighter pilots whose superb skill in the air helped save us during our most desperate need for help. They not only played a crucial role in the Battle of Britian in 1940, but they also contributed significantly to the allied war effort.100_1058

The Prime Minister at the time Winston Churchill speaking about the Battle of Britain in 1940 said, “never was so much owed by so many to so few.” By the beginning of 1941 there was a fully fledged Polish air force operating alongside the RAF. With 14 squadrons it was larger than any other of the air force from en-occupied Europe that had joined the allies. Over 17,000 men and women passed through the ranks of the polish air force while it was stationed in the UK. they shot down 745 enemy aircraft, with a further 175 unconfirmed. They dropped thousands of bombs and laid hundreds of mines, flying 102,486 sorties notching up a total of 290,895 operation flying hours. They achieved this at a cost of 1,973 killed and 1,388 wounded. They received 342 British gallantry awards. A question of honour is the gripping, little-known story of the refugee polish pilots who joined the RAF and played an essential role in saving Britain from the enemy, only to be betrayed by the allies after the war. Second world war, the story of millions of young men and women who gave everything for freedom and in the final victory were let down. SAM_7070 During the Second World War there were nearly a quarter of a million Poles in the Polish Armed Forces serving under British command. Today the Commission cares for the graves of nearly 4,500 Polish servicemen and women in 35 countries around the world. The highest concentration of commemorations can be found in the United Kingdom, where over 2,100 Poles are commemorated from Scotland, Newark-On-Trent to Cornwall in 244 different locations. In particular, nearly 400 casualties are commemorated in Newark-upon-Trent. Memorial Service to the Polish aircrew will take place at Newark Cemetery NG241SQ

http://friendsofnewarkcemeteryuk.weebly.com/ https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=newark+cemetery+    

SAM_4759 There were a number of RAF stations within a few miles of Newark from which several Polish squadrons operated, and a special plot on the Eastern side Newark-upon-Trent Cemetery was set aside for RAF burials. The plot includes a Memorial Cross to the Polish airmen buried here which was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. Both men subsequently died and were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial, until their remains were Newark-upon-Trent Cemetery repatriated back to Poland on the

14th September 1993.

Sikorski 2024

In June 1943, General Władysław Sikorski, the polish wartime leader, went to the Middle East to inspect the Polish units. July 4th 1943, On his return trip to England when a Royal Air Force aircraft he was travelling aboard plunged into the sea after take-off from Gibraltar. His daughter Zofia, Chief of Staff General Klimecki, an English liaison officer and all the other passengers on board died with him. Only the Czech pilot survived the crash. SAM_7287 General Wladyslaw Sikorski wishes were remembered and on Thursday 15, July 1943, his body arrived at Holy Trinity RC Church on Parliament Street Newark, Nottinghamshire, England. His coffin stayed and was guarded overnight at the Catholic Church. The next day Friday 16th July 1943 his funeral and Requiem Mass took place.

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Polish Squadrons joined With The Royal Air Force

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/09/10/remembering-the-2165-polish-airmen-and-their-sacrifice-during-the-2nd-world-war/

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Newark remembers together with RAF and Polish veterans will remember the Warsaw Uprising Air Bridge Memorial tribute. To be held each year on the last Sunday in Sept at 2pm {25th Sept 2016} at Newark Cemetery

The tragic fate of Warsaw during WWII is known to all, but surprisingly few are familiar with the heroic resistance put up by Poles during the 1944 Uprising. The plan was to reclaim Warsaw from the Germans and greet arriving Soviet forces as equals in an already independent city.

The Polish government-in-exile, headquartered in London, informed the Allies of the plans and were promised support. On 1 August at 5pm the Uprising began. Three days later Allied airdrops began, flown by British, Polish and South African pilots.

The Warsaw Rising Museum, arguably the city’s finest museum, was opened in 2004 to commemorate the 60th Anniversary of the doomed Warsaw Uprising of 1944. The Uprising is tragic and largely unknown chapter of World War II, in which a brave Polish resistance of freedom fighters met annihilation and retribution from the enemy, in front of a backdrop of underhand maneuverings – principally by Stalin. Hushed up by the Soviets after the War and largely ignored by the West, the subject of the Uprising has only started to receive the attention it demands in recent years. It is a fascinating and disturbing story, partly because of the gall and guile of the Polish Home Army, which, despite being small and woefully ill-equipped, resisted the Germans for 63 days; and partly because of the complicated issues surrounding the event. The Uprising’s ultimate futility, the severe consequences of its failure, the inaction of the Russians, and what many Poles still perceive as the betrayal of Poland by its Western Allies.

The Warsaw Uprising Museum attempts to accurately recreate the atmosphere and events of the struggle of 1944, and to give a picture of the realities of life under the enemy which precipitated the fight for freedom. The Uprising has been criticised in the past as a pointless gesture that brought needless death and destruction upon the city; however the Museum shows the importance of this ‘gesture’, which serves as an example of the strength of the Polish spirit – the same spirit that eventually helped overthrow Communism and secure Poland’s status as a free country. The Museum seeks to give this bold resistance, and in particular its patriotic protagonists, a prominent place in the national consciousness – something which was denied to them for 45 years after the War.

Address: ul. Grzybowska 79, Warsaw 00-844 , Poland
Phone Number: +48 22 539 79 05
  Website: http://www.local-life.com/warsaw/articles/warsaw-rising-museum

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-29440727

http://www.polska.pl/en/experience-poland/history-poland/portrait-woman-soldier/

http://culture.pl/en

“Culture.pl” <redakcja@culture.pl>

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Commonwealth And Polish War Graves I Polskich Newark Cmentarz Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark Upon Trent, Notts NG24 1SQ

 The next Friends of Newark Cemetery (FoNC) next meeting will take place on Wednesday 20th January 2016 at 2pm in the Pickin Room 1st floor of Newark Town Hall, Market place Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1DU.

On behalf of Friends Of Newark Cemetery. Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ since 1856. website was put together by Laurence Goff http://www.friendsofnewarkcemeteryuk.weebly.com/ http://www.facebook.com/laurencegoffnewark

laurencegoff4newark@yahoo.co.uk

frindsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

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Newark Town Councillor Laurence Goff                                                                              

    Friends Of Newark Cemetery Newark Town Hall Market Place Newark NG241DU 07794613879 01636-681878 {home}

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Newark-On-Trent Ransome and Marles Ball Bearings Bombing, Factory Workers Remembered 7th March 1941- 2016

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100_3243Bert Emerson helped rescue other survivors of the bombing at Ransome and Marles Newark-On-Trent on 7th March 1941. The factory was targeted because it made ball bearings for the defence in our country.

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2016/01/03/newark-remembers-the-air-raid-on-ransome-and-marles-ball-bearings-factory/

Newark Ransome and Marles’ Factory was Bombed, Friday 7th March 1941 Friends of Newark Cemetery will mark The 75th Anniversary our Annual Tribute commemoration Newark On-Trent

 

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Newark Ransome and Marles’ Factory was Bombed, Friday 7th March 1941 Friends of Newark Cemetery will mark The 75th Anniversary Annual Tribute commemoration Newark On-Trent. Newark Town Council is considering hosting a tribute
more details on 20th January 2016.
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​ Newark Cemetery Monday 7th March 2016 also at 1.30pm. If would like to take part please contact the chairman.

Newark Ransome and Marles’ Factory was Bombed, Friday 7th March 1941, a two day event will took place.

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Tribute with a roll call of the 41 names that died.
Roll Call
1, George Harold Henry Adams, aged 45 *
2, Wilfred Evelyn Andrew, aged 39 *
3, Olive Ash, aged 31 * O
4, Bertie Augustus Ball, aged 18 * O
5, Ernest Patrick Beale, aged 27, Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment (Private) *
6, Edward Beaver, aged 26 (Buried in Mansfield) with no Tombstone
7, Harold Vincent Brown, aged 44 *
8, Vivian Maud Castle, aged 18
9, Enid Winifred Hall Cooper, aged 30 ( Buried in Balderton in St Giles Church Yard)
10, Edna May Cottam, aged 19 *
11, Gladys Cummings, aged 21 *
12, William Joseph Dixey, aged 62 *
13, Frederick Fowler, aged 39 – Lived on Long Street Great Gonerby, Grantham, Lincolnshire. He is buried in the Churchyard of St Sebastians C of E Church, Great Gonerby, Grantham, Lincolnshire
14, George William Godridge, aged 29 * O
15, Robert Barnsdale Grant, aged 47, his son Chris was only five when his Father died, he became Newark town mayor 50 years later in 1991-1992 *
16, John Henry Green, aged 55, Volunteer Home Guard, 11th Nottinghamshire (Newark) *
17, Horace Grocock, aged 47 ( Buried in Barnby in the Willow)
18, Albert Robert Gyde, aged 42*
19, Rose Ellen Hall, aged 30 * O
20, James Hazelby Hanger, aged 29 *
21, Thomas McHallam Hardie, aged 26 *
22, Sybil Harriet Hayden, aged 34
of Ivy Farm Cottage Kirklington Newark Notts buried at Hatfield Hyde Cemetery Hollybush Lane, Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire, AL7 4JU
23, Joyce May Kirton, aged 18
24, Lily Lambert, aged 22 * O
25, George Felix Lambley, aged 39 *
26, Edith Makins, aged 21 ( Buried in South Collingham)
27, Frederick William Mann, aged 46 * O
28, Frederick Markwell, aged 50 ( Balderton ?)
29, Claude Ware Hannah Martin, aged 36 *
30, Edward E. Martin, aged 46 * O
31, Richard Naylor, aged 25 *
32, Frederick William Packwood, aged 52 *
33, William Thomas Pepper, aged 18
34, Frederick Richards, aged 32 * O
35, Alfred Mayfield Ridge, aged 68 * O
36, Reginald William Senior, aged 35, died on the 8th March 1941 *
37, George Swanwick, aged 38 * O
38, Norah Trueblood, aged 34, *
39, Esther Evelyn Varney, aged 19, (her body was never found)
40, William Warner, aged 51 *
41 Arthur Worrell, aged 31 *

Our tribute, we will Remember the people that died during Ransome and Marles Bombing. 41 were killed 30 are buried in Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire. A * star mark they are buried in Newark Cemetery 21 in total have a tombstone. O is put after names that do not have a tombstone.A retired journalist is appealing for help with his latest book that will tell the untold stories of those whose lives were affected by the bombing of a Newark factory during the second world war.

 Trevor Frecknall of North Muskham, has written ten books, including Newark In The Great War and Lionel’s War.
His next will deal with the bombing of Ransome and Marles bearings factory on March 7, 1941.

100_3087Chris Grant
A total of 41 people died and 165 more were injured when Luftwaffe bombers targeted the factory.
Mr Frecknall has received help with his research from local studies librarian Mr Tim Warner and an appeal through Facebook, but he is keen to hear from anyone with recollections.
“I want to include every angle of this story and make it a thorough tribute to all those involved” he said.
“I would love to hear from the families who lost their loved ones and from the families of those who were injured.
“I am hoping their children will remember and I would love to hear from them.”
Mr Frecknall said the day was known as Newark’s Black Friday.
“It must have been horrendous,” he said. “But 75 years later there are still many untold stories and I want to tell them for the first time.”
The raid began when many workers were returning from lunch at about 1.40pm.
A low-flying Heinkel bomber approached the factory from the south along the railway line.
Two bombs landed in the factory, another on the street and a fourth on an air raid shelter next to nearby Stanley Street.
The plane then passed over again and dropped a further bomb, which did not explode.
There was another attack at 2.25pm, when five bombs were dropped. One exploded and wounded many of the rescue workers. Mr Frecknall hopes his book will be ready in time for the 75th anniversary of the bombing, which will be commemorated next year.
The Friends of Newark Cemetery will lead tributes over three days of events and is inviting survivors, witnesses and descendants of those affected to take part.
The planned events will include roll calls on the steps of Newark Town Hall and Newark Cemetery of those killed, and a church service.
Anyone with information for Mr Frecknall Author and former journalist should contact him at tfrecknall@hotmail.com oracle 01636 702200.

Newark in the Second World War records the events surrounding the bombing of the Ransome and Marles bearing factory at Newark-on-Trent. On Friday 7th March 1941 the most well known of all the raids on [Newark-On-Trent] took place when Ransome and Marles factory was bombed. The type of work carried out at the factory made it an obvious target for the Germans. The raid commenced at about 1.40pm. Many workers were returning from their lunch break when the alert sounded at 1.35pm. A few minutes later a single Heinkel III bomber – flying so low that those on the ground could see its markings – approached from the south, following the railway line. As it neared Ransome and Marles it was fired on from several different points but still managed to drop four high explosive bombs. Two of these landed in the works, one on the road at the side of the factory and the other on an air raid shelter adjacent to Stanley Street. The plane also machine-gunned the site before circling, passing over the factory again and dropping another bomb. Fortunately this one did not explode. According to German reports the aircraft flew over for a third time in order to take photographs. The Raiders Passed siren was sounded and rescue parties went immediately into action. Various ambulances transported casualties to hospital and the Home Guard helped to close the roads around the works. The First Aid posts and the Womens Voluntary Service canteen were also kept busy. At 2.24pm the alert sounded again. Another enemy aircraft approached and dropped five more bombs but only one exploded. This was near the road and caused more damage and casualties, many of those hurt being rescue workers. Raiders Passed was sounded again at 2.51pm. As a result of the raid 29 men and 12 women were killed. One young woman was never found and presumed dead. Amongst those killed, were a young woman who had planned to get married the following weekend and a man who had recently been discharged from the army. Sixty-five people were admitted to Newark Hospital and 100 more were treated at the works own underground hospital. The official German communiqué of the raid stated that A daring low level attack took place on an armament factory at Newark causing heavy damage in the workshops. The bombers were under the command of Lietenant Knaut and Lieutenant Randolf. Local papers were severely restricted in what they could report. The day after the raid the Newark Herald reported that A single German plane came out of the low-lying clouds yesterday and dropped a number of bombs on an East Midlands town. An hour later the same or another raider dropped more bombs in the same locality. There were a number of casualties, some being fatal. The official report from which much of this information comes was not made public until the end of the war. The day became known locally as Black Friday. After the raid the two paired Lewis guns which were mounted in sand-bagged positions on Clay Lane Bridge were replaced by a Bofors 40mm anti-aircraft gun mounted on a proper gun platform. Fortunately the factory was not attacked again. We will Remember them

To The Works That Died At Ransome and Marles Bombing Air Raid of 1941

This article is about the Luftwaffe’s air-raid on the Beacon Hill factory of Ransome & Marles, as witnessed. There is also a link to a list of the names of the people killed as a result of that raid.

Ransome and Marles Stanley factory (later RHP and now owned by NSK),
During WWI women replaced many factory workers – in Newark women worked in Ransome & Marles and Wothington & Simpsons factories making munitions, Mumby & Sons doing uniforms and Coopers parachutes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fowler R&MFrederick Fowler aged 39 Lived on Long Street Great Gonerby, Grantham, Lincolnshire. He is buried in the Churchyard of St Sebastians C of E Church, Great Gonerby, Grantham, Lincolnshire

Sybil R&M DSC05251

Sybil Harriet Hayden, aged 34
of Ivy Farm Cottage Kirklington Newark Notts buried at Hatfield Hyde Cemetery Hollybush Lane, Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire, AL7 4JU

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Friends of Newark Cemetery
come and join us

The group will hold a public meeting on
17th Febrary 2016 at 2pm. This will be held at Newark Town Hall – Pickin Room arrive for a cuppa at 1.45pm and anyone interested in become a member, volunteering or put an exhibition at the Cemetery Centre.

I attribute and link to sources on the website wherever possible. My direct contact details are displayed on every page of the site. I do not receive payment or services for any reviews or editorial. The views expressed are solely my own. It dose not reflect the views of Newark Town Council,
Friends of Newark Cemetery website was created by Laurence Goff .
http://www.friendsofnewarkcemeteryuk.weebly.com/ http://www.facebook.com/grou/newarkransomeandmarle/?fref=ts http://www.facebook.com/group/friendsofnewarkcemetery/?fref=ts
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Friends of Newark Cemetery
friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk
01636-681878 ( leave a message)
07794613879

Taken by Amateur Photographer Laurence Goff
Newark Resident since 1997
Printed and promoted by Laurence Goff – Friends Of Newark Cemetery – 14 The Osiers Newark Nottinghamshire NG24 4TP

This Website By Laurence Goff of Newark Cemetery Notts UK

20150709_152626Our Historic Newark Cemetery

Newark 

London Road

Nottinghamshire

 NG24 1SQ

 Open All Year Round 

April – September 8am – 8pm

October -March 8am – 6pm

 

We will Remember them

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Taken by Laurence Goff (LG)

Flying over Newark Cemetery 


Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

SONY DSCTaken by LG

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SONY DSCTaken by LG

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 Newark Cemetery 1856

Thursday 30th October 1856

The Church of England portion of the new Cemetery was consecrated by the Bishop of Lincoln. Soon after the ceremony took place, the very first burial was made for the family of W.N. Nicholson, Ironmonger, Market Place, Newark. Their three year old son Charles John.

On 23rd February 1856

At 10 O’clock the members of the Corporation and Burial Board together with Ministers of Churches from the area. The Town Mayor Henry Sutton, Chief Constable, Waterton, with the battle-axe and the Police, W.Newton the Clerk to the Board, Town Crier with Two Mace-bearers, 12 scholars from the Grammar School and other officials assembled at the Town Hall. The procession crossed the Market Place and went by Bridge Street, Carter Gate and Beaumont Street to the New Cemetery site. The corner-stone of the new buildings was laid by Joseph Branston Esq.

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  October – March 8am – 6pm

Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERATaken by LG

The Canada goose was visiting Newark Cemetery 

Locating a grave have a look at this Map, walking up the Main Drive numbers start low and high at the other end of  cemetery. Please note Left  E side stand for East and Right  W side for West . The graves are numbered from A the next one will be B, C, D, E, and so on going outward on either side East or West. All new tombstone are black with the information on the back has  E for East then the letter for the row then the number, looking something like this E B 100 or West side W E 200.

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Taken by LG

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Taken by Laurence Goff

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Laurence Goff

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  October – March 8am – 6pm

Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm

Laurence Goff

Newark resident Laurence Goff visiting Newark Cemetery

Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856

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 My blogging principles are that to strive to be accurate. I promptly correct any inaccuracy or error with a visible edit and update. I attribute and link to sources on the website wherever possible. My direct contact details are displayed on every page of the site. I do not receive payment or services for any reviews or editorial on this website. The views expressed are solely my own, and do not reflect the views of Newark Town Council.

This memorial website is Laurence Goff personal views, I have put it together and does not represent Newark Town Council . It dedicated to the thousands of  people who resting place going back to 1856.

 A number of Royal Air Force stations within and round Newark from which several Polish squadrons operated. The highest concentration of commemorations can be particularly found in Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire.  Our local cemetery with nearly 400 Polish that died during the 2nd world war from 1940 -1947 and are buried in special plot on the east side of Newark Cemetery. Many  of the  Polish Airman after the war stayed in the UK married and choose to be buried or their ashes remains put in Newark Cemetery near Polish war graves.

 SAM_7764Taken by LG  – War Memorial to the Fallen

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Memorial to the fallen near the Main Gate at Newark Cemetery, It is location on London Road, Newark, Notts.

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William Pride name was added 96 later on war memorial on 11th September 2014

The name of a first world war soldier from Newark, has finally been added to a war memorial after two years of campaigning.
Sapper William Pride’s name was engraved onto the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery yesterday, which by coincidence was the the 96th anniversary his death.

Sapper Pride, who served with the Royal Engineers, committed suicide in 1918 at a military camp in Kent while the balance of his mind was disturbed by his experiences of combat.

He had served with the Water Transport Corps ferrying wounded soldiers from the frontline in Mesopotamia, now Iraq, while under constant shell-fire.

His name was omitted from the town’s roll of honour after the war because of the stigma attached to suicide at the time.

It was sadly a familiar story replicated up and down the country as soldiers, seamen and airmen who took their own lives or were shot for cowardice were refused inclusion on war memorials.

Many would have had what we now understand to be post-traumatic stress disorder.

The wrong was finally righted yesterday when the name of Sapper William Pride was engraved on one of the memorial’s granite monuments.

Sapper Pride had already been recognised as a casualty of war by the Commonwealth War Grave Commission and honoured with one of its headstones on his grave which is in Newark Cemetery.

Pete Stevens of Balderton, who works for the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, discovered the omission and launched a campaign backed by the Advertiser and Sapper Pride’s descendants.

After strong lobbying, Newark Town Council, who own the cemetery, agreed in July to change the criteria for inclusion on the war memorial which meant Sapper Pride’s name could finally be added.

The work was carried out on Thursday. It was done by Mark Gill, the workshop manager at E. Gill and Sons of Newark and letter cutter Roger Smeeton.

A stencil was placed on the memorial and the name was then sandblasted near the bottom of the final column of first world war names.

Mr Gill said: “It was a shame it was not put on originally but I am pleased that the criteria has changed so it could be added.”

Sapper Pride’s great grandaughter Cherilyn Pride of Southend Avenue, Newark, visited the cemetery just after the work had been completed. She said it was wonderful to see his name finally on the memorial.

“Pete Stevens really got the ball rolling and the Advertiser has been a great help,” she said.

“I always hoped that his name would be added and I am very pleased that it has been. I feel it is important that people see the names of the brave men who sacrificed so much.”

Mr Stevens said it had taken a long time to sort the matter out.

“In the end we have done what we set out to achieve,” he said.

“It is right and fitting that Sapper Pride’s name is on the memorial.”http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Sapper-William-Prides-name-added-to-Newark-w

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Friends of Newark Cemetery

Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery  by appointment for groups

 Contact the Chairman Laurence Goff  01636-681878  mobile 07794613879 or leave a message at Newark Town Hall 01636-0333 or by Email: 

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk  

 

We  need to found more Volunteers to welcome visits to Newark Cemetery by  showing around our exhibition, serving refreshments giving tours or help 

We will help you locate a grave for visits.

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Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish Airmen

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Their Sacrifice during the dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth and Polish who also join up with the RAF

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Commonwealth and Polish War Graves, Newark On Trent, Nottinghamshire  24 1SQ

Time to emphasized the heroism, bravery, valour and determination for  our freedom. Lest We Forget, Britain honoured its war dead. Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish Sacrifice. The dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth that join up with the RAF that were killed and there resting place is Newark Cemetery 4 RAAF- Australian, 44 British Servicemen, 17 RCAF- Canadian, 3 RNZAF- New Zealand and 397 Polish Airmen and other servicemen.

Newark Cemetery can boast of having lot’s of impressive people that are buried in our Cemetery since 1856. An array of famous inhabitants that are buried in Newark

Laurence Goff Chairman Friends Of Newark Cemetery and Newark resident 

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Laurencegoff

Newark 

Laurence Goff Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery

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Laurencegoff 

Visiting Commonwealth and Polish War Grave – Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire

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Many British Commonwealth helped thanks to  Royal Australian Air Force (4 killed), British, Royal Canadian Air Force (17 killed), Royal New Zealand Air Force (3 killed) and Polish Air Force some (nearly 400 killed) They are Buried in Newark-On-Trent Cemetery 2nd World War at Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire. Let us all Remember the many Airmen that were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force during the Battle to save Europe 1939-1945.  Paying a fitting Tribute to our brave fighters for their contribution. 17,000 Polish pilots and ground crew members had formed 14 squadron in RAF and 2,000 were killed of which over 400  from 1940 – 1947 are buried in Newark Cemetery.

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Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm,  October – March 8am-6pm

Location:  Newark-on-Trent

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski

 Poland’s war heroes

Lest We Forget

 4th July 2013 marked the 70th anniversary of his death

Buried in Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July 1943 until 13th September 1993

 I believe we should Remember him, RIP

 

Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish their Sacrifice 

 The dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth and Polish who also join up with the RAF

 Many were killed who resting place is Newark Cemetery 4 RAAF – Australian, 44 British Servicemen, 17 RCAF – Canadian, 3 RNZAF – New Zealand and 397 Polish Airmen together with other servicemen

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves, Newark On Trent NG24 1SQ

Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish

Their Sacrifice 

General Wladyslaw Sikorski

Our remembrance for Poland’s War hero

Lest We Forget

 4th July 1943 – 2013

Buried in Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July 1943 until 13th September 1993

Let’s mark the 70th anniversary of his death

General Sikorski was one of the great Polish heroes. After the German invasion of Poland, he became the Prime Minister of a new Polish Government in exile, and also Commander in Chief of the Polish Armed Forces, which fought with the Allies by land, sea and air throughout the Second World War. But he also personally directed Poland’s internal resistance movement against the German occupying army in Poland itself. He was thus Political leader, military leader and resistance leader, all at the same time. He was the personal embodiment of the whole Polish Nation’s fight for survival as a free nation and as a people, and liberation from the terrible oppression to which they had become subject. It is little wonder then that this man was so loved and respected by his people, and that they continue to revere and honour his memory to this day. As British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill said in his tribute to General Sikorski in the House of Commons, ‘he was truly the symbol and embodiment of that spirit which has borne the Polish nation through the centuries.’ General Sikorski was also very active in World politics at that time, attending many political conferences with the allies and was, indeed, one of the Architects of the United Nations. Churchill described his death as ‘a most grievous loss to the cause of the United Nations.’ And so it was as Commander in Chief of the Free Polish Forces that General Sikorski left England on 24th May 1943 onboard an RAF Liberator Aircraft bound for Cairo to visit Polish Troops fighting with the Allies in North Africa. On his return from Cairo, his Liberator aircraft touched down at Gibraltar, just as it had done on the way out to Cairo. General Sikorski was accompanied by his daughter Zofia, who was also Chief of the Polish Womens Auxiliary. The Party also included the Polish military Chief Of Staff and Chief of Operations, and their support staff. They arrived at Gibraltar on Saturday 3rd July at 6.37p.m. Their aircraft, the same Liberator, took off from Gibraltar airport at 11p.m. the next day, Sunday 4th July on the final leg of General Sikorskis return journey from Cairo to London. The aeroplane crashed seconds after take-off, just off the eastern end of the runway. General Sikorski, his daughter and all his party perished. General Sikorski’s body lay in State for several days at the Cathedral of St Mary the Crowned on Main Street, until a Polish warship could reach Gibraltar to take it to the UK for burial. On arrival at the Cathedral entrance the street was crowded with Gibraltarian men (their wives, children and parents had been evacuated from Gibraltar during the war) who wanted to show their respect to this courageous Polish hero. The then Bishop of Gibraltar celebrated a requiem mass in the Cathedral before the mortal remains of General Sikorski and his party were transferred to the Polish destroyer ‘Orkan’. General Sikorski was buried in Newark Cemetery in England. His grave became a shrine to free Poles throughout the world whose view was that the General’s remains should never be returned to Poland while the country was under foreign domination. It was therefore not until the fall of the Berlin Wall and the liberation of Eastern Europe from Soviet domination that, in September 1993, his remains were disinterred and flown to Warsaw to be re-interred in a special crypt in Wawel Cathedral which lies inside the walls of the ancient castle, traditional burial place of Polish Kings.

  Remember him

 RIP

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/friends-of-newark-cemetery-fonc/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/04/13/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

The Act Of Commemoration, Honouring The Memory As Our Fitting Tribute To Them

 The Valiant Contribution made by the Commonwealth and Polish Airmen for protection of our country freedom.The Newark Town Council  particularly proud to be the custodian of the Memorial to General Wladyslaw Sikorski

 Newark Cemetery can boast of having lot’s of impressive people that are buried in our Cemetery since 1856. An array of famous inhabitants that are buried in Newark.

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Chapel Interpretation Centre (East side turn left at the Main Arch)

{Location walk from the parking lot to the main Arch turn left red side door}

Organised by

The Friends of Newark Cemetery

 The Chapel  Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery, will  open  by appointment for groups for our exhibition – tours  on 7 days a week during the Summer Months

Please give plenty of notice

{Location walk from the parking lot to the main Arch turn left red side door}

Chapel Interpretation Centre {Former Non Conformist Chapel} 

 (East side turn left at the Main Arch)

Laurencegoff

Friends Of Newark Cemetery

Opening of The Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery

 September Heritage Day  2014 – Annual Air Bridge Memorial Service

28th September 2014 Polish and Commonwealth  2pm from the main gate off London Road NG24 1SQ

Friends Of Newark Cemetery

  

25th October 2015 Sunday All Souls Day Polish and Commonwealth event 3pm from the main gate of London Road

Friends Of Newark Cemetery

Opening of The Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery

 Any other times and dates by appointment

The Friends of Newark Cemetery,

Also we will provide help

In finding a specific grave location and are

Offering a general tour of the Cemetery.

A highlight within the Centre Will be a

Display of history of Newark Cemetery

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Laurence Goff and Pete Stevens

Photo Project from the First World War by Pete Stevens, with over 150 Photographs from

the Newark & Balderton Memorial to the Fallen

 

Volunteers are welcome

For more information

Laurence Goff

Chairman

Friends of Newark Cemetery

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

 Newark Town Hall/Market Place

Newark-on-Trent NG24 1DU

01636-681878 (home)

07794613879 {Mobile}

The Friends of Newark Cemetery  will open The Chapel  Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery,  on weekend  or by appointment for groups.  Historical  walks or  help by locating  families/casualties both in Newark Cemetery.  Friends of Newark Cemetery Volunteers will give assistance members of the public with display of history of well know people that are buried here.

 Come and see what you will find

At Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery.

We will have volunteers on site from Friends of Newark Cemetery

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 We are happy to welcome groups visiting Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for  160 years since 1856. This memorial website is my personal views, I have put it together and do not represent Newark Town Council . It dedicated to the thousands of  people who resting place is at Newark Cemetery for all to see and view. Having a means of further promoting Newark cemetery, and encouraging interested people to join the tribute. This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately, the content here is solely the responsibility of

Newark resident Laurence Goff

Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery

Newark Cemetery can boast of having lot’s of impressive benefactors  since 1856. An array of  names and servicemen going back to 1914 to the present day who resting place is located in Newark-On-Trent.

Amongst the many well-known local people that are buried in Newark Cemetery include  among the many graves are Memorials to some of Newark’s greatest benefactors and people who have helped shape Newark

Thursday 30th October 1856. The Church of England portion of the new Cemetery was consecrated by the Bishop of Lincoln. Soon after the ceremony took place, the very first burial was made for the family of W.N. Nicholson, Ironmonger, Market Place, Newark. Their three year old son Charles John.

On 23rd February 1856 . At 10 O’clock the members of the Corporation and Burial Board together with Ministers of Churches from the area. The Town Mayor Henry Sutton, Chief Constable, Waterton, with the battle-axe and the Police, W.Newton the Clerk to the Board, Town Crier with Two Mace-bearers, 12 scholars from the Grammar School and other officials assembled at the Town Hall. The procession crossed the Market Place and went by Bridge Street, Carter Gate and Beaumont Street to the New Cemetery site. The corner-stone of the new buildings was laid by Joseph Branston Esq.

Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire since 1856

Newark Cemetery at first glance appear to possess anything of particular historical significance, since I have found out that is not the case.

 Friends Of Newark Cemetery next meeting is on Wednesday  20th January 2016  Newark Town Hall at 2.00pm in the Pickin Room

Family history and research day which was held last April was a great success so will be doing tours and locating graves for visits. We are grateful to Newark Town Council and James Radley  who opened Newark cemetery records system so families can have the plot numbers and location of the grave  there would like to found. 

Pete Stevens of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, who lives in Balderton, has made it a project to try to produce a photo of every one that died in wars.

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 The  War Memorial To The Fallen

457 WWI –  WW11 144 were killed from Newark

Newark Town Hall, Market Place, Newark, Nottinghamshire, NG24 1DU.

 20150709_152626Laurence Goff At Newark Cemetery

History and sacrifice come alive in Newark cemetery

Pete Stevens of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, who lives in Balderton, has made it a project to try to produce a photo of every one of the 457 WWI fallen who came from Newark. 144 of those from WWII. Photos found so far are displayed in the Interpretation Centre.
Some 30 fatalities from the Ransome and Marles bombing in 1941 are buried here, including John Henry Green, a roof spotter in the Home Guard who had the misfortune, aged 55, to be up there when the bombs rained down, and Edward Beale. I located his grave when far-flung family members travelled to Newark to see it for the first time.

There are of course 397 Polish war graves here from WWII (the figure of 422 given in the cemetery leaflet includes fatalities from 1947) – and General Sikorski was buried here during his country’s occupation, his remains being finally repatriated in 1993.

Given the prospect of a sunny summer’s day, most folk would contemplate a trip to the seaside rather than visit the local cemetery, but having just spent two fascinating hours in Newark Cemetery I’m starting to appreciate its attractions, writes Graham Keal.

These even include a donkey, though he’s not giving rides and he (or she) is there in photographic form only. Newark town councillor and chair of the Friends of Newark Cemetery Laurence Goff showed me round and shared his increasing knowledge about the cemetery its residents. And he told me about the donkey, whose photograph he’s pictured holding:

“He used to live in the cemetery many years ago and pulled the cart with the coffins. I’m still trying to find out what his name was,” said Laurence.

Apart from the donkey photo there were many more reasons to visit, especially on this Saturday’s next Open Day (July 14 2012) – peace and quiet, flowers and the freshly mown grass, the chaffinch perched perkily on a nearby gravestone while we reviewed the final home of Newark’s local notables, and the chance to quietly appreciate for a moment the sacrifice made by so many young men in wars spanning centuries.

The Victorian chapel now converted into the cemetery’s Interpretation Centre holds a wealth of information, photographic displays and leaflets detailing everything from the sobering number of soldiers and servicemen – English, Polish, Canadians, Australians and New Zealanders – laid to rest here to the most famous residents and the native fauna and flora. Apart from the chaffinch, you might see a spotted flycatcher, gold crests, field fares and tree creepers as well as the more common blackbirds, sparrows and wood pigeons – plus squirrels and hedgehogs.

Laurence has become thoroughly absorbed in the cemetery’s history since becoming a founder member of the Friends of Newark Cemetery in 2005. He has been Chairman of the Friends for three years: “It’s been fascinating to find out about the people here. I didn’t know when I started that I would get so heavily involved, but once you’ve taken that first step, you have to find out the next chapter.”

He gets enquiries from all over the world about long-lost graves of family members – his website at https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com has had 32,700 hits. Last year a lady from Australia came in search of the grave of Hilda Scaife, who died in 1923, aged 39.

Her gravestone reads “She kept her honour bright” but the grave took some finding, not least because it was smothered in ivy. Laurence later cleared the ivy and tidied the area before emailing a picture of Hilda’s grave, brightness restored, to her relative.

Local notables buried here include war hero Sam Derry, whose daring undercover work in The Vatican during WWII was immortalised in his gripping book The Rome Escape Line, about his work with Monsignor Hugh O’Flaherty, sustaining escaped PoWs and smuggling them back to Britain. Their exploits were also recorded in the film The Scarlet and the Black, starring Gregory Peck. Sam even appeared on This Is Your Life.

https://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/05/22/lieutenant-colonel-sam-derry-of-newark-on-trent/

 

Balderton’s distinguished actor Sir Donald Wolfit is not buried here, but his older brother Philip Woolfitt is (Sir Donald changed the spelling for his stage name). Philip was a casualty of WWI, aged just 19. He joined up after travelling to Canada and served in the Canadian infantry.

Cornelius Brown, who died in 1907 after writing the definitive history of Newark in two huge volumes and editing the Newark Advertiser for 33 years, lies here as do renowned artist William H. Cubley, Joseph Gilstrap, whose son founded Newark’s first free library in 1883, countless Quibells and 48 Blatherwicks, both families having made great contributions to the town’s history and civic life.

  • Further Open Days at the Cemetery Interpretation Centre are planned for,  2014.  Newark Heritage Open day. Laurence can also open the centre for groups or visitors  by arrangement. Call him on 01636 681878 leave a message or 07794613879 email:

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

“Loved In Life, Honoured In Death, Cherished In Our Memory, Amen”

  Newark Cemetery 1856

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  October – March 8am – 6pm

Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm

 

Locating a grave have a look at this Map, walking up the Main Drive numbers start low and high at the other end of  cemetery. Please note E side stand for East and W side for West . The graves are numbered from A the next one will be B, C, D, E, and so on going outward on either side East or West. All new tombstone are black with the information on the back has  E for East then the letter for the row then the number, looking something like this E B 100 or West side W E 200.

We Will Remember  Them At Newark Cemetery

LG

 War Memorial to the Fallen of Newark commemorating, by name, those local military personnel who lost their lives in conflict going back to the first World War of 1914

Memorial To The Fallen located off London Road at Newark Cemetery

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Behind the Remembrance Poppy

This is the story of how the red field poppy came to be known as an internationally recognized symbol of Remembrance.

 

From its association with poppies flowering in the spring of 1915 on the battlefields of Belgium, France and Gallipoli this vivid red flower has become synonymous with great loss of life in war.

Pete Stevens exhibition at

Chapel Interpretation Centre, Newark Cemetery

Video http://youtu.be/11ipWE1C6qo

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

Pete Stevens his project has been launched to match photographs to all the names on the Newark and Balderton war memorials There are 603 names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen at Newark Cemetery, of whom 456 are first world war casualties. Another 144 are from the second world war, one died in West Africa in 1961, one in Malaya in 1952 and one in Afghanistan in 2007 There are 45 names from the first world war on the memorial in St Giles’ Church, Balderton, and a further 13 from the second world war.

I am grateful to the Newark Advertiser http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

Memorial project in need of help

A project to match photographs to names on Newark and Balderton war memorials is almost a third of the way through, but more help is needed to see it completed.

The aim was to trace pictures of those who fell in battle from the first world war to the present day. We held commemorations marking the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of the first world war.

 So far, more than 150 pictures have been submitted thanks to appeals in the Advertiser.

Many have come from relatives, while others are from the newspaper’s archives.

 There are, however, 604 names on Newark’s Memorial to the Fallen in the London Road cemetery, of which 457 are first world war casualties.

Another 144 are from the second world war, one died in West Africa in 1961, one in Malaya in 1952.

 Afghanistan in 2007.

There are 45 names on the memorial in St Giles’ Church, Balderton, from the first world war, and 13 from the second world war.

Mr Pete Stevens, a Commonwealth War Graves Commission stonemason, of Coleman Avenue, Balderton, is behind the project.

Mr Stevens said: “I am very pleased with the response we have had so far but we need people to speak to family members and delve into their lofts and cupboards for the pictures of their relatives so we can see this through.

 “It would be wonderful to be able to have a complete, publicly-available record of what each of these men looked like, both for their families and future generations of residents of Newark and Balderton.”

 Among those whose pictures have been submitted already is Lance-corporal Charles Edgar Harrison of the 1st/8th Battalion Sherwood Foresters. He was killed aged 36 on May 10, 1915.

 He was married to Eleanor A. Harrison, of Bethulie, Farndon Road, Newark, and is buried in Dud Corner Cemetery, Loos Par-de-Calais, France

 

 Another casualty from the same regiment, 25 years later in the second world war, is Private Richard Scott, of 8th Battalion the Sherwood Foresters, who died on April 27, 1940 aged 21.

He was the son of Penelope Scott, of Bowbridge Road, Newark, and is buried in Lillehammer Northern Civil Cemetery in Norway where he was killed during an ill-fated effort to prevent Norway falling into Nazi hands.

 If you have a photograph of anyone featured on either memorial, send it to Mr Stevens at Petejstevens@hotmail.co.uk or drop it in at the Advertiser offices on Appletongate, Newark, with details of who it is and as much information about them as possible.


http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Memorial-project-in-need-of-help

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Medals awarded to Newark’s only Victoria Cross Recipient

Laurence Goff Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery

01636-681878 (Home)

 Laurence Goff

Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery

Their Sacrifice 

during the dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth and Polish who also join up with the RAF

 

The Valiant Contribution made by the Commonwealth and Polish Airmen for protection of our country freedom.The Newark Town Council  particularly proud to be the custodian of the Memorial to General Wladyslaw Sikorski

Newark Cemetery can boast of having lot’s of impressive people that are buried in our Cemetery since 1856. An array of famous inhabitants that are buried in Newark.

  

Chapel Interpretation Centre Newark Cemetery

 Memorial plaque located up high on the wall of  The Natwest Bank,  Stodman Street, Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

It is dedicated to the thou