We Remember The Fallen Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

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A time to remember – they will never be forgotten

“We reflect 
on times past and to remember 
them, 
but never forgotten”

Laurencegoff

British Legion Flag Will Fly During Remembrance Day Events

Ministry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of Defence

The 4th of August 2014  declaration of the 1st World War by Great Britain on Germany

Two minutes

Two minutes isn’t much to give,

To those who fought and died,

And not forgetting loved ones,

Who Till this day have cried.

To Flanders fields where poppies grow,

Our thoughts return to long ago,

And in remembrance they still live,

Two minutes isn’t much to give

Remembrance Day Sunday 9th November 2014

for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

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At the going down of the sun and in the morning

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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 Laurencegoff

War Memorial Newark Cemetery Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire 

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls
 

We will remember them

On the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month in 1918 the First World War ended. Newark still wants to remember those who have given and give today their lives for peace and freedom.  Remembrance Day they will laid wreathes besides  War Memorials. It’s heartening to see that people will still remember their sacrifices.

Laurencegoff

Newark Parish Church, St. Mary Magdalene in Nottinghamshire

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

 Ministry of Defence

Laurencegoff

Memorial To The Fallen located off London Road at Newark Cemetery

 Newark, Notts NG24 1SQ

Ministry of Defence

Laurencegoff

First World War 1914-1918 total from Newark Killed  455

Second World War 1939-1945 total from Newark  killed 144 One from West Africa 1961 total  killed 1 One from Malaya 1962 total killed  1 One from Afghanistan 2007 total  killed 1

Sunday 9th November 2014 at 11am Remembrance Day, we will Remember them at Newark Cemetery with Two Minute Silence

Memorial to the Fallen at Newark Cemetery

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Memorial to the fallen at Newark Cemetery

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Ministry of Defence

Laurencegoff

We will Remember the courage and honour the sacrifice of the boys who became men 100 years ago and support the young men and women who have followed in their footsteps and are today’s soldiers    

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Pat Alexander President Friends of Newark Cemetery

Memorial to the Fallen of Newark-On–Trent

 A Lasting tribute to mark the ultimate sacrifice made by Newark’s fallen heroes has been officially unveiled 2007

Memorial to the Fallen of Newark-On–Trent

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Laurencegoff 

We Will Remember Them  for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom   

 

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Laurencegoff 

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

 

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Laurencegoff

Newark Cemetery Remembrance Day

London Road, Newark On Trent, Notts NG24 1DU  

A Lasting tribute to mark the ultimate sacrifice made by Newark’s fallen heroes 

Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

Sunday 9th November 2014 at 11am Remembrance Day, we will Remember them. Visitors at Newark cemetery at the war memorial to victims of the First  Second World War, paying their respects for the two minute silence on Remembrance Sunday

Newark Cemetery

For over 150 years since 1856

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm, October – March 8am-6pm 

 

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Laurence Goff  Chairman and Pat Alexander President Friends of Newark Cemetery

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

The 4th of August 2014 is the 100th anniversary of the declaration of the 1st World War 

by 

Great Britain on Germany

Ministry of Defence

Laurencegoff 

Newark Cemetery  Memorial to the Fallen  Newark  Nottinghamshire,  On 28th April 2007, Richard Todd OBE, officially unveiled the Memorial to the Fallen with  The Lord-Lieutenant of Nottinghamshire, Sir Andrew Buchanan. Memorial to the Fallen of Newark-On–Trent commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914 First World War 1914 -1918 total from Newark Killed  456

We Remember The Fallen Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire 

Click on  for location of Cemetery Newark-on-Trent

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

 Ministry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of Defence

Ministry of DefenceMinistry of Defence

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Friends of Newark Cemetery would like more volunteers to help with events in 2014. We would welcome you at our AGM – meeting. This will be held on Wednesday

30th April 2014, 6pm at Town Hall Newark in the Pickin room.

Volunteers

 Newark  exhibition of the First world war display during
 2014 for groups by appointment.

Tours of the 49 graves at Newark Cemetery

Cemetery War Memorial to the Fallen (Main Gate London Road)

We want to make this a memorable and successful event, it will mark the 100th anniversary of the declaration of the 1st World War which started on 4th August 1914.

We look forward to hearing from you with your input.

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https://www.facebook.com/events/1432427336972821/ 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/233752416933/?fref=ts

2 poster Arboretumm

A Trip is planned on Wednesday 28th May 2014 

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Friends Of Newark Cemetery

Will be organizing a Coach Trip Wednesday 28th May 2014 (All 49 Seats have Been Sold). 

Leaving from Newark  to The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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The National Memorial Arboretum , Staffordshire 

www.thenma.org.uk

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 The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire, an uplifting visit for all ages

Honours the fallen all year round

 

A time to remember – that you will never forget28th May Arboretum poster 1

We Remember The Fallen 

Published on Jul 18, 2013

During World War One, Some 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers were shot for desertion or cowardice, most of them were sentenced after a short trial at which no real opportunity for defence was allowed , today it is recognised that several of them were under age when they volunteered and that many of them suffering from shell shock or post traumatic stress disorder,

Andy Decomyn’s statue shot at dawn is modelled on Private Herbert  Francis Burden, of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, who was Shot at Dawn at Ypres in 1915, aged 17.

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Laurencegoff

August 2006

Pardoned for the 306 soldiers shot at dawn for ‘cowardice’ 

At the age of 16, Private Herbert Burden lied that he was two years older so he could join the Northumberland Fusiliers and fight in the war. Private Herbert Burden, was sentenced to death for desertion.

http://bellewaarde1915.co.uk/men/private%20herbert%20burden.htm

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2014/01/23/the-national-memorial-arboretum-staffordshire-laurence-goff-uplifting-visit/

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Laurencegoff

All 306 soldiers of the First World War who were shot at dawn for cowardice or desertion were granted posthumous pardons, the Ministry of Defence. 

Des Browne, the Defence Secretary, has decided to cut short a review that had been prompted by campaigns to exonerate the men, and emergency legislation was put before the House of Commons . The news was greeted with joy by the family of Pte Harry Farr, who was executed during the Battle of the Somme in 1916 for cowardice in the face of the enemy.

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Laurencegoff

The names of Herbert Francis Burden and those others who suffered the fate of being shot at dawn are listed on the stakes arranged in the form of a greek theatre around the statue, symbolising the tragedy that these events signify. Many of the posts say Age unknown and this is because many young men lied about their age in order to enlist for their country. Many of them had no representation at court-martial because most of the officers had been killed when they went over the top. The average life expectancy of an officer on the front line was around 10 weeks. We know of these 306 soldiers, but we do not know the total figure because between 80pc and 90pc of those sentenced to die had their sentences commuted and were probably sent to jail or hard labour.

Many visitors ask about the Shot at Dawn location of the memorial in the Arboretum, it seems appropriate that it should be on the eastern edge where dawn strikes.
The six trees facing the posts represent the firing squad, all aiming for the medal around the statue’s neck and none of them knowing who had the fatal bullet, it must have been very traumatic for them too, having to shoot one of their own.

The Campaign For a Pardon,
After the 75 year Secrecy Act was lifted, Members of the Shot at Dawn Organisation started Campaigning for a Pardon, 
The campaign commenced in 1992 and was led by Janet Booth who sought a pardon for her grandfather. Private Harry Farr, janet’s grandmother had lived with the shame and stigma of her husband being shot for cowardice in 1916. She believed he was wrongly convicted and actually suffering from shellshock , Harry Farr’s family took the Ministry of Defence to the high court and won, in 2006 a posthumous pardon was granted for Harry and the other men that were Shot and Dawn.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7FFW40AZxA

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Laurencegoff

The Memorial at The National Memorial Arboretum, the UK’s Centre of Remembrance

Laurencegoff

The Memorial at The National Memorial Arboretum, the UK’s Centre of Remembrance

Laurencegoff

The Memorial at The National Memorial Arboretum, the UK’s Centre of Remembrance

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2014/01/23/the-national-memorial-arboretum-staffordshire-laurence-goff-uplifting-visit/

Laurencegoff

The Memorial at The National Memorial Arboretum,

the UK’s Centre of Remembrance

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Newark Schools Remembrance Day

We will again on 4th November 2014

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In Loving Memory of Samuel Boyd Quibell, who died of wound in the 1st World war at age 25

 Also his Brother Oliver Henry Quibell

Major 4th East Yorks.T.F. Son of Oliver and Elizabeth Quibell

Ministry of Defence

Member from the 1st World War of Major Samuel Boyd Quibell died of wound in Germany 5th Feb 1916. His names  on the back of his father Oliver and Mother grave stone located at Newark Cemetery.

We Will Remember

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

“They went with songs to the battle, they were young, Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow. They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted; They fell with their faces to the foe. They shall not grow old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them.”

 For the Fallen by Laurence Binyon

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HMS Newark Bell 

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We Remember The Fallen Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire 

Laurencegoff

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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Display of history of Newark Cemetery Photo Project from the First World War by Pete Stevens, with over 150 Photographs from the Newark & Balderton Memorial to the Fallen

.Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

During the First World War, we are grateful that both local newspapers,  ran extensive coverage on local casualties, which are of great interest and value for those researching their family history.

  War Graves

London Road

Newark Cemetery

Nottinghamshire NG 24 1SQ

Is Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm

October – March 8am-6pm

 

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls  Ministry of Defence

Laurencegoff

Memorial To The Fallen located off London Road at Newark Cemetery

Sunday 9th November 2013 at 11am Remembrance Day, we will Remember them at Newark Cemetery

Memorial to the Fallen at Newark Cemetery

Laurencegoff

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow in Flanders fields

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

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We Remember  them

 

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We Remember  them

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We Remember Them

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We Remember Them

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Laurencegoff

                Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Ministry of Defence

Laurencegoff

First World War 1914-1918 total from Newark Killed  455 

Second World War 1939-1945 total from Newark  killed 144 One from West Africa 1961 total  killed 1 One from Malaya 1962 total killed  1 One from Afghanistan 2007 total  killed 1

Total 602 Memorial To The Fallen  London Road at Newark Cemetery

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsSAM_1928

Laurencegoff

                 Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Ministry of Defence

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

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Laurencegoff

A Lasting tribute at Newark Cemetery to mark the ultimate sacrifice made for Newark’s fallen heroes

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

 

Kitchener was a British military leader and statesman who, as secretary of state for war in the first years of World War One, organised armies on an unprecedented scale. He was also depicted on the most famous British army recruitment poster ever produced.

Horatio Kitchener was born on 24 June 1850 in County Kerry, Ireland. He was educated in Switzerland and at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich. In 1871, he joined in the Royal Engineers. He took part in the unsuccessful operation to relieve General Charles Gordon at Khartoum in 1884-1885, and in 1886 was appointed governor general of eastern Sudan. Six years later served he became commander in chief of the Egyptian army. In 1896, he began the reconquest of Sudan from the forces of al-Mahdi, culminating in the Battle of Omdurman and the reoccupation of Khartoum in 1898. Kitchener was then made governor of Sudan, having become a national hero.

In 1900, Kitchener was appointed chief of staff to Lord Roberts, British commander in the Boer War. When Roberts returned to England, Kitchener was left to deal with continuing Boer resistance. His ruthless measures – including the use of camps to imprison civilians (the origin of the term ‘concentration camp’) – were much criticised.

On returning to England in 1902, he was created Viscount Kitchener (he was made an earl in 1914) and was appointed commander in chief in India. In 1911, he became the proconsul of Egypt, serving there and in the Sudan until 1914. When war broke out, Kitchener reluctantly accepted the appointment of secretary of state for war. Unlike many in government and the military, he foresaw a war lasting for years, and planned accordingly. He rapidly enlisted and trained huge numbers of volunteers for a succession of entirely new ‘Kitchener armies’.

But his cabinet colleagues did not share the public worship of Kitchener and he was gradually relieved of his responsibilities. His support for the disastrous Dardanelles operation, combined with the ‘shell crisis’ of 1915, eroded his reputation further. Sent on a mission to Russia in June 1916, he drowned on 5 June when his ship, HMS Hampshire was sunk by a German mine off the Orkneys.

Ministry of Defence

 The Call Out For the 1st World War Lord Kitchener, the Secretary of State for War, considered the Territorial Army  after the first call in August for 500,000 men; a further 3.5 million were called-for

www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk

 Sherwood Foresters In Newark Market Place Off to War

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Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire  

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WWI soldiers Newark

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Newark Cemetery

London Road

Newark, Notts NG24 1SQ

Remembrance Day

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Memorial to the Fallen of Newark-On–Trent

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We Will Remember Them  for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom   

Ministry of Defence

Laurencegoff 

Newark Cemetery  Memorial to the Fallen  Newark  Nottinghamshire,  On 28th April 2007, Richard Todd OBE, officially unveiled the Memorial to the Fallen with  The Lord-Lieutenant of Nottinghamshire, Sir Andrew Buchanan. Memorial to the Fallen of Newark-On–Trent commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914 First World War 1914 -1918 total from Newark Killed  455 Second World War 1939-1945 total from Newark  killed 144 

One from West Africa 1961 total  killed 1 One from Malaya 1962 total killed  1

One from Afghanistan 2007 One  killed 1 Total 602

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Laurencegoff

Pictures come in for project, thanks to Pete Stevens CWGC and our local paper

The Newark Advertiser

http://www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Pictures-come-in-for-project

Photographs of ten fallen heroes have so far been found for a pictorial project to honour them

  1. CWGC - Homepage

    www.cwgc.org/

     The Commonwealth War Graves Commission - the cemeteries, work memorials, horticulture, architecture and records of CWGC and the commemoration

 SAM_1337Ministry of Defence

 Laurence Goff Chairman Friends Of Newark Cemetery and Pete Stevens from Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC)100th years on this date 4th August 1914 start of World War 1 Memorial to the Fallen of 603 Newark residents that have lost their lives in conflict since 1914 to the present day. Located at Newark Cemetery,  Main Gate, London Road, Newark,

Nottinghamshire Newark’s war dead

Mr Brian Clark-Dench, 74, of Balderton, whose uncle features on the Newark Memorial To The Fallen. The project, which aims to put faces to the 603 names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen at Newark Cemetery, is being coordinated by Mr Pete Stevens, a Commonwealth War Graves Commission stonemason. He hopes to find all of the pictures in time for the 100th anniversary of the start of the first world war in 2014. The Newark memorial names 456 Servicemen who died in the first world war and 144 casualties from the second world war. Also named are one Serviceman who died in West Africa in 1961, one who died in Malaya in 1952, and one in Afghanistan in 2007. Mr Stevens is seeking pictures to a further 45 names from the first world war on the memorial in St Giles’ Church, Balderton, and 13 from the second world war. Mr Stevens has set up a website to add each picture collected to the details of the casualty on one of the war memorials.The website can be viewed at 

www.memorialphotoproject.tumblr.com

So far those who have come forward to help with the project include Mr Brian Clark-Dench, of Gibson Crescent, Balderton, whose uncle, Mr Alfred Charles Dench, is one of the names on the Newark memorial. Mr Dench, who was born in Winthorpe and lived on Middlegate, Newark, for most of his life, served in 1st Battalion King’s Company of the Grenadier Guards. He was killed in 1915 at the village of Loos, France, at the age of 23, and was later buried to the north-west of the village.

Over the years Mr Clark-Dench has compiled and collected military items related to his uncle, including his original dog tags, campaign medals, postcards sent from France, photographs and even his death notice, signed by Field Marshall Herbert Kitchener, British Secretary of State for War from 1914-16. Mr Clark-Dench, who served in the same battalion as his uncle during the 1950s, said: “When I saw the article in the Advertiser I was amazed and wanted to come forward and help. “I never knew my uncle but I do feel the need to keep his memory alive because his story is an interesting tale. “He was held in high regard as being a real hard man, strong as an ox. “During battle he saved his company commander from No Man’s Land, despite being under heavy enemy fire — this was the type of man he was.“Coming forward to help with the project is very important because the men on the memorials should be remembered — what they did for this country should never be forgotten. “I am immensely proud of what my uncle did and the rest of my family — that is something I wanted to honour.” Any relative of one of the fallen featured on either memorial and who has a photograph of them or who can help in any way can contact Mr Stevens via Petejstevens@hotmail.co.uk  

or contact the Advertiser newsdesk on 01636 681234. The Newark project mirrors a much bigger scheme to find photographs of as many as possible of the 72,000 British and Commonwealth casualties of the Battle of The Somme, whose names are commemorated on the French Thiepval Memorial To The Missing.

 

Thanks to Dan Churcher Newark Advertiser News Editor

FOOTBALLERS Reece Self, front, and Josh Smithson, with a first world war-style ball. 101213DT2-2

FOOTBALLERS Reece Self, front, and Josh Smithson, with a first world war-style ball.

A football match to commemorate a brief moment of peace amid the horrors of the first world war can go ahead thanks to Lottery funding. British and German soldiers set aside their weapons at Christmas 1914 to play a game of football in No Man’s Land.

They held joint burial services for dead comrades, sang songs and exchanged gifts.

The match, which became known as the Christmas Truce, will be recreated by a team from Newark Town and FC Emmendingen 03, with a grant of almost £8,300 from the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Interest in recreating the game was sparked earlier this year when historian Francis Towndrow discovered a Newark soldier, William Setchfield, who served with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, witnessed the original match and may have even taken part.The rematch between the Newark team and one from its German twin town, will be played in Messines, Belgium, 18 miles south of Ypres where the Christmas Truce game took place and the scene of some of the most intense fighting of the war.

The match, in which both teams have agreed to field under-21 sides, will be played on August 24 next year.

The grant will finance the Newark Town delegation’s trip as well as a series of events in Newark marking the Christmas Truce.

Money will also be used to create a temporary memorial garden at Sconce and Devon Park, and hold a centenary memorial service on Christmas Day, 2014.

Further research into the Christmas Truce football matches will lead to an exhibition in Newark.

Paul Baggaley, the chairman of Newark Town FC, said: “Getting this grant is absolutely fundamental to staging the game.

“We couldn’t go ahead without it because not everyone would be able to afford to go.

“We would like to hear from anyone who might have stories about relatives who played football before joining the Army for example, and we want to know what people were doing in Newark during the war.”

Mr Baggaley can be contacted at psbaggaley@goodlemail.com

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Grant-secures-truce-game 

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Ministry of Defence

Laurencegoff

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“I believe in angels”
Taken at Newark Cemetery
Laurencegoff

Laurencegoff

 

Friends Of Newark Cemetery

Will be organizing a Coach Trip Wednesday 28th May 2014

From Newark On Trent to The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

Travel Wright Ltd,  Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 2AG.

Leaving 9.00am – 9.15pm arriving by 11am  leaving at  4.30pm returning to Newark at  6pm.

 First pickup points at 9.00am The  Friendly Farmer Restaurant

 Located next to the Shell Petrol Station The A46, A17, A1 Roundabout,  Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 2NY. Restaurant open at 8am for Breakfast or a cuppa, free parking.

Another pickup at 9.15am Holy Trinity RC School, Boundary Road, Newark NG24 4AU

Tickets will be on sale  at Newark Town Hall, Market PlaceReception

 01636 680333.  From market place into the Buttermarket  elevator on the right to 2nd floor.

 9.30am – 4pm

 Monday – Friday.

For more information

Laurence Goff

 

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

www.thenma.org.uk

 The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire, an uplifting visit for all ages

Honours The Fallen All Year Round

WWI soldier ‘should be on memorial’

 Thursday Nov 22, 2012

A decision not to allow the name of a first world war soldier to be added to Newark’s war memorial has been branded a scandal

Mr Pete Stevens at the grave of William Pride, marked by a Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone.

Mr Pete Stevens, who works for the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, says William Pride’s name should be on the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery.

William, a Royal Engineers sapper, who lived in Newark, committed suicide following frontline service.

His Army record and the coroner’s report show he took his own life “whilst of unsound mind.”

Mr Stevens has been told William does not fit the criteria for inclusion on the memorial.

Mr Stevens said the Commonwealth War Graves Commission had categorised William as a casualty of war with one of its headstones, so his name should be added.

William operated hospital barges that were under constant attack as they transported casualties.

Mr Stevens believes the stigma that would have been attached to William’s suicide was why his name wasn’t included on the 1921 town Roll of Honour.

It was common to omit from war memorials the names of those who took their own lives or were shot for cowardice when they were actually shell-shocked or battle-fatigued — the condition is now recognised as post-traumatic stress disorder.

William’s name was not on the list agreed by Newark Town Council and the Royal British Legion in 2007 when plans for the Memorial to the Fallen were being considered.

“The scandal is not his suicide but the refusal to add him to the Memorial to the Fallen and right that wrong,” said Mr Stevens, of Balderton.

He discovered the omission of William Pride from the memorial by chance during research on another project.

“One can only imagine the noise, the smell and the constant cries of the wounded and the toll this would have taken on a man,” he said.

“I feel it was these horrors and the worsening of William’s disability that drove him to take his own life.

“No one understood post-traumatic stress disorder back then but we do now.

“The Government pardoned those shot for not going over the top and their names have been added to their local memorials, so why not William Pride? We must demonstrate we have moved on.”

Mr Geoff Meakin, from the Newark branch of the Royal British Legion, said: “Mr Pride doesn’t fit the criteria to go on the memorial so will not be added.

“You have to have lived or been living in the old borough of Newark and to have fallen in battle — that’s the difficulty.

“His suicide does not come into it.

“I sympathise and it’s often a contentious issue.

“If you relax the criteria for one, it opens the floodgates. These are the criteria and we must stick to them.”

Mr Stevens said there were 29 graves in Newark Cemetery of men whose names were on the memorial who did not die in battle but from wounds or other effects of their service.

“There is one man whose name appears who died in the sanatorium at Radcliffe in 1925,” said Mr Stevenson

William Pride was an engine driver and fireman with the Trent Navigation Company.

He lived on Bowbridge Road, Newark, with his wife and five children when he was called up for service on September 18, 1916 at the age 40.

He was enlisted into the Water Transport Corps of the Royal Engineers and, 19 days later he was on his way to Mesopotamia where he operated hospital barges ferrying wounded soldiers away from the front.

The barges operated under constant shell-fire.

William developed arthritis in both knees that got so bad he was invalided to India, arriving back in England on June 6, 1918.

He was sent to a camp in Kent and placed on light duties. He was found on September 11, 1918 with his throat cut and a razor in his hand.

Comrades reported he had been depressed.

The clerk to Newark Town Council, Mr Alan Mellor said: “We are and will be looking into this and will be speaking with all appropriate interested parties.”

 Dan Churcher

Newark Advertiser

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/WWI-soldier-should-be-on-memorial-

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History and Exhibition  A name and photographs of our fallen heroes will be on display in   Newark which can be open with dates in 2014 or by appointment for groups

 

100_9969Ministry of Defence

 Laurencegoff

Memorial to the Fallen at Newark Cemetery commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914

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Let’s Remember them, On the 11th hour, of the 11th Month in 1918 the First World War ended. Newark still wants to Remember those who have given and give today their lives for peace and Freedom.

If ye break faith with us who die, We shall not sleep, though poppies grow in Flanders fields.

His poem has stuck with me since I first read it as a young lad, and I have always, when abroad, visited nearby war cemeteries to pay my respects to those that lay in a foreign field far from home.

Ministry of Defence

I’m still a traditionalist and observe two minutes silence at 11 Date on the 11th Hour of the 11th Month. Those, and sadly there are a few, that feel this is an inconvenience, fail to grasp that they are only here because of our forces.

Interestingly the idea of the two minutes silence was a very Commonwealth merging of ideas based on an old idea to a very solemn occasion.

The true originator of the Silence on Remembrance Day was an Australian reporter working in Fleet Street called Edward Honey, who wrote a piece about it.

This was subsequently read by Sir Percy Fitzpatrick, an astute South African statesman who contacted Lord Milner to put the proposal to King George the Fifth, who put the official seal on the idea and authorised its adoption. But the idea all started with a journalist  the power of the press.

Respect their sacrifice.

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Ministry of Defence

By Laurencegoff

Today, the sale of poppies helps the Royal British Legion’s charitable work helping safeguard the welfare, interests and memory of those who are serving or who have served in our Armed Forces.

Regardless of which side, left or right, that you wear your poppy, just wearing one shows you remember and care. It’s when we stop remembering and caring that tyrants start to rear their ugly heads.

The whole object is to remember and endeavour as a people working together, to ensure that such losses never happen again, or at the very least every peaceful solution sought.

It is not to glorify war as some factions have tried to claim, but to honour the individual human as well as the forces as a whole, that have tried to defend mankind and democracy.

They have ensured our freedoms, and they and their memory, rightly deserves our respect.

 That is why we wear the poppy.

The colour of the poppy is red, as Colonel John McCrae saw them and the last three lines of his poem are:

IN FLANDERS FIELDS

by Colonel John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row by row,  That mark our place,’ and in the sky The larks still bravely singing fly, Scarce heard among the guns below.  We are the dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow –  Loved and were loved,’ and now we lie in Flanders Fields. Take up our quarrel with the foe! To you from failing hands we throw The torch – Be yours to hold it high! If ye break faith with us who die, We shall not sleep, though poppies grow in Flanders fields.

When you wear your Poppy, it is not just for those that laid down their lives in what was the nightmare of carnage of the First World War; it is for all those brave men and women who have lost their lives in all the wars and conflicts, that we have had the unfortunate nature to be in.

 Our forces, built up of exceptional men and women, endeavour to protect our freedoms and this nation as a whole.

The immortal poem, ‘In Flanders Fields,’ was seeded from the simple Corn Poppy . It was brought to Europe from the Holy Land  and has now become the symbol of Remembrance of all those who died in the wars of this century.

In Flanders, the simple, yet beautiful little Corn Poppy grows everywhere. During the First World War, Colonel John McCrae, a Canadian veteran of the South African war, looked out from his water logged trench during a lull in the fierce fighting at the second battle of Ypres… His eyes met the sickening sight of makeshift crosses… rows and rows… the ghastly relics of the first battle which had drenched the battlefield with blood.The Canadian Medical Officer was struck with admiration at the sight of the little red poppies… swaying gently in the breeze over the graves of the dead.McCrae was so moved at the sight, he took out his note pad and pencil and wrote the poem…In Flanders Fields.In 1918, Colonel John McCrae was severely wounded and he was moved from the makeshift front-line field hospital in a dugout to a rear-base hospital near Calais… he had asked to be moved to the coast area so that he could see the white cliffs of Dover from across the Channel.On the third night he fought his last fight… he succumbed to his wounds… but in the last fleeting seconds before the Reaper called… Colonel McCrae whispered… “Tell them this… if ye break faith with us who die…we shall not sleep.” And with that…the gallant Colonel was gone. That very night he was buried in the cemetery at Wimereux.In November 1918… after four years of almost incessant fighting… came the Armistice. The Great War was over… the terrible carnage was at an end. France had lost its life blood of youth for about seven million had perished.After the misery of war… the truth that it was all for nothing became very clear when the disabled and shell-shocked Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen were cast-off overnight as unwanted. Touched by the plight of the war disabled, Madame Yvonne Guerin proposed that the women of France should make artificial red poppies and sell them throughout the world in order to raise money for the war disabled, for after all, it was they who had given them their freedom.In England the idea caught on and Field Marshal Haig proposed a factory, where British Soldiers who, had been injured during the war, could be employed making red silk poppies. Sponsored by the British Legion it brought in much need money for the relief of those disabled in the war.Today, millions of red poppies are sold throughout Britain. The red petals of the poppy signify the vast ocean of blood spilt… the yellow and black centre for the mud and desolation of the battlefields…the green of the stem is symbolic of the fields where many brave Soldiers fell.

 


Our lasting tribute to mark the ultimate sacrifice made by Newark’s fallen heroes

has been officially unveiled, we will remember them

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Laurencegoff

Display of history of Newark Cemetery Photo Project from the First World War by Pete Stevens, with over 150 Photographs from the Newark & Balderton Memorial to the Fallen.

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Memorial To The Fallen located off London Road at Newark Cemetery

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A Lasting tribute at Newark Cemetery to mark the ultimate sacrifice made for Newark’s fallen heroes

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Sherwood Foresters In Newark Market Place Off to War

 

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SAM_0917Ministry of Defence

WWI soldiers Newark

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Memorial to the Fallen of  Newark residents that have lost their lives in conflict since 1914 to the present day. 

Located at Newark Cemetery  

Main Gate, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

 

 We Will Remember Them

Ministry of Defence

By Laurencegoff

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We Remember Them

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Chris Grant holding a photo of his uncle Lance-Corpoal Alma Adolphus Grant who died 27th June 1916. Age 20 during World War 1.Buried in France: Foncquevillers Military Cemetery Country: France Area: Pas De Calais Rank: Lance CorporalOfficial Number: 3194 Unit: 1st/8th Bn. Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment). Force: Army Nationality: British Details: Son of Joshua and Mary Alma Grant of 14 Charles St. Newark Notts. I. F. 22. — in 

Newark upon Trent.

Box full of memories from 100 years ago

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Box-full-of-memories-from-100-years-ago

TWO brass tins sent to troops in the first world war containing items such as chocolate and tobacco are among the mementos one woman has saved.

Annette Hambidge with some of the mementos. 180114DT4-5

Annette Hambidge with some of the mementos. 180114DT4-5

Annette Hambidge, of Lower Kirklington Road, Southwell, has a wooden box containing the two tins, medals, postcards, photographs and cap badges that belonged to her grandfather, Mr James Webb, and great uncle, Mr George Hutchinson, in the war.

The two decorative tins were sent to the troops over Christmas 1914 as a gift from Princess Mary, the daughter of King George V and Queen Mary.

They contained chocolate, tobacco and a small Christmas card, which read “best wishes for the New Year from friends at home.”

Annette said: “I would have thought a lot of people have a box stashed away at home with bits and bobs like this. I just had it stored in the bottom of a wardrobe.

“Both my great grandfathers fought in the first world war. As well as the tin we’ve got various bits and pieces, including pictures.

“I have had the box for about six years, and my mother had it before me.

“James died when I was three so I only remember him as an old man. It’s amazing to see him in the pictures as he was then. He was a big man with size 15 feet.”

Mr Webb rose to the rank of sergeant major with the Royal Berkshire Regiment and won prizes for his swordmanship.

He trained new recruits to use bayonets.

Annette Hambidge with some of the mementos. 180114DT4-5

Annette Hambidge with some of the mementos. 180114DT4-5

Mr Hutchinson served in the Merchant Navy and his Merchant Navy medal is among the items.

Annette said her favourite item was a small cap that her grandfather fitted on the bowl of his pipe.

“His pipe was a treasured possession and he was never without it, so it is a very personal thing,” she said.

“The cap would stop the glow of the tobacco being seen by enemy snipers, so although a small item it saved lives.”

She said he would have had it with him when he lay wounded in a shell-hole for three days after being caught in a blast.

Mr Webb was taken back to England for treatment. He later returned to the front.

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http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

 Photo taken by Laurencegoff

List of names from workers from Ransome and Marles factory that died during the 1st World War.— at Newark on Trent.

 

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Remembrance at Newark Cemetery, for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

 

The 4th of August 2014 is the 100th anniversary of the declaration of the 1st World WarbyGreat Britain on GermanyFirst World War 1914-1918 total from Newark Killed  455

Name

Rank

Service Number

Date of Death

Age

Regiment / Service

Service Country

Grave /

Memorial Reference

Cemetery / Memorial Name

BLATHERWICK, PETER

Private

4809880

22/04/1943

20

Lincolnshire Regiment

United Kingdom

VI. F. 12.

MASSICAULT WAR CEMETERY

 

    Remembering them, On the 11th hour, of the 11th Month in 1918 the First World War ended. We still wants to Remember those who have given their lives for peace and Freedom

 

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene

In Flanders Fieldsby Colonel John McCrae

 The 4th of August 2014  100th aniversary of the declaration of war by Great Britain on Germany. We have around 500 names on the 2 memorials, but that is all they are just names I think it would be fantastic to put faces to as many names as we can. Names on a memorial mean little to the younger generation, But if we can put faces to these names and find a place to display them then they will be remembered for ever. It will be a mammoth task to achive this but with your support I believe it can be done.

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Woolfitt, Philip Canadian Btn 88th Btn., and 43rd Btn.,Born 1897, Died 1916During the First World War, both local newspapers, the Newark Advertiser and the Newark Herald ran extensive coverage on local casualties, which are of great interest and value for those researching their family history from this period.The following articles appeared in each newspaper:NEWARK HERALD – 4th November 1916 PTE PHILIP WOOLFITT DIES OF WOUNDS The many friends of Mr & Mrs W P Woolfitt of New Balderton, will learn with much regret and sympathy of the death from wounds of their eldest son, Pte. Philip Woolfitt, of the gallant Canadians.  Pte. Woolfitt, who was only 19 years of age in August last, was an old Magnus boy, and upon leaving school went out to Victoria, British Colombia,  five years ago, to his grandfather, Mr Tomlinson.  For the last two years before enlisting he was learning surveying and was engaged with his uncle, Mr Nowell Johnson, working under government.  As soon as he had turned the age of 19, and had finished his engagement, he joined the 88th Battalion of Canadians at Victoria in December last and came over to England in June when he had a few days leave and re-joined his parents at New Balderton near Newark. Returning to camp he volunteered to join a draft and was transferred to the 43rd Canadians, being sent to France early in August.  He was in the firing line about a month when he was severely wounded on October 9th, being wounded through the right arm, left hand, slight wound in the head, and a severe shrapnel wound in the hip, which caused complications.  He arrived in England on 17th and was sent to King George’s Hospital, London where he underwent several operations.  He was treated with the best medical skill possible and with every care and attention, but owing to septic poisoning and haemorrhage, no hopes were entertained of saving the young life and his parents were sent for and they were able to be present when he passed away most peacefully, practically in his sleep, at 10.15 on Wednesday night. The greatest sympathy is extended to Mr and Mrs Woolfitt in their great loss. The funeral, which will be of a military character, will take place this afternoon.  There was a service in the Parish Church at 2.30pm, and the interment was at Newark Cemetery at 3.20pm.NEWARK ADVERTISER - November 8th 1916 (p.5)MILITARY FUNERAL AT NEWARK  CEMETERY Pte Philip Woolfitt: died of wounds.  With full military honours, the mortal remains of Pte. P Woolfitt (eldest son of Mr & Mrs W P Woolfitt, New Balderton) who died of wounds sustained in France, were laid to rest in Newark Cemetery on Saturday.  Deceased, who was 20 years of age, was an old Magnusian, having won a scholarship from the Mount School. After leaving school he went out to Victoria, British Columbia, to his grandfather, Mr J H Tomlinson.  During the last two years of his stay in the Colonies he was learning surveying with his uncle, Mr Norwell Johnson.  As soon as he was 19 years of age he joined a Canadian Battalion, and came over to England in June.  Early in August he was drafted out, and after being about a month in the firing line he was badly wounded in the right arm, left hand, slightly in the head, and severely in the hip. He arrived in England on 17th and was sent to King George’s Hospital London where he underwent several operations.  Owing to septic poisoning and haemorrhage, no hopes were entertained of his recovery, and his parents were sent for.  He passed away practically in his sleep at 10.15pm on Wednesday night, 1st November 1916 on All Souls’ Night.THE FUNERAL The funeral service was conducted by the Vicar of Newark (Canon W Paton Hindley), and the obsequies were attended by a firing party, bugle and drum and fife band of the Royal Engineers.  The first part was in the Parish Church, where the hymn “How those glorious spirits shine” was sung.  Mr W T Wright, A.R.C.O., presided at the organ. The chief mourners were Mr & Mrs W P Woolfitt (father and mother), Misses Eva and Nora Woolfitt (sisters), Masters Donald and Albert Woolfitt (brothers), Mrs F E Hoe (aunt), Mr and Mrs W H Tomlinson and Mr H S Whiles.  Amongst those also present were Rev. H Gorse (headmaster), and scholars from the Magnus Grammar School, Mr G B Friend, Ald. J C Wright, Ald. L Priestley, Mr C H Whitehouse, Mr and Mrs T A Watford, Mr G B Heading, Mr F Allott, Mrs. Garner (Commandant of the VAD Hospital, Lombard Street, Newark), Miss Garner, Mrs M H Colton, Mr E Winter Rose, and others.  The cortege, as it wended its way towards the Cemetery, was headed by the Royal Engineers band playing the Dead March.  Then came the firing party, walking with arms reversed.  When near the Cemetery gates the band played “Abide with me”, and lined up each side of the entrance to allow the body, enclosed in an oak coffin, on which was the Union Jack and deceased’s cap, to pass through to the burial place.  After the Vicar had concluded reading the burial service, the customary three volleys were fired over the grave, and the buglers sounded the “Last Post”. In addition to the family wreaths, beautiful floral tributes were sent as follows:With deepest sympathy from Uncle Albert, Auntie Jane and Auntie Fanny.In loving remembrance of dear Phil., from Aunty Lill and Uncle Billy (Hoveringham).In loving sympathy from J W P Hall.From Mr and Mrs E Harker and family, with deepest sympathy.With deepest sympathy from Mr and Mrs Otter and family.In loving sympathy from Mrs Heppenstall and Miss Heppenstall.With deepest sympathy from Mr and Mrs B Newbound.With sincere sympathy from Mrs Wright and the Misses Parnham.With kind remembrance and deep sympathy from Mr and Mrs VasonWith love from Mrs H M Coles.In affectionate remembrance from Lieut. and Mrs J H W Ford and family.From Elizabeth Anderson “Blessed are the pure in heart for they shall see God”With deepest sympathy for a dear friend – Frank Slater.With deepest sympathy from Mrs H M Colton and family, South Scarle Hall.With deepest sympathy for a young life nobly sacrificed for his country’s cause, from a few friends at the Brewery Office.With pride in an old schoolfellow and in deepest sympathy, from the boys of the Magnus Grammar School.Photo: Illustrative image for the 'WOOLFITT, Philip' page
Taken by laurencegoff  TOUCHING TRIBUTE In the course of his sermon on Sunday morning, the Vicar (Canon W Paton Hindley) made a touching allusion to the death of Pte. Woolfitt.  He quoted from a letter written by the Chaplain of King George’s Hospital, who said: “He died at 10 p.m. last night, and all of us who have come in touch with the dear boy have felt that it was fitting that he should be called away on All Saints’ Day.  His sheer goodness has inspired us all.  His patience and cheerfulness were wonderful all through for he has been suffering much pain.  On Sunday morning he received Holy Communion with much joy and devotion – we have lost a lot of boys since July, but in no case do I remember such a wide-spread feeling of sorrow and sympathy in the Hospital as was felt today.Private Philip Woolfitt – 1897-1916 – who had gone to Canada and enlisted in the Canadian Infantry (Manitoba Regiment) and died on 1st November of 1916 aged 19.  He is buried with his parents William and Emma, in Newark cemetery, and was the elder brother of Sir Donald Wolfit (1902-1968), the actor (who changed the spelling of his name later in his career).  The family lived on London Road, Balderton, where a plaque to Donald was erected in 1974.

 

We will Remember them

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 Ministry of Defence

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From the 1st World War

Thomas Hall died of this wounds in France during the 1st World War

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 Ministry of DefenceMinistry of Defence

During the First World War, we are grateful that both local newspapers,  ran extensive coverage on local casualties, which are of great interest and value for those researching their family history.

 War GravesLondon Road

Newark CemeteryNottinghamshire NG 24 1SQIs Open all year round April – September 8am-8pmOctober – March 8am-6pm

 

SAM_0357Ministry of Defence

 Laurencegoff

Memorial to the Fallen at Newark Cemetery commemorating those military personnelwho lost their lives in conflict1914 – 1818 and to the present dayhttps://www.facebook.com/greatwarcentenary Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsAbide with Me

Abide with me; fast falls the eventide;
The darkness deepens; Lord with me abide.
When other helpers fail and comforts flee,
Help of the helpless, O abide with me.

Swift to its close ebbs out life’s little day;
Earth’s joys grow dim; its glories pass away;
Change and decay in all around I see;
O Thou who changest not, abide with me.

Not a brief glance I beg, a passing word,
But as Thou dwell’st with Thy disciples, Lord,
Familiar, condescending, patient, free.
Come not to sojourn, but abide with me.

Come not in terrors, as the King of kings,
But kind and good, with healing in Thy wings;
Tears for all woes, a heart for every plea.
Come, Friend of sinners, thus abide with me.

Thou on my head in early youth didst smile,
And though rebellious and perverse meanwhile,
Thou hast not left me, oft as I left Thee.
On to the close, O Lord, abide with me.

I need Thy presence every passing hour.
What but Thy grace can foil the tempter’s power?
Who, like Thyself, my guide and stay can be?
Through cloud and sunshine, Lord, abide with me.

I fear no foe, with Thee at hand to bless;
Ills have no weight, and tears no bitterness.
Where is death’s sting? Where, grave, thy victory?
I triumph still, if Thou abide with me.

Hold Thou Thy cross before my closing eyes;
Shine through the gloom and point me to the skies.
Heaven’s morning breaks, and earth’s vain shadows flee;
In life, in death, O Lord, abide with me.

 

Ministry of DefenceSAM_1135

Photo by Laurencegoff

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Ministry of Defence

First World War 1914-1918 total from Newark Killed  455 Second World War 1939-1945 total from Newark  killed 144 One from West Africa 1961 total  killed 1 One from Malaya 1962 total killed  1 One from Afghanistan 2007 total  killed 1

Total 602 Memorial To The Fallen  London Road at Newark Cemetery

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Newark Parish Church

Church of St. Mary Magdalene, Newark-on-Trent

 Church Walk, Newark-on-Trent, Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1JS 

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Ministry of Defence 

Major Samuel Boyd Quibell(1890-1916) Obituary from “The Times” – Major Sam. B. Quibell, 4th East Yorkshire Regiment (T.F.), who died of wounds in France on February 5, was the eldest son of Mr. And Mrs. Oliver Quibell, of Shalem Lodge,Newark. He was educated at the Magnus Grammar School, and the Leys School, Cambridge. On leaving school, he joined his grandfather Mr. J.H. Holmes, the head of the firm of Messrs. Thomas Holmes and Son, tanners, of Hull. He had been in the Cadet Corps at school, and while at Hull obtained a commission in the 4th East Yorkshire Regiment (T.F.) six years ago. He was gazetted captain when 22, and attained his majority on the field, and being only 24 years old was the youngest major in the Territorial Force. He went to the front with his regiment on April 23 and took part in the second battle of Ypres, after which he was the senior officer, the commanding officer and 17 officers of the battalion having been either killed or wounded. He was wounded twice within three weeks. On the first occasion, while helping wounded officers of another regiment to a dressing station, he received a slight wound in the neck. He recovered within a few days, and returned to duty, but soon afterwards he suffered a gunshot wound in the chest, which proved fatal. A brother officer writes :– ”We shall miss him greatly, but his cheery example will not leave us, and he will be present to encourage us on to do our bit as he did his. He was cheerful even in our greatest trial, and we feel we must do our utmost to feel the same, although it is most difficult.”

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

In Loving Memory of Samuel Boyd Quibell, who died of wound in the 1st World war at age 25. Also his Brother Oliver Henry QuibellMajor 4th East Yorks.T.F. Son of Oliver and Elizabeth QuibellMember from the 1st World War of Major Samuel Boyd Quibell died of wound in Germany 5th Feb 1916. His names  on the back of his father Oliver and Mother grave stone.

Laurencegoff

List of names from workers from Ransome and Marles factory that died during the 1st World War.

— at Newark-On-Trent

Chris Grant holding a photo of his uncle Lance-Corpoal Alma Adolphus Grant who died 27th June 1916. Age 20 during World War.Buried in France: Foncquevillers Military Cemetery Country: France Area: Pas De Calais Rank: Lance Corporal Official Number: 3194 Unit: 1st/8th Bn. Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment). Force: Army Nationality: British Details:

Son of Joshua and Mary Alma Grant of 14 Charles St. Newark Notts. I. F. 22.— in Newark upon Trent

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SAM_1271

 Laurence Goff Chairman Friends Of Newark Cemetery
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Laurencegoff

Church of St. Mary Magdalene, Newark-on-Trent

  • The Church of St Mary Magadalene, Newark-on-Trent is a parish church in the Church of England in Newark-on-Trent in Nottinghamshire. 

  • Address: Church Walk, Newark-on-Trent, Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1JS

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The National Memorial Arboretum, the UK’s Centre of Remembrance, is free and open every day. Set in 150 acres of trees and gardens, it is located in

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Ministry of Defence

By laurencegoffnewarkGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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By laurencegoffnewark
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Memorial 603 that lost their lives in conflict since 1914 to the present day

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Ministry of Defence

From the 1st World WarThomas Hall died of this wounds in France during the 1st World War
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Ministry of Defence

By laurencegoffnewark

 
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In Flanders fields the poppies blow Between the crosses, row by row,That mark our place,’ and in the sky The larks still bravely singing fly, Scarce heard among the guns below. We are the dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow – Loved and were loved,’ and now we lie in Flanders Fields. Take up our quarrel with the foe! To you from failing hands we throw  The torch – Be yours to hold it high! If ye break faith with us who die

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Ministry of Defence

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Book-tribute-to-towns-war-heroes-Ministry of Defence

SAM_0387

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When you wear your Poppy, it is not just for those that laid down their lives in what was the nightmare of carnage of the First World War; it is for all those brave men and women who have lost their lives in all the wars and conflicts, that we have had the unfortunate nature to be in.

Right or wrong their being in any war or conflict that is the fault of politicians who should, but sadly seldom are, be held accountable to us the people. Our forces, built up of exceptional men and women, endeavour to protect our freedoms and this nation as a whole.

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Ministry of Defence

Priestley Ernest

Private Ernest Priestley Sherwood Foresters Age 23

Photo Courtesy of the Newark Herald and Newark Library

Priestley
Laurencegoff

Private Ernest Priestley Sherwood Foresters Age 23Buried in Newark Cemetery

Priestley E Notice

Private Ernest Priestley Sherwood Foresters Died 20th June 1916 Age 23

Photo Courtesy of the Newark Herald and Newark LibraryPriestley E 1

Private Ernest Priestley Sherwood Foresters Age 23

Photo Courtesy of the Newark Herald and Newark LibraryPriestley E2

Private Ernest Priestley Sherwood Foresters Age 23

Photo Courtesy of the Newark Herald and Newark Library

Footitt 1

Two Brothers during the 1st World War that came from Newark Photo Courtesy of the Newark Herald and Newark LibraryFootitt Fred Private Fred Footitt 1st/8th Sherwood Foresters  he received  wounds when a box of Grenades was dropped causing an explosion sadly died the next day 21st March 1916 age 21. Photo Courtesy of the Newark Herald and Newark LibraryFootitt Harry

One week later his Brother Private Harry Footitt 1st Bb Northumberland Fustiliers was killed in action on 27th March 1916 age 19Photo Courtesy of the Newark Herald and Newark Library

Ministry of Defence

 

Let’s Remember them, On the 11th hour, of the 11th Month in 1918 the First World War ended. Newark still wants to Remember those who have given and give today their lives for peace and Freedom.

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Laurencegoff

Laurencegoff

Ministry of Defence

Laurencegoff

Memorial to the Fallen at Newark Cemetery commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914

A Lasting tribute to mark the ultimate sacrifice made by Newark’s fallen heroes

Let’s Remember them, On the 11th hour, of the 11th Month in 1918 the First World War ended. Newark still wants to Remember those who have given and give today their lives for peace and Freedom.

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Memorial  At Newark Cemetery

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Ministry of Defence

 

We Remember Our Fallen Heroes 

 

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Frances Mary and Arthur Darby. Arthur was an high ranking officer in the Army, but have no further details.

 died in 1957 He is buried in Winthorpe Cemetery

 

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Laurencegoff

Newark Parish Church, St. Mary Magdalene in Nottinghamshire

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Ministry of Defence

The 4th of August 2014 is the 100th aniversary of the declaration of war by Great Britain on Germany

Laurencegoff

Newark Parish Church, St. Mary Magdalene in Nottinghamshire

The Young Children Did Remember Them

 

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laurencegoff

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Ministry of Defence

 

Ministry of Defence Ministry of Defence

 

Laurencegoff

Newark resident Laurence Goff

Would Like to Welcome you to This Website  On Newark Cemetery

I’m happy to welcome groups and visitors to Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856. This memorial website is my personal views, I have put it together and do not represent Newark Town Council . It dedicated to the thousands of  people who resting place is at Newark Cemetery for all to see and view. Having a means of further promoting Newark cemetery, and encouraging interested people to join the tribute. This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately, the content here is solely the responsibility of Laurence Goff

 The next meeting will be held at Newark town hall in the Pickin room on Tuesday 28th January 2014 at 2pm

Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery will only open by appointment for groups on weekends in the afternoon or on Monday and Tuesday School time .

 by Contact the Chairman Laurence Goff  01636-681878 by leaving a message  or by Email: friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk  

  

Location of Cemetery Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ 

Newark Cemetery is opened all year round October – March 8am – 6pm

Spring – Summer April – September 8am – 8pm

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 Ministry of Defence

Ministry of Defence

Photo by Laurencegoff

War Memorial to the Fallen of Newark commemorating, by name, those local military personnel who lost their lives in conflict going back to the first World War of 1914. First World War 1914-1918 total from Newark Killed  456

Remembering them, Newark Cemetery  Our Tribute

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Ministry of Defence

Laurencegoff

 455 WWI Fallen who are came from Newark-On-Trent

and 

144 from WWII

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Ministry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of Defence

SAM_1446

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Laurencegoff

We Remember The Fallen At Commonwealth and Polish War Graves Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire  

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https://www.facebook.com/greatwarcentenary

https://www.facebook.com/greatwarcentenary

Ministry of Defence

War Memorial to the Fallen of Newark commemorating, by name, those local military personnel

who lost their lives in conflict going back to the first World War of 1914

 First World War 1914-1918 total from Newark Killed  455 

Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856

 This memorial website is Laurence Goff personal views, I have put it together and do not represent Newark Town Council . It dedicated to the thousands of  people since 1856.There were a number of Royal Air Force stations within and around Newark from which several Polish squadrons operated. The highest concentration of commemorations can be particularly found in Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire.  Our local cemetery with nearly 400 that died, and are buried in special plot on the east side. You can park for free at the Main Gate parking lot at Newark Cemetery, It is location on London Road, Newark, Notts

They shall grow not old,

As we that are left grow old, Age shall not weary them, Nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun, And in the morning We will remember them

Newark resident Laurence Goff Would Like to Welcome you to This Website  On Newark Cemetery

I’m happy to welcome groups and visitors to Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856. This memorial website is my personal views, I have put it together and do not represent Newark Town Council . It dedicated to the thousands of  people who resting place is at Newark Cemetery for all to see and view. Having a means of further promoting Newark cemetery, and encouraging interested people to join the tribute. This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately, the content here is solely the responsibility of

Newark Resident

Laurence Goff

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 Looking Out From The Arch on The Main Drive, Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery

Friends of Newark Cemetery laid a wreath at Newark Cemetery War Memorial to the Fallen, we will Remember them

Remembering them, Newark Cemetery  Our Tribute

  Ministry of Defence

Memorial 603 that lost their lives in conflict since 1914 to the present day. Tribute at Newark Cemetery War Memorial to the Fallen

The First World War 1914-1918

Battle of the Somme and life in the trenches

Wreaths laid at the annual ceremony held at Lochnagar Crater, in Remembrance of those lost on 1st July and the subsequent fighting in the Battle of the Somme 1st July – 18th November 1916. In World War I, the “trenches” were literally trenches dug into dirt or mud to shelter soldiers while they were firing at the enemy. Both sides used them in the fighting. Trench warfare was primarily a defensive tactic, placing soldiers low in the trench for protection, installing barbed wire in front of them in more modern times, and then allowing the soldiers to shoot at the enemy. Trench warfare has been used militarily since Roman times, although it came into widespread use in World War I. The trenches were, of course, dirty. They could often become crowded, so any kind of wound sustained in the trenches was likely to become infected.

Ministry of DefenceMinistry of Defence

Let's pay our respects

A Lasting tribute to mark the ultimate sacrifice made by Newark’s fallen heroes has been officially unveiled 2007 

Memorial to the Fallen of 602 Newark residents that have lost their lives in conflict since 1914 to the present day. Located at Newark Cemetery,  Main Gate, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire

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Newark NG24 1SQ

 Our Beautiful and Historic Newark Cemetery

Main Gates off London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire open all year round

April -September 8am-8pm, October – March 8am-6pm

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  • Laurencegoff 

Chapel Interpretation Centre (East side turn left at the Main Arch and enter at the red door) 

Needing help to found a graves [plus a tour} Organised by the Friends of Newark CemeteryThe Chapel Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery, will open by appointment for groups on Monday and Tuesday am – pm and weekends afternoon and pm. Please give plenty of notice.

If you would like to volunteers at Newark Cemetery, we will look forward to hearing from you.

    Friends of Newark Cemetery

 Laurence Goff

C/o Newark Town Hall/Market Place

Newark-on-Trent NG24 1DU

Town Hall 01636-680333

01636-681878 {My Home Phone}

Mobile 07794613879

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

Click on  for location of Cemetery Newark-on-Trent

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Laurence Goff  Chairman Friends Of Newark Cemetery Visiting Newark Cemetery

Disclaimer

 In the public interest

I accept no responsibility for the accuracy of the information contained on this website, which is a non profit project designed soley by

 Laurence Goff.  

The opinions expressed  are entirely my own, and do not represent the views of Newark Town Council who have possibility of Newark Cemetery.

Newark Town Council, Town Hall/Market Place, Newark-on-Trent NG24 1DU

Phone: 01636 680333

http://newark.gov.uk

post@newark.gov.uk

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https://www.facebook.com/greatwarcent

 

Four years is not a long time – but in four years a boy in his early teens grows into a young man and in four years the generation of British and Commonwealth lads born in the mid 1890s would come of age and go to war.  In 1914 they went to The Great War, the War to End All Wars – and many never came home.

You may not know their names – but you can find them easily.  From the biggest city to the smallest hamlet they are on memorials – some are simple plaques others grander affairs – and if you cross to France and Belgium and further afield you will see the names on the white headstones ranged like soldiers on parade in cemeteries on the old battlefields.

2014 will mark the 100th anniversary of what we now sadly know as The First World War – it would never be The War to End All Wars.  As we look back over the century we should remember that these men did not die in vain – they fought a war that, like the one that followed only 25 years later, was necessary to contain the territorial ambition of a major European power.  About one hundred years before the outbreak of the First World War British and Allied troops had defeated France at the Belgium village of Waterloo – and contained a major European power.

Remember the courage and honour the sacrifice of the boys who became men 100 years ago and support the young men and women who have followed in their footsteps and are today’s soldiers.     

 

Spirit of Remembrance believes that it is important to promote events relating to the 100th Anniversary of the First World War.

Here are some key websites:

  • The Imperial War Museum has launched a very powerful and well worth visiting website called 1914.org 

  • Centenary News was set up  by the media company Inclusive Digital to provide news and information about the upcoming 2014-2018 First World War Centenary – let’s work together to get the word out. We recommend visiting the First World War 100th Anniversary 2014-2018 page on Facebook, which is where we learnt about this website

enary Remembrance Day - Lest We Forget - Poppy DayRemembrance Day - Lest We Forget - Poppy DayRemembrance Day - Lest We Forget - Poppy DayRemembrance Day - Lest We Forget - Poppy DayRemembrance Day - Lest We Forget - Poppy DayRemembrance Day - Lest We Forget - Poppy Day

Photo taken by Laurencegoff

On Tuesday 11th November 2014, outdoor Newark Town Hall

at 11 O’clock

Picture
 
Picture

Unknown panel
Private G. Ward
1st Battalion
Royal Berkshire Regiment
executed for cowardice
26/09/1914

http://ahoy.tk-jk.net/macslog/ShotatDawnWW1ArmyExecutio.html

Ahoy – Mac’s Web Log – Shot at Dawn, WW1 Army Executions

ahoy.tk-jk.net

Introduction.During the fighting in Europe against the German Army in WW1, a number of soldiers from the British Army were executed at dawn, they were deserters, or shot for cowardice against their enemy. Special firing squads of 12 were selected to carry out the dreadful order to execute as many as…

   

Also

Memorial Arboretum to commemorate Armistice Day.

Everyone is welcome to attend the Arboretum’s annual outdoor Armistice Day service. The 2013 service will be held on the Armed Forces Memorial; ticket holders only are allowed onto the Memorial during the service. Non ticket holders can view the service via a large screen which is situated close to the Visitor Centre. The service will begin at approximately 10.40am.

Orders of service will be available for purchase on Armistice Day near to the Visitor Centre. 

A parade, with a salute taken by Mr Ian Dudson CBE,  Lord-Lieutenant of Staffordshire, will begin on Millennium Avenue at 12 noon. 

The Armed Forces Memorial will re-open to the public and those wishing to lay wreaths as soon as possible at the end of the service. 

Special parking arrangements will apply on the day. All general public and other non pass holders, including coaches, should park on the Arboretum’s overflow car park.

The overflow car park is situated on Croxall Road, past the main car park entrance.  Please follow directional road signs on Croxall Road. A £3 parking charge will apply. 

Blue badge holders will be admitted onto the main Arboretum car park as space allows. All vehicles may drop off and collect passengers outside the Visitor Centre prior to parking on the overflow car park. Please allow extra time for your journey. 

Venue: The Arboretum

Time: 10.30am

Cost: Free, but donations appreciated

Information:  No advance booking required unless arriving as part of a group of 10 or more persons.

Contact: 01283 792 333 or info@thenma.org.uk

 

Contact us

National Memorial Arboretum, Croxall Road, Alrewas, Staffordshire, DE13 7AR

Tel: 01283 792 333 Fax: 01283 792 034 Email: info@thenma.org.uk

 

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Today the Royal Air Force Museum launches a national photography competition as part of its calendar of activities to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Britain. Accordingly, it is inviting members of the public to submit photographs taken at various Battle of Britain events that will be taking place around the country this summer. Entries should be made via the Museum’s website, www.rafmuseum.org.

 

This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately, the content here is solely the responsibility of Laurence Goff. As a fitting tribute to the people who resting place is at Newark cemetery. The views expressed our solely my own and do not reflect  Newark Town Council.

 Laurence Goff

I have been walking around Newark cemetery since  2004. In 2005 we set up a group Friends Of Newark Cemetery, I have been Chairman for the last three years. I had an opportunity to have a blog for the last four years and I have had 35,700 visit across the UK, and the World. Many kind words which I really enjoy and appreciate from people that have contacted me. It has intrigues me, something that makes me want to look into who is buried and history going back to 1856, which has been fascinating.

Friends of Newark Cemetery Meeting 

 Wednesday  5th March 2014 at Newark Town Hall (Pickin Room) at 6.00pm

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Newark Cemetery British Commonwealth And Polish War Graves During the  2nd World War

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The chapel Interpretation centre at Newark Cemetery will open next Sunday 13th April 2014 from 2 – 4pm

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We Will Remember Them

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We Will Always Remember Them At Newark Cemetery

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We Will Remember Them at Newark Cemetery

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The chapel Interpretation centre at Newark Cemetery will open next Sunday 13th April 2014 from 2 – 4pm

Laurencegoff

The chapel Interpretation centre at Newark Cemetery will open next Sunday 13th April 2014 from

2 – 4pm. It can also  open by appointment for groups .

 by Contact the Chairman Laurence Goff  01636-681878  Mobile 07794613879 or leave a message at Newark Town Hall 01636-0333 or by Email: friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk  

 We  need to found more Volunteers to welcome visits to Newark Cemetery by  showing around our exhibition, serving refreshments giving tours or help locate a grave for our visitors in the summer of 2014.

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  Laurence Goff

 Friends of Newark Cemetery

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

   Location of Cemetery Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ 

Newark Nottinghamshire, England

Walk On By If you see me walkin’ down the street

And I start to cry each time we meet
Walk on by, walk on by

Second World War 1939-1945 total from Newark killed 144

One from West Africa 1961 total killed 1

One from Malaya 1962 total killed 1

One from Afghanistan 2007 total killed 1

Total 602

We will Remember them, RIP

Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish their Sacrifice who are buried in Newark Cemetery

The dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth and Polish who also join up with the RAF

Many were killed who resting place is Newark Cemetery

4 RAAF – Australian, 44 British Servicemen, 17 RCAF

– Canadian, 3 RNZAF –

New Zealand and 397 Polish Serviceman – Airmen

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/10/10/a-few-good-heroes-we-will-remember-them/

http://ahoy.tk-jk.net/macslog/ShotatDawnWW1ArmyExecutio.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4QMXN48ANII

FOR THE SAKE OF EXAMPLE
He woke to the sound of a far distant gun
Corporal said softly ‘you ready old son?’
He gave him a drink, it didn’t taste right
They stood quietly waiting, until it was light.

The Padre came in, looking sombre and sad
He muttered low words that were lost on the lad
The others stood stiffly, then moved to the door
He still wasn’t certain what all this was for.

They took him outside as the fingers of dawn
Spread over the courtyard so sad and forlorn
He saw them, his comrades, all standing in line
Not one if them looked at him, or gave him a sign.

They pinned a white rag on, they gave him a chair
His comrades stood ready, cruel shots filled the air
So back to the trenches, more terror to sample
He’s dead, they knew why, for the sake of example.

They had all watched him die, in a foreign land
A warning to others from the High Command.

Author Unknown

The National Memorial Arboretum

The Arboretum is open every day, except Christmas Day, between 9am and 5pm. During winter months the grounds close at dusk but the Visitor Centre remains open until 5pm. During summer months the last admission is at 4.30pm (unless otherwise stated).

Pictures come in for project, thanks to The Newark Advertiser

http://www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Pictures-come-in-for-project

Photographs of ten fallen heroes have so far been found for a pictorial project to honour Newark’s war dead.

Mr Brian Clark-Dench, 74, of Balderton, whose uncle features on the Newark Memorial To The Fallen. The project, which aims to put faces to the 603 names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen at Newark Cemetery, is being coordinated by Mr Pete Stevens, a Commonwealth War Graves Commission stonemason. He hopes to find all of the pictures in time for the 100th anniversary of the start of the first world war in 2014. The Newark memorial names 456 Servicemen who died in the first world war and 144 casualties from the second world war. Also named are one Serviceman who died in West Africa in 1961, one who died in Malaya in 1952, and one in Afghanistan in 2007. Mr Stevens is seeking pictures to a further 45 names from the first world war on the memorial in St Giles’ Church, Balderton, and 13 from the second world war. Mr Stevens has set up a website to add each picture collected to the details of the casualty on one of the war memorials.The website can be viewed at

www.memorialphotoproject.tumblr.com

So far those who have come forward to help with the project include Mr Brian Clark-Dench, of Gibson Crescent, Balderton, whose uncle, Mr Alfred Charles Dench, is one of the names on the Newark memorial. Mr Dench, who was born in Winthorpe and lived on Middlegate, Newark, for most of his life, served in 1st Battalion King’s Company of the Grenadier Guards. He was killed in 1915 at the village of Loos, France, at the age of 23, and was later buried to the north-west of the village.

Over the years Mr Clark-Dench has compiled and collected military items related to his uncle, including his original dog tags, campaign medals, postcards sent from France, photographs and even his death notice, signed by Field Marshall Herbert Kitchener, British Secretary of State for War from 1914-16. Mr Clark-Dench, who served in the same battalion as his uncle during the 1950s, said: “When I saw the article in the Advertiser I was amazed and wanted to come forward and help. “I never knew my uncle but I do feel the need to keep his memory alive because his story is an interesting tale. “He was held in high regard as being a real hard man, strong as an ox. “During battle he saved his company commander from No Man’s Land, despite being under heavy enemy fire — this was the type of man he was.“Coming forward to help with the project is very important because the men on the memorials should be remembered — what they did for this country should never be forgotten. “I am immensely proud of what my uncle did and the rest of my family — that is something I wanted to honour.” Any relative of one of the fallen featured on either memorial and who has a photograph of them or who can help in any way can contact Mr Stevens via Petejstevens@hotmail.co.uk or contact the Advertiser newsdesk on 01636 681234. The Newark project mirrors a much bigger scheme to find photographs of as many as possible of the 72,000 British and Commonwealth casualties of the Battle of The Somme, whose names are commemorated on the French Thiepval Memorial To The Missing.

Thanks to Dan Churcher Newark Advertiser Reporter

Ministry of Defence

Photo by Laurencegoff

 

Newark Cemetery

For over 150 years since 1856

Our beautiful and historic

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm, October – March 8am-6pm 

Click on  for location of Cemetery Newark-on-Trent

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Contact:

Friends Of Newark Cemetery  Laurence Goff

Newark Town Hall, Market Place, Newark, Notts, NG24 1DU

01636-680333 (Town Hall)

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

Laurence Goff

01636-681878 (Home) Mobile 07794613879

Friends Of  Newark Cemetery

Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road Newark  for over 150 years.  This  memorial website

 http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/  

  Laurence Goff personal website which I’ve put together and does not represent Newark Town Council. Its dedicated to the thousands of  people since 1856 as a means of further promoting Newark cemetery, and encouraging interested people to join the tribute.

It Will Never Be The Same If You Become A Volunteer at Newark Cemetery. Perhaps the biggest difference that you will make is in you. Volunteering is a life-changing experience. It will provide you with a new outlook and lease on life. You will understand better than most people how you fit into the family history of who is buried in Newark Cemetery since 1856. Make no mistake about it, this is an experience that you won’t want to miss.

“I had the most unbelievable experience for the last nine years. It not hard work but hugely rewarding for me. I met so many great people and learnt so much about the Cemetery environment. An experience I will never forget and recommend to everyone.”

Friends of Newark Cemetery public meeting is being held at Newark Town Hall (Pickin Room).  30th April 2014 arrive for a cuppa at 5:45pm before the start of the AGM meeting at 6pm.

 

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

http://www.youtube.com/user/laurencegoff

www.facebook.com/laurencegoffnewark

www.flickr.com/photos/friendsofnewarkcemetery

http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=newark%20cemetery%20

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/

https://twitter.com/laurencegoff

 laurencegoff4newark@yahoo.co.uk

My Website principles are that I strive to be accurate. I promptly correct any inaccuracy or error with a visible edit and update. I attribute and link to sources on the web wherever possible. My direct contact details are displayed on every page of the site. I do not receive payment or services for any reviews or editorial. And this is a personal website of Laurence Goff. The views expressed are solely my own, and do not reflect the views of Newark Town Council who are responsible for the cemetery

Click on  for location of Cemetery Newark-on-Trent

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

 

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire, Laurence Goff uplifting visit

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

The National Arboretum in Staffordshire honours the fallen and recognises  service, sacrifice around the world

A time to remember – they will never be forgotten

“We reflect 
on times past and to remember 
them, 
but never forgotten”

It is a spirtual uplifting place and emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance run by The Royal British Legion

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The Royal British Legion flag will fly all around, we will Remember them 

Remembrance for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

The 4th of August 2014 is the 100th anniversary of the declaration of the 1st World War 

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

The Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British Legion

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire, You Will Have An Uplifting Day

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Friends Of Newark Cemetery

Will be organizing a Coach Trip, from Newark

to The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

  May half – term Wednesday 28th May 2014 (All 49 seats have been sold). 

Travel Wright Ltd,  Newark, Nottinghamshire  

Departing leaving 9.00am – 9.15pm arriving by 11am  departing at  4.30pm returning to Newark by 6pm. 

 First pickup point at 9.00am The  Friendly Farmer Restaurant

 Located next to the Shell Petrol Station The A46, A17, A1 Roundabout,  Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 2NY. Restaurant open at 8am for Breakfast or a cuppa, free parking.

Second pickup at 9.15am Holy Trinity RC School, Boundary Road, Newark NG24 4AU

www.thenma.org.uk

 The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire, an uplifting visit for all ages

Honours The Fallen All Year Round

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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Friends Of Newark Cemetery

 Coach Trip

From Newark  to The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

 Wednesday 28th May 2014

 Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

The Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British Legionimg043

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

The Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British Legionimg045

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

You Will Experience A Wonderful  Place, An Awe-Inspiring Day

The Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British Legionimg041

The Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British LegionThe Royal British Legionimg040

 

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Memorial  

There are over 300 memorials the special centrepiece in my heart and mind is the memorial the “Shot at Dawn” over three hundred men who were shot as cowards, but many we would now recognise as suffering from post traumatic stress disorder.

 

The memorial was modelled and portrays a likeness of a young British soldier 

of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliess

Private Herbert Burden age 17 

 he was blindfolded

 and tied to a stake ready to be shot by a firing squad

He like many who lied about his age to enlist in the armed

 forces and was later shot for desertion. It is surrounded by a

 semicircle of stakes on which are listed the names of every

 soldier executed in this fashion. These include:

 

 Conceived as a place of national remembrance not only for the fallen, but also for those who have served the nation. 

 
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This being the centrepiece is a statue of a young man  Private Herbert Francis Burden

of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliess who was the first to be shot a dawn.

21st July 1915 aged 17

http://youtu.be/d7FFW40AZxA

The National Arboretum Croxall Road, in the village of Alrewas, Staffordshire UK

 

This being special to me is a statue of a young man ­ age 17 Private Herbert Burden of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliess who was the first to be shot. He was blindfolded and strapped to a post, surrounded by 306 other posts, each with the name, age and ­regiment of a man who was executed.

306 Listed

  • Private John Abigail, 8/Norfolk Regiment

  • Private George Ainley, 1st/4th Battalion, Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

  • Private James Archibald, 17th Battalion, Royal Scots

  • Lance Serjeant H. Ashton, 11th Battalion, Cameronians

  • Private William Baker, 26th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers

  • Rifleman R. L Barker, 6th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers

  • Private Joseph Bateman, 2/South Staffs Regiment

  • Sapper Robert Bell, 123 Field Company, Royal Engineers

  • Private J. Bennett, 1st Battalion, Hampshire Regiment

  • Private D. J. Blakemore, 8th Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment

  • Private Albert Botfield, 9th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment

  • Private William Bowerman, 1/East Surrey Regiment

  • Private Thomas Brigham, 1/10th Battalion, Manchester Regiment

  • Private C. Britton, 1/5th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment

  • Private F. Broadrick, 11th Battalion, Warwickshire Regiment

  • Private A. Brown, 10th Battalion, Black Watch

  • Private Archibald Browne, 2nd Battalion, Essex Regiment

  • Private Herbert Francis Burden, 1st Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers

  • Private Robert Burton, 6th Battalion, South Lancashire Regiment

  • Private J. Byers, 1st Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers

  • Private Herbert H. Chase, 2nd Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers

  • Rifleman F. W. Cheeseman, 18th Kings Royal Rifle Corps

  • Private G. E. Collins, 1st Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment

  • Private J. Crampton, 9th Battalion, Yorks & Lancs Regiment

  • Rifleman James Crozier. 9th Battalion, The Royal Irish Rifles

  • Private J. J. Daly, 1st Battalion, Connaught Rangers

  • Private Edward Delargy, 1st/8th Battalion, Royal Scots

  • Private Thomas Docherty, 2nd Battalion, King’s Own Scottish Borderers

  • Rifleman Thomas Donovan, 16th Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps

  • Private Walter Dossett, 1st/4th Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment

  • Private Thomas Downey, 6th Leinster Regiment

  • Private Thomas Downing, 6th South Lancashire Regiment

  • Sub Lieutenant Edwin Dyett, Nelson Battalion, Royal Naval Division

  • Private A. Evans, 1st Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers

  • Private Alfred E. Eveleigh, 1st Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment)

  • Private G. Everill, 1st Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment

  • Private Harry Farr, 1st Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment

  • Private Ernest Fellows, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Lance Corporal J. S. V. Fox, 1st Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment, attached 3rd Division Cyclists’ Company

  • Private A. Frafra, Gold Coast Regiment

  • Private Evan Fraser, 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots

  • Private J. W. Fryer, 12th Battalion, Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment

  • Private Robert Gawler, 1st Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment)

  • Private D. Gibson of 12th Battalion, Royal Scots

  • Lance Corporal Peter Goggins, 19th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry

  • Private F. C. Gore, 7th Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment)

  • Private Thomas Harris, 1st Battalion, Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent Regiment)

  • Private Bert Hartells, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private T. Hawkins, 7th Battalion, Royal West Surrey Regiment (Queen’s)

  • Private Thomas Highgate, 1st Battalion, Royal West Kent Regiment

  • Lance Corporal James Holland, 10th Cheshire Regiment

  • Private R. Hope, 1st Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

  • Private Thomas Hope, 2nd Battalion, Leinster Regiment

  • Private H. Hughes, 1st/5th Battalion, Yorks and Lancs Regiment

  • Private William Hunt, 18/Manchester Regiment

  • Private William Hunter, 1/Loyal North Lancashire Regiment

  • Private J. J. Hyde, King’s Royal Rifle Corps

  • Private Albert Ingham, 18/Manchester Regiment (Attd. 90th Coy. MGC)

  • Corporal Frederick Ives, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private W. Jones, 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers

  • Private C. La Liberte, 3rd Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force

  • Driver Alexander Lamb, 21st Battery, 2nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery

  • Private Ernest Lawrence, 2nd Battalion, Devonshire Regiment

  • Private F. Loader, 1/22nd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers

  • Private Alfred Longshaw, 18/Manchester Regiment[2][8]

  • Lance Corporal Allassan Mamprusi, Gold Coast Regiment

  • Rifleman Samuel McBride, 2nd Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles

  • Private Charles McColl, 1st/4th Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment

  • Private John McFarlane, 4th Battalion, King’s Liverpool Regiment

  • Private B. McGeehan, 1/8th Battalion, King’s Liverpool Regiment

  • Private J. S. Michael, 10th Battalion, Cameronians

  • Private L. Mitchell, 8th Battalion, Yorks and Lancs Regiment

  • Private Thomas Lionel Moles, 54th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force

  • Private H. Morris, 6th Battalion, British West Indies Regiment

  • Private Joseph Nisbet, 1st Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment

  • Private A. Parry, 2nd Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment

  • Private Louis Phillips, 6th Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry

  • Private Albert Henry Pitts, 2nd Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment

  • Second Lieutenant Eric Skeffington Poole, 11th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment

  • Corporal George Povey, 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment

  • Private Albert Rickman, 1st Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

  • Sergeant John Robins, 5th Wiltshire Regiment

  • Private John Robinson, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private George Ernest Roe, 2nd Battalion, King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

  • Private William Scotton, 4th Battalion, Middlesex Regiment

  • Private J. Seymour, 2nd Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

  • Private W. H. Simmonds, 23rd Battalion, Middlesex Regiment

  • Rifleman F. N. Slade, 2/6th Battalion, London Regiment

  • Private James Smith, 17th Battalion, The King’s (Liverpool Regiment)

  • Private W. Smith, 3/5th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers

  • Private Victor Manson Spencer, 1st Battalion, Otago Regiment of the New Zealand Division

  • Private J. Steadman, Machine Gun Corps

  • Private R. Stevenson, 1/4th Battalion, Loyal North Lancashire Regiment

  • Private Stanley Stewart, 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers

  • Private Alfred Thompson, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private R. T. Tite, 13th Battallion, Royal Sussex Regiment

  • Private Frederick Turner, 6th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers

  • Private William J. Turpie, 2nd Battalion, East Surrey Regiment

  • Sergeant J. T. Wall, 3rd attalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private G. Watkins, 13th Battalion, Welsh Regiment

  • Private A. H. Westwood, East Surrey Regiment

  • Private J. H. Wilson, 4th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force

  • Private W. Wycherley, 2nd Manchester Regiment

  • Private R. Young, 11th Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shot_at_Dawn_Memorial

During World War One, around 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers were shot for desertion or cowardice, most of them were sentenced after a short trial at which no real opportunity for defence was allowed, this would have been sad for many families. At last it is recognised that several of them were under age when they volunteered and that many of them suffering from shell shock or post traumatic stress disorder,
Andy Decomyn’s statue shot at dawn is modelled on Private Herbert Francis Burden, of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, who was shot at dawn at Ypres on 21st July 1915,aged 17.

The names of Herbert Francis Burden and those others who suffered the fate of being shot at dawn are listed on the stakes arranged in the form of a greek theatre around the statue, symbolising the tragedy that these events signify, many of the posts say Age unknown and this is because many young men lied about their age in order to enlist, some of them had no representation at court-martial because most of the officers had been killed when they went over the top, first (the average life expectancy of an officer on the front line was 10 weeks) We know of these 306 soldiers, sadly to this day we do not know the total figure because between 80pc and 90pc of those sentenced to die had their sentences commuted and were probably sent to jail or hard labour.

Each year many visitors ask about the location of the Shot at Dawn Memorial in the Arboretum, it seems appropriate that it should be on the eastern edge where dawn strikes, the six trees facing the posts represent the firing squad, all aiming for the medal around the statue’s neck and none of them knowing who had the fatal bullet, it must have been very traumatic for them too, having to shoot one of their own. The Campaign For a Pardon
After the 75 year Secrecy Act was lifted, Members of the Shot at Dawn Organisation started Campaigning for a Pardon.

The campaign commenced in 1992 and was led by Janet Booth who sought a pardon for her grandfather, Private Harry Farr, janet’s grandmother had lived with the shame and stigma of her husband being shot for cowardice in 1916. She believed he was wrongly convicted and actually suffering from shellshock. Harry Farr’s family took the Ministry of Defence to the high court and won, in 2006 a posthumous pardon was granted for Private Harry Farr and the other men that were Shot at Dawn.

The Shot at Dawn Memorial is a British Monument at the National Memorial Arboretum near Alrewas, in StaffordshireUK. It memorialises the 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers executed after courts-martial for cowardice or desertion during World War I.

The mass pardon of 306 British Empire soldiers executed for certain offences during the Great War was enacted in section 359 of the Armed Forces Act 2006, which came into effect on royal assent on 8th November 2006.

Britain finally honours Polish war effort with first official Arboretum Memorial

A section of the Polish Memorial, it commemorates the memory of the Polish men and women who gave their lives in the Second World War.  National Memorial Arboretum, 2011.Seventy years after start of second wold war, memorial and book commemorates 500,000 Poles who fought under UK command. They showed extraordinary bravery, many giving their lives as the ultimate sacrifice for our Freedom. The Arboretum, near Lichfield, Staffordshire, contained some 130 war memorials.

 

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

Two minutes

Two minutes isn’t much to give, To those who fought and died, And not forgetting loved ones, Who Till this day have cried.

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To Flanders fields where poppies grow, Our thoughts return to long ago, And in remembrance they still live, Two minutes isn’t much to give

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

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The National Memorial Arboretum,  Croxall Road, Alrewas, Staffordshire, DE13 7AR 

Part of The Royal British Legion family of charities 

www.thenma.org.uk

www.justgiving.com/thenma

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28th May Arboretum poster 1

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

Open All Year Round 9am - 5pm Only Closed on Christmas Day

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

2 poster Arboretumm

  

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire  is a great place to spend the day any time of the year. They honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance.

There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces. Many civilian organisation and voluntary bodies who have played a big part in serving their country at home and around the world. I enjoyed taking lot’s of photos which I’m  happy to share with you. I also took the time for lovely walks around the many trails exploring the outdoors.

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

Honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world. I am sharing my photos with you, it was a wonderful day.

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

  

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

info@thenma.org.uk

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

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http://www.thenma.org.uk/

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http://www.thenma.org.uk/

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http://www.thenma.org.uk/

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http://www.thenma.org.uk

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General Sikorski Cap

http://www.thenma.org.uk

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Polish armoured Forces 

The National Memorial Arboretum honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world.

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

Laurencegoff

Polish armoured Forces, Staffordshire

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The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

 
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Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

info@thenma.org.uk

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

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Laurencegoff 

Brave Polish that come over during the 2nd world war. We are grateful for you helping

out at our time of need

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Thanks to the Polish during 2nd world war

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Polish Memorial, we will Remember Them

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The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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Laurence Goff uplifting visit

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

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All 306 soldiers of the First World War who were shot at dawn for cowardice or desertion have be granted posthumous pardons 90 years later

Shot at Dawn

During the First World War some 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers were shot for desertion or cowardice; the real cause for their offences was often a psychological reaction to the stresses of war which today would be diagnosed as post-traumatic stress syndrome or combat stress reactionShot at Dawn is modelled on Private Herbert Burden, of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, who was shot at Ypres in 1915 aged 17.

The Shot at Dawn Memorial is a British Monument at the National Memorial Arboretum near Alrewas, in Staffordshire

Laurencgoff

During the First  World War 306 who were shot now have a trees planted with the person name put on a metal plate.  The British Monument at the National Memorial Arboretum near Alrewas, in Staffordshire.

The National Memorial Arboretum honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world.

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The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire, Laurence Goff uplifting visit

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/britain_wwone/shot_at_dawn_01.shtml

laurencegoff4newark@yahoo.co.uk

 

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The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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Laurence Goff an introduction to the National Memorial Arboretum, Memorials

 

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Remembrance for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

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The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

 

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The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire, The Royal British Legion Flags

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In the face of these Child, we will Remember them, The Royal British Legion

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

 

Laurencegoff

 The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

Laurencegoff Amateur Photographer, it been a joyful time and I look forward to my next visit

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http://www.thenma.org.uk/

The National Memorial Arboretum honours the fallen all year round

www.thenma.org.uk/

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National Memorial Arboretum Croxall Road Alrewas Staffordshire DE13 7AR

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Laurencegoff

How to get there by Road 

M1 (southbound) – exit at Junction 28 and take the A38 south bypassing Derby and Burton to the A513 Tamworth then local directions. M1 (northbound) – exit onto M6 north then after Corley Services follow signs for M6 (Toll) & M42 then leave at next junction (Junction 9 M42 ) signposted A 446, then follow A446 Lichfield to A38 Lichfield, then A38 Derby to A513 Tamworth then local directions. M6 (southbound) – exit Junction 15 follow A50 Derby then A38 Lichfield to A 513 Tamworth then local directions. M6 (northbound) South of Birmingham – follow signs for M6 (Toll) & M42 then leave at next junction (Junction 9 M42 ) signposted A 446, then follow A446 Lichfield to A38 Lichfield, then A38 Derby to A513 Tamworth then local directions. M6 (northbound) & M6 North of Birmingham – leave M6 at Junction 11, follow A5 then A38 Derby until A513 Tamworth then local directions. M54 (eastbound) – leave at Junction 1 and take A460 Cannock passing over M6 continue towards continue then follow A5 (Tamworth), then A38 Derby until A513 Tamworth then local directions.

Local directions: from A38 at Alrewas follow Brown Signs to the National Memorial Arboretum following A513 towards Tamworth after about half a mile turn left at the roundabout following the road round to the Arboretum entrance.

For sat nav, AA Route Finder or RAC Route Finder users the post code is DE13 7AR. Streetmap.

 

 ONLINE HELP

Use our online knowledge base to find the help you need, when you need it.

Or call 0808 802 8080 (free from UK landlines and main mobile networks) from 8am to 8pm, 7 days each week (closed Christmas Day, reduced hours on Boxing Day and New Year’s Day)

The phrase ‘When you go home tell them of us’ is from the epitaph carved on the memorial of the 2nd British Division in the Kohima cemetery for the Allied war dead. The full inscription on the epitaph reads, (When You Go Home, Tell Them Of Us And Say, For Their Tomorrow, We Gave Our Today). The verse is said to have been inspired by the epitaph written by Simonides to honour the Greek who fell at the Battle of Thermopylae in 480 BC and is attributed to

John Maxwell Edmond

Don’t tell me that you understand, don’t tell me that you know, Don’t tell me that I will survive, how I will surely grow

Don’t tell me this is just a test, that I am truly blessed, That I am chosen for this task, apart from all the rest. Don’t come at me with answers that can only come from me, Don’t tell me how my grief will pass, that I will soon be free. Don’t stand in pious judgment of the bonds I must untie, Don’t tell me how to suffer, don’t tell me how to cry. My life is filled with selfishness, my pain is all I see,But I need you, I need your love, unconditionally. Accept me in my ups and downs, I need someone to share, Just hold my hand and let me cry, and say,”My friend, I really do care.”

 “At the going down of the Sun and in the morning, we shall remember them.”

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The Royal British Legion

 

Disclaimer

 In the public interest

I accept no responsibility for the accuracy of the information contained on this website, which is a non profit project designed soley by

Laurence Goff

   14 The Osiers

Newark On Trent

 Nottinghamshire NG24 4TP

01636-681878 leave message on Answering Machine

07794613879 

Honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world. I have enjoyed and happy to sharing my photos with you, it was a wonderful day. I also took the time to see the many Memorial lovely walks around the trails exploring the outdoors.

 The photos I took  freely on an uplifting and spiritually visit, National Arboretum Staffordshire. They are my opinions expressed  and are entirely my own. Please Note  they also do not represent the views of The British Legion or others.

This photos were all taken by Laurencegoff Amateur Photographer

RAIL INDUSTRY MEMORIAL

On the top of the plinth is a black granite replica Class 8 Freight Locomotive.
The rear panel has an etching montage showing life on the railways through the ages.

 

QUAKER SERVICE MEMORIAL

Dedicated: 20 April 2013

Commemorates: Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) wartime service.  

The Quaker Service Memorial Trust commissioned the memorial to honour the vital humanitarian role undertaken by members of the Friends Ambulance Unit (FAU), an independent body enabling conscientious objectors to undertake wartime civilian service, and the Friends Relief Service (FRS), the official relief body of the Religious Society of Friends, which worked at home and in mainland Europe to help civilians in distress.

Designed by Staffordshire sculptor and Quaker, Rosemary Barnett, it features six texts carved onto four stone benches. The seats are arranged in an open circle – as are many Quaker meetings for worship – symbolic of unity and equality.

GCHQ

Dedicated: 13 July 2012

Commemorates: GCHQ

The memorial is a sphere of rose coloured granite; and the plaque to anonymous code breakers at the National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire reads: “To commemorate all British and Allied personnel whose work with Signals Intelligence and Communications Security has supported HMG in war and peace since 1914″. The sphere was sculpted by the artist Nick Johnson.

The memorial features two pieces of code; a line of Morse code G C C S representing the “Government Code and Cypher School” the forerunner of GCHQ, and a line of binary code representing the numbers 7 3 8 17, the position of the letters G C H Q in the alphabet.BASRA MEMORIAL WALL

Dedicated: 11 March 2010

Commemorates: The 178 UK Service personnel and one MOD civilian who lost their lives on combat operations in Iraq. It also lists members of Coalition Forces who were killed while under UK command during six years of conflict.

The original memorial was built in Basra in 2006 and stood outside the front of the Headquarters of the Multi-National Division (South East). Following the end of operations, the Basra Memorial Wall was brought back to the UK and rebuilt. The original wall was built, dismantled, and reconstructed at the Arboretum by British soldiers from 37th Armoured Engineer Squadron in a personal gesture to commemorate their fallen comrades.

The brass plaques on this memorial are the originals placed on the wall when it was in situ in Basra, Iraq.

 

ROYAL AIR FORCE ASSOCIATION REMEMBRANCE GARDEN

Dedicated: 28 September 2009

Commemorates: All those who have served in the RAF and Commonwealth air.

Inspiration for the garden comes from the RAF Association’s dedication, the last line of which is “we will remember them”. The central feature is the RAF Association emblem – a magnificent stainless steel eagle sitting on top of a globe. The eagle is made up of over 1,000 hand-forged feathers and is surrounded by a segmented RAF roundel, which is separated into four quarters to depict the RAF Association at the heart of RAF welfare. The RAF Association provides friendship, help and support for any members of the RAF past and present, and their families. It is the largest single-service membership organisation in the UK, with around 74,000 members and almost 500 branches.

 

POLISH ARMED FORCES WAR MEMORIAL

Dedicated: 19 September 2009

Commemorates: The Polish men and women who gave their lives in World War II. Designed as a tribute to the fallen and also as an educational aid for visitors not familiar with the history of the allied Polish Forces

ARMED FORCES MEMORIAL

Dedicated: 12 October 2007

Commemorates:  The men and women of our Armed and Merchant Services who have lost their lives in conflict, as a result of terrorist action or on training exercises since the end of WW2. Unlike the World War memorials in towns and villages across the Nation, there is nowhere else that records over 16,000 names of those who have been killed on duty in recent times.

Dedicated in the presence of Her Majesty The Queen on 12 October 2007, the Armed Forces Memorial is a nationally significant focus for Remembrance, providing recognition and thanks for those who have given their lives in the service of the country.

The Memorial is a stunning piece of architecture designed by Liam O’Connor, inspired by the ancient landscapes of prehistoric Britain and the classical forms of ancient Rome.

 

THE FAR EAST PRISONERS OF WAR MEMORIAL BUILDING

Dedicated: 15 August 2005

Commemorates: The 55,000 Far East Prisoners of War from World War II. It not
only remembers those who died, but also encompasses the whole story of events during this unprecedented chapter in British history. The memorial roll contains the name and rank of all British Servicemen taken prisoner during the South East Asia conflict and embraces the story of their treatment and the thousands who died as well. The building houses an exhibition which reveals clearly the life and experiences of these prisoners, aided by archive video footage and interviews. It was opened on the 60th Anniversary of VJ Day, the end of World War II in the Pacific.

Close by is the original lychgate from the cemetery at Changi Jail in Singapore, built by prisoners as a memorial to their comrades who died.

THE MERCHANT NAVY CONVOY

Dedicated: 1 October 2003

Commemorates: Over 46,000 British merchant seafarers and fishermen lost in conflict during the 20th Century, including two World Wars, Falklands, Kuwait, Vietnam, Iran, Iraq and others.

31,908 seafarers perished in World War II, proportionately more than any of the Armed Services. 2,535 trees represent the British vessels lost at that time.

 

 

SHOT AT DAWN MEMORIAL

Unveiled: 21 June 2001

Commemorates: 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers who were shot for desertion or cowardice during World War I. Most were sentenced after a short trial at which no real opportunity for defence was allowed. Today it’s recognised that many of them were underage and suffering from shell-shock. Andy Decomyn’s statue is modelled on Private Herbert Burden, of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, who was shot at Ypres in 1915 aged 17. In 2006 a posthumous pardon was granted.

STILLBIRTH AND NEONATAL DEATH CHARITY MEMORIAL

Dedicated: June 2001

SANDS was founded in 1978 by a small group of bereaved parents devastated by the death of their babies and by a complete lack of acknowledgement and understanding of the significance and impact of their loss. It aims to support anyone affected by the death of a baby; to work with health professionals to improve the quality of care and services provided to bereaved parents and families and to promote changes that could help to reduce the loss of babies’ lives.

THE CHILDREN’S WOODLAND

Dedicated: 2001

Commemorates: Sponsored by the Midlands Co-operative Society Limited and planted with 2,640 native British trees, the Children’s Woodland was designed to combine arboriculture and wildlife education with Remembrance.

Individual trees have been sponsored by families and schools and dedicated to babies and children who have passed away. In the nearby shelter are large child-sized wooden figures of the characters from ‘The Wind in the Willows’ by Kenneth Grahame. They were carved by the Essex Woodcarvers under the supervision of Peter Benson of the British Woodcarvers Association.

The children’s activity area and picnic area was funded by Staffordshire Aggregates Levy Grant Scheme (SALGS). It is a purpose-built wooden environment for children aged between 7-13 years.

MILLENNIUM CHAPEL OF PEACE AND FORGIVENESS

Dedicated: 2 November 2000

The Chapel represents a desire for, and is dedicated to, peace and forgiveness. It is also a celebration of the beginning of the third Millennium. It is the only place within the UK where the Act of Remembrance is observed every day of the year. Visitors to the Chapel and surrounding areas are invited to stop and observe the Silence at 11am to remember those who have lost their lives in conflict.

The Chapel’s wood construction is supported on twelve trunks of Douglas fir, each one representing one of the twelve apostles on whose witness the early church was built. Douglas fir was selected to pay tribute to David Douglas, the great plantsman, the 200th anniversary of whose birth coincided with the beginning of work on the Chapel. Each pillar has a carving by Jim Heath of one of the apostles.

National Memorial Arboretum

More than 50,000 trees, form a living tribute to Britain’s fallen heroes at the National Memorial Arboretum.

The brainchild of Commander David Childs, a retired naval officer, the site was opened in 2001 using donations and Lottery funding. It encompasses 300 separate memorials paying tribute to the Armed Forces, the emergency services and voluntary organisations.

1. The centrepiece of the memorial arboretum is the Portland stone Armed Forces Memorial which honours the UK’s 16,000 servicemen and women who have lost their lives since the end of the Second World War.

2. Bordered by a hedge, the Brotherhood of Greek Veterans Chapel honours those who fought in Greece from 1940 to 1945.

3. The Polar Bear memorial is dedicated to the 49th (West Riding) Infantry Division, which fought the Germans in Norway in 1940 and was then stationed in Iceland.

4. The marquees, which stage more than 200 events a year, are to be replaced by a pavilion.

5. The Millennium Chapel of Peace and Forgiveness, the only place in the UK where  the Act of Remembrance is observed every day.

6. The Leonard Cheshire Amphitheatre is dedicated to the highly decorated RAF pilot who devoted his life to charity.

7. White alabaster stone marks the memorial to the Fauld explosion, which killed 68 in 1944 when a munitions dump in Staffordshire blew up.

8. Dwarf fruit trees, which can be picked at wheelchair height, mark out the British Limbless ex-Servicemen’s Association Garden.

9. The Y Group Memorial remembers women from the Auxiliary Territorial Service, the Women’s Royal Air Force and the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force.

10. Among the latest additions to the site is the 165ft-long RAF Remembrance Garden, which honours those who   have served in the RAF and Commonwealth air forces. The garden layout is based on the RAF roundel.

11. This striking V-shaped monument is dedicated to members of the Soroptimist International women’s organisation, which aims to promote world peace.

  • Donations to the arboretum appeal can be made via http://www.thenma.org.uk or by sending cheques, payable to the NMA Future Foundations Appeal, to: The NMA Future Foundations Appeal Office, 1 Fitzgerald Road, Mortlake, London SW14 8HA.

The National Memorial Arboretum is the UK’s year-round Centre of Remembrance; a spiritually uplifting place which honours the fallen, recognises service and sacrifice, and fosters pride in our country.  The Arboretum is part of The Royal British Legion family of charities.

Sited in the heart of the Nation, with 50,000 maturing trees and over 250 significant memorials, it is a beautiful and lasting tribute to those who serve their country or who have died in conflict.  Over 200 special events are held annually.  The Act of Remembrance, including a Silence, is observed daily in the Millennium Chapel at 11am.

The Arboretum is home to the iconic Armed Forces Memorial which commemorates those who have been killed on duty, or as a result of terrorism, from the end of the Second World War to the present day.

For enquiries call 01283 792333.

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Laurencegoff

Lest We Forget, Britain honoured its war dead. Tribute to British Commonwealth and Polish Sacrifice.They departed this life into the next. Though they are hidden in the shadow of Death.Their lives for others in the love of serving our Country and Newark-On-Trent that never dies. Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856

http://www.deceasedonline.com/

 Newark Town Council

Newark Town Hall, Market Place, Newark, Nottinghamshire, NG24 1DU.

Nearly 40,000 burial records are available, with a mixture of register scans and computerised records.

Newark Cemetery – Added 7 June 2010

Burials numbered 1 to 37,141 dated 31 December 1856 to 4 March 1997, are available as burial register scans. Subsequent data is only available as full computerised records. Initially, records have been added up to no 39,673 dated 26 March 2010.

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Laurencegoff

This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately, the content here is solely the responsibility of Laurence Goff. As a fitting tribute to the people who resting place is at Newark cemetery. The views expressed our solely my own and do not reflect  Newark Town Council.

I have been walking around Newark cemetery since  2004. In 2005 we set up a group Friends Of Newark Cemetery, I have been Chairman since 2010. I had an opportunity to have a blog for the last four years and I have had 37,260 visit across the UK, and the World. Many kind words which I really enjoy and appreciate from people that have contacted me. It has intrigues me, something that makes me want to look into who is buried and history going back to 1856, which has been fascinating.

It Will Never Be The Same If You Become A Volunteer at Newark Cemetery. Perhaps the biggest difference that you will make is in you. Volunteering is a life-changing experience. It will provide you with a new outlook and lease on life. You will understand better than most people how you fit into the family history of who is buried in Newark Cemetery since 1856. Make no mistake about it, this is an experience that you won’t want to miss.

“I had the most unbelievable experience for the last nine years. It not hard work but hugely rewarding for me. I met so many great people and learnt so much about the Cemetery environment. An experience I will never forget and recommend to everyone.”

Friends of Newark Cemetery public meeting is being held at Newark Town Hall (Pickin Room).  30th April 2014 arrive for a cuppa at 5:45pm before the start of the AGM and meeting at 6pm.

  

Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery will only open by appointment for groups on weekends .

 by Contact the Chairman Laurence Goff  01636-681878 or 07794613879 or leave a message at Newark Town Hall 01636-0333 or by Email: friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk  

We  need to found more Volunteers to welcome visits to Newark Cemetery by  showing around our exhibition, serving refreshments giving tours or help locate a grave for visits.

 

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www.facebook.com/laurencegoffnewark

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George William “Willie” Hall memory of an inspirational sporting-hero that came from Newark, Nottinghamshire

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

A time to remember – that you will never forget

George William “Willie” Hall

Born in Newark, Nottinghamshire on Tuesday 12th March 1912

Died in Newark on Monday 26th May 1967

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Laurencegoff

Our sporting-hero, his last legacy will live on and be remembered

As a young schoolboy an international, and was a member of the Ransome & Marles

side which won the Notts Alliance title in 1929-30

Played Notts County Football Team 1930 – 1932

Played Football For Tottenham Hotspur 1932 for many years

Played England Football Team 1930s

Willie Hall Scores England’s Fastest Ever Hat-Trick legendary footballer

Scored 5 of the 7 goals against Northern Ireland on 16th November 1938

 Died in Newark on Monday 26th May 1967
His Resting Place

Cremation, and the ashes later interred at Newark Cemetery at his and parents grave

The Willie Hall Memorial Trophy is played each year since 1967

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George  William “Willie” Hall Played Football For Tottenham Hotspur At Age 20.

Amongst the many well-known local people that are buried in Newark Cemetery include  among the many graves are Memorials to some of Newark’s greatest benefactors and people who have helped shape Newark

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Willie Hall Scores England’s Fastest Ever Hat-Trick legendary footballer

His famous ‘hat trick’ (still unbeaten) was achieved in the game with Northern Ireland, when he scored all five goals. A date to remember, 16th November 1938 and was played at Old Trafford.  It still has never yet been beaten.

Dreams do come true if you believe in yourself

Let’s help others achieve their dreams 

 Honouring His Memory As A Fitting Tribute To Him

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Willie Hall, 1950 by Lilian Iris ‘Betty’ Hall

 He was Newark’s football genius and true gentleman, and he won his own battles always helping other people to win theirs

George William “Willie” Hall a Newark true local and national Football Legend, his memory needs to live on. He was born on Tuesday 12th March 1912, to John William Hall and Elizabeth (née Hopkinson). at 12 Tenter Buildings this house on Appleton Gate, Newark once was originally the largest Victorian back to back yard in town with 82 houses.

A true local and national Football Legend, let’s start inspiring the young people of today.

George William “Willie” Hall memory of an inspirational sporting-hero that came from Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

A schoolboy international, and was a member of the Ransome & Marles side which won the Notts Alliance title in 1929-30. His brothers, Cyril and Harry, were also footballers.

Notts County football team back in 1932. He went on to play for Tottenham Hotspur in 1932 and the England national team during the 1930s. He was a versatile inside forward and skillful dribbler. In his later career he played a full-back.

Dreams do come true. 

George William Hall

  • Born: 12th March 1912, Newark, Nottinghamshire

  • Position whilst with England: Inside Forward

  • Clubs whilst with England: Tottenham Hotspur

  • Scored 5 goals against Northern Ireland on 16th November 1938.

    His hat-trick coming inside 4 minutes (which is still an intenational record).

On This Weekend In Football: Willie Hall Scores England’s Fastest Ever Hat-Trick

by Stuart Moriarty-Patten

16th November 1938

Willie Hall takes under four minutes to score England’s fastest ever international hat-trick

George William Hall was known to everyone as Willie and was born in 1912 in Newark, Nottinghamshire.  He had played as a schoolboy international for England and had begun his professional career with Notts County, then in the Third Division (South) in 1930.  After 35 games and 8 goals in just over two years with the club, in which they won promotion to the Second Division, he had done enough to bring himself to the attention of bigger clubs.  He was signed by Tottenham Hotspur, who were pushing for promotion from the Second Division, in December 1932 for a fee of £2600 plus another £500 if he won an England cap.  Signed as a replacement for George Greenfield who had broken a leg, the 20 year-old Hall was immediately picked for the first team, making his debut ironically away to Notts County.  Spurs lost that game 3-0 but would finish runners-up at the end of the season to win promotion.

Spurs returned to the top flight in style and were lying second when Hall was selected to make his debut for England in a 4-1 win against France at White Hart Lane in 6 December 1933.  Although he played well enough he wasn’t selected again until 1937, although he did appear for an FA XI against an Anglo-Scot XI in 1935 to celebrate the silver jubilee of King George V.   Hindering his call up for further caps was an injury received in 1934 at Maine Road when, after a heavy tackle, he required surgery on his knee.  This left him sidelined for a number of months, and when he returned to the first team towards the end of the 1934/35 season Spurs had struggled and were bottom of the table and were to be relegated back to the second tier.   Out of the top division the selectors overlooked him, but his form was such that even though he was still playing in the Second Division he was called up to win his second cap in a 5-1 win over Northern Ireland in Belfast on 23 October 1937.  He scored one of the goals in this game and was picked for the next international against Wales on 17 November in which he scored the second goal in a 2-1 victory at Middlesbrough’s Ayresome Park.

On 6 November 1938 he was selected for his seventh England cap for the game in which he was going to write his name in the record books by scoring five times in a magical thirty-minute period either side of the half-time break.  Tommy Lawton had opened the scoring in the eighth minute but it was nearly half an hour before the team scored again and Willie Hall started on his rampage.  The first of his goals came in the 36th minute followed by two more in the 38th and 40th minutes which gave Hall the record of the fastest international hat-trick by an England player, a feat timed officially at 3 minutes 30 seconds and yet to be bettered.  It took him 10 minutes of the second half for him to get his fourth, quickly followed by the fifth another 10 minutes later.  Stanley Matthews rounded off the afternoon with England’s seventh in the 75th minute.

Willie Hall was a skilful dribbler of the ball but not renowned as a goalscorer and the five he scored for England was more than half the total he got for Spurs all that season, but he had not only scored the fastest hat-trick for England that day but also equalled Steve Bloomer’s 1896 record for the most goals in an international game by an English player.   It was a game that was to leave Hall immensely proud and Stanley Matthews, who himself had a rewarding afternoon having been credited with assists for all of Willie Hall’s goals, later wrote in his autobiography The Way It Was, “Willie was full of emotion back in the dressing room and cried unashamedly as each of his team-mates in turn congratulated him on his outstanding performance and his England goalscoring match record.”

Hall was to win a total of 10 caps, scoring a highly creditable nine goals and was a regular selection up until the intervention of the Second World War in 1939, with his final game being against Yugoslavia on 18 May 1939.  During the war he was rejected by the army on health grounds caused by injuries suffered from playing football, and he served in the London Police reserve.  He continued to turn out for Spurs in war-time games and was made captain of the team, playing 136 times and scoring 10 goals.  He also appeared in three war-time internationals. In 1944 he retired from playing after a serious ankle injury and took over the management of Clapton Orient, as Leyton Orient were then called.

His tenure was to be short-lived though due to complications suffered after a thrombosis had affected his legs and by the time football had resumed in 1946 Hall sadly had had both his legs amputated.  Tommy Lawton mirrored the public’s mood in his book My Twenty Years of Soccer, when he wrote, “What a tragedy it was that Willie should lose both his precious legs, the legs that had thrilled us all in football for many a year.”  Notts County and Spurs both held testimonials for him, with over 30,000 turning out to White Hart Lane on 7 May 1946 to see a Spurs XI take on an FA XI.

After a period coaching and managing in the non-league with Chelmsford and Chingford he left the game and became a publican.   A measure of his fame and the regard that he was held in for how he had dealt with his disability was that in 1959, some 13 year after the end of his career, he was the subject of the This Is Your Life TV programme and presented with the famous red book by Eamonn Andrews.  Inscribed inside were the words  “Willie Hall – football genius and true gentleman, your brand of unique courage has inspired all who have known you.  Your kindness and humour have brought solace into the lives of all you have met.  This book is intended as our tribute and token of appreciation.”

Willie Hall passed away on 22 May 1967 aged 55 and a trophy, the Willie Hall Memorial Trophy, was inaugurated for teams in Newark to compete for, and is still played for today, and a plaque was unveiled earlier this year at the primary school in Lovers’ Lane, Newark where Hall began his tentative steps towards football immortality.  When looking back at his career perhaps there are no more fitting words than those written by Stanley Matthews when he wrote, “He was the most unassuming of men, modest to a fault. His unselfish play and great contribution to a game was never truly appreciated by the sports writers of the day.”

http://www.thedaisycutter.co.uk/2013/11/on-this-weekend-in-football-willie-hall-scores-englands-fastest-ever-hat-trick/

One of the Premier League’s biggest clubs is to honour Newark’s most famous footballing son.

Willie Hall

Willie Hall

Tottenham Hotspur are taking back the original Willie Hall Cup they donated to the Newark Alliance league almost 50 years ago.

It was presented in memory of Willie Hall, scorer of the fastest international hat-trick of all time.

Spurs, with the approval of the Newark Alliance, want to exhibit the trophy in a museum at the club’s proposed new stadium.

Mr Dennis Rawle, from the Alliance, said: “Willie Hall is the most prestigious player from our area and that is why his memorial trophy is still played for by every team in the Newark Alliance to this day.

“He is the best player Newark has produced.

“In return for us giving them the trophy back, I’m hoping someone from Tottenham can come and present the Willie Hall Cup to the winners of the 2017 competition, which will mark both the cup’s and Alliance’s 50th anniversary.”

Hall wrote his name into the history books when he scored a 3½-minute hat-trick for England against Northern Ireland at Old Trafford on November 16, 1938.

In total he scored five in England’s 7-0 win.

In 1967, the year Willie Hall died, Tottenham donated a trophy to the newly-formed Newark Alliance.

It was presented to the winners of the league’s main cup competition.

The Willie Hall Memorial Trophy was presented for more than 40 years before being replaced with a newer trophy.

Representatives of the Alli-ance will travel to London to present the original trophy to Tottenham.

Mr Andy Porter, a Spurs historian, said: “We will be extremely proud to display the original trophy in our lounges and, when we move to the new ground, the planned museum.

“We were one of the clubs and organisations that made a donation back in 1968 to keep his memory alive.

“His five-goal haul against Northern Ireland in 1938 makes him unique among the England players listed on our international honours board.

Members of the Newark Alliance committee with the Willie Hall Memorial Trophy. They are, left to right, back row, Mr Dennis Rawle and Mr Keith Arnold. Front, Mr Paul Samuels and Mr Simon Roberts. 100314JT8-8

Members of the Newark Alliance committee with the Willie Hall Memorial Trophy. They are, left to right, back row, Mr Dennis Rawle and Mr Keith Arnold. Front, Mr Paul Samuels and Mr Simon Roberts. 100314JT8-8

“He was one of the most prominent players of his era.

“To students of Spurs’ history he was a star of our 1930s team.”

Willie Hall’s nephew, Mr Mick Gill, of Newark, said handing back the cup was appropriate.

Willie Hall was a schoolboy international and a member of the Ransome and Marles side that won the Notts Alliance title in 1929-30.

Notts County signed him in 1930 when he was 18 and after 35 appearances and eight goals, he moved to Tottenham in 1932.

He was capped ten times by England.

Football legend Tommy Lawton once said: “Willie Hall was a ball player of the highest class.

“He could make a football do the most alarming tricks.”

Poor health ended Willie Hall’s playing career in 1945.

After his enforced retirement he became the first Spurs player to be awarded a benefit match.

The game on May 7, 1946 attracted a crowd of 30,220 and raised more than £3,000 for him.

After being a publican in London, Willie Hall returned to Newark in 1954 to be near his sister.

He had to have the lower parts of both his legs amputated because of thrombosis.

He died from a heart attack in 1967 six days after seeing his beloved Spurs beat Chelsea 2-1 in the FA Cup.

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Up-for-the-cup

 

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George William “Willie” Hall, Tottenham Hotspur football team captain

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  • Tottenham Hotspur Football Club, commonly referred to as Spurs, is an English football

    club located in Tottenham, London, that plays in the Premier League.

    The club’s home stadium is White Hart Lane.

 

Willie Hall Scores England’s Fastest Ever Hat-Trick legendary footballer

His famous ‘hat trick’ (still unbeaten) was achieved in the game with Northern Ireland, when he scored all five goals. A date to remember, 16th November 1938 and was played at Old Trafford.  It still has never yet been beaten.

Dreams do come true if you believe in yourself

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Laurencegoff

Willie attended Lovers’ Lane Primary School, Newark , Nottinghamshire which was nearby, that where his interest in football started together with his other brothers and friends.

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http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

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Laurencegoff 

N.A.L.H.S. Plaque Dedication to George William “Willie” Hall

located at Lovers’ Lane Primary School, Newark 

Memory of an inspirational sporting-hero, this plaque was unveiled by the town’s mayor, Councillor Bryan Richardson, on Tuesday 23rd July 2013

A dedication to a Newark-born footballer in a plaque erected at Lovers’ Lane School

By ROGER PEACOCK

17th August 2013

http://www.ournottinghamshire.org.uk/page_id__1121_path__0p31p38p50p.aspx

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Can you see the plaque on the wall of Lovers’ Lane School Playground? 

During the Second World War Willie continue to play in friendly matches for Spurs whilst also being a member of the London Police Reserve.

Sadly ill-health brought an end to his playing career in 1944 and 1945  he suffered the amputation of both lower parts of his legs. He continued his association with the game as a Vice-president of the Spurs Supporters Club and in coaching roles at Clapton Orient and other clubs. Testimonial games were played at both Tottenham and Notts County grounds in 1946. From 1954 he became a publican. 

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Willie’s Hall fame was enhanced on 16th February 1959, when he was chosen as the subject of This is your life by B.B.C. Television host Eamonn Andrews.

 

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Born on 12th March 1912 in Newark, Nottinghamshire, England.

 When George Greenfield, the Tottenham inside forward broke his leg with the team on a good run in the Second Division, manager Percy Smith had to find someone to come in to cover and he went out and picked up Willie Hall from Notts. County.  The 20 year old cost £2,500 and was regarded as a good purchase, as the youngster fitted in straight away and helped the side to promotion to the top flight.  So well did Hall do in the Tottenham team that he caught the eye of the England selection committee and was selected to play for his country against France in December 1933 at home at White Hart Lane, which cost Tottenham another £500 in what was an early condition of a transfer fee.

Originally a schoolboy prodigy, Willie made the Notts. County first team at the end of the 1930-31 season and stayed with his club until 1932, when he made his Spurs debut.  Playing between the defence and the attack, Hall used his dribbling skills and his willingness to chase 

chase back to join the two parts of the team together.  His partnership with Willie Evans saw him regularly release the Welshman down the wing and create openings. 

It was only a year after joining Tottenham that Hall first won an England cap and that debut in 1933 was added to with nine further caps, scoring nine goal sin the process, including five against Northern Ireland at Old Trafford on 16th November 1938, which included the fastest hat-trick for England, coming in 3½ minutes and all five came in 30 minutes.  His scoring record was outstanding, but when the war came, it interrupted his international career, as well as his club career.  He could not join the forces, because he had sustained injuries while playing football which ruled him out of signing up to go to war, but Willie still managed to play a total of 136 war-time games, hitting 10 goals for Tottenham, while he served in the local London police reserve.

Spurs played well in the 1932-33 and ended the season as runners-up to gain promotion to the First Division and followed that up with another good season in gaining third place in the top flight in 1933-34.  However, in a match at Maine Road, three Manchester City players crunched Hall in a tackle and he required surgery on a cartilage tear, which kept him out for five months and the rest of the season was a struggle, with Willie just coming back for the tail-end of the campaign and despite his return signalling an upturn in fortunes, the team finished rock bottom, being relegated back to Division 2.

Willie dropped deeper in the side to fill in at full-back and he was selected for England in three war-time internationals against Wales.  During World War Two, Willie also played as a guest at Brighton and Hove Albion.

 

Sadly, he suffered from ill health and had to retire from playing and in 1945 suffered amputations of both legs.  Such was his service to Tottenham respected, the club held a testimonial game against an FA XI at White Hart Lane on 7th May 1946, with a 30,220 crowd paying to see the match and providing £3,000 for Hall’s needs.  There was also another game staged for him in Nottingham to help him out.

Although handicapped by no longer having the full use of his lower limbs, he continued to play a part in the game with coaching stints at Clapton Orient, Chelmsford City and Chingford Town.

He was so popular with the fans that he was appointed as the Vice-President of the Spurs Supporters Club when it was first formed and after his retirement, Hall took over the Archers pub in Osborne Street, London EC1.

Perhaps he was a trend-setter of his day, as Hall was one of the first footballers to be feature don the TV programme “This Is Your Life.”

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Laurencegoff

 New Family Grave January 2014

 Willie Hall died in his home town of Newark, Nottinghamshire on Monday, 22nd May 1967.

Hall’s prominence in the game in the Nottingham area was also recognised by a “Willie Hall Memorial Trophy” being contested among local sides in the area every year since his death. 

Memory Will Live On

On This Weekend In Football: Willie Hall Scores England’s Fastest Ever Hat-Trick

WILLIE’S PLACE IN HALL OF FAME

  • THURSDAY, 13 NOVEMBER, 2003
  • FA Header Image

SUNDAY’S MATCH AT OLD TRAFFORD IS THE 65TH ANNIVERSARY OF A TRULY REMARKABLE ACH

http://www.thefa.com/england/News/2003/73734

Sunday’s match at Old Trafford is the 65th anniversary of a truly remarkable achievement – Willie Hall scored what is still the quickest ever international hat-trick…

English football history is littered with great players who did their country a great service but whose achievements, having come in an era before mass media coverage of football, are now consigned only to faint memory and the record books.

George William Hall, better known as Willie, was one such player. Between 1933 and 1939, Hall won ten caps for England, scoring nine goals – a strike rate that any modern day forward would be proud to have.

Having signed for Tottenham Hotspur from Notts County in December 1932 for a then-massive £2,500, Hall made his England debut against France in December 1933 at, appropriately enough, Spurs’ White Hart Lane.

Five years and five further caps later came Hall’s great moment. In a Home Championship match between England and Northern Ireland at Old Trafford on 16 November 1938 – exactly 65 years ago this Sunday – Hall scored three goals in three and a half minutes to register what is still the fastest ever hat-trick in international football.

His goals came after 36, 38 and 40 minutes and followed up Tommy Lawton’s header on eight minutes. An inspired Hall then struck twice more after the break before Stanley Matthews finished things off with a goal fifteen minutes from time.

Not only is that hat-trick still a world record but Hall’s five goals also equalled Steve Bloomer’s 1896 record of the most goals in a match by a single player for the Three Lions. Malcolm Macdonald would become the third player to achieve five in a game 37 years later.

Hall ‘s career all but ended with the outbreak of the Second World War but in total he made 34 League appearances for Notts County, scoring seven times and 205 appearances for Tottenham, knocking in 27 goals.

George ‘Willie’ Hall died in the town of his birth, Newark, in May 1967.


England
: V Woodley, W Morris, E Hapgood (c), C Willingham, S Cullis, J Mercer, S Matthews, G Hall, T Lawton, J Stephenson, J Smith

Northern Ireland: Twoomey, Hayes, Cook, Brolly, McMillen, Browne, Cochrane, Stevenson, Baird, Doherty, Brown

Goals: Lawton (8), Hall, (36, 38, 40, 55, 65), Matthews (75)

Referee: Peter Craigmoyle (Scotland) 
Attendance: 40,000

Hall made his name at Notts County and, in the matchday programme for their FA Cup First Round tie against Shildon, the Magpies ran a great article all about the life and times of the player. For more, check out nottscountyfc.co.uk

NALHS Plaque to Willie Hall - Our Nottinghamshire

http://www.ournottinghamshire.org.uk › … › Newark and Sherwood › Newark

4 Sep 2013 - ‘NALHS Plaque to Willie Hall‘ by ROGER PEACOCK from Our  George William Hall was born in a humble home at 12 Tenter Buildings;

Willie Hall spent more time with his sister back in Newark, with new skills in fishing, and nostalgic sharing with old friends. He was happy person, on 20th May 1967, having watched Tottenham beat Chelsea 2:1 in the F.A. Cup. Sadly Willie died of a heart attack six days later on Monday 26th May 1967. 

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Laurencegoff

A  thanksgiving service took place at  Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene Church was followed by cremation, and the ashes later interred at Newark Cemetery at his  and parents grave. Our bid farewell and fond memory will live on for years to come.

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Laurencegoff
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Willie Hall New Family Grave January 2014

 

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 Laurencegoff

His  ashes later interred at Newark cemetery at his parents grave, plot number West 220 row S on the

West side, turn right at memorial Cross. William name is on his parents grave. 

 It reads: Also Her Beloved Son George William Hall Died 22nd May

1957 Aged 55 Years Reunited.

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A new tombstone has now been made by his family, that’s good news.  It  looks nice which is now in placed at Newark Cemetery for all to see. 

 Our sporting-hero will always be remembered in Newark his lasting legacy.

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Laurencegoff

Willie Sister Family Grave Together As One

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

Laurencegoff

George William “Willie” Hall

Parents Grave located at Newark Cemetery

His ashes later interred at his parents grave

A old gravestone, a new stone with all three names together with his family

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Laurencegoff

Willie Hall ashes were interred at his parents grave

George William Hall
Born 12 March 1912 at 12 Tenter Buildings, Appletongate, Newark, Nottinghamshire[registered in Newark, June 1912]To John William and Elizabeth (née Hopkinson). With eleven older brothers and sisters (twelve, if the the tragic death of a child is to be included)

 

 Willie Hall together with his parents have a new gravestone a restoration project has finished.

Willie Hall ashes were interred at his parents grave

A new photo will be posted of

Headstone and Memorial to Willie Hall  and his parents

 Honouring His Memory As

A Fitting Tribute To Willie Hall who came from Newark

Home
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DISPLAY CARDS

WILLIE HALL
This display shows the cards that Willie Hall has been featured on.
Click on the Card Set name to display all cards in that set.
Click on the large front or back card images to display this player’s career details.
Zoom
TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR 
Second Division
Zoom

Card manufacturer: Churchman

Age when this set was released: 26

Card set
Association Footballers
 Series 1

Published in 1938

Card number 17 from a set of 50
Zoom
TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR 
Second Division
Zoom

Card manufacturer: Churchman

Age when this set was released: 27

Card set
Association Footballers
 Series 2

Published in 1939

Card number 18 from a set of 50
Zoom
TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR 
Second Division
Zoom

Card manufacturer: Wills Cigarettes

Age when this set was released: 27

Card set
Association Footballers

Published in 1939

Card number 23 from a set of 50
Zoom
TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR 
Second Division
Zoom

Card manufacturer: R & J Hill

Age when this set was released: 27

Card set
Famous Footballers
 Series 1

Published in 1939

Card number 28 from a set of 50

 

Locating a grave have a look at this Map, walking up the Main Drive numbers start low and high at the other end of  cemetery. Please note E side stand for East and W side for West . The graves are numbered from A the next one will be B, C, D, E, and so on going outward on either side East or West. All new tombstone are black with the information on the back has  E for East then the letter for the row then the number, looking something like this E B 100 or West side W E

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Laurencegoff

Click on  for location of Cemetery Newark-on-Trent

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

The Villa hit ten past RHP Social Reserves to book a place in the quarter-finals of the Willie Hall Cup

appier times... Lowdham are pictured with the Willie Hall Trophy after their penalty shoot-out win in May.

Lowdham United, who won the Willie Hall Trophy for the third time in their history in May and also gained promotion to the Newark Alliance Senior Division, have withdrawn from the league because of a lack of players.

Formed in 1992, the club have also won two Pat Jepson Memorial Trophy Finals and the Notts Junior Cup in the last ten years, but this season they have struggled to field a team because of summer departures, and their last league outing ended in a 20-0 defeat at the hands of reigning champions Farndon United.

The Alliance has already seen five clubs pull out in the close season, with Barkestone-le-Vale, EBS Shelford, Coddington Reserves, Crown FC and Zenith joining the withdrawals of Senior Division BG Hawtonville and Division One side Balderton Athletic during the last campaign, but the Willie Hall holders are the most high-profile of those deciding to call it a day.

Read more Oct 09, 2009

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/sport/Now-the-Willie-Hall-winners-bite-the-dust

The crowd at Rubys Avenue enjoyed an exciting Willie Hall Cup tie between Fernwood and Fiskerton, which ended with a home win on penalties. Fernwood’s Simon Jack (wearing red and black) is pictured tackling Shannon Bird.

http://www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/sport/Ten-goal-Villa-breeze-into-last-eight

Super-sub Johnson seals cup win

1:54pm Wed May 01, 2013

Premier Division leaders Wheatsheaf United secured silverware for a second successive season as they came from behind to beat RHP Social 2-1 to lift the Sam Arnold Memorial Trophy.

Substitute Matt Johnson heads the winning goal to secure the Sam Arnold Memorial Trophy for Wheatsheaf United. (280413DM5-5)

Substitute Matt Johnson heads the winning goal to secure the Sam Arnold Memorial Trophy for Wheatsheaf United. (280413DM5-5)

Second-half goals from Marlon Waites and Matthew Johnson saw the Sheaf — Willie Hall Cup winners last season — turn the game around after Stuart Bennett had put RHP in front in the first-half. 

The result will bring back memories of RHP’s Sam Arnold final defeat last season, when they lost 2-1 to Coddington, while Wheatsheaf more than avenged their Willie Hall semi-final defeat to RHP earlier this year.

Ricky Brewer, who had been booked not long before, teed up Bennett for the opener on 22 minutes when he crossed for the target man to convert from six yards into the top left corner. 

RHP took their lead into the break, prompting Wheatsheaf boss Jonathan Nussey to shuffle his pack, Paddy Ryan replacing Lewis Cracknell. 

The first 20 minutes of the second-half saw little action until Nussey brought Johnson on for William Pycroft, a move that changed the game. 

Three minutes later, Johnson crossed for the prolific Waites, who made no mistake from three yards out to level the scores. 

Johnson put the Southwell side in front 15 minutes before the end when he firmly headed home from Jonathan Upton’s fine cross from the left wing. 

RHP manager Lee Julian brought on Alex Hales and Ben Porter as the Greens desperately sought to fight back, but Wheatsheaf held on to clinch their first trophy of the season. 

Nussey said: “It’s the first time we have won the Sam Arnold and it feels really good. 

Wheatsheaf celebrate with the cup. (280413DM5-14)

Wheatsheaf celebrate with the cup. (280413DM5-14)

“We have put the pressure on RHP now, they’ve lost two cup-finals, and it will give us a good feeling when we play them in the league again. 

“We have got a great chance of pulling off our first double in history now, so now we want to make sure we win the league as well.”

RHP Social will play Wheatsheaf United in the league on May 19, the last weekend of the season.  Wed May 01, 2013

http://www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/sport/Super-sub-Johnson-seals-cup-win

WILLIE HALL CUP is played each year

The Willie Hall Memorial Trophy is still played for each year having been inaugurated in 1967, the year he died, by the Newark Football Alliance.

 Simon Roberts

General Secretary

Newark Football Alliance

Email: simonroberts@newarkfootballalliance.co.uk

Website: www.newarkfootballalliance.co.uk 

Newark Town Council who have possibility of Newark Cemetery.

Town Hall/Market Place, Newark-on-Trent NG24 1DU

Phone: 01636 680333

http://newark.gov.uk

post@newark.gov.uk


Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  October – March 8am – 6pm

Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm

http://www.deceasedonline.com/

Newark Town Council

Newark Town Hall, Market Place, Newark, Nottinghamshire, NG24 1DU.

Nearly 40,000 burial records are available, with a mixture of register scans and computerised records.

Newark Cemetery – Added 7 June 2010

Burials numbered 1 to 37,141 dated 31 December 1856 to 4 March 1997, are available as burial register scans. Subsequent data is only available as full computerised records. Initially, records have been added up to no 39,673 dated 26 March 2010.

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My Website principles are that I strive to be accurate. I promptly correct any inaccuracy or error with a visible edit and update. I attribute and link to sources on the web wherever possible. My direct contact details are displayed on every page of the site. I do not receive payment or services for any reviews or editorial. And this is a personal website of Laurence Goff. The views expressed do not reflect  Newark Town Council who are responsible for the cemetery.

 If you would like to help in anyway on this project or have any information, photos to post on the website please contact me.

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/12/31/george-william-willie-hall-memory-of-an-inspirational-sporting-hero-that-came-from-newark-on-trent-nottinghamshire/

Laurence Goff personal website which I’ve put together and does not represent Newark Town Council. Its dedicated to the thousands of  people since 1856 as a means of further promoting Newark cemetery, and encouraging interested people to join the tribute to Willie Hall.

Remembering those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

 Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag 

Honouring Their Memory As A Fitting Tribute To Them

 A time to remember – they will never be forgotten

Laurencegoff

Remembrance Day, for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

The 4th of August 2014 is the 100th anniversary of the declaration of the 1st World War 

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

 Remembering  the outcome of the First World War 4th August 1914 -2014

Laurencegoff

The phrase ‘When you go home tell them of us’ is from the epitaph carved on the memorial of the 2nd British Division in the Kohima cemetery for the Allied war dead. The full inscription on the epitaph reads, (When You Go Home, Tell Them Of Us And Say, For Their Tomorrow, We Gave Our Today). The verse is said to have been inspired by the epitaph written by Simonides to honour the Greek who fell at the Battle of Thermopylae in 480 BC and is attributed to

John Maxwell Edmond.

 Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

Two minutes

Two minutes isn’t much to give, To those who fought and died, And not forgetting loved ones, Who Till this day have cried.

To Flanders fields where poppies grow, Our thoughts return to long ago, And in remembrance they still live, Two minutes isn’t much to give

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

A short introduction to the National Memorial Arboretum, the grounds

have over 300 memorials 

The National Memorial Arboretum is the UK’s year-round centre of Remembrance. It is part of The Royal British Legion family of charities. http://t.co/ukIImVbz

http://www.thenma.org.uk/gallery/videos/a-short-introduction/

 The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

Laurencegoff

The Armed Forces Memorial at the National Memorial Arboretum

The National Memorial Arboretum honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world.

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

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Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

Remembering those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

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 Friends Of Newark Cemetery

Will be organizing a Coach Trip on Wednesday 28th May 2014

During the half – Term 

Newark  to The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

With Coach with Travel Wright Ltd,  Newark, Nottinghamshire  

Departing from 9.00am – 9.15pm

Arriving by 11am  departing at 4.30pm returning to Newark by 6pm. 

 First pickup points at 9.00am The  Friendly Farmer Restaurant

 Located next to the Shell Petrol Station The A46, A17, A1 Roundabout,  Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 2NY. Restaurant open at 8am for Breakfast or a cuppa, free parking.

Second pickup at 9.15am Holy Trinity RC School, Boundary Road, Newark NG24 4AU

 The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire, an uplifting visit for all ages

Honours the fallen all year round

www.thenma.org.uk

 

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

info@thenma.org.uk

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

Memorial Arboretum @Nat_Mem_Arb

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Each year many visitors ask about the location of the Shot at Dawn Memorial in the Arboretum, it seems appropriate that it should be on the eastern edge where dawn strikes, the six trees facing the posts represent the firing squad, all aiming for the medal around the statue’s neck and none of them knowing who had the fatal bullet, it must have been very traumatic for them too, having to shoot one of their own. The Campaign For a Pardon After the 75 year Secrecy Act was lifted, Members of the Shot at Dawn Organisation started Campaigning for a Pardon.

The campaign commenced in 1992 and was led by Janet Booth who sought a pardon for her grandfather, Private Harry Farr, janet’s grandmother had lived with the shame and stigma of her husband being shot for cowardice in 1916. She believed he was wrongly convicted and actually suffering from shellshock. Harry Farr’s family took the Ministry of Defence to the high court and won, in 2006 a posthumous pardon was granted for Private Harry Farr and the other men that were Shot at Dawn.

 

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This being the centrepiece is a statue of a young man ­ age 17 Private Herbert Burden of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliess who was the first to be shot. He was blindfolded and strapped to a post, surrounded by 306 other posts, each with the name, age and ­regiment of a man who was executed.

Conceived as a place of national remembrance not only for the fallen, but also for those who have served the nation. There are over 300 memorials the centrepiece of which is The Armed Forces Memorial. There is also a memorial to those who were ‘Shot at Dawn’ over three hundred men who were shot as cowards, but many we would now recognise as suffering from post traumatic stress disorder. The first  being Private Herbert Burden, of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, was shot at Ypres, Belgium on 21st July 1915 aged 17. 

The memorial was modelled on the likeness of  Private Herbert Burden, who lied about his age to enlist in the armed forces and was later shot for desertion. It is surrounded by a semicircle of stakes on which are listed the names of every soldier executed in this fashion.

 There are over 20 memorials here with links to WW1. The thought-provoking Shot at Dawn memorial commemorates the 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers who were shot during the war for cowardice or desertion. The names of those shot, now pardoned, are inscribed on posts surrounding a statue of a young soldier, blindfolded, awaiting his fate. It is located in the east of the Arboretum so that it is the first point to be touched by the light of dawn each day. Visit  Featured Memorials page to learn more about The Shot at Dawn Memorial and others.

 

During World War One, around 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers were shot for desertion or cowardice, most of them were sentenced after a short trial at which no real opportunity for defence was allowed, this would have been sad for many families. At last it is recognised that several of them were under age when they volunteered and that many of them suffering from shell shock or post traumatic stress disorder, Andy Decomyn’s statue shot at dawn is modelled on Private Herbert Francis Burden, of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, who was shot at dawn at Ypres on 21st July 1915, aged 17.

The names of Herbert Francis Burden and those others who suffered the fate of being shot at dawn are listed on the stakes arranged in the form of a greek theatre around the statue, symbolising the tragedy that these events signify, many of the posts say Age unknown and this is because many young men lied about their age in order to enlist, some of them had no representation at court-martial because most of the officers had been killed when they went over the top, first (the average life expectancy of an officer on the front line was 10 weeks) We know of these 306 soldiers, sadly to this day we do not know the total figure because between 80pc and 90pc of those sentenced to die had their sentences commuted and were probably sent to jail or hard labour.

The Shot at Dawn Memorial is a British Monument at the National Memorial Arboretum near Alrewas, in StaffordshireUK. It memorialises the 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers executed after courts-martial for cowardice or desertion during World War I.

The mass pardon of 306 British Empire soldiers executed for certain offences during the Great War was enacted in section 359 of the Armed Forces Act 2006, which came into effect on royal assent on 8th November 2006. 

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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The memorial portrays a young British soldier blindfolded and tied to a stake ready to be shot by a firing squad. The memorial was modelled on the likeness of 17-year-old Private Herbert Burden, who lied about his age to enlist in the armed forces and was later shot for desertion. It is surrounded by a semicircle of stakes on which are listed the names of every soldier executed in this fashion. These include:

  • Private John Abigail, 8/Norfolk Regiment

  • Private George Ainley, 1st/4th Battalion, Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

  • Private James Archibald, 17th Battalion, Royal Scots

  • Lance Serjeant H. Ashton, 11th Battalion, Cameronians

  • Private William Baker, 26th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers

  • Rifleman R. L Barker, 6th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers

  • Private Joseph Bateman, 2/South Staffs Regiment

  • Sapper Robert Bell, 123 Field Company, Royal Engineers

  • Private J. Bennett, 1st Battalion, Hampshire Regiment

  • Private D. J. Blakemore, 8th Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment

  • Private Albert Botfield, 9th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment

  • Private William Bowerman, 1/East Surrey Regiment

  • Private Thomas Brigham, 1/10th Battalion, Manchester Regiment

  • Private C. Britton, 1/5th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment

  • Private F. Broadrick, 11th Battalion, Warwickshire Regiment

  • Private A. Brown, 10th Battalion, Black Watch

  • Private Archibald Browne, 2nd Battalion, Essex Regiment

  • Private Herbert Francis Burden, 1st Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers

  • Private Robert Burton, 6th Battalion, South Lancashire Regiment

  • Private J. Byers, 1st Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers

  • Private Herbert H. Chase, 2nd Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers

  • Rifleman F. W. Cheeseman, 18th Kings Royal Rifle Corps

  • Private G. E. Collins, 1st Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment

  • Private J. Crampton, 9th Battalion, Yorks & Lancs Regiment

  • Rifleman James Crozier. 9th Battalion, The Royal Irish Rifles

  • Private J. J. Daly, 1st Battalion, Connaught Rangers

  • Private Edward Delargy, 1st/8th Battalion, Royal Scots

  • Private Thomas Docherty, 2nd Battalion, King’s Own Scottish Borderers

  • Rifleman Thomas Donovan, 16th Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps

  • Private Walter Dossett, 1st/4th Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment

  • Private Thomas Downey, 6th Leinster Regiment

  • Private Thomas Downing, 6th South Lancashire Regiment

  • Sub Lieutenant Edwin Dyett, Nelson Battalion, Royal Naval Division

  • Private A. Evans, 1st Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers

  • Private Alfred E. Eveleigh, 1st Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment)

  • Private G. Everill, 1st Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment

  • Private Harry Farr, 1st Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment

  • Private Ernest Fellows, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Lance Corporal J. S. V. Fox, 1st Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment, attached 3rd Division Cyclists’ Company

  • Private A. Frafra, Gold Coast Regiment

  • Private Evan Fraser, 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots

  • Private J. W. Fryer, 12th Battalion, Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment

  • Private Robert Gawler, 1st Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment)

  • Private D. Gibson of 12th Battalion, Royal Scots

  • Lance Corporal Peter Goggins, 19th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry

  • Private F. C. Gore, 7th Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment)

  • Private Thomas Harris, 1st Battalion, Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent Regiment)

  • Private Bert Hartells, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private T. Hawkins, 7th Battalion, Royal West Surrey Regiment (Queen’s)

  • Private Thomas Highgate, 1st Battalion, Royal West Kent Regiment

  • Lance Corporal James Holland, 10th Cheshire Regiment

  • Private R. Hope, 1st Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

  • Private Thomas Hope, 2nd Battalion, Leinster Regiment

  • Private H. Hughes, 1st/5th Battalion, Yorks and Lancs Regiment

  • Private William Hunt, 18/Manchester Regiment

  • Private William Hunter, 1/Loyal North Lancashire Regiment

  • Private J. J. Hyde, King’s Royal Rifle Corps

  • Private Albert Ingham, 18/Manchester Regiment (Attd. 90th Coy. MGC)

  • Corporal Frederick Ives, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private W. Jones, 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers

  • Private C. La Liberte, 3rd Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force

  • Driver Alexander Lamb, 21st Battery, 2nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery

  • Private Ernest Lawrence, 2nd Battalion, Devonshire Regiment

  • Private F. Loader, 1/22nd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers

  • Private Alfred Longshaw, 18/Manchester Regiment[2][8]

  • Lance Corporal Allassan Mamprusi, Gold Coast Regiment

  • Rifleman Samuel McBride, 2nd Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles

  • Private Charles McColl, 1st/4th Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment

  • Private John McFarlane, 4th Battalion, King’s Liverpool Regiment

  • Private B. McGeehan, 1/8th Battalion, King’s Liverpool Regiment

  • Private J. S. Michael, 10th Battalion, Cameronians

  • Private L. Mitchell, 8th Battalion, Yorks and Lancs Regiment

  • Private Thomas Lionel Moles, 54th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force

  • Private H. Morris, 6th Battalion, British West Indies Regiment

  • Private Joseph Nisbet, 1st Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment

  • Private A. Parry, 2nd Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment

  • Private Louis Phillips, 6th Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry

  • Private Albert Henry Pitts, 2nd Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment

  • Second Lieutenant Eric Skeffington Poole, 11th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment

  • Corporal George Povey, 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment

  • Private Albert Rickman, 1st Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

  • Sergeant John Robins, 5th Wiltshire Regiment

  • Private John Robinson, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private George Ernest Roe, 2nd Battalion, King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

  • Private William Scotton, 4th Battalion, Middlesex Regiment

  • Private J. Seymour, 2nd Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

  • Private W. H. Simmonds, 23rd Battalion, Middlesex Regiment

  • Rifleman F. N. Slade, 2/6th Battalion, London Regiment

  • Private James Smith, 17th Battalion, The King’s (Liverpool Regiment)

  • Private W. Smith, 3/5th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers

  • Private Victor Manson Spencer, 1st Battalion, Otago Regiment of the New Zealand Division

  • Private J. Steadman, Machine Gun Corps

  • Private R. Stevenson, 1/4th Battalion, Loyal North Lancashire Regiment

  • Private Stanley Stewart, 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers

  • Private Alfred Thompson, 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private R. T. Tite, 13th Battallion, Royal Sussex Regiment

  • Private Frederick Turner, 6th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers

  • Private William J. Turpie, 2nd Battalion, East Surrey Regiment

  • Sergeant J. T. Wall, 3rd attalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • Private G. Watkins, 13th Battalion, Welsh Regiment

  • Private A. H. Westwood, East Surrey Regiment

  • Private J. H. Wilson, 4th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force

  • Private W. Wycherley, 2nd Manchester Regiment

  • Private R. Young, 11th Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shot_at_Dawn_Memorial

The Shot at Dawn Memorial is a British Monument at the National Memorial Arboretum near Alrewas, in StaffordshireUK. It memorialises the 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers executed after courts-martial for cowardice or desertion during World War I.

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All 306 soldiers of the First World War who were shot at dawn for cowardice or desertion have be granted posthumous pardons 90 years later

Shot at Dawn

During the First World War some 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers were shot for desertion or cowardice; the real cause for their offences was often a psychological reaction to the stresses of war which today would be diagnosed as post-traumatic stress syndrome or combat stress reactionShot at Dawn is modelled on Private Herbert Burden, of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, who was shot at Ypres in 1915 aged 17.

The Shot at Dawn Memorial is a British Monument at the National Memorial Arboretum near Alrewas, in Staffordshire

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During the First  World War 306 who were shot now have a trees planted with the person name put on a metal plate. The British Monument at the National Memorial Arboretum near Alrewas, in Staffordshire.

National Memorial Arboretum my uplifting visit by Laurence Goff

The National Memorial Arboretum honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world.

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/102746358

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/britain_wwone/shot_at_dawn_01.shtml

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

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The National Arboretum Croxall Road, in the village of Alrewas, Staffordshire UK

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The National Memorial Arboretum

http://www.thenma.org.uk

http://www.thenma.org.uk

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General Sikorski Cap

POLISH ARMED FORCES WAR MEMORIAL

Dedicated: 19 September 2009

Commemorates: The Polish men and women who gave their lives in World War II. Designed as a tribute to the fallen and also as an educational aid for visitors not familiar with the history of the allied Polish Forces.

 

http://www.thenma.org.uk

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Polish armoured Forces 

The National Memorial Arboretum honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world.

www.thenma.org.uk

 Laurencegoff

Polish armoured Forces

 

The National Memorial Arboretum honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world.

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

RAIL INDUSTRY MEMORIAL

On the top of the plinth is a black granite replica Class 8 Freight Locomotive.
The rear panel has an etching montage showing life on the railways through the ages.

 

QUAKER SERVICE MEMORIAL

Dedicated: 20 April 2013

Commemorates: Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) wartime service.  

The Quaker Service Memorial Trust commissioned the memorial to honour the vital humanitarian role undertaken by members of the Friends Ambulance Unit (FAU), an independent body enabling conscientious objectors to undertake wartime civilian service, and the Friends Relief Service (FRS), the official relief body of the Religious Society of Friends, which worked at home and in mainland Europe to help civilians in distress.

Designed by Staffordshire sculptor and Quaker, Rosemary Barnett, it features six texts carved onto four stone benches. The seats are arranged in an open circle – as are many Quaker meetings for worship – symbolic of unity and equality.

GCHQ

Dedicated: 13 July 2012

Commemorates: GCHQ

The memorial is a sphere of rose coloured granite; and the plaque to anonymous code breakers at the National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire reads: “To commemorate all British and Allied personnel whose work with Signals Intelligence and Communications Security has supported HMG in war and peace since 1914″. The sphere was sculpted by the artist Nick Johnson.

The memorial features two pieces of code; a line of Morse code G C C S representing the “Government Code and Cypher School” the forerunner of GCHQ, and a line of binary code representing the numbers 7 3 8 17, the position of the letters G C H Q in the alphabet.BASRA MEMORIAL WALL

Dedicated: 11 March 2010

Commemorates: The 178 UK Service personnel and one MOD civilian who lost their lives on combat operations in Iraq. It also lists members of Coalition Forces who were killed while under UK command during six years of conflict.

The original memorial was built in Basra in 2006 and stood outside the front of the Headquarters of the Multi-National Division (South East). Following the end of operations, the Basra Memorial Wall was brought back to the UK and rebuilt. The original wall was built, dismantled, and reconstructed at the Arboretum by British soldiers from 37th Armoured Engineer Squadron in a personal gesture to commemorate their fallen comrades.

The brass plaques on this memorial are the originals placed on the wall when it was in situ in Basra, Iraq.

 

ROYAL AIR FORCE ASSOCIATION REMEMBRANCE GARDEN

Dedicated: 28 September 2009

Commemorates: All those who have served in the RAF and Commonwealth air.

Inspiration for the garden comes from the RAF Association’s dedication, the last line of which is “we will remember them”. The central feature is the RAF Association emblem – a magnificent stainless steel eagle sitting on top of a globe. The eagle is made up of over 1,000 hand-forged feathers and is surrounded by a segmented RAF roundel, which is separated into four quarters to depict the RAF Association at the heart of RAF welfare. The RAF Association provides friendship, help and support for any members of the RAF past and present, and their families. It is the largest single-service membership organisation in the UK, with around 74,000 members and almost 500 branches.

 

POLISH ARMED FORCES WAR MEMORIAL

Dedicated: 19 September 2009

Commemorates: The Polish men and women who gave their lives in World War II. Designed as a tribute to the fallen and also as an educational aid for visitors not familiar with the history of the allied Polish Forces

ARMED FORCES MEMORIAL

Dedicated: 12 October 2007

Commemorates:  The men and women of our Armed and Merchant Services who have lost their lives in conflict, as a result of terrorist action or on training exercises since the end of WW2. Unlike the World War memorials in towns and villages across the Nation, there is nowhere else that records over 16,000 names of those who have been killed on duty in recent times.

Dedicated in the presence of Her Majesty The Queen on 12 October 2007, the Armed Forces Memorial is a nationally significant focus for Remembrance, providing recognition and thanks for those who have given their lives in the service of the country.

The Memorial is a stunning piece of architecture designed by Liam O’Connor, inspired by the ancient landscapes of prehistoric Britain and the classical forms of ancient Rome.

 

THE FAR EAST PRISONERS OF WAR MEMORIAL BUILDING

Dedicated: 15 August 2005

Commemorates: The 55,000 Far East Prisoners of War from World War II. It not
only remembers those who died, but also encompasses the whole story of events during this unprecedented chapter in British history. The memorial roll contains the name and rank of all British Servicemen taken prisoner during the South East Asia conflict and embraces the story of their treatment and the thousands who died as well. The building houses an exhibition which reveals clearly the life and experiences of these prisoners, aided by archive video footage and interviews. It was opened on the 60th Anniversary of VJ Day, the end of World War II in the Pacific.

Close by is the original lychgate from the cemetery at Changi Jail in Singapore, built by prisoners as a memorial to their comrades who died.

THE MERCHANT NAVY CONVOY

Dedicated: 1 October 2003

Commemorates: Over 46,000 British merchant seafarers and fishermen lost in conflict during the 20th Century, including two World Wars, Falklands, Kuwait, Vietnam, Iran, Iraq and others.

31,908 seafarers perished in World War II, proportionately more than any of the Armed Services. 2,535 trees represent the British vessels lost at that time.

 

SHOT AT DAWN MEMORIAL

Unveiled: 21 June 2001

Commemorates: 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers who were shot for desertion or cowardice during World War I. Most were sentenced after a short trial at which no real opportunity for defence was allowed. Today it’s recognised that many of them were underage and suffering from shell-shock. Andy Decomyn’s statue is modelled on Private Herbert Burden, of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, who was shot at Ypres in 1915 aged 17. In 2006 a posthumous pardon was granted.

STILLBIRTH AND NEONATAL DEATH CHARITY MEMORIAL

Dedicated: June 2001

SANDS was founded in 1978 by a small group of bereaved parents devastated by the death of their babies and by a complete lack of acknowledgement and understanding of the significance and impact of their loss. It aims to support anyone affected by the death of a baby; to work with health professionals to improve the quality of care and services provided to bereaved parents and families and to promote changes that could help to reduce the loss of babies’ lives.

THE CHILDREN’S WOODLAND

Dedicated: 2001

Commemorates: Sponsored by the Midlands Co-operative Society Limited and planted with 2,640 native British trees, the Children’s Woodland was designed to combine arboriculture and wildlife education with Remembrance.

Individual trees have been sponsored by families and schools and dedicated to babies and children who have passed away. In the nearby shelter are large child-sized wooden figures of the characters from ‘The Wind in the Willows’ by Kenneth Grahame. They were carved by the Essex Woodcarvers under the supervision of Peter Benson of the British Woodcarvers Association.

The children’s activity area and picnic area was funded by Staffordshire Aggregates Levy Grant Scheme (SALGS). It is a purpose-built wooden environment for children aged between 7-13 years.

MILLENNIUM CHAPEL OF PEACE AND FORGIVENESS

Dedicated: 2 November 2000

The Chapel represents a desire for, and is dedicated to, peace and forgiveness. It is also a celebration of the beginning of the third Millennium. It is the only place within the UK where the Act of Remembrance is observed every day of the year. Visitors to the Chapel and surrounding areas are invited to stop and observe the Silence at 11am to remember those who have lost their lives in conflict.

The Chapel’s wood construction is supported on twelve trunks of Douglas fir, each one representing one of the twelve apostles on whose witness the early church was built. Douglas fir was selected to pay tribute to David Douglas, the great plantsman, the 200th anniversary of whose birth coincided with the beginning of work on the Chapel. Each pillar has a carving by Jim Heath of one of the apostles.

Remembrance Day, for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

https://www.facebook.com/greatwarcentenary

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Newark Cemetery War Memorial

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Newark Cemetery War Memorial

First World War, wartime service burials were not strongly regulated and many of those who died in this country were laid to rest in locations chosen by their families, often in family graves scattered throughout Newark cemetery grounds. A team from Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) have been restoring the graves stones in Newark Cemetery and location around Europe.

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Let’s Remember them, On the 11th hour, of the 11th Month in 1918 the First

World War ended. Newark still wants to Remember those who have given and give today their lives for peace and Freedom

 Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag  

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Church of St. Mary Magdalene, Newark-on-Trent

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

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Bell from HMS Newark

Remembrance Day, for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

 

https://www.facebook.com/greatwarcentenary

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First World War 1914-1918 total from Newark Killed  455

Remembrance Day, for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

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 Newark Cemetery Memorial To The fallen

 located on London Road Newark Notts NG24 1SQ

Sunday 9th November 2014

 Remembrance Day, for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom  

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Memorial to the Fallen of Newark-On–Trent Remembrance Day at Newark Cemetery

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Memorial to the Fallen  Newark Cemetery,  A Lasting tribute to mark the ultimate sacrifice made by Newark’s fallen heroes Newark-On-Trent, London Road, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

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War Memorial Newark Cemetery

London Road

Newark, Notts  

9th November 2014

Remembrance Sunday at 11am

Newark Cemetery Remembrance Day 

 Sunday 9th November 2014 at 11am, at War Memorial to the Fallen

 located on London Road, Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ   

Let’s commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914

 

First World War 1914-1918 total from Newark Killed  455

Second World War 1939-1945 total from Newark  killed 144

One from West Africa 1961 total  killed 1

One from Malaya 1962 total killed  1

One from Afghanistan 2007 total  killed 1

Total 602

We will Remember them, RIP 

 Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

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Our Historic Newark Cemetery

Newark 

London Road

Nottinghamshire

 NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery Is Open All Year Round 

April – September 8am – 8pm

October -March 8am – 6pm

 

We will Remember them

Spitfire Flying Over Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

It was heard over Newark on Sunday morning to mark the  Anniversary of the Battle of Britain.

These Spitfire Flying Over Newark to Remember The Battle of Britain

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

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 Remembrance Day, for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom  

Ministry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of Defence

Ministry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of Defence

 

Remembering them, On the 11th hour, of the 11th Month in 1918 the First World War ended. We still wants to Remember those who have given their lives for peace and Freedom.

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

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Remembrance Tuesday 11th November 2014

11 day 11 Hour 11 Month

at

11am outside Newark Town Hall steps

Let’s remember those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

A Lasting tribute to mark the ultimate sacrifice made by Newark’s fallen heroes

  

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Laurencegoff

   Remembering them On the 11th hour

 at

Newark Cemetery Memorial to the Fallen

We still wants to Remember those who have given their lives for peace and Freedom.

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

Friends of Newark Cemetery would like more volunteers to help with events during the  2014. We would welcome interested people and groups at our public meeting to plan events.  Volunteers will welcome groups and visitors to an exhibition of the First world war display during the summer of 2014. If we can find more volunteers to make this a memorable and successful event it will mark the 100th anniversary of the declaration of the 1st World War which started on 4th August 1914.

More Information Laurence Goff 07794613879 01636-681878 friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/

Laurencegoff

Laurencegoff

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Remembrance Day Monday 11th November 2013 11am outside Newark Town Hall steps

for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

  Memorial to the Fallen Newark-On-Trent

Ministry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of Defence

Ministry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of Defence

 

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Laurencegoff

Memorial located in Newark Cemetery

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Laurencegoff

Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery on London Road, Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Young people in Newark-On-Trent Cemetery Flowers were placed at the Memorial to the Fallen

The Amazing Spitfire Flying For Our Freedom

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Laurencegoff

A Fly-past of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight’s Lancaster Bomber

 

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History and Exhibition 

  A name and photographs of our fallen heroes will be on display inNewark  

 Many have found the pictorial project to honour Newark’s – Balderton war dead very interesting.

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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 Ministry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls
Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsSAM_0548Remembrance Day, for those who have given up their lives for our Freedom

Remembering them, On the 11th hour, of the 11th Month in 1918 the First World War ended. We still wants to Remember those who have given their lives for peace and Freedom.

Our Historic Newark Cemetery

Newark

 NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery Is Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm

October – March 8am-6pm

For over 150 years since 1856

We Will Remember Them

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There, has always been an interest to many as it seems to exemplify the heights of human heroism coupled with the depths of folly and horrors that only war can bring, we will Remember them

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The 2nd World Wartime air raid on Ransome & Marles the date to Remember is 7th March 1941 on that Friday afternoon. This was a big part of our history during the 2nd Word War, with the most loss of life with 41 killed and another 165 that were injured. It was a huge event we most remember them.

Ransome and Marles  bombing 30 Are Buried in Newark Cemetery. 

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Nottingham also Remembering  out come of the First World War 4th August 1914 -2014 

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Since 1914 To The Present Day

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http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/10/10/a-few-good-heroes-we-will-remember-them/

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/10/10/a-few-good-heroes-we-will-remember-them/

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/10/10/a-few-good-heroes-we-will-remember-them/

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/10/10/a-few-good-heroes-we-will-remember-them/

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/10/10/a-few-good-heroes-we-will-remember-them/

Newark Cemetery  Uk Remembering Them

Remembering Him

Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

We Will Remember Them

Kenneth Ramsey Rawson Duckworth, from Newark, 19 years old

who was lost in the sinking of HMS Hood, 24th May 1941

Richard JonesHMS Hood

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Can you help us track down Coventry artist John Curry? Here is his amazing painting of HMS Hood… (Producer Kerry)

https://www.facebook.com/photo.phpfbid=696711720349820&set=a.191674027520261.42827.177089518978712&type=1&theater

http://www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk/  2011

Note this Newark Advertiser story is over three years old.

We must not forget those of the Commonwealth and Polish airmen, they fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinchSAM_1250

 

http://www.hmshood.com/crew/memorial/d/DuckworthKRR.htm

We will Remember Them

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Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

Zawolnosc nasza i wasza / For our freedom and yours

Memorial to the Fallen Newark-On-Trent

On 28th April 2007, Richard Todd OBE, officially unveiled the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery on London Road. Around 200 VIP guests plus Newark’s general public attended a Service  

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

First World War 1914-1918 total from Newark Killed  456

Second World War 1939-1945 total from Newark  killed 144

One from West Africa 1961 total  killed 1

One from Malaya 1962 total killed  1

One from Afghanistan 2007 total  killed 1

Total 603

We will Remember them, RIP

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Memorial To The Fallen at Newark-On-Trent Cemetery – YouTube

 Uploaded by laurencegoff There are 603 names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen atNewark Cemetery, located off London Road

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First World War 456 Killed Came From Newark-On-Trent

Memory to the Fallen

Let’s Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagBehind the Remembrance Poppy

This is the story of how the red field poppy came to be known as an internationally recognized symbol of Remembrance.

From its association with poppies flowering in the spring of 1915 on the battlefields of Belgium, France and Gallipoli this vivid red flower has become synonymous with great loss of life in war.

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Yet the scope of the poppy and its connection with the memory of those who have died in war has been expanded to help the living too. It was the inspiration and dedication of two women who promoted this same “Memorial Flower” as the means by which funds could be raised to support those in need of help, most especially servicemen and civilians suffering from physical and mental hardship as a result of war.

If ye break faith with us who die, We shall not sleep, though poppies grow in Flanders fields.

His poem has stuck with me since I first read it as a young lad, and I have always, when abroad, visited nearby war cemeteries to pay my respects to those that lay in a foreign field far from home.

I’m still a traditionalist and observe two minutes silence at 11 on the 11th of the 11th. Those, and sadly there are a few, that feel this is an inconvenience, fail to grasp that they are only here because of our forces.

Interestingly the idea of the two minutes silence was a very Commonwealth merging of ideas based on an old idea to a very solemn occasion.

The true originator of the Silence on Remembrance Day was an Australian reporter working in Fleet Street called Edward Honey, who wrote a piece about it.

This was subsequently read by Sir Percy Fitzpatrick, an astute South African statesman who contacted Lord Milner to put the proposal to King George the Fifth, who put the official seal on the idea and authorised its adoption. But the idea all started with a journalist … the power of the press.

Let’s Respect their sacrifice.

Today, the sale of poppies helps the Royal British Legion’s charitable work helping safeguard the welfare, interests and memory of those who are serving or who have served in our Armed Forces.

Regardless of which side, left or right, that you wear your poppy, just wearing one shows you remember and care. It’s when we stop remembering and caring that tyrants start to rear their ugly heads.

The whole object is to remember and endeavour as a people working together, to ensure that such losses never happen again, or at the very least every peaceful solution sought.

It is not to glorify war as some factions have tried to claim, but to honour the individual human as well as the forces as a whole, that have tried to defend mankind and democracy.

They have ensured our freedoms, and they and their memory, rightly deserves our respect.

 That is why we wear the poppy.

The colour of the poppy is red, as Colonel John McCrae saw them and the last three lines of his poem are:

Ben ParkinsonBen ParkinsonGiant flagGiant flagBen ParkinsonBen ParkinsonGiant flagGiant flag

IN FLANDERS FIELDS

by Colonel John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row by row, That mark our place,’ and in the sky The larks still bravely singing fly, Scarce heard among the guns below. We are the dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow – Loved and were loved,’ and now we lie in Flanders Fields. Take up our quarrel with the foe! To you from failing hands we throw The torch – Be yours to hold it high! If ye break faith with us who die, We shall not sleep, though poppies grow in Flanders fields.

When you wear your Poppy, it is not just for those that laid down their lives in what was the nightmare of carnage of the First World War; it is for all those brave men and women who have lost their lives in all the wars and conflicts, that we have had the unfortunate nature to be in.

Right or wrong their being in any war or conflict that is the fault of politicians who should, but sadly seldom are, be held accountable to us the people. Our forces, built up of exceptional men and women, endeavour to protect our freedoms and this nation as a whole.

Ministry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Ministry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

 

 

29th July 1942-2012 We will Remember them

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Honouring-lives-of-past-cadets

Honouring lives of  2 past cadets

Air cadet Joe Parkes (14) of Newark 1260 Squadron, lays a wreath at the grave of Keith Couzin-Wood, who was killed in a plane crash, aged 16, in 1942. Two former air cadets from different eras were remembered during a service at Newark Cemetery .

                                                                                                                                                 Keith Couzin-Wood

Honouring Lives Of Past Cadets | Newark Advertiser

1st Aug 2008

 Fourteen members of 1260 Squadron Newark Air Training Corps marched to the war graves,  led a service at the grave of Keith Couzin-Wood. Plaque for Sergeant Patton near the London Road entrance to the cemetery.

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Honouring-lives-of-past-cadets

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Laurencegoff

Ministry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Ministry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of Defence Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsHe was just 16 

Air Cadet Keith Rollason Couzin-Wood, the young cadet killed buried in

Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

http://www.flickr.com/photos/newarkcemeteryuk/4847272393/sizes/l/in/photostream/

Honouring lives of past cadets

Air cadets, led by, left, Flight-lieutenant Mark Edwards and Pilot Officer Nick Squire, of the Newark squadron, march to the war graves section at Newark Cemetery.  

Fourteen members of 1260 Squadron Newark Air Training Corps marched to the war graves, where the Newark team curate, the Rev Tim Pownall-Jones, led a service at the grave of Keith Couzin-Wood.The service followed research by the cadets into the plane crash that killed him, aged 16, on July 29, 1942.Keith, who was on his first flight, was in an RAF Hampden bomber from 408 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force, when it stalled and crashed soon after take off from RAF Balderton.The crew, who also included another cadet, Geoffrey Hughes of Chesterfield, and two flying officers, were all killed.It is hoped the memorial service, on the Saturday closest to Keith’s death, could become an annual event. Mr Pownall-Jones said: “Those young men stood out because of their uniform and what that uniform still represents.“The young men and women here today are champions of the same core values of the services.”He said the values were teamwork, initiative, dedication and being young at heart, and that the first letters of those words spelt tidy. He said when the cadets

checked their uniforms were tidy they should think of those values.

Cadet Andrew Tallis (13) lays a wreath in memory of Sergeant Michael Patton. 

During a minute’s silence flags were lowered by corporal Sam Parkes (16) and Mr Robert Doyle, the standard bearer for Newark Royal British Legion.

Mrs Karen Grayson, the mother of a current cadet, Kristian Grayson, read a poem called Somebody’s Darling.

Cadet Joe Parkes (14) laid a wreath. 

The Mayor of Newark, Mr Harry Molyneux, said: “The youngsters wanted to serve their country but little did they know what could happen to them. They were very brave.”

Keith was from Leigh-on-Sea and his father’s family were from Southwell and Normanton. The cadets tracked down Keith’s nephew, who is in his seventies and lives in Australia.

One of the pallbearers at Keith’s funeral was Mr Jack Stringer (85) of Grosvenor Road, Balderton. He was unable to attend the ceremony due to illness and was represented by his wife, Mrs Irene Stringer (83).

She said her husband, who was a corporal in the RAF stationed at Balderton, was sorry he could not be there. 

The cadets also honoured Sergeant Michael Patton, a former cadet of the Newark squadron, who died in September 1996 when he fell from an RAF helicopter during an exercise over south Wales. 

Cadet Andrew Tallis (13) laid a wreath beside a memorial tree and plaque for Sergeant Patton near the London Road entrance to the cemetery.

Mr Patton’s niece, Miss Natalie Henstock (24) of Newark, represented his family. 

She said her grandparents, Mr and Mrs Brian Patton, of Bathley, who are Mr Patton’s parents, and her mother, Ruth Hughes, of William Street, Newark, who is Mr Patton’s sister, were unable to attend. 

Mr Patton’s father-in-law, Mr Chris Grant, of The Park, Newark, attended along with his wife, Mrs Doreen Grant.

The cadets, who meet at their Sherwood Avenue headquarters on Tuesdays and Thursdays, are looking for adult helpers.

July 2008

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Honouring-lives-of-past-cadets

Ben Parkinson

The 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month marks the signing of the Armistice, on 11th November 1918, to signal the end of World War One. At 11 am on 11th November 1918 the guns of the Western Front fell silent after more than four years continuous world war from 1914 – 1918

 

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Ben Parkinson

 

Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom

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Newark-On-Trent

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Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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 The 4th of August 2014 is the 100th aniversary of the declaration of war by Great Britain on Germany

Children Did Remember Them

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Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Remembrance Day is on 11 November. It is a special day set aside to remember all those men and women who were killed during the two World Wars and other conflicts. At one time the day was known as Armistice Day and was renamed Remembrance Day

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When you receive this, please stop for a moment and if you are so inclined, feel free to say a prayer for our troops in the trouble spots around the world

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Let’s Remember them, On the 11th hour, of the 11th Month in 1918 the First World War ended. Newark still wants to Remember those who have given and give today their lives for peace and Freedom.

Behind the Remembrance Poppy

This is the story of how the red field poppy came to be known as an internationally recognized symbol of Remembrance.

From its association with poppies flowering in the spring of 1915 on the battlefields of Belgium, France and Gallipoli this vivid red flower has become synonymous with great loss of life in war.

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Memorial to the Fallen of Newark-On–Trent commemorating those military personnel who lost their lives in conflict since 1914. 

Newark Cemetery has 49 First World War graves that are scattered throughout, and not in one place. Let’s commemorate our local War died during the First – Second World Wars and to the present day.

WWI soldier ‘should be on memorial’

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/WWI-soldier-should-be-on-memorial-

SAM_1918

A decision not to allow the name of a first world war soldier to be added to Newark’s war memorial has been branded a scandal.

Mr Pete Stevens at the grave of William Pride, marked by a Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone.

Mr Pete Stevens, who works for the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, says William Pride’s name should be on the Memorial to the Fallen in Newark Cemetery.

William, a Royal Engineers sapper, who lived in Newark, committed suicide following frontline service.

His Army record and the coroner’s report show he took his own life “whilst of unsound mind.”

Mr Stevens has been told William does not fit the criteria for inclusion on the memorial.

Mr Stevens said the Commonwealth War Graves Commission had categorised William as a casualty of war with one of its headstones, so his name should be added.

William operated hospital barges that were under constant attack as they transported casualties.

Mr Stevens believes the stigma that would have been attached to William’s suicide was why his name wasn’t included on the 1921 town Roll of Honour.

It was common to omit from war memorials the names of those who took their own lives or were shot for cowardice when they were actually shell-shocked or battle-fatigued — the condition is now recognised as post-traumatic stress disorder.

William’s name was not on the list agreed by Newark Town Council and the Royal British Legion in 2007 when plans for the Memorial to the Fallen were being considered.

“The scandal is not his suicide but the refusal to add him to the Memorial to the Fallen and right that wrong,” said Mr Stevens, of Balderton.

He discovered the omission of William Pride from the memorial by chance during research on another project.

“One can only imagine the noise, the smell and the constant cries of the wounded and the toll this would have taken on a man,” he said.

“I feel it was these horrors and the worsening of William’s disability that drove him to take his own life.

“No one understood post-traumatic stress disorder back then but we do now.

“The Government pardoned those shot for not going over the top and their names have been added to their local memorials, so why not William Pride? We must demonstrate we have moved on.”

Mr Geoff Meakin, from the Newark branch of the Royal British Legion, said: “Mr Pride doesn’t fit the criteria to go on the memorial so will not be added.

“You have to have lived or been living in the old borough of Newark and to have fallen in battle — that’s the difficulty.

“His suicide does not come into it.

“I sympathise and it’s often a contentious issue.

“If you relax the criteria for one, it opens the floodgates. These are the criteria and we must stick to them.”

Mr Stevens said there were 29 graves in Newark Cemetery of men whose names were on the memorial who did not die in battle but from wounds or other effects of their service.

“There is one man whose name appears who died in the sanatorium at Radcliffe in 1925,” said Mr Stevenson

William Pride was an engine driver and fireman with the Trent Navigation Company.

He lived on Bowbridge Road, Newark, with his wife and five children when he was called up for service on September 18, 1916 at the age 40.

He was enlisted into the Water Transport Corps of the Royal Engineers and, 19 days later he was on his way to Mesopotamia where he operated hospital barges ferrying wounded soldiers away from the front.

The barges operated under constant shell-fire.

William developed arthritis in both knees that got so bad he was invalided to India, arriving back in England on June 6, 1918.

He was sent to a camp in Kent and placed on light duties. He was found on September 11, 1918 with his throat cut and a razor in his hand.

Comrades reported he had been depressed.

The clerk to Newark Town Council, Mr Alan Mellor said: “We are and will be looking into this and will be speaking with all appropriate interested parties.”

First World War, wartime service burials were not strongly regulated and many of those who died in this country were laid to rest in locations chosen by their families, often in family graves scattered throughout Newark cemetery grounds. A team from Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) have been restoring the graves stones in Newark Cemetery and location around Europe.

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Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

We Did Remember Them

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Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom

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Newark-On-Trent

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 The 4th of August 2014 is the 100th aniversary of the declaration of war by Great Britain on Germany

We have memorials, but that is all they are just names I think it would be fantastic to put faces to as many names as we can. Names on a memorial mean little to the younger generation, But if we can put faces to these names and find a place to display them then they will be remembered for ever. This will be a mammoth task to achieve in our interest with your help and support. I believe it can be done.

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/

Pete Stevens his project has been launched to match photographs to all the names on the Newark and Balderton war memorials. There are 603 names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen at Newark Cemetery, of whom 456 are first world war casualties. Another 144 are from the second World War, one died in West Africa in 1961, one in Malaya in 1952 and one in Afghanistan in 2007. There are 45 names from the first World War on the memorial in St Giles’ Church, Balderton, and a further 13 from 2nd World war.

 Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

The immortal poem, ‘In Flanders Fields,’ was seeded from the simple Corn Poppy . It was brought to

Europe from the Holy Land  and has now become the symbol of Remembrance of all those who died in the wars of this century. In Flanders, the simple, yet beautiful little Corn Poppy grows everywhere. During the First World War, Colonel John McCrae, a Canadian veteran of the South African war, looked out from his water logged trench during a lull in the fierce fighting at the second battle of Ypres. His eyes met the sickening sight of makeshift crosses… rows and rows… the ghastly relics of the first battle which had drenched the battlefield with blood.

The Canadian Medical Officer was struck with admiration at the sight of the little red poppies… swaying gently in the breeze over the graves of the dead.

McCrae was so moved at the sight, he took out his note pad and pencil and wrote the poem…In Flanders Fields.

In 1918, Colonel John McCrae was severely wounded and he was moved from the makeshift front-line field hospital in a dugout to a rear-base hospital near Calais… he had asked to be moved to the coast area so that he could see the white cliffs of Dover from across the Channel.

On the third night he fought his last fight… he succumbed to his wounds… but in the last fleeting seconds before the Reaper called. Colonel McCrae whispered “Tell them this if ye break faith with us ho die…we shall not sleep.” And with that…the gallant Colonel was gone. That very night he was buried in the cemetery at Wimereux.

In November 1918… after four years of almost incessant fighting came the Armistice. The Great War was over… the terrible carnage was at an end. France had lost its life blood of youth for about seven million had perished.

After the misery of war… the truth that it was all for nothing became very clear when the disabled and shell-shocked Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen were cast-off overnight as unwanted. Touched by the plight of the war disabled, Madame Yvonne Guerin proposed that the women of France should make artificial red poppies and sell them throughout the world in order to raise money for the war disabled, for after all, it was they who had given them their freedom.

In England the idea caught on and Field Marshal Haig proposed a factory, where British Soldiers who, had been injured during the war, could be employed making red silk poppies. Sponsored by the British Legion it brought in much need money for the relief of those disabled in the war.

Today, millions of red poppies are sold throughout Britain. The red petals of the poppy signify the vast ocean of blood spilt, the yellow and black centre for the mud and desolation of the battlefields the green of the stem is symbolic of the fields where many brave Soldiers fell.

We Will Remember them

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

We Will Remember Them, our Airmen from The Commonwealth and Poland  who“Made the Ultimate Sacrifice” In An Extremely Patriotic & Heroic Devotion To Our Country By Giving Up His Life During The 2nd World War.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

We Will Remember Them

 

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Newark Cemetery can boast of having lot’s of impressive benefactors  since 1856. An array of  names and servicemen going back to 1914 to the present day are buried in Newark-On-Trent.

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Commonwealth and Polish War Grave located at Newark Cemetery, London Road Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire, England

Zawolnosc nasza i wasza / For our freedom and yours

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Lance Corpoal ”Sean” Ivano Violino Our Hero. We departed this life into the next. Though they are hidden in the shadow of Death. Their lives for other in the love of freedom that never dies. In Memory of our Fallen Heroes, greater love hath no person give than they lay down there life for his friends.War Memorial to the Fallen, 603 names from former residents that died in wars since 1914 to the present day who came from Newark-On-Trent.

 Newark Cemetery can boast of having lot’s of impressive benefactors  since 1856. An array of  names and servicemen going back to 1914 to the present day are buried in Newark-On-Trent.

We Remember them on this day which is dedicated to all those who gave their lives between 1914-2011 in defence of this nation; for liberty, democracy, justice and truth. To those who died for King or Queen and Country; to those who gave their lives yesterday in order that we may enjoy today and a thousand tomorrows. Honour and respect are due to you, and we bow our heads in memory of your sacrifice. 

The poppy is a remembrance not only of the millions who have died, but of what they died for.

Lest we forget our liberty, traditions, faith and democracy, we will remember them.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Newark-On-Trent is also important internationally, as it contains the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

The cemetery also contains 49 scattered burials of the First World War. A memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski in 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s remains were returned to Poland in 1993, but there is still a memorial to him at Newark. 

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsThe Chapel  Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery, will  also open by appointment  for groups on Monday and Tuesday and weekends. Please give plenty of notice. New volunteers are most welcome and can be put on a rota.

Come and see what you will find

 Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery.

We will have volunteers on site from the

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

The Friends of Newark Cemetery

Also we will provide help

In finding a specific grave location and are

Offering a general tour of the Cemetery.

A highlight within the Centre Will be a

Display of over 150 Photographs from the Newark & Balderton Memorial to the Fallen Photo Project by Pete Stevens.

Chapel Interpretation Centre,

Newark Cemetery.

Organised by the Friends of Newark Cemetery

The Chapel  Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery, will  open  by appointment for groups on Monday and Tuesday and weekends. Please give plenty of notice.

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

The Friends of Newark Cemetery meeting, to be held at Newark Town Hall in the Pickin Room  on Wednesday 5th March 2014. Arrive at 5:30pm for a cuppa meeting will start at 5:45pm.

All most welcome

Laurence Goff Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery

 

 

 

THE MAIN ARCH AT NEWARK CEMETERY NOTTINGHAMSHIRE UK

 

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70th Anniversary tribute to Dambusters

70th Anniversary tribute to Dambusters

“They went with songs to the battle, they were young, Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow. They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted; They fell with their faces to the foe. They shall not grow old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them.” From For the Fallen by Laurence Binyon

Remembrance Day Poppy

WEAR YOUR POPPY WITH PRIDE

War Memorial Newark-On-Trent. On the 11th hour, of the 11th Month in 1918 the First World War ended. Newark still wants to Remember those who have given and give today their lives for peace and Freedom. Many thanks the School Children in Newark who on the eve of Remembrance Day laid wreathes beside Newark War Memorial next to The Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene, Newark.

Remembrance Day in Newark-On-Trent

A very special thank you to all the men and women of our armed forces who have made the ultimate sacrifice.  Wear  a poppy and remember those who have died in service to our country.

Lance Corpoal ”Sean” Ivano Violino Our Hero. He was deservedly promoted to Lance Corporal in October 2004. Lance-corporal Ivano Violino (29) known in Newark as Sean Sutcliffe, of the Royal Engineers, who died in the blast from a roadside bomb in Helmand. We departed this life into the next. Though they are hidden in the shadow of Death. Their lives for other in the love of freedom that never dies. In Memory of our Fallen Heroes, greater love hath no person give than they lay down there life for his friends.

THE RED POPPY

A History

Synonymous with War Memorials are the red poppies worn on Remembrance Day, Nov.11th ( originally known as Armistice Day ). The origin of the poppy tradition rests with three people, Major John McCrae* a Medical Officer with the 1st.Canadian Contingent at the battle of the Ypres salient in May 1915. Miss Moira Michael, Secretary of the American YMCA and Madam Guerin, Secretary French YMCA.

Apalled at the slaughter caused by the seventeen day Ypres battle Major McCrae wrote the following poem:

In Flanders’ Fields

In Flanders’ Fields the poppies blow Between the crosses, row on row, That mark our place; and in the sky The larks, still bravely singing, fly Scarce heard amid the guns below. We are the dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, Loved, and were loved, and now we lie In Flanders’ Fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe: To you from failing hands we throw The torch; be yours to hold it high. If ye break faith with us who die We shall not sleep, though poppies grow In Flanders’ Fields.

Published in the London magazine ‘Punch’ December,1915, it received wide publicity.

Miss Moira Bell Michael, a teacher,was so impressed with the poem she wrote the following:

“We Shall Keep The Faith”

Oh! You who sleep in Flanders’ fields, Sleep sweet – to rise anew; We caught the torch you threw; And holding high we kept The faith with those who died. We cherish, too, the Poppy red That grows on fields where valour led. It seems to signal to the skies That blood of heroes never dies, But lends a lustre to the red Of the flower that blooms above the dead In Flanders’ Fields. And now the torch and poppy red Wear in honour of our dead Fear not that ye have died for naught We’ve learned the lesson that ye taught In Flanders’ Fields.

and made a decision to always wear a Flanders poppy “to keep the faith”.

In November 1918 Madame Guerin attended a convention of YMCA Secretaries from the Allied Nations and met Miss Michael, greatly impressed with Miss Michael’s idea of the Flanders poppy as a badge of remembrance she took the idea back to France from where it quickly spread amongst the Allies of WW1. In 1919 the newly formed British Legion adopted the Flanders Poppy as it’s official badge of remembrance followed by the Australian RSL in 1921. In 1922 a factory for the manufacture of poppies for distribution in Britain and Northern Ireland was established in the Old Kent Road, London under the supervision of Major George Howson MC to provide employment for disabled soldiers. As demand increased larger premises were required so in 1925 a move was made to premises in Petersham Rd., Richmond, SW London where it remains to the present day. At one time the factory employed some 365 people producing 45 million poppies per annum; today, with improved production methods, 44 people are employed at the factory with another 90 home workers,only ex-Service persons or their relatives qualify for employment. Production for the 2006 ceremony will be 36 million poppies ( 650,000 buttonhole type) 105,000 wreaths 750,000 crosses 5 million petals In addition to the above the factory also produces a special corsage of five poppies for the Queen to wear and wreaths for the Special Air Services Regiment, the SAS wreaths differ from the norm having a central plaque of the SAS badge surrounded by dark and light blue leaves interspersed with white carnations

“Worn to remember the nation’s war dead, the red poppy is a widely recognised emblem. Millions of poppies were sold last year and the appeal raised £30m for the Royal British Legion’s charitable work. But what is the etiquette of wearing one? 1. Should you wear one? The poppy commemorates those who have died in war. The tradition was started by American teacher Moina Bell Michael, who sold silk poppies to friends to raise money for the ex-service community. In 1920 the poppy was proclaimed the national emblem of remembrance in the US, and in the UK, the first poppy day was in 1921. Last year Britons bought 26m poppies, but others choose not to. Channel 4 newsreader Jon Snow famously refuses to wear one on air, reportedly saying he does not want to bow to “poppy fascism” 2. What colour to wear – red, white or purple? Red is most popular, but the lesser-seen white poppy dates from 1933, when the Women’s Co-operative Guild wanted a lasting symbol for peace and an end to all wars. But the Royal British Legion refused to be associated with their manufacture, and so the Co-operative Wholesale Society took on production. The intention was not to offend the memory of those who died in the Great War, but many veterans felt white poppies undermined their contribution and the lasting meaning of the red poppy. Feelings ran so high that some women lost their jobs in the 1930s for wearing white poppies. Critics argue the red poppy already encompasses the sentiments of white one, which they say also diverts funds for the Royal British Legion. Then there are purple poppies, worn to remember the animal victims of war and sold by animal charities. 3. When to start wearing one? Many people think poppies should be worn from 1 November until Armistice Day on 11 November. Others pin one on only in the week running up to Remembrance Sunday – 13th November this year. A Royal British Legion spokesman says they can be worn from the launch of the poppy appeal in October. Organisations like the BBC usually choose a day for presenters to start wearing one.  

4. When not in uniform, where should you pin your poppy – left or right. Some people say left, as it’s worn over the heart. It is also where military medals are worn. Others say only the Queen and Royal Family are allowed to wear a poppy on the right, which isn’t true. Then there is the school of thought that says men should wear theirs on the left and women on the right, as is the traditional custom with a badge or brooch. The Royal British Legion spokesman says there is no right or wrong side “other than to wear it with pride”. 5. What size should\b0 it be? The traditional poppy is roughly 7cm from red tip to the bottom of its green stalk and 4cm wide. But other sizes are worn.”(extract from BBC Magazine Oct.2009)

In adopting the Poppy of Flanders’ Fields as the Memorial Flower to be worn by all Returned Soldiers on the above mentioned day, we recognise that no emblem so well typifies the Fields whereon was fought the greatest war in the history of the world nor sanctifies so truly the last resting place of our brave dead who remain in France” excerpt from RSL declaration of 1921.

In spite of the sentiments expressed above the “Poppies” supplied by the WA RSL for sale to the public since 2003 do not replicate Flanders Poppies, having more in common with minature multi petalled roses

Col. John McCrae died of wounds in France, 1918

 

WOOLFITT, Philip

Canadian Btn

88th Btn., and 43rd Btn.,

Born 1897, Died 1916

During the First World War, both local newspapers, the Newark Advertiser and the Newark Herald ran extensive coverage on local casualties, which are of great interest and value for those researching their family history from this period.

The following articles appeared in each newspaper:

NEWARK HERALD – 4th November 1916 

PTE PHILIP WOOLFITT DIES OF WOUNDS 

The many friends of Mr & Mrs W P Woolfitt of New Balderton, will learn with much regret and sympathy of the death from wounds of their eldest son, Pte. Philip Woolfitt, of the gallant Canadians.  Pte. Woolfitt, who was only 19 years of age in August last, was an old Magnus boy, and upon leaving school went out to Victoria, British Colombia,  five years ago, to his grandfather, Mr Tomlinson.  For the last two years before enlisting he was learning surveying and was engaged with his uncle, Mr Nowell Johnson, working under government.  As soon as he had turned the age of 19, and had finished his engagement, he joined the 88th Battalion of Canadians at Victoria in December last and came over to England in June when he had a few days leave and re-joined his parents at New Balderton near Newark. 

Returning to camp he volunteered to join a draft and was transferred to the 43rd Canadians, being sent to France early in August.  He was in the firing line about a month when he was severely wounded on October 9th, being wounded through the right arm, left hand, slight wound in the head, and a severe shrapnel wound in the hip, which caused complications.  He arrived in England on 17th and was sent to King George’s Hospital, London where he underwent several operations.  He was treated with the best medical skill possible and with every care and attention, but owing to septic poisoning and haemorrhage, no hopes were entertained of saving the young life and his parents were sent for and they were able to be present when he passed away most peacefully, practically in his sleep, at 10.15 on Wednesday night. 

The greatest sympathy is extended to Mr and Mrs Woolfitt in their great loss. 

The funeral, which will be of a military character, will take place this afternoon.  There was a service in the Parish Church at 2.30pm, and the interment was at Newark Cemetery at 3.20pm.

NEWARK ADVERTISER - November 8th 1916 (p.5)

MILITARY FUNERAL AT NEWARK  CEMETERY

 Pte Philip Woolfitt: died of wounds. 

 With full military honours, the mortal remains of Pte. P Woolfitt (eldest son of Mr & Mrs W P Woolfitt, New Balderton) who died of wounds sustained in France, were laid to rest in Newark Cemetery on Saturday.  Deceased, who was 20 years of age, was an old Magnusian, having won a scholarship from the Mount School. 

After leaving school he went out to Victoria, British Columbia, to his grandfather, Mr J H Tomlinson.  During the last two years of his stay in the Colonies he was learning surveying with his uncle, Mr Norwell Johnson.  As soon as he was 19 years of age he joined a Canadian Battalion, and came over to England in June.  Early in August he was drafted out, and after being about a month in the firing line he was badly wounded in the right arm, left hand, slightly in the head, and severely in the hip. 

He arrived in England on 17th and was sent to King George’s Hospital London where he underwent several operations.  Owing to septic poisoning and haemorrhage, no hopes were entertained of his recovery, and his parents were sent for.  He passed away practically in his sleep at 10.15pm on Wednesday night, 1st November 1916 on All Souls’ Night.

THE FUNERAL 

The funeral service was conducted by the Vicar of Newark (Canon W Paton Hindley), and the obsequies were attended by a firing party, bugle and drum and fife band of the Royal Engineers.  The first part was in the Parish Church, where the hymn “How those glorious spirits shine” was sung.  Mr W T Wright, A.R.C.O., presided at the organ. 

The chief mourners were Mr & Mrs W P Woolfitt (father and mother), Misses Eva and Nora Woolfitt (sisters), Masters Donald and Albert Woolfitt (brothers), Mrs F E Hoe (aunt), Mr and Mrs W H Tomlinson and Mr H S Whiles.  Amongst those also present were Rev. H Gorse (headmaster), and scholars from the Magnus Grammar School, Mr G B Friend, Ald. J C Wright, Ald. L Priestley, Mr C H Whitehouse, Mr and Mrs T A Watford, Mr G B Heading, Mr F Allott, Mrs. Garner (Commandant of the VAD Hospital, Lombard Street, Newark), Miss Garner, Mrs M H Colton, Mr E Winter Rose, and others. 

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'WOOLFITT, Philip' page

The cortege, as it wended its way towards the Cemetery, was headed by the Royal Engineers band playing the Dead March.  Then came the firing party, walking with arms reversed.  When near the Cemetery gates the band played “Abide with me”, and lined up each side of the entrance to allow the body, enclosed in an oak coffin, on which was the Union Jack and deceased’s cap, to pass through to the burial place.  After the Vicar had concluded reading the burial service, the customary three volleys were fired over the grave, and the buglers sounded the “Last Post”. 

In addition to the family wreaths, beautiful floral tributes were sent as follows:

With deepest sympathy from Uncle Albert, Auntie Jane and Auntie Fanny.

In loving remembrance of dear Phil., from Aunty Lill and Uncle Billy (Hoveringham).

In loving sympathy from J W P Hall.

From Mr and Mrs E Harker and family, with deepest sympathy.

With deepest sympathy from Mr and Mrs Otter and family.

In loving sympathy from Mrs Heppenstall and Miss Heppenstall.

With deepest sympathy from Mr and Mrs B Newbound.

With sincere sympathy from Mrs Wright and the Misses Parnham.

With kind remembrance and deep sympathy from Mr and Mrs Vason

With love from Mrs H M Coles.

In affectionate remembrance from Lieut. and Mrs J H W Ford and family.

From Elizabeth Anderson “Blessed are the pure in heart for they shall see God”

With deepest sympathy for a dear friend – Frank Slater.

With deepest sympathy from Mrs H M Colton and family, South Scarle Hall.

With deepest sympathy for a young life nobly sacrificed for his country’s cause, from a few friends at the Brewery Office.

With pride in an old schoolfellow and in deepest sympathy, from the boys of the Magnus Grammar School.

TOUCHING TRIBUTE 

In the course of his sermon on Sunday morning, the Vicar (Canon W Paton Hindley) made a touching allusion to the death of Pte. Woolfitt.  He quoted from a letter written by the Chaplain of King George’s Hospital, who said: “He died at 10 p.m. last night, and all of us who have come in touch with the dear boy have felt that it was fitting that he should be called away on All Saints’ Day.  His sheer goodness has inspired us all.  His patience and cheerfulness were wonderful all through for he has been suffering much pain.  On Sunday morning he received Holy Communion with much joy and devotion – we have lost a lot of boys since July, but in no case do I remember such a wide-spread feeling of sorrow and sympathy in the Hospital as was felt today.

Private Philip Woolfitt – 1897-1916 – who had gone to Canada and enlisted in the Canadian Infantry (Manitoba Regiment) and died on 1st November of 1916 aged 19.  He is buried with his parents William and Emma, in Newark cemetery, and was the elder brother of Sir Donald Wolfit (1902-1968), the actor (who changed the spelling of his name later in his career).  The family lived on London Road, Balderton, where a plaque to Donald was erected in 1974.

100_0417

From the 1st World War, RIP

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

 

We will Remember them

To have the Desert Poppy adopted by the British Legion in remembrance of UK Armed Forces personnel who lost their lives in Afghanistan and Iraq

The Royal British Legion

The Royal British Legion Charity Registration No. 219279

It is the UK’s leading charity providing financial, social and emotional support to millions who have served and are currently serving in the British Armed Forces and their dependents.

“WE WILL REMEMBER THEM”

Our Heroes who have lost their lives in Afghanistan,  RIP to all those brave soldiers who have fallen in Afghanistan and around the World.

We will Remember them all year round.

Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom

Smiles in the sunshire and tears in the rain still take me back where my memories remain

A heavenly choir – what a song – my desire – simply great – I have always loved this Mull of Kintyre this great song by Sir Paul Mccartney and wing

www.youtube.com/watch?v=4JPHNuAAZDE&feature=related

  1. Tags
  2. British Remember remembrance Armed Forces Iraq Afghanistan War Army Navy Marines RAF UK Great Britain

“WE WILL REMEMBER THEM”

Remembrance of UK Armed Forces personnel who lost their lives in Afghanistan and Iraq

Let’s Remember our UK Armed Forces personnel who lost their lives in Afghanistan and Iraq, RIP

 

Wreaths were laid at Newark Cemetery War Memorial to the Fallen

British Commonwealth and Polish War Graves Newark Cemetery

Click on Links

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/category/general-sikorski/

General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Prime Minister of Poland’s London …

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/friends-of-newark-cemetery-fonc/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/08/13/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/category/general-sikorski/

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/03/13/tribute-to-ivano-sean-violino-lasting-tribute/

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2011/09/26/we-must-not-forget-those-of-the-commonwealth-and-polish-airmen-they-fought-for-freedom-against-the-enemy-and-didn’t-flinch/

www.coddington.org.uk/index.php/20th-century/175-ransome-a-marles-air-raid-1941

Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom

Annual Air Bridge Commemoration Service, will be held at Newark Cemetery London Road, Nottinghamshire. Held on the Last Sunday in September each year. In Remembrance of the casualties of the 1944 Warsaw Uprising which will start  at 1:45pm when Standard Bearers assemble at Main Gate. 2pm Procession to the Air Bridge Memorial.