General Wladyslaw Sikorski Our remembrance for Poland’s War hero, Lest We Forget 4th July 1943 marking the anniversary of his death

 

  • General Wladyslaw Sikorski  was buried in Newark Cemetery from 16th July 1943 until he was exhumed on 13th September 1993. The General was taken over night before Mass the next day at St. Mary Magdalene (Newark parish church)  a Catholic service (Mass) was held  the  next day. On 14th September 1993 remains re-turn home to Poland after 50 years resting in Newark Cemetery.

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    • Laurencegoff

    • General Wladyslaw Sikorski remains rested in Newark Parish Church 13-14 Sept 1993, before returning home to Poland on the 14th Sept 1993

     

    On the same day his coffin stayed overnight,on 13-14 September 1993

    at

    Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene

    Tuesday 14th September a farewell high Mass before returning home to Poland on the same day.

    Remember him

    RIP

     

Pics Laurence Goff

The Consul General of the Republic of Poland Lukasz Lutostanski Manchester ( General Sikorski Memorial Plaque, his coffin was at the foot of The Altar.

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Remembrance for Poland’s War hero

Air Bridge Warsaw Uprising 1944 Memorial Service London Road Newark Cemetery NG24

1SQ at 2pm, on Sunday – 27th Sept 2015.

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4 lipca 1943 r. z lotniska w Gibraltarze wystartował “Liberator” z generałem Sikorskim na pokładzie. Po chwili samolot runął do morza. Wszyscy oprócz głównego pilota zginęli, w tym córka generała Zofia Leśniowska, której ciała nigdy nie znaleziono. Przyczyny katastrofy samolotu nie zostały jednoznacznie i precyzyjnie wyjaśnione. Ciało premiera i naczelnego wodza spoczywa w Krakowie na Wawelu.

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Polish President Wladyslaw Raczkiewicz Grave in Newark Cemetery, Newark-On-Trent,

Nottinghamshire

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  •  During the Second World War there were a number of R.A.F. stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for R.A.F. burials and this is now the war graves plot, where all but ten of the 90 Commonwealth and all of the 397 Polish burials were made. The cemetery also contains 49 scattered burials of the First World War.

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  • A memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski on 4th July 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s remains were returned to Poland on 14th September 1993, after being buried for 50 years at Newark Cemetery. You can still view a memorial to him at Newark.

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  • For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

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Polish maked a large contribution to the war effort, during the 2nd world war. The brave Polish military in the West was composed of army, air and naval forces

We are grateful to them

   

 

 

 

 

 

Sikorski 2024

 

Many Poles came to England to help with the war effort and many chose to stay after the 2nd world war. We have been welcoming Polish people for over 74 years since 1940 to the Newark area. During the Second World War there were a number of RAF. stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery. General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. Our remembrance for Poland’s War hero, lest We Forget 4th July 1943 – marked the anniversary of his death.

British Commonwealth and Polish war Grave during the wars from 1939-1947 at Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire
Many links were bonded during Britain’s darkest hour. When Poland was invaded by Germany Polish pilots came to the UK and formed fighter squadrons that would operate during the Battle of Britain. RAF Winthorpe near Newark was established in 1940. It was a satellite station for RAF Swinderby over the border in Lincolnshire. Two Polish air squadrons, 300 and 301, were based at Winthorpe, near Newark, Nottinghamshire.
Each year there are two services annually at the immaculately-kept war graves’ section at Newark Cemetery – of Homage and Remembrance organised by the Polish Air Force Association Charitable Trust and a tribute to the 250 airmen who died during the Airbridge operations of 1944.
Airbridge service Sunday 28th September 2014 2pm
All Souls’ Day Ceremony
26th October 2014
at 3pm

Many Poles came to England to help with the war effort and many chose to stay
A memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski on 4th July 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s remains were returned to Poland on 14th September 1993, after being buried for 50 years at Newark Cemetery. You can still view a memorial to him at Newark.

 

 

For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

By Laurencegoff

 

By Laurencegoff

Dakota plane

Polish made a large contribution to the war effort, during the 2nd world war. The brave Polish military in the West was composed of army, air and naval forces
We are grateful to them
General Wladyslaw Sikorski Our remembrance for Poland’s War hero, Lest We Forget 4th July 1943 – 2014 marking the 71st anniversary of his death
During the Second World War there were a number of RAF. stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery.
for RAF burials and this is now the war graves plot, where all but ten of the 90 Commonwealth and all of the 397 Polish burials were made.
Newark Cemetery
For over 150 years since 1856

Our beautiful and historic
Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark,
Many Poles came to England to help with the war effort and many chose to stay after the 2nd world war. We have been welcoming Polish people for over 74 years since 1940 to the Newark area. During the Second World War there were a number of RAF. stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery.

A memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski on 4th July 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s remains were returned to Poland on 14th September 1993, after being buried for 50 years at Newark Cemetery. You can still view a memorial to him at Newark. Polish made a large contribution to the war effort, we should be grateful.

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ
Open all year round
April – September 8am-8pm, October – March 8am-6pm

General Wladyslaw Sikorski our remembrance for Poland’s War hero, lest We Forget 4th July 1943 – marked the anniversary of his death

He was buried in Newark Cemetery from 16th July 1943 until he was exhumed on 13th September 1993.

 

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For over 150 years since 1856

Our

beautiful and historic

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark,

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Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Open all year round

 April – September 8am-8pm, October – March 8am-6pm 

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British Commonwealth and Polish war Grave during the wars from 1939-1947 at Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire

Many links were bonded during Britain’s darkest hour. When Poland was invaded by Germany Polish pilots came to the UK and formed fighter squadrons that would operate during the Battle of Britain. RAF Winthorpe near Newark was established in 1940. It was a satellite station for RAF Swinderby over the border in Lincolnshire. Two Polish air squadrons, 300 and 301, were based at Winthorpe, near Newark, Nottinghamshire.

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  • Statue Of General Sikorski

    Portland Pace London W –  To The Commander-In-Chief Of The Polish Armed Forces & Prime Minster Of Poland

     

Polish President August Zaleski died in 1972 age 88 Buried in Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

Stanislaw Ostrowski

Who is buried at Newark was the President of the Polish Government in exile and one of many distinguished Poles who stood shoulder to shoulder with the Allies in the Second world war. Exiled from his native city of Lwow, where he was previously Mayor at the time of the invasion, he came to the UK and worked alongside many polish nationaLs exiled here to keep hopes alive for Poland.He was a medical man who vaLued education. His service to his country included his involvement with Posk – the cultural home in West London for exiled Poles. Historians far more authorative than me can give you the histoiry. Fittingly his burial place is Newark Cemetry alongside fallen comrades who served in the Polish Air Force.  Given the annual commemoration on All Souls Day in the cemetry and the importance of remembering all who fought for our freedom today.

Joan Walley MP

Polish President Stanislaw Ostrowski, died age 92 in 1982 buried at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

Za wolnosc nasza i wasza / For our freedom and yours

 

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British, Commonwealth and Polish many were killed who resting place is located at Memorial Site located at

Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark-on-Trent

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  

October – March 8am – 6pm – Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm

 

              

Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish their Sacrifice

Let’s  commemorate the 2165 Polish airmen who lost their lives in 2nd World War

 

 The dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth and Polish who also join up with the

RAF

 Killed who resting place is Newark Cemetery, Newark On Trent, Nottinghamshire

4 RAAF – Australian, 44 British RAF and Servicemen, 17 RCAF – Canadian, 

3 RNZAF – New Zealand 

and 

397 Polish Serviceman – Airmen

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Laurencegoff

Polish War Memorial Commemoration All Souls Day of Remembrance at Newark Cemetery. This event is organised by the Polish Air Force Association and will take place on Sunday 26th October 2014, in the Commonwealth War Graves Section of the Newark Cemetery. The Procession of the Collegiate Body, led by the Standards will begin at 3pm. Wreaths are laid, and tea lights will be lit on each of the graves. It’s held annual each year on the 4th Sunday in October. 

www.panoramio.com/photo/74638325 

President Wladyslaw Raczkiewicz

Date Of Birth 28th January 1885

Death Date 7th  June  1947

Jan. 28, 1885 Polish political figure and the first president of the Polish government in exile from 1939 until his death in 1947. Until 1945 he was the internationally recognized Polish head of state, and the Polish Government in Exile was recognized as the continuum to the Polish government of 1939.

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/friends-of-newark-cemetery-fonc/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile 

The Amazing Spitfire Flying For Our Freedom

polish20emblem2.jpg Polish Flag image by PolishAmericans

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Young Boy attended the annual Air Bridge at Newark Cemetery

During the Second World War there were a number of R.A.F. stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for R.A.F. burials and this is now the war graves plot, where all but ten of the 90 Commonwealth and all of the 397 Polish burials were made. The cemetery also contains 49 scattered burials of the First World War. A memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski on 4th July 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s remains were returned to Poland on 14th September 1993, after being buried for 50 years at Newark Cemetery. You can still view a memorial to him at Newark.

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Sunday 26th October 2014

Newark Cemetery Annual All Soul’s Day Memorial service 3pm Parade from the Main Gate on London Road To the Commonwealth and polish War graves The Chapel Interpretation Centre will be open from 12.30pm – until 4pm — at Newark on Trent

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Tribute to British, Commonwealth and Polish their Sacrifice 

 The dark days of the 2nd World War from the British Commonwealth and Polish who also join up with the

RAF

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Newark on Trent marked The Battle Of Britain our personal contribution to the National Memorial to the Few in memory of the aircrew who took to the skies to defend these shores in the summer and early autumn of 1940. We also remember The 2165 Polish Airmen who lost their lives during the 2nd World War, flighting alongside the Allies

Flying over Newark On Trent for our Freedom

Many were killed who resting place is Newark Cemetery 4 RAAF – Australian, 44 British Servicemen, 17 RCAF – Canadian, 3 RNZAF – New Zealand and 397 Polish Airmen together with other servicemen

             

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves, Newark -on-Trent NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark-on-Trent

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  October – March 8am – 6pm – Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm

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Annual Air Bridge 

The monument, located up the Main Drive to the over end on Newark Cemetery

Sunday 28th September, 2014, 2pm  Guests and Standard Bearers assemble at Newark Cemetery, Main Gates on London Road, Newark. “tremendously important”

We should be grateful to the brave Polish — pilots, mechanics and ground staff — served in the Polish air force during the 2nd world war in Britain. In the summer of 1940, General Wladyslaw Sikorski — the head of Poland’s Government in Exile in London — we should be grateful when he  signed an agreement to form a Polish Air Force in Britain. A Polish Air Force in the UK, with two fighter squadrons – 302 and 303 – composed of Polish pilots and ground crews, with British commanding officers.

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Newark Cemetery Commonwealth And Polish War Graves

 London Road

Newark

NG24 1SQ

 Open all year round 

April – September 8am-8pm

October – March 8am-6pm 

  •  The Polish War Memorial is just inside Newark boundaries, an important enough to merit this website. Following the fall of Poland to German and Soviet forces in 1939, many Poles left their homeland to continue the fight from other countries. By the summer of 1940 Britain was facing the axis powers alone, but with the help of men from other European countries. Not the least of these were the Poles. Among the RAF squadrons at Northolt, there were a number of Polish squadrons based there in 1940-1943.

    During the Battle of Britain in the late summer of 1940, the 303rd (Warsaw) squadron saw service at Northolt, flying Hurricane fighter aircraft. They were replaced in October by the 302nd (Poznan) squadron after the Battle of Britain had been won. Others serving from the aerodrome were the 306th, 308th, 305th, 315th and 317th squadron. Some of them returned to the airfield for another tour of duty here. Thirty Polish airmen, a fifth of their number, were killed in the Battle of Britain, and of these, five had been flying from Northolt.

    After the war was over, the Polish armed forces in Britain were disbanded. A group of Polish air force officers decided to form the Polish Air Force Association. One of their first decisions was to erect a memorial for their former comrades. A committee under Air Vice Marshal Izycki started a public appeal for funds (most of which were contributed by British people), and the work soon began.

    The memorial was unveiled on 2 November 1948 by Lord Tedder, RAF Marshal and chief of the air staff. It is made from Portland stone, with bronze lettering and is topped by a bronze Polish air force eagle. The craftsman was Miecystam Lubelski, who had been recently liberated from a labour camp. The names of 1,243 Poles who died in the war were inscribed on the memorial.

    Viscount Portal of Hungerford made a speech before the unveiling. He said that it was a sad blow that many Polish veterans were unable to return home, as their country had been occupied by the Soviet Union. He added that it would be to the mutual advantage of Britons and Poles that the latter were to make their home in Britain.

    In 1991, the first post-war democratically elected Polish president, Lech Walesa, laid a wreath at the memorial. By this time it had been realised that further work was needed. Repair work was necessary, as were extensions in order to accommodate a further 659 names that had not been included hitherto. An appeal was made in 1994 and the memorial was rededicated in 1996 in the presence of the Duke of Gloucester, British and Polish military and civil dignitaries.

    The memorial remains as a monument to the men of the fighter and bomber squadrons and as an expression of Anglo-Polish friendship.

     

    We would like to thank Dr Jonathan Oates, borough archivist and local history librarian, for the use of his information.

    (Reproduced with permission from the London Borough of Ealing). 

       

General Wladyslaw Sikorski  Newark Cemetery remembering Poland’s War hero,  Lest We Forget

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski

Our remembrance for Poland’s War hero

Lest We Forget

Poland’s War hero, Lest We Forget 4th July 1943 – 2013 marking the 70th anniversary of his death

             

General Wladyslaw Sikorski was one of the great Polish heroes, let’s commemorate our wartime links with Poland. After the German invasion of Poland, he became the Prime Minister of a new Polish Government in exile, and also Commander in Chief of the Polish Armed Forces, which fought with the Allies by land, sea and air throughout the Second World War.  He was thus Political, military and resistance leader, during the  2nd world war.The Polish fighting for survival for a free nation and  liberation from the terrible oppression to which they had become subject for too long. It is little wonder then that General Sikorski was so loved and respected by his people, and that they continue to revere and honour his memory to the present day. As British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill said in his tribute to General Sikorski in the House of Commons, ‘he was truly the symbol and embodiment of that spirit which has borne the Polish nation through the centuries.’ General Sikorski was also very active in World politics at that time, attending many political conferences with the allies and was, indeed, one of the Architects of the United Nations. Churchill described his death as ‘a most grievous loss to the cause of the United Nations.’ And so it was as Commander in Chief of the Free Polish Forces that General Sikorski left England on 24th May 1943 onboard an RAF Liberator Aircraft bound for Cairo to visit Polish Troops fighting with the Allies in North Africa. On his return from Cairo, his Liberator aircraft touched down at Gibraltar, just as it had done on the way out to Cairo. General Sikorski was accompanied by his daughter Zofia, who was also Chief of the Polish Womens Auxiliary. The Party also included the Polish military Chief  of Staff, Operations. They arrived at Gibraltar on Saturday 3rd July at 6.37pm. Their aircraft, the same Liberator, took off from Gibraltar airport at 11pm. the next day, Sunday 4th July 1943 on the final leg of General Sikorski was returning his journey from Cairo to London. The aeroplane crashed seconds after take-off,  just off the eastern end of the runway. General Sikorski, his daughter and all his party perished. General Sikorski’s body lay in State for several days at the Cathedral of St Mary the Crowned on Main Street, until a Polish warship could reach Gibraltar to take it to the UK for burial. On arrival at the Cathedral entrance the street was crowded with Gibraltarian men (their wives, children and parents had been evacuated from Gibraltar during the war) who wanted to show their respect to this courageous Polish hero. The then Bishop of Gibraltar celebrated a requiem mass in the Cathedral before the mortal remains of General Sikorski and his party were transferred to the Polish destroyer ‘Orkan’. General Sikorski was buried in Newark Cemetery in England on 16th July 1943. His grave became a shrine to free Poles throughout the world their view was that the General’s remains should never be returned to Poland while the country was under foreign domination. It was therefore not until the fall of the Berlin Wall and the liberation of Eastern Europe from Soviet domination. On this date Monday 13th September 1993, his remains were disinterred from Newark cemetery and  taken Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magadalene stayed over night the next day had a farewell Catholic Mass. After the service  was flown home to Warsaw to be re-interred in a special crypt in Wawel Cathedral which lies inside the walls of the ancient castle, traditional burial place of Polish Kings.

Thursday 4th July 2013

A service of remembrance was held in Newark Cemetery today to mark the 70th anniversary of the death of Polish wartime leader General Wladyslaw Sikorski

The Consul General of the Republic of Poland Lukasz Lutostanski

The Consul General of the Republic of Poland Lukasz Lutostanski

General Sikorski, who was the Prime Minister of the Polish government in exile and commander of the Polish Armed Forces, died in 1943 when the plane he was travelling in plunged into the sea off

Gibraltar.

He had been returning to Britain after visiting Polish troops in the Middle East.

Before his death he visited the war graves section in Newark Cemetery and was so impressed with its care he asked to be buried there alongside his men if he died while Poland was still occupied.

As a result he was laid to rest in the cemetery.

His body was exhumed in 1993 and taken back to Poland where he is now buried in the Hall of Kings in Wawel Cathedral, Krakow.

The Polish Consulate arranged a series of events throughout the country to mark the anniversary and wanted Newark to be included.

A service was held in St Barnabas’ Cathedral in Nottingham on the morning of the anniversary.

About 100 Polish ex-Servicemen and their families then attend Newark Cemetery for a service around the site of General Sikorski’s former grave.

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski

Speeches and tributes were paid by, among others, the Consul General of the Republic of Poland in the UK, Lukasz Lutostanski.

A reception and conference in Newark Town Hall then feature speakers, including Krzysztof Deberg from the Polish Institute and Sikorski Museum in London, who focused on the life of General Sikorski, his role in organising and shaping a new Polish army abroad post Nazi invasion and the history of the relationship between Britain and Poland.

A film of the exhumation and return to a hero’s welcome of General Sikorski’s remains to Poland – sourced by Advertiser Editor-in-Chief Roger Parlby – was also screened as part of the proceedings.

An exhibition was staged in the Town Hall during the week of the anniversary.

It was open to the public and schools were invited to learn more about the history of Newark and its associations with the Polish community, which developed as a result of General Sikorski’s burial in the town.

Each year there are two services annually at the immaculately-kept war graves’ section at Newark Cemetery – All Souls’ Day Ceremony of Homage and Remembrance organised by the Polish Air Force Association Charitable Trust and a tribute to the 250 airmen who died during the Airbridge operations of 1944.

The Airbridge Association Service of Remembrance honours the men who kept the Polish partisans supplied from the air through their 63-day uprising against the Nazis.

http://newarkadvertiser.co.uk/articles/news/Polish-general-remembered

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Taken by Laurencegoffnewark

A Dakota from the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight flew three times over Nottinghamshire.  It will fly over Newark Cemetery at the annual Air Bridge to be held at 2pm starting  from the Main Gate on  London Road to the War Graves Sunday 22nd September 2013

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 General Wladyslaw Sikorski  Our remembrance for Poland’s War hero,  Lest We Forget   4th July 1943 – 2013 marking the 70th anniversary of his death   http://www.panoramio.com/photo/102974365

polish20emblem2.jpg Polish Flag image by PolishAmericans

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Laurencegoff

Newark Cemetery 4th July  2013

The Consul General of the Republic of Poland Lukasz Lutostanski

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Newark Cemetery 4th July  2013

The Consul General of the Republic of Poland Lukasz Lutostanski

Lest We Forget 4th July 1943 – 2013 marking the 70th anniversary.

 

A service of remembrance was held in Newark Cemetery today to mark the 70th anniversary of the death of Polish wartime leader General Wladyslaw Sikorski

   

SAM_0480Laurencegoff           

 

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski our remembrance for Poland’s War hero, lest We Forget 4th July 1943 – marked the anniversary of his death

Laurencegoff

Father Michael O’Donoghue from Holy Trinity RC Church Newark Town. A service of remembrance was held in Newark Cemetery today to mark the 70th anniversary of the death of Polish wartime leader General Wladyslaw Sikorski.

Commemorate our wartime links with Poland 1939 – 1945

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Laurencegoff

Poland’s War hero,  Lest We Forget

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Father Michael O’Donoghue from Holy Trinity RC Church Newark

There were a number of RAF stations within a few miles of Newark on Trent. Several Polish fighter squadrons fighting alongside the Royal Air Force were set up. Polish fighter squadrons went into action  1940 – 1945 

 

Laurencegoffnewark

Cllr Trish Gurney returning to Newark Cemetery

 Laurencegoff  

Stanislaw Ostrowski

Who is buried at Newark was the President of the Polish Government in exile and one of many distinguished Poles who stood shoulder to shoulder with the Allies in the Second world war. Exiled from his native city of Lwow, where he was previously Mayor at the time of the invasion, he came to the UK and worked alongside many polish nationaLs exiled here to keep hopes alive for Poland.He was a medical man who vaLued education. His service to his country included his involvement with Posk – the cultural home in West London for exiled Poles. Historians far more authorative than me can give you the histoiry. Fittingly his burial place is Newark Cemetry alongside fallen comrades who served in the Polish Air Force. Given the annual commemoration on All Souls Day in the cemetry and the importance of remembering all who fought for our freedom today.

Joan Walley MP 

Laurencegoffnewark

Laurencegoffnewark

Laurencegoffnewark

Laurencegoffnewark

General Wladyslaw Sikorski  Our remembrance for Poland’s War hero, 4th July 1943 – 2013 marking the 70th anniversary of his death at Newark Cemetery  

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General Wladystaw Sikorski   Born 20th May 1881 –  Sadly Died  4th July 1943

On this date Sunday 4th July 1943,  we will Remember General Wladystaw Sikorski Prime Minister of Polish Government in exile, and Commander in Chief of the Polish Armed Forces. He  and others were returning from an inspection of Polish forces deployed in the Middle East, his plane, a Liberator II, serial AL523, operated by No. 511 Squadron RAFcrashed into the sea 16 seconds after taking off  all passengers only the Czech pilot Edward prchal survived when it crashed. 

It was a sad day for the Polish people, we will remember him. 

  1. Thursday 4th July 2013 ceremony at Newark Cemetery took place mark the occasion of 70th Anniversary of the death of the General Wladystaw Sikorski Prime Minister of Polish Government in exile, and Commander in Chief of the Polish Armed Forces. 

     Marking the 70th anniversary when he died on 4th July 1943 – 2013

    Remembrance for Poland’s War hero

    Lest We Forget

    Buried in Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July 1943 until Monday 13th September 1993, his remains were disinterred from Newark Cemetery after 50 years

    On the same day his coffin stayed overnight on 13th-14th September 1993

    Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene

    Tuesday 14th September 1993 a farewell high Mass before returning home to Poland to be buried on 17th September 1993 in Wawel Cathedral. We will Remember him and will always live in our hearts.

     

    The Amazing Spitfire Flying For Our Freedom

     

     Ministry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

     

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  • For over 150 years since 1856

    The Polish Air Force Memorial Committee was established in 2011 as a partnership between the former Polish Air Force Association and RAF Northolt. The Polish War Memorial  is situated adjacent to the roundabout on the A40 at its junction with the A4180

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    http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/09/10/remembering-the-2165-polish-airmen-and-their-sacrifice-during-the-2nd-world-war/

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    Former Newark Town Mayor and Councillor Jean Moore at  General Wladyslaw Sikorski grace July 1981 at Newark Cemetery

     

    General Wladyslaw Sikorski  1881 – 1943

     Let’s mark the 70th anniversary of his death

    Remembrance for Poland’s War hero

    Lest We Forget

    4th July 1943 – 2013

    Buried in Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July 1943

    Monday 13th September 1993, his remains were disinterred from Newark Cemetery after 50 years

    On the same day his coffin stayed overnight,on 13-14 September 1993

     at 

    Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene

    Tuesday 14th September a farewell high Mass before returning home to Poland on the same day.

      Remember him

     RIP

    4 lipca 1943 r. z lotniska w Gibraltarze wystartował “Liberator” z generałem Sikorskim na pokładzie. Po chwili samolot runął do morza. Wszyscy oprócz głównego pilota zginęli, w tym córka generała Zofia Leśniowska, której ciała nigdy nie znaleziono. Przyczyny katastrofy samolotu nie zostały jednoznacznie i precyzyjnie wyjaśnione. Ciało premiera i naczelnego wodza spoczywa w Krakowie na Wawelu.

     Giant flag

     

    The Polish Air Force Memorial Committee was established in 2011 as a partnership between the former Polish Air Force Association and RAF Northolt. 

    http://www.raf.mod.uk/rafnortholt/

     

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   General Wladyslaw Sikorski  Our remembrance for Poland’s War hero

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski

 

General Wladyslaw Sikorski died on 4th July 1943 – 2013

Newark will mark the 70th anniversary of his death

  We will Remember him

 

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves in Newark

  • WWII victims remembered at  Polish War Memorial at Newark Cemetery

    Commonwealth and Polish War Graves 

    A Memorial Cross to the Polish airmen that are buried here during the 2nd World War was erected in the plot and unveiled on 15th July 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Commander in Chief of the Polish Forces and war-time Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski (aged 62) on the 4th July 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s It contains a memorial to Poland’s exiled war leader, General  Sikorski who died when the aeroplane he was travelling in crashed over Gibraltar on the 4th July 1943.

     General Sikorski was so impressed with the care of the War graves at Newark Cemetery UK  his requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark.

    Until Poland was once again a free Country.

    15th July 1941

    General Wladyslaw Sikorski visited Newark Cemetery to unveil a Memorial Cross dedicated to Polish servicemen who had died fighting alongside the British. He was so impressed with the care of the War graves and requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark Cemetery UK until his Country was free once again.

    Memorial At Newark Cemetery Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

    Inscription

    (On Plinth) Za Wolnosc – For Freedom 1940 – 1945/

    (On Front Of Cross) To The Memory Of Fallen Polish Airmen/ I Have Fought A Good

    Fight, I Have Finished My Course,

    I Have Kept The Faith

    Physical Description

    These Very Tall Latin Cross, Decorated With 12 Cross And Polish Eagle Devices On The Front Face. On Two Stage

    Plinth Time to emphasized the Heroism, Bravery, Valour and Determination for our Freedom. We must not forget the Polish Airman and the Commonwealth they fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch. They fought to the end and then carried on the fight, we should be grateful. We certainly owe them a great deal of credit that they so rightly deserve.

    For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

    General Wladyslaw Sikorski. 4th July 2013 will mark the 70th anniversary of his death,  we should

    Remember him

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This can be viewed at Newark Cemetery former chapel by appointment, Laurence Goff 07794613879

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Flying over Newark On Trent for our Freedom

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Taken By Laurencegoff

By Laurencegoff

Flying over Newark Cemetery at the annual Warsaw Air Bridge Memorial Service

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Generał Władysław Sikorski w połowie 1943 roku obserwował pogarszającą się pozycję swojego rządu a tym samym sprawy polskiej. Musiał także dochodzić do wniosku, że sojusznicy zachodni marginalizują rolę Polski i niekoniecznie staną w obronie jej interesów, gdyż na Związku Radzieckim spoczywał olbrzymi ciężar działań wojennych. Premier opowiadał się podobnie jak inni członkowie rządu za nienaruszalnością polskiej granicy wschodniej i nie był skłonny do ustępstw terytorialnych na rzecz ZSRR. Podejmowane przez niego działania, w tym wyjazd na przełomie 1942/1943 roku do Stanów Zjednoczonych i spotkanie z prezydentem Rooseveltem również nie przyczyniło się do wsparcia rządu polskiego.

W maju 1943 roku rozpoczęła się podróż inspekcyjna naczelnego wodza generała Władysława Sikorskiego na Bliski Wschód. Jej celem było przede wszystkim wytłumaczenie polityki rządu i uspokojenie wrzenia w korpusie oficerskim, związanego z brakiem zdecydowanego przeciwdziałania polityce ZSRR na forum międzynarodowym. Dokonana inspekcja w ocenie generała i jego otoczenia przyniosła pozytywne rezultaty i załagodziła konflikty wśród kadry oficerskiej.

W drodze powrotnej premier i naczelny wódz generał Władysław Sikorski w dniu 3 lipca 1943 roku wylądował na lotnisku w Gibraltarze, skąd miał udać się do Wielkiej Brytanii. 4 lipca 1943 roku samolot B – 24 Liberator, którym leciał generał uległ katastrofie. Zginęli wszyscy podróżujący nim pasażerowie i część załogi. Jedyną osobą, która ocalała był pilot. Okoliczności katastrofy budzą wątpliwości do dzisiaj i dają powód do wysuwania różnych hipotez dotyczących śmierci generała.

Zwłoki generała przewieziono na pokładzie polskiego niszczyciela z Gibraltaru do Wielkiej Brytanii. Po kilkudniowych uroczystościach żałobnych pogrzeb generała Władysława Sikorskiego odbył się w dniu 16 VII 1943 roku na cmentarzu polskich lotników wojskowych w Newark.

W dniu 17 XI 1993 roku prochy generał sprowadzono do Polski i pochowano je w krypcie św. Leonarda na Wawelu.

 

  • Polish and Commonwealth War Graves  Newark On Trent

 Za wolnosc nasza i wasza / For our freedom and yours

 Newark Cemetery

London Road

Newark

NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery Is Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm

October – March 8am-6pm

For over 150 years since 1856

The Amazing Spitfire Flying For Our Freedom

Sikorski Lying in state

Lest We Forget

General Wladyslaw Sikorski

 4th July 2013 will mark the 70th anniversary of his death,  we should Remember him

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski

Our remembrance for Poland’s War hero

Lest We Forget

 4th July 1943 – 2013

Let’s mark the 70th anniversary of his death

  Remember him, RIP

Polish War Graves

The highest concentration of commemorations can be particularly found in Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire.  Our local cemetery with nearly 400 Polish Airmen that died, and are buried in special plot on the east side. You can park for free at the Main Gate parking lot at Newark Cemetery, It is location on London Road – Elm Avenue,

Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

 

Laurencegoff

General Wladyslaw Sikorski Our remembrance for Poland’s War hero, 4th July 1943 – 2013 the 70th of his death http://www.panoramio.com/photo/102974365 

Sikorski Close is located near the Newark Castle Railway Station housing estate

Sikorski Close Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1FD

British Commonwealth and Polish War Graves located in Newark-On-Trent

Newark Cemetery

London Road

Newark

NG24 1SQ

Newark Cemetery Is Open all year round

 April – September 8am-8pm

October – March 8am-6pm

The Act Of Commemoration, Honouring The Memory As Our Fitting Tribute To Them

 

Statue of General Sikorski Portland Place, London – Erection of this Statue To The Former Commander-in-Chief  Of The Polish Armed Forces and  Prime Minster Of Poland

 General Sikorski Commander-in-Chief  Of The Polish Armed Forces and  Prime Minster Of Poland

 

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Ministry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsMinistry of DefenceMinistry of DefencePoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Sikorski Close

 

Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1FD

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 Our Beautiful and Historic Newark Cemetery

Newark

NG24 1SQ

Main Gates off London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire

For over 150 years since 1856

We Will Remember Them

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

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Commonwealth and Polish Air Force

We are paying tribute to the gallant  men and women, both civilian and military, who gave their lives in World War II in the cause of freedom. 

When you receive this, please stop for a moment and if you are so inclined, feel free to say a prayer for our troops in the trouble spots around the world.

 We Will Remember Them

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Air Bridge

WWII victims remembered at  Polish War Memorial at Newark Cemetery

For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

 1940 some 8,400 Polish airmen were evacuated to the United Kingdom, which they now called Wyspa Ostatniej Nadziei or “The Island of Last Hope.” We are paying tribute to the gallant Polish men and women, both civilian and military, who gave their lives in World War II in the cause of freedom.

Lest We Forget

The United Kingdom, also have over 2,100 Polish War dead, we here in Newark Cemetery have 397 since 1947 and more use Newark as their rest place to the present day. Polish died are also commemorated in 244 different locations. Our lasting tribute, is a time to remember them for their  heroism, bravery, valour and determination for freedom.  Let’s remember them by paying our tribute to them and for their contribution during the 2nd World War.

For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

 

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/04/17/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/07/07/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

 http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/07/17/304-polish-bomber-squadron-sodn-during-the-2nd-world-war-that-are-buried-at-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

Giant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flagPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsGiant flag

For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

Lukasz Lutostański Polish Consul General in Manchester and  Father Krzysztof Kawczynski from the Polish Church, Nottingham

Newark Cemetery

A Memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and unveiled on 15th July 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander in Chief of the Polish Forces and war-time Prime Minister. General Wladyslaw Sikorski visited Newark Cemetery to unveil a Memorial Cross dedicated to Polish servicemen who had died fighting alongside the British. He was so impressed with the care of the War graves and requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark Cemetery UK until his Country was free once again.

 When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski (aged 62) on the 4th July 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s It contains a memorial to Poland’s exiled war leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski, who died when the aeroplane he was travelling in crashed over Gibraltar on the 4th July 1943.

General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Prime Minister of Poland’s London-based government in exile was killed on the 4th July 1943. 2013 will be his 70th Anniversary of his death, let’s use Remember him next year in Newark and around the World.

Laurencegoff

General Sikorski Cap

http://www.thenma.org.uk

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  1. http://www.britishlegion.org.uk/news-events/news/national…   Cached

    We will remember them. … Polish Armed Forces Memorial at the National MemorialArboretum … at the National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire, …

  2. polishforcesmemorial.com/index.php?option=com_content&…   Cached

    The Polish Armed Forces Memorial at the … this memory and remember them on these pages, symbolically in the National Memorial Arboretum and …

  3. Polish Forces War Memorial:National Memorial Arboretum …

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_Forces_War_Memorial:…   Cached

    The National Memorial Arboretum near Lichfield, Staffordshire, England, …

  4. National Memorial Arboretum – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Memorial_Arboretum   Cached

    The National Memorial Arboretum … designed to remember those who have served in the Brigade … the contribution made by Polish service men and women …

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Polish armoured Forces 

The National Memorial Arboretum honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world.

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

Laurencegoff

Polish armoured Forces, Staffordshire

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The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

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The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

info@thenma.org.uk

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

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Laurencegoff 

Brave Polish that come over during the 2nd world war. We are grateful for you helping

out at our time of need

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Thanks to the Polish during 2nd world war

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Polish Memorial, are Remembered at National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

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Laurence Goff uplifting visit

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

info@thenma.org.uk

http://www.thenma.org.uk/

Friends Of Newark Cemetery

Will be organizing a Coach Trip Wednesday 28th May 2014 

From Newark On Trent to The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

  Cost Adult £10  Children £7  Family  special reduce rate Tickets  2 Adults  and 2 Children Cost £32. The National Memorial Arboretum Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

Travel Wright Ltd,  Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 2AG. 

Leaving 9.00am – 9.15pm arriving by 11am  leaving at  4.30pm returning to Newark at  6pm. 

 First pickup points at 9.00am The  Friendly Farmer Restaurant

 Located next to the Shell Petrol Station The A46, A17, A1 Roundabout,  Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 2NY. Restaurant open at 8am for Breakfast or a cuppa, free parking.

Another pickup at 9.15am Holy Trinity RC School, Boundary Road, Newark NG24 4AU

Tickets will be on sale in the next few weeks at Newark Town Hall, Market PlaceReception

 01636 680333.  Catch the Buttermarket  elevator on the right to 2nd floor from

 

 9.30am – 4pm Monday – Friday.

 

For more information

 

Laurence Goff 01636-681878 Mobile 07794613879

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

www.thenma.org.uk

 The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire, an uplifting visit for all ages

Honours the fallen all year round

 

Laurencegoff

This is a privately owned and maintained, not-for-profit, website which is supported privately, the content here is solely the responsibility of Laurence Goff. As a fitting tribute to the people who resting place is at Newark cemetery. The views expressed our solely my own and do not reflect  Newark Town Council.

I have been walking around Newark cemetery since  2004. In 2005 we set up a group Friends Of Newark Cemetery, I have been Chairman since 2010. I had an opportunity to have a blog for the last four years and I have had 29,500 visit across the UK, and the World. Many kind words which I really enjoy and appreciate from people that have contacted me. It has intrigues me, something that makes me want to look into who is buried and history going back to 1856, which has been fascinating.

 

 The next meeting will be held at Newark Town Hall at 6:00pm on Wednesday 5th March 2014

Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery will only open by appointment for groups on weekends .

 by Contact the Chairman Laurence Goff  01636-681878 or 07794613879 or leave a message at Newark Town Hall 01636-0333 or by Email: friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk  

We  need to found more Volunteers to welcome visits to Newark Cemetery by  showing around our exhibition, serving refreshments giving tours or help 

locate a grave for visits.

All Souls Ceremony of homage and remembrance will be held on Sunday 26th October  2014 at 3pm at Newark Cemetery at the Main Gate on London Road Newark to the war memorial

There are Polish war graves here from WWII  – and General Sikorski was buried here during his country’s occupation, his

 remains being finally repatriated in 1993.

Lest We Forget

Newark’s annual All Souls Day Ceremony takes place on Sunday 26th October 2014, 3pm  at Newark Cemetery, and the cemetery’s Chapel Interpretation Centre will be open before and after service.

This event is organised by the Polish Air Force Association and will be held in the Commonwealth War Graves Section of the cemetery.

The Procession of the Collegiate Body, led by the Standard, will begin the ceremony, after which wreaths will be laid, and tea lights will be lit on each of the graves.

The Interpretation Centre will be open before and after the ceremony. Also after the ceremony, guests are invited back to Newark Town Hall for light refreshments.

The ceremony marks the end of the season for the Interpretation Centre with its exhibits and photographs of local casualties in successive wars. During the autumn and winter months the centre will be open only by appointment for groups. Anyone interested should contact  Laurence Goff, chair of the Friends of Newark Cemetery, on 01636 681878.

The next meeting of the Friends of Newark Cemetery takes place at Newark Town Hall in the Pickin Room on Tuesday 28th January 2014 at 2.00pm.

• Pic of Newark Cemetery by Laurence Goff

http://www.newarknotts.co.uk/all-souls-day-ceremony-of-homage-and-remembrance/

The United Kingdom, also have over 2,100 Polish War dead that are also commemorated in 244 different locations. Our lasting tribute, is a time to remember them for their  heroism, bravery, valour and determination for freedom.  Let’s remember them by paying our tribute to them and for their contribution during the 2nd World War.

Dakota flies in for Newark Air Bridge ceremony

A Dakota from the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight flew three times over Newark Cemetery during the annual Air Bridge Commemoration Service will be held on 4th Sunday  2pm ( 28th September 2014), reports Laurence Goff.

The annual Air Bridge Service is held to commemorate the casualties stemming from the 1944 Warsaw Uprising during World War II, resulting in the Polish Government in exile in London appealing to Winston Churchill for assistance. Help came when the Allies decided to fly in food and munitions to the Polish Partisans or Home Army, but the help was delivered at enormous cost, hence the commemorations which continue to this day.

The open-air service used to be organised by the Airbridge Association but has now been taken on by Newark Town Council, as survivors from that era grow fewer.

Some 250 airmen from Britain and the Commonwealth died during the perilous Air Bridge operation. Visitors from Poland and all over the UK attend the service and lay wreaths. Mayor of Newark are among those who laid a wreath in memory of the airman who lost their lives on the mission.

 • Pic: Dakota over Newark, taken by town resident Laurence Goff.

 

Annual Air Bridge  

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Chapel Interpretation Centre (East side turn left at the Main Arch) Newark Cemetery {Location walk from the parking lot to the main Arch turn left red side door} Organised by The Friends of Newark Cemetery

Open  by appointment for groups for our exhibition – tours on Monday and Tuesday – weekends, Please give plenty of notice

New volunteers are welcome For more information

Laurence Goff

Chairman

Friends of Newark Cemetery

Newark Town Hall/Market Place

Newark-on-Trent NG24 1DU

01636-681878 (home)

The Friends of Newark Cemetery will open The Chapel Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery,  by appointment for groups. Historical walks or help by locating families/casualties both in Newark Cemetery. Friends of Newark Cemetery Volunteers will give assistance members of the public with display of history of well know people that are buried here. Come and see what you will find

At Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery. We will have volunteers on site from Friends of Newark Cemetery

15th July 1941

General Wladyslaw Sikorski visited Newark Cemetery to unveil a Memorial Cross dedicated to Polish servicemen who had died fighting alongside the British. He was so impressed with the care of the War graves and requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark Cemetery UK until his Country was free once again.

 

Memorial At Newark Cemetery Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

Inscription

(On Plinth) Za Wolnosc – For Freedom 1940 – 1945/

(On Front Of Cross) To The Memory Of Fallen Polish Airmen/ I Have Fought A Good

Fight, I Have Finished My Course,

I Have Kept The Faith

Physical Description

These Very Tall Latin Cross, Decorated With 12 Cross And Polish Eagle Devices On The Front Face. On Two Stage

Plinth Time to emphasized the Heroism, Bravery, Valour and Determination for our Freedom. We must not forget the Polish Airman and the Commonwealth they fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch. They fought to the end and then carried on the fight, we should be grateful. We certainly owe them a great deal of credit that they so rightly deserve.

Annual Air Bridge Sunday 28th September 2014, 2pm Commemoration Service of Remembrance at Newark Cemetery is dedicated to preserving their Memory

All Souls Day Ceremony of Remembrance organised by the Polish Air Force Association, will take place in the Commonwealth War Graves section of Newark Cemetery on Sunday 26th October 2014, 3pm.

 The procession will take place from the Main Gate located on London Road, Newark-On-Trent at 3pm to the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves.

Held on the last Sunday in October, Polish Airmen who gave their lives in the 2nd World War are remembered at the All Souls ceremony in Newark, England. Let’s pay tribute to the gallant Polish men and women, both civilian and military, who gave their lives in World War II in the cause of freedom.

General Sikorski was one of the great Polish heroes. After the German invasion of Poland, he became the Prime Minister of a new Polish Government in exile, and also Commander in Chief of the Polish Armed Forces, which fought with the Allies by land, sea and air throughout the Second World War. But he also personally directed Poland’s internal resistance movement against the German occupying army in Poland itself. He was thus Political leader, military leader and resistance leader, all at the same time. He was the personal embodiment of the whole Polish Nation’s fight for survival as a free nation and as a people, and liberation from the terrible oppression to which they had become subject. It is little wonder then that this man was so loved and respected by his people, and that they continue to revere and honour his memory to this day. As British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill said in his tribute to General Sikorski in the House of Commons, ‘he was truly the symbol and embodiment of that spirit which has borne the Polish nation through the centuries.’ General Sikorski was also very active in World politics at that time, attending many political conferences with the allies and was, indeed, one of the Architects of the United Nations. Churchill described his death as ‘a most grievous loss to the cause of the United Nations.’ And so it was as Commander in Chief of the Free Polish Forces that General Sikorski left England on 24th May 1943 onboard an RAF Liberator Aircraft bound for Cairo to visit Polish Troops fighting with the Allies in North Africa. On his return from Cairo, his Liberator aircraft touched down at Gibraltar, just as it had done on the way out to Cairo. General Sikorski was accompanied by his daughter Zofia, who was also Chief of the Polish Womens Auxiliary. The Party also included the Polish military Chief Of Staff and Chief of Operations, and their support staff. They arrived at Gibraltar on Saturday 3rd July at 6.37p.m. Their aircraft, the same Liberator, took off from Gibraltar airport at 11p.m. the next day, Sunday 4th July 1943 on the final leg of General Sikorskis return journey from Cairo to London. The aeroplane crashed seconds after take-off, just off the eastern end of the runway. General Sikorski, his daughter and all his party perished. General Sikorski’s body lay in State for several days at the Cathedral of St Mary the Crowned on Main Street, until a Polish warship could reach Gibraltar to take it to the UK for burial. On arrival at the Cathedral entrance the street was crowded with Gibraltarian men (their wives, children and parents had been evacuated from Gibraltar during the war) who wanted to show their respect to this courageous Polish hero. The then Bishop of Gibraltar celebrated a requiem mass in the Cathedral before the mortal remains of General Sikorski and his party were transferred to the Polish destroyer ‘Orkan’. General Sikorski was buried in Newark Cemetery in England. His grave became a shrine to free Poles throughout the world whose view was that the General’s remains should never be returned to Poland while the country was under foreign domination. It was therefore not until the fall of the Berlin Wall and the liberation of Eastern Europe from Soviet domination not until 13th September 1993, his remains were disinterred and flown to Warsaw to be re-interred in a special crypt in Wawel Cathedral which lies inside the walls of the ancient castle, traditional burial place of Polish Kings.

 The body of the General was laid to rest in the newly established Polish Cemetery at Newark, Nottinghamshire.  The pilot, Flt. Lt. Edward Prchal of the Czechoslovakian Air Force, was the only survivor. The body of General Sikorski’s daughter, Zofia, Chief of the Polish Women’s Auxiliary, was never found.

His cap and uniform, recovered from the sea at the site of the crash, is displayed in the Sikorski Museum, in the Polish Institute at 20, Princess Gate, London.

General Wladyslaw Sikorski 1881-1943, 13th Sept 1993 his remains was exhumed from Newark Cemetery. On the same day his coffin stay overnight, at Newark Parish Church.

14th September 1993 The next day had a farewell high Mass.

These took place at Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene.

On 13-14 September 1993, at Newark Parish Church,

Laurencegoff

St Mary Magdalene. These being a farewell High Mass before he left Newark for the last time after the service, on his a home to Poland. He was buried in Newark Cemetery from 1943-1993.

 

Polish War Graves

The highest concentration of commemorations can be particularly found in Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire.  Our local cemetery with nearly 400 Polish Airmen that died, and are buried in special plot on the east side. You can park for free at the Main Gate parking lot at Newark Cemetery, It is location on London Road – Elm Avenue,

Newark, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

 

General Sikorski was buried at Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July, 1943. On 13th September 1993 his remains were taken from Newark Cemetery and taken over night at St. Mary Magdalene (Newark parish church)  a Catholic service (Mass) was held  the  next day. On 14th September 1993 remains re-turn home to Poland after 50 years resting in Newark Cemetery.

General Wladyslaw Sikorski Farewell Mass Held At Newark Parish Church 14th September 1993 Be Re-turning Home To Poland

November 2010

The bodies of three Polish Army officers who died in the plane crash on 4th July 1943 that were killed together with their country’s wartime leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski, are to be exhumed from Newark Cemetery. The Ministry of Defence has agreed that the bodies can be removed from the Polish war graves section. The remains were taken to London and on to Poland with full military honours for a post mortem examination.

The bodies are those of the Chief of the Polish General Staff, Major General Tadeusz Klimecki; the Chief of Operation Staff, Colonel Andrzej Marecki; and Lieutenant Jozef Ponikiwski.  They died with General Sikorski whwith full military honours for a post mortem examination.

en his RAF Liberator plunged into the sea after taking off from Gibraltar on 4th July, 1943. General Sikorski’s remains were exhumed from Newark Cemetery in 1993 and taken back to Poland where he is now buried in the Hall of Kings in Wawel Cathedral.

MoD approves exhumation of Polish soldiers to solve mystery of General Sikorski’s death – Telegraph

http://t.co/Iw1qQJw

laurencegoff

Lieutenant Jozef Ponikiewski Naval A.D.C. Major General Tadeusz Klimecki Chief of the Polish General Staff 4.Colonel Andrzej Marecki Chief of Operations Staff

Lieutenant Ponikiwski will be reburied in the Roman Catholic churchyard at Oporowo, Poland, and the two others will be reburied in the Powazki Military Cemetery in Warsaw. A wartime inquiry ruled that the crash was an accident but there have long been rumours that there was more to it. Conspiracy theories include suggestions that the accident was the work of Stalin’s assassins or British agents working under Churchill’s orders. A post mortem was carried out on General Sikorski’s body again in November, 2008 following suggestions that he may have been poisoned before take-off. It confirmed that the remains were those of the general and that he had died from injuries consistent with a plane crash. Post mortems are planned to see if the other officers suffered similar injuries.

Passengers 17 in total

1.

General Władysław Sikorski

Prime Minister and Commander-in-Chief of Poland

2.

Zofia Leśniowska

Chief of the Polish Women’s Auxiliary

3.

Major General Tadeusz Klimecki

Chief of the Polish General Staff

4.

Colonel Andrzej Marecki

Chief of Operations Staff

5.

Lieutenant Jozef Ponikiewski

Naval A.D.C.

6.

Adam Kulakowski

Personal secretary to Sikorski

7.

Colonel Victor Cazalet

M.P., British Liason Officer

8.

Brigadier J.P. Whitely

M.P.

9.

Mr. W.H. Lock

(Never found, presumed dead)

10.

Mr. Pinder

Head of British Intelligence Service in the Middle East (his position was never revealed to General Sikorski)

11.

Bombardier Gralewski

(Joined the party at Gibraltar)

Crew:

1.

1Lt Edward Maks Prchal

Captain/1st Pilot

2.

Squadron Leader W.S. Herring

2nd Pilot (never found)

3.

Warrant Officer L. Zalsberg

Navigator

4.

Sergeant F. Kelly

Flight Engineer

5.

Flight Sergeant C.B. Gerrie

Radio Operator/Air Gunner

6.

Flight Sergeant D. Hunder

Radio Operator/Air Gunner (never found)

There are over 39,000 graves going back to the first one in 1856

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Wartime Newark

Refugees

Prior to the Second World War, the civil authorities decided that Newark would not be a main target for the Luftwaffe. Sheffield, Hull, Derby and Birmingham were considered more likely targets. As a result wardens visited Newark and the surrounding villages for an evacuation census. If you had bedrooms empty, then this was noted.

Plans were therefore in place as early as January 1939, nine months prior to the commencement of war, for the evacuation of 5000 Sheffield children. In March 1939, Jewish refugees from Austria were housed in Spring Gardens as guests of the Newark Committee for Refugees.

The first evacuees from Sheffield arrived in September 1939. When the children and sometimes their mothers arrived in Newark they were auctioned off to whichever householder liked the look of them. Brothers and sisters were often split up adding to the upset of being in a strange town.

It was not surprising then, when Sheffield was not bombed in the early months of the war that the evacuees went back home. Some Newark children were sent to Canada for safety, but this was stopped when a boat carrying 13 Newark children was torpedoed in September 1940. Fortunately all were rescued. As more refugees arrived in the town they were, on their first night, billeted in the Town Hall, the High School for girls, the Technical College and the Tudor Hall. The next morning after sleeping on palliasses and blankets, they were given a breakfast provided by the WVS and then allocated to various houses. Later in the war more evacuees arrived from Worthing, Great Yarmouth and London.

During 1940, purpose built brick blast and splinter proof shelters were constructed. They offered protection against shrapnel but would not withstand a direct hit. These above ground shelters could accommodate 850 people. Some of the shelters proved attractive to young courting couples and in May 1941, The Newark Advertiser reported that ”Many of them are being used for purposes for which they were never intended. They have become resorts for men and women seeking the shadowy seclusion for doubtful conduct.” Large numbers of electric light bulbs were also being stolen from the shelters.

Since Newark was considered unlikely to be bombed, no steel was allocated to Newark in 1939 – 1940 to build Anderson corrugated iron shelters. In the main Newarkers were expected to take refuge either under the stairs or in their cellar. In 1942 Morrison shelters were made available free of charge to residents earning less than 350 pounds per annum. These were strong flat indoor shelters that could also be used as tables. Anderson corrugated shelters were also available for those wishing to build one in their garden. Mothers were advised to make gas proof rooms in their homes by hanging blankets around the doors and blocking off fireplaces. They were instructed by the Chief Constable of Newark (also head of ARP) not to panic whatever happened. Sounds like Captain Mainwaring of Dads Army. If paratroopers landed they should inform the police immediately and if there was an invasion they should carry on as normal until informed otherwise. Because the main air raid shelters were in the center of town, anyone caught outdoors in the outskirts were advised to knock on someone’s door to seek refuge in the householders air raid protection area.

Blackouts had begun on 1st September 1939 and this meant that during the hours of darkness all lights had to be extinguished or protected sufficiently in order not to be of any help to enemy aircraft. All car headlights had to be masked so that they were only a fraction of their normal brightness. Pavement edges and mudguards were panted white to aid motorists driving in darkness but it was very dangerous to be a pedestrian. In the first months of the war you were more likely to be hurt on the road because of blackout restrictions than by enemy action. In June 1940, 12 householders were each fined 20 shillings for blackout offenses. 18 months later the Newark Advertiser reported offences including lighting bonfires, incorrect use of cycle lights and reflectors and car lights not being properly masked.

Months before the war began, appeals were made for Volunteers for ARP (Air Raid Precautions) personnel. Newark’s first air raid alarm was sounded in the early hours of September 4th 1939, but this was a false alarm.

On Friday, 7th March 1941, Ransome and Marles bearing factory was bombed. This was the most notable incident of enemy action in the town. The type of work carried out at the factory made it an obvious target for the Germans. It was shortly after 1pm, the sirens had already sounded, when there was a rattle of machine gun fire and the drone of an aircraft engine. Visibility was bad, but people in the streets suddenly saw the raider, an Heinkel 111 bomber, dive through the low clouds and almost immediately release 4 bombs. Two of these landed in the works, one on the road at the side of the factory, and one on an air raid shelter adjacent to Stanley Street. One of the witnesses was Mike Wright age 4 years. There was a constant chatter of machine gun fire from both the raider and the defenders, until the plane reached the sanctuary of the clouds.

No time was lost by the Civil Defence services in getting to the scene of the bombing. Rescue workers were soon busy extricating survivors and those killed. Within an hour, and whilst the rescue work was still going on, there was another alert and a second raider, it may have thefirst returning, dropped 5 more bombs but only one exploded. As a result of the raid 30 men and 10 women were killed and more than 165 injured. More than 100 of these were treated in the works own underground hospital. After the raid the two paired Lewis guns which were mounted in sand-bagged positions on Clay Lane were replaced by a Bofors 40 mm anti aircraft gun mounted on a proper gun platform. Fortunately, the town was not attacked again.

Mr Chris Grant at the grave of his father, who was killed in the bombing of Ransome and Marles. 070313MW8-6

 Mr Chris Grant a former Newark Town Mayor at the grave of his father, who was killed in the bombing of Ransome and Marles.
  • On March 7, 1941, several bombs were dropped on Ransome and Marles — now NSK. A total of 41 civilians, 30 men and 11 women, were killed.

In 1992 a plaque was unveiled in a garden in the centre of the works in memory of those who were killed, one of whom was Chris Grants father.

Evidence of air raid precautions, in the form of camouflage at Ransome and Marles may still be seen today on a wall of the old toolroom, and a damaged purlin in the roof of the old carpenters shop is the only evidence of where an unexploded bomb fell. With the removal of censorship restrictions in October 1944, it was possible for the Newark Advertiser to reveal the number of casualties during air raids on Newark. Apart from the principle attack on Ransome and Marles (NSK), The air raid warning was sounded 283 times and there incidents on 7 occasions, 5 of which were in the first months of 1941. In all 43 people were killed and 66 injured. In all raids over 60 incendiary bombs and 39 high explosives fell on the town. Some damage was caused to 187 houses but none were rendered inhabitable.

In August 1941, a British bomber crashed onto a house in London Road, Balderton and burst into flames. Two of the crew and 6 children who were asleep in the house were killed. Their mother just managed to escape with one of her sons. Their father who was working on the railway saw the crash and thought that it was near his home but carried on working until his shift finished a 6pm.

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The Canada goose was visiting Newark Cemetery .

Taken by Laurencegoff

 

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

The annual Air Bridge Commemorati

Newark Town Mayor Councillor Irene Brown at The service remembers those who died during the Air Bridge Operations when Britain and the Commonwealth

 forces answered a plea for help from the Polish Government in Exile to drop supplies to the Polish secret army which was striking back against the enemy. The service remembers the 250 airmen who lost their lives during the Air Bridge operations, which helped the Warsaw uprising in 1944. — at Newark on Trent.

on Service at Newark Cemetery is to be held on the last  Sunday  September

each year at 2pm parade starting from the Main Gate on London Road, Newark to the Air Bridge Memorial.

 The annual Air Bridge Commemoration Service at Newark Cemetery is to be held on 4th Sunday September (22nd 2013 at 2pm from the Main Gate on London Road, Newark

The service is held in remembrance of the casualties stemming from the 1944 Warsaw Uprising, resulting in the Polish Government in exile in London appealing to Winston Churchill for assistance. Help came when the Allies decided to fly in food and munitions to the Polish Partisans or Home Army, but the help was delivered at enormous cost, hence the commemorations which continue to this day.

After many discussions with the Allied Command and getting no help from Russia, who refused even to grant permission for Allied aircraft to land in Russia, Churchill ordered relief to be flown to Warsaw from Italy.

He was told by General Durrant that an airlift of 2000 miles there and back would have no hope of success, in that the loss of aircraft flying over occupied territory would be tremendous. Although Churchill agreed with him, he nevertheless ordered the operation to proceed. The operation was called “Warsaw Concerto”.

The task was allocated to 205 group, of which RAF

Squadrons 148 and 178, SAAF 31 and 34 squadrons and Polish Special Services Flight 1586 were part. The losses were horrendous: for every ton of supplies delivered and recovered by the Polish insurgents one aircraft was lost (39 four-engine bombers in total).

The Air Bridge Commemoration Service follows the 72nd Battle of Britain Memorial Ceremony to be held on Sunday 9th September 2012 at the War Memorial outside Newark Parish Church at 10.55am, followed by the Battle of Britain Memorial Service inside Church just after 11am.

This annual service commemorates the remarkable victory, and loss of life, by Royal Air Force pilots and aircrew during the Battle of Britain in 1940 and is an occasion to mark the nation’s gratitude for the service and sacrifice of those who took part in this critical phase of World War Two.

The Battle of Britain was the first major campaign to be fought entirely in the skies. When the Battle of Britain was over, 544 Allied pilots and aircrew were dead. The conflict also brought together a truly multinational force comprising 574 British, 139 Poles, 98 New Zealanders, 86 Canadians, 84 Czechoslovakians, 29 Belgians, 21 Australians, 20 South Africans, 13 French, 10 Irish plus others from the USA, Jamaica, Palestine and Southern Rhodesia.

The monument, located up the Main Drive to the over end on Newark Cemetery

Annual Air Bridge

The joy of seeing the flypast at Newark Cemetery of a Dakota from the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight during an annual Ceremony to commemorate the 1944 Warsaw Uprising.

Sunday 28rd September 2014 ”tremendously important”

2pm Procession to the Air Bridge Memorial up the Main Drive at Newark Cemetery

The Polish Air Bridge Monument in Newark

The Air Bridge Monument in Newark remembers the aircrew who died during world war two, supporting the popular uprising in Warsaw of 1944. The uprising badly needed the support of the allies to provide food and munitions to the Polish Partisans, resulting in the Polish

Government in London appealing to Churchill for assistance. After many discussions with the Allied Command and no help from Russia (they refused to grant permission for allied aircraft to land there) Churchill was told that an airlift of 2000 miles there and back would have no hope of success – the loss of aircraft flying over occupied territory would be to large. Although Churchill agreed, he nevertheless ordered the operation to be proceeded. The task was allocated to 205 group, of which RAF Squadrons 148 and 178, SAAF 31 and 34 squadrons and Polish Special Services Flight 1586 were part. The losses were horrendous, for every ton of supplies delivered and recovered by the Polish insurgents one aircraft was lost (39 four-engine bombers total). The operation was called “Warsaw Concerto”.

 

Annual Airmen honoured the service remembers at Newark Cemetery on Sunday 28th September 2014 at 2pm. Let’s remember those who died during the Air bridge Operations when Britain and the Commonwealth forces answered a plea for help from the Polish Government in Exile to drop supplies to the Polish secret army which was striking back against the enemy.

This event is held at Newark Cemetery, at a special memorial near to the Polish War Graves, organised by Newark Town Council.  The service remembers the 250 airmen who lost their lives during the Air Bridge operations, which helped the Warsaw uprising in 1944. People from Poland and all over the country attend and wreaths are laid.

We will Remember them

You will found this memorial plaque which is located up high on the wall of Natwest Bank Stodman Street, Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire Memorial plaque reads

Dedicated to the thousands of men and women of many nations on the nearby airfields and walked and enjoyed these ancient Streets of Newark during the war years 1939 – 1945.

In the morn they came and passed a few quiet hours. In the evening twilight their aircraft in countless numbers circled above the town and surrounding countryside. Climbing higher and higher. In the blackness of the night they fought and died. Remember them as you pass by. These brave young men who fell from the sky. 55,573 Airmen died in the night skies over Europe. May have graves known only to God.

Site Given by

The National westminster Bank Plc

Erected by Bomber Airfield Society

Plaaque donated by Mr and Mrs Tony Wilkinson

Photo taken by Laurencegoff


Spitfire flying over Newark

 

Photo taken by Laurencegoff

Spitfire flying over Newark each year on Battle of Britain day of Remember

Annual All Souls, 26th Sunday October 2014, 3pm

Held at  the British Commonwealth and Polish war graves at Newark Cemetery at 3pm. We welcome visitors from Newark, Nottinghamshire and across Poland the UK and the Commonwealth.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Photo taken by Laurencegoff

Photo taken by Laurencegoff

The Valiant Contribution made by the Commonwealth and Polish Airmen for protection of our country freedom.The Newark Town Council are particularly proud to be the custodian of the Memorial  to General Wladyslaw Sikorski

General Sikorski and number of his staff, including his daughter, were killed when their plane, a Liberator, crashed seconds after take off from Gibraltar, en-route to England, on July 4, 1943.

Passengers 17 in total

  • General Władysław Sikorski Prime Minister andCommander-in-Chief of Poland

Zofia Leśniowska Chief of the Polish Women’s Auxiliary

Major General Tadeusz Klimecki Chief of the Polish General Staff

Colonel Andrzej Marecki Chief of Operations Staff

 Lieutenant Jozef Ponikiewski Naval A.D.C.

Adam Kulakowski Personal secretary to Sikorski

Colonel Victor Cazalet M.P., British Liason Officer

 Brigadier J.P. Whitely M.P.

Mr. W.H. Lock (Never found, presumed dead)

Mr. Pinder Head of British Intelligence Service in the Middle East (his position was never revealed to General Sikorski)

Bombardier Gralewski (Joined the party at Gibraltar)

Crew:

 1 Lt Edward Maks PrchalCaptain/1st Pilot

Squadron Leader W.S. Herring2nd Pilot (never found)

Warrant Officer L. Zalsberg Navigator

Sergeant F. Kelly Flight Engineer

Flight Sergeant C.B. Gerrie Radio Operator/Air Gunner

Flight Sergeant D. Hunder Radio Operator/Air Gunner (never found)

RIP

AL523.jpg AL523 image by liberator_2008

General Wladyslaw Sikorski

 Plane crash we remembrance the Poland’s War hero, Lest We Forget 4th July 1943

Pat Alexander

Honorary president of the Friends of Newark Cemetery

www.newarkadvertiser.co.uk

 

Newark cemetery

For over 150 years since 1856

Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire

Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm, October – March 8am-6pm 

Newark Cemetery can boast of having lot’s of impressive people that are buried in our Cemetery since 1856. An  to the present day. You can found an array of famous inhabitants that  are buried in Newark.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  October – March 8am – 6pm

Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm

  

Locating a grave have a look at this Map, walking up the Main Drive numbers start low and high at the other end of  cemetery. Please note E side stand for East and W side for West . The graves are numbered from A the next one will be B, C, D, E, and so on going outward on either side East or West. All new tombstone are black with the information on the back has  E for East then the letter for the row then the number, looking something like this E B 100 or West side W E 200.

 For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

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For all the men who gave their lives so bravely, for our country during the 2nd World War, so many volunteered from The Commonwealth from The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) The Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) The Royal New Zealand Air Force, Polish Airmen fighter pilots served in the RAF during the Battle of Britain. 1940 some 8,400 Polish airmen were evacuated to the United Kingdom, which they now called Wyspa Ostatniej Nadzieior “The Island of Last Hope.”

Za wolnosc nasza i wasza /For our freedom and yours

   General Sikorski Will Live Forever In Our Hearts.

RIP

Display of Photos of History of General Sikorski and Polish Exhibition  

Deputy Consulate General  of the Republic of Poland Grzegorz Dyk From Manchester UK with Newark Deputy Town Mayor Councillor Irene Brown {elected Mayor 13th May 2012} Visiting Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery Family History Day.

Laurencegoff

 The Friends Of Newark Cemetery next meeting will be held at  2.00pm to be held at Newark Town Hall on Tuesday 28th January 2014 arrive for a cuppa at 1.45pm

Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery will only open by appointment for groups on weekends .

 Contact the Chairman Laurence Goff  01636-681878 or 07794613879 or leave a message at Newark Town Hall 01636-0333 or by Email: friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk  

We  need to found more Volunteers to welcome visits to Newark Cemetery by  showing around our exhibition, serving refreshments giving tours or help locate a grave for visits.

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski, former Prime Minister of Poland’s London-based government farewell Mass. Thousands of Newarkers saw the procession headed by the exiled Polish government and Newark mayor, Councillor Cyril Parlby on 16th July 1943. After his body was exhumed on 13th September 1993, General Sikorski had his Polish flag draped across a fresh coffin and taken to Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene overnight, guarded by members of the RAF Regiment with reversed arms. The next day had a farewell Mass before his return home to  Poland. Newark Town Mayor Councillor Harry Furness and Mayoress together with Town Clerk, Councillor Dennis Jones and Mr Roger Parlby also went along on that plane to Poland.

Sign Post on London Road, Newark-On-Trent, ~ Nottinghamshire UK

 Our Beautiful and Historic Newark Cemetery

Newark

NG24 1SQ

Main Gates off London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire 

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Welcome sign on London Road, Newark-On-Trent 

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

I have put this Website  together as a fitting tribute to the people who resting place is Newark cemetery. The views expressed our solely my own and do not reflect  Newark Town Council. It reflects my interests for Newark-On-Trent Cemetery Nottinghamshire. Any comments about this website are most welcome.

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Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire for over 150 years since 1856

 This memorial website is Laurence Goff personal views, I have put it together and do not represent Newark Town Council . It dedicated to the thousands of  people since 1856.There were a number of Royal Air Force stations within and around Newark from which several Polish squadrons operated. The highest concentration of commemorations can be particularly found in Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire.  Our local cemetery with nearly 400 that died, and are buried in special plot on the east side. You can park for free at the Main Gate parking lot at Newark Cemetery, It is location on London Road, Newark, Notts.

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Chapel Interpretation Centre (East side turn left at the Main Arch)

{Location walk from the parking lot to the main Arch turn left red side door}

Organised by

The Friends of Newark Cemetery

 The Chapel  Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery, will  open from April – October  by appointment for groups for our exhibition – tours  

Please give plenty of notice

New volunteers are welcome

For more information

Chairman

Friends of Newark Cemetery

friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

 Laurence Goff

Friends Of Newark Cemetery Chairman 07794613879 or 01636-681878 {home}

Commonwealth, Polish War Graves  and former residents are located in Newark-On-Trent

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski Farewell Mass Held At Newark Parish Church 14th September 1993 Be Re-turning Home To Poland

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 During Britain’s darkest hour. When Poland was invaded by Germany Polish pilots came to the UK and formed fighter squadrons that would operate during the Battle of Britain, we will Remember them that are buried at Newark Cemetery.

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves 

A Memorial Cross to the Polish airmen that are buried here during the 2nd World War was erected in the plot and unveiled on 15th July 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Commander in Chief of the Polish Forces and war-time Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski (aged 62) on the 4th July 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s It contains a memorial to Poland’s exiled war leader, General  Sikorski who died when the aeroplane he was travelling in crashed over Gibraltar on the 4th July 1943.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

We will Remember them, RIP

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Prime Minister of Poland’s London-based government in exile

“Loved In Life, Honoured In Death, Cherished In Our Memory, Amen”

Newark

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After the Battle of Britain more Polish squadrons were formed. By the end of 1943, a total of 14 Polish squadrons, imcluding 10 fighter squadrons and a complete infrastructure was in existence, making the Polish Air Force the fourth largest Allied air force, numbering on 1st December 1943 – 11,638 personnel. By May 1945 the manpower strength stood at 19,400 and fourteen Polish squadrons, most of which were based in the UK (Air Defence of Great Britain) or in NW Europe.

During Britain’s darkest hour. When Poland was invaded by Germany Polish pilots came to the UK and formed fighter squadrons that would operate during the Battle of Britain.

RAF Winthorpe near Newark was established in 1940. It was a satellite station for RAF Swinderby over the border in Lincolnshire.

Two Polish squadrons, 300 and 301, were based at Winthorpe.

A war memory from RAF Winthorpe >

Lasting legacy

The work of the museum is ensuring the contribution of the Polish pilots is never forgotten.

More about the museum

The Newark Air Museum is open 361 days of the year and is located on part of the former World War Two airfield of Winthorpe in eastern Nottinghamshire close to the border with Lincolnshire.

The country that suffered most, was Poland, it had a pre-war Jewish population of around 3.2 million, some 2.9 million of whom were annihilated (88%). Of Europe’s Jewish children, alive in 1939, only 11 percent survived the war, an estimated one and a half million being murdered. Of all the German who occupied countries in WW II, the percentage of Jews saved in Poland was the smallest. The attitude of the vast majority of the Polish population towards Jews was anti-Semitic, particularly in the eastern areas after the Soviet occupation, surpassed only by their vehemently anti-German hatred. Even some members of the Polish police joined the German in rounding up Jews for deportation to the death camps. It must be said however that around 50,000 Jews were saved by Poles who helped hide them at the risk of their own lives. The ‘Council for Aid to Jews’ provided false Aryan documents and gave refuge to many of the persecuted Jews. Unfortunately, many of these ‘aid workers’ along with their entire families, paid with their lives.  As his chosen children were being massacred by the millions he remained silent!. (In all, Poland suffered 4,900,000 dead in World War II about 20 percent of its population)

 

Our Beautiful And Historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire

Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm, October – March 8am-6pm

 Any comments about this website are most welcome

 Laurence Goff  Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery 

 

MICHAL OMIELJASZKO

He was a pilot, born on 18th April 1914 and known to be in service on 28th January 1942.  He was killed on the way to an anti-submarine sweep when HX384 was struck by ferocious cross winds on 12th August 1942.  It was blown over the cliffs by the runway at RAF Dale.  He is buried at Newark upon Trent Cemetery.  He won the Cross of Valour three times and the Silver Cross of the Order of Virtuti Militari.

 Memorial Plaque is Located at Newark Parish Church near the High Alter

 

General Sikorski was buried at Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July, 1943. On 13th September 1993 his remains were taken from Newark Cemetery and taken over night at St. Mary Magdalene (Newark parish church)  a Catholic service (Mass) was held  the  next day. On 14th September 1993 remains re-turn home to Poland after 50 years resting in Newark Cemetery.

For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

A Grateful Sacrifice

“Loved In Life, Honoured In Death, Cherished In Our Memory, Amen”

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

We also have Commonwealth and Polish War Graves located in Newark-On-Trent

During Britain’s darkest hour. When Poland was invaded by Germany Polish pilots came to the UK and formed fighter squadrons that would operate during the Battle of Britain, we will Remember them that are buried at Newark Cemetery

A Memorial Cross to the Polish airmen that are buried here during the 2nd World War was erected in the plot and unveiled on 15th July 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander in Chief of the Polish Forces and war-time Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski (aged 62) on the 4th July 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s It contains a memorial to Poland’s exiled war leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski, who died when the aeroplane he was travelling in crashed over Gibraltar on the 4th July 1943.

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

Lest We Forget

The United Kingdom, also have over 2,100 Polish War dead that are also commemorated in 244 different locations. Our lasting tribute, is a time to remember them for their  heroism, bravery, valour and determination for freedom.  Let’s remember them by paying our tribute to them and for their contribution during the 2nd World War.  

General Sikorski was so impressed with the care of the War graves at Newark Cemetery UK  his requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark . When Poland was once again a free Country.

15th July 1941

General Wladyslaw Sikorski visited Newark Cemetery to unveil a Memorial Cross dedicated to Polish servicemen who had died fighting alongside the British. He was so impressed with the care of the War graves and requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark Cemetery UK until his Country was free once again.

Memorial At Newark Cemetery Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

Inscription

(On Plinth) Za Wolnosc – For Freedom 1940 – 1945/ (On Front Of Cross) To The Memory Of Fallen Polish Airmen/ I Have Fought A Good

Fight, I Have Finished My Course,

I Have Kept The Faith

Physical Description

These Very Tall Latin Cross, Decorated With 12 Cross And Polish Eagle Devices On The Front Face. On Two Stage Plinth

Time to emphasized the Heroism, Bravery, Valour and Determination for our Freedom. We must not forget the Polish Airman and the Commonwealth they fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch. They fought to the end and then carried on the fight, we should be grateful. We certainly owe them a great deal of credit that they so rightly deserve.

 

Sign Post on London Road, Newark-On-Trent, ~ Nottinghamshire UK

 Our Beautiful and Historic Newark Cemetery

Newark

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Main Gates off London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire 

Welcome sign on London Road, Newark-On-Trent 

Nottinghamshire  NG24 1SQ off the A1

Polish Flag during the War flying for Freedom

 

Sikorski Close Newark NG24 1FD

maps.google.co.uk Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

The War graves at Newark Cemetery

General Wladyslaw Sikorski remains was exhumed from Newark Cemetery after 50 years on 

13th September 1993 

Newark-On-Trent Commonwealth and Polish War Graves – YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gKmfH4DUiec13 Jul 2009 – 9 min – Uploaded by laurencegoff Newark On Trent Cemetery, Nottinghamshire War GravesGeneral Sikorski the Polish war time leader 

More videos for Polish War Graves located in »

Newark cemetery

For over 150 years since 1856

Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire

Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm, October – March 8am-6pm 

For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

Newark Cemetery

A Memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and unveiled on 15th July 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander in Chief of the Polish Forces and war-time Prime Minister. General Wladyslaw Sikorski visited Newark Cemetery to unveil a Memorial Cross dedicated to Polish servicemen who had died fighting alongside the British. He was so impressed with the care of the War graves and requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark Cemetery UK until his Country was free once again.

 When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski (aged 62) on the 4th July 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s It contains a memorial to Poland’s exiled war leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski, who died when the aeroplane he was travelling in crashed over Gibraltar on the 4th July 1943.

We Will Remember  Them At Newark Cemetery

War Memorial to the Fallen of Newark commemorating, by name, those local military personnel who lost their lives in conflict going back to the first World War of 1914

Pete Stevens exhibition at

Chapel Interpretation Centre, Newark Cemetery

Video http://youtu.be/11ipWE1C6qo

There are 603 war casualties names on Newark’s Memorial To The Fallen at Newark Cemetery, at the main gate on London Road. There are 456 names are first world war, 144 are from the second world war, one died in West Africa in 1961, one in Malaya in 1952 and one in Afghanistan in 2007.

Chapel Interpretation Centre, Newark Cemetery

The Battle of British pilots became known collectively as ‘The Few’ after The Prime Minster Winston

Churchill said of them: ‘Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.’

For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

This plaque is dedicated to the men and women of many Nations that served on the nearby airfield during the 2nd World War. It is Located on the corner Stodman Street, Newark  at Natwest Bank for all the see.

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

Newark Cemetery Commonwealth and Polish War Graves, we will Remember them

 

Poppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all soulsThe War graves at Newark CemeteryPoppy Day .... R.I.P to all souls

General Wladyslaw Sikorski remains was exhumed from Newark Cemetery after 50 years on 13th September 1993

 Memorial Plaque is Located at Newark Parish Church near the high alter

General Sikorski was buried at Newark Cemetery on Friday 16th July, 1943. On 13th September 1993 his remains were taken from Newark Cemetery and was he was held  over night at St. Mary Magdalene (Newark parish church)  a Catholic service (Mass) was held  the next day.

 

For our freedom and yours / Za wolnosc nasza i wasza

The Polish Air Force Memorial Committee was established in 2011 as a partnership between the former Polish Air Force Association and RAF Northolt.

September 2014 – Polish War Memorial Commemoration – 1200 noon (all welcome to attend)

http://www.raf.mod.uk/rafnortholt/

General Władyslaw Sikorski Statue. Portland Place, London UK

General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Prime Minister of Poland’s London-based government 

The Polish Institute and Sikorski Museum Official Website, 20 Prince’s Gate, London, SW7 1P TTelephone: 00 44 (0)207 589 9249 Monday – Friday – 9.30 – 16.30 Opening hours:Archives:Tuesday – Friday – 9.30 – 16.00 Closed throughout February Closed throughout the Easter Season. Museum:Tuesday – Friday – 14.00 – 16.00 First Saturday of the month – 10.30 – 16.00

BATTLE-HARDENED POLISH PILOTS WERE MOST EXPERIENCED IN RAF

Following the German invasion of Poland, many Polish pilots – a great number of whom had fought the Luftwaffe – escaped and made their way to France and Britain.

In June 1940 the Polish Government in Exile formed a Polish Air Force in the UK, with two fighter squadrons – 302 and 303 – composed of Polish pilots and ground crews, with British commanding officers.

The two fighter squadrons went into action in August.

Most of the Polish pilots had hundreds of hours of pre-war flying experience and were among the most experienced in the battle. They had learned from combat experience to fire from close range.

Between them the Polish pilots claimed 201 aircraft shot down. 303 Squadron, in which Brigadier General Tadeusz Sawicz served, claimed the highest number of kills – 126 – of all Allied squadrons in the Battle of Britain.

The Polish War Memorial on the outskirts of RAF Northolt was dedicated in 1948 as a commemoration of the Polish contribution to Allied arms.

Polish War Graves (Air Force) – Newark, England

Several hundred Polish Airmen from the 2nd World War lie buried in the war graves cemetery at Newark, England. A memorial cross with the words – For Freedom – remembers their sacrifice.Polish War Grave – Sierz Wojciech Lichota (Polish Forces) 304 Squadron, 6 February 1941, age 31, lies buried in the war graves cemetery at Newark.

 

Wladyslaw Raczkiewicz – The first Polish President-in-Exile, Wladyslaw Raczkiewicz, lies buried in Newark cemetery. He was President-in-Exile from 1939-1947. He died in June 1947.

 

August Zaleski – The second Polish President-in-Exile, August Zaleski, lies buried in Newark cemetery. He was President-in-Exile from 1947-1972. He died on 7 April 1972.

 

Stanislaw Ostrowski – The third Polish President-in-Exile, Stanislaw Ostrowski, lies buried in Newark cemetery. He was President-in-Exile from 1972-1979. He died on 22 November 1982.

 

Polish War Grave – Kpl Zdzistaw Kozlowski (Polish Forces) 18 OTU, 18 May 1942, age 17, lies buried in the war graves cemetery at Newark.

 

Polish War Grave – Plt Stanislaw Dorosz (Polish Forces) 305 Squadron, 13 January 1943, age 34, lies buried in the war graves cemetery at Newark.

 

Polish War Grave – Kpl Zbigniew Pulnarowicz (Polish Forces) 16 S.F.T.S., 9 June 1944, age 22, lies buried in the war graves cemetery at Newark.

 

Polish War Grave – There are some graves of members of the Polish forces which are not part of the CWGC plot but are located close by. One of these is the grave of General Gabszewicz who was in command of 131 Fighter Wing in WW2.

 

Warsaw Air Bridge Memorial – A memorial at Newark cemetery remembers the 250 airmen of Britain, the Commonwealth and Poland who flew from bases in Italy in an attempt to deliver supplies to the people of Warsaw during the Uprising of 1944.

 

Warsaw Air Bridge Memorial – A memorial close to the Polish War Graves at Newark remembers the 250 airmen of Britain, the Commonwealth and Poland who gave their lives attempting to deliver supplies to the people of Warsaw during the Uprising of 1944.

 

Polish War Grave – Pplk Romuald Sulinski DSO DFC (Polish Forces) 300 Squadron, 4 February 1946, age 37, lies buried in the war graves cemetery at Newark.

 

Polish War Grave – Ppor Czeskaw K Sulgut (Polish Forces) 300 Squadron, 4 February 1946, age 27, lies buried in the war graves cemetery at Newark.

 

Polish War Grave – Por Wladyslaw R Jedrzejczyk (Polish Forces) 300 Squadron, 4 February 1946, age 30, lies buried in the war graves cemetery at Newark.

 

I have a record of a Polish Air Force WAAF – Anastazia Kulinska,  Died 17th 

July 1946, age 28 and buried in Newark Cemetery

http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/women…/22265-polish-air-force-waaf.html -

 

During the Second World War there were a number of R.A.F. stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for R.A.F. burials and this is now the war graves plot, where all but ten of the 90 Commonwealth and all of the 397 Polish burials were made. The cemetery also contains 49 scattered burials of the First World War. A memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski in 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s remains were returned to Poland in 1993, but there is still a memorial to him at Newark.

No. of Identified Casualties:

533

15th July 1941

General Wladyslaw Sikorski visited Newark Cemetery to unveil a Memorial Cross dedicated to Polish servicemen who had died fighting alongside the British. He was so impressed with the care of the War graves and requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark Cemetery UK until his Country was free once again.

General Sikorski and number of his staff, including his daughter, were killed when their plane, a Liberator, crashed seconds after take off from Gibraltar, en-route to England, on July 4, 1943.

Passengers 17 in total

  • General Władysław Sikorski Prime Minister andCommander-in-Chief of Poland

 Zofia Leśniowska Chief of the Polish Women’s Auxiliary

Major General Tadeusz Klimecki Chief of the Polish General Staff

Colonel Andrzej Marecki Chief of Operations Staff

Lieutenant Jozef Ponikiewski Naval A.D.C.

Adam Kulakowski Personal secretary to Sikorski

Colonel Victor Cazalet M.P., British Liason Officer

Brigadier J.P. Whitely M.P.

Mr. W.H. Lock (Never found, presumed dead)

Mr. Pinder Head of British Intelligence Service in the Middle East (his position was never revealed to General Sikorski)

Bombardier Gralewski (Joined the party at Gibraltar)

Crew:

1 Lt Edward Maks PrchalCaptain/1st Pilot

Squadron Leader W.S. Herring2nd Pilot (never found)

Warrant Officer L. Zalsberg Navigator

Sergeant F. Kelly Flight Engineer

Flight Sergeant C.B. Gerrie Radio Operator/Air Gunner

Flight Sergeant D. Hunder Radio Operator/Air Gunner (never found)

We are impressed with the care of the War graves at Newark Cemetery

General Wladyslaw Sikorski remains was exhumed from Newark Cemetery after 50 years on 13th September 1993

 

Latest – Polish officers’ bodies to be exhumed

Thursday Dec 02, 2010

The bodies of three Polish Army officers who died in the plane crash that killed their country’s wartime leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski, are to be exhumed from Newark Cemetery. Ministry of Defence (MoD) has approved exhumation of three Polish officers remains that were killed with General Sikorski on 4th July 1941. All three were buried next to each other in Newark Cemetery, and will return home to Poland with full military honours and for a post mortem. It was decide to bring back the remains of Colonel Andrzej Marecki Chief of operation Staff, Major General Tadeusz Klimecki Chief of the Polish General Staff and Lieutenant Jozef Ponikiewski Naval ADC. On July 4, 1943, a converted Liberator bomber from RAF Transport Command took off from Gibraltar for England. On board was General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Prime Minister of Poland’s London-based government in exile and Commander-in-Chief of her armed forces, returning from visiting Polish troops in the Middle East. After tours of Gibraltar and festivities, General Sikorski departs for London at 11:00pm. After reaching only 100 feet, the plane began a slow dive into the sea. Only the pilot survived. All others died or were presumed dead on impact at 11:06pm. B-24C Liberator AL523. A British inquiry deemed the crash an accident, General Sikorski’s death has long been the subject of enduring conspiracy theories. In an attempt to get to the bottom of the mystery, let’s solve this once and for all.

Newark-on-Trent is important internationally, as it is home to the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves where there are over 400 graves of Polish airmen who died during the second world war. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for Polish burials and this is now the war graves for people to see across the UK and the World. Former Polish Airmen choosing to be buried since staying in England after the 2nd World War.

A Memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and unveiled on 15th July 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander in Chief of the Polish Forces and war-time Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski (aged 62) on the 4th July 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s It contains a memorial to Poland’s exiled war leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski, who died when the aeroplane he was travelling in crashed over Gibraltar on the 4th July 1943.

He was so impressed with the care of the War graves at Newark Cemetery UK  his requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark . When Poland was once again a free Country.  requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in our cemetery. 

On July 4, 1943, a converted Liberator bomber from RAF Transport Command took off from Gibraltar for England. On board was General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Prime Minister of Poland’s London-based government in exile and Commander-in-Chief of her armed forces, returning from visiting Polish troops in the Middle East. After tours of Gibraltar and festivities, General Sikorski departs for London at 11:00pm. After reaching only 100 feet, the plane began a slow dive into the sea. Only the pilot survived. All others died or were presumed dead on impact at 11:06pm.

B-24C Liberator AL523.

Passengers 17 in total

1. General Wladyslaw Sikorski Prime Minister and Commander-in-Chief of Poland

2. Zofia Lesniowska Chief of the Polish Women’s Auxiliary

3. Major General Tadeusz Klimecki Chief of the Polish General Staff

4. Colonel Andrzej MareckiChief of Operations Staff

5. Lieutenant Jozef Ponikiewski Naval A.D.C.

6.Adam KulakowskiPersonal secretary to Sikorski

7. Colonel Victor Cazalet M.P., British Liason Officer

8. Brigadier J.P. Whitely M.P.

9.Mr. W.H. Lock (Never found, presumed dead)

10. Mr. PinderHead of British Intelligence Service in the Middle East

(his position was never revealed to General Sikorski)

11. Bombardier Gralewski (Joined the party at Gibraltar)

Crew:

1. 1 Lt Edward Maks Prchal Captain/1st Pilot

2. Squadron Leader W.S. Herring 2nd Pilot (never found) 3. Warrant Officer L. Zalsberg Navigator 4. Sergeant F. Kelly Flight Engineer 5. Flight Sergeant C.B. Gerrie Radio Operator/Air Gunner 6. Flight Sergeant D. Hunder Radio Operator/Air Gunner (never found)

General Wladyslaw Sikorski remains was exhumed from Newark Cemetery after 50 years on 13th September 1993. During the Second World War there were a number of R.A.F. stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery. We must not forget the polish Airman and the Commonwealth they fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch. They fought to the end and then carried on the fight, we should be grateful. We certainly owe them a great deal of credit that they so rightly deserve.

Laurence Goff

Friends of Newark Cemetery Chairman

 

 Annual Air Bridge  held on the last Sunday in September 1:45pm at Newark Cemetery starting with a parade from the Main Gate London Road, Newark to Memorial at the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves.

Annual All Souls which is held on the last Sunday in October at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire, 2:45pm at Newark cemetery with a parade to the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves.

“The grass withers and the flowers fall, but the word of our God stands forever.”

Isaiah 40:8

Only those who have loved and lost, can understand war’s bitter cost

Cmentarz Polskich Lotników, Newark, 25 września 2011

LGFCE w imieniu kibiców Lechii Gdańsk wzięło udział w uroczystości obchodów rocznicy utworzenia mostu powietrznego Warszawa – Londyn. Złożono 2 wieńce: pierwszy pod pomnikiem upamiętniającym utworzenie wspomnianego mostu lotniczego, a drugi pod krzyżem Generała Sikorski.

polish20emblem2.jpg Polish Flag image by PolishAmericansFile:Polish War Memorial.JPG

The Polish War Memorial at Northolt in west London was dedicated in 1948

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2054013/Last-Polish-pilot-Battle-Britain-dies-aged-97.html#ixzz1qOoNDU4X

BATTLE-HARDENED POLISH PILOTS WERE MOST EXPERIENCED IN RAF

Following the German invasion of Poland, many Polish pilots – a great number of whom had fought the Luftwaffe – escaped and made their way to France and Britain.

In June 1940 the Polish Government in Exile formed a Polish Air Force in the UK, with two fighter squadrons – 302 and 303 – composed of Polish pilots and ground crews, with British commanding officers.

The two fighter squadrons went into action in August.

Most of the Polish pilots had hundreds of hours of pre-war flying experience and were among the most experienced in the battle. They had learned from combat experience to fire from close range.

Between them the Polish pilots claimed 201 aircraft shot down. 303 Squadron, in which Brigadier General Tadeusz Sawiczserved, claimed the highest number of kills – 126 – of all Allied squadrons in the Battle of Britain.

The Polish War Memorial on the outskirts of RAF Northolt was dedicated in 1948 as a commemoration of the Polish contribution to Allied arms.

Following the collapse of the city’s defence on September 17, he joined Polish pilots fighting in France.

 After the surrender of Paris in July 1940 he made his way — along with tens of thousands of Polish airmen, soldiers and sailors — to Britain, where they made up the largest foreign military force in the country.

Mr Zamoyski said that some 17,000 Poles — pilots, mechanics and ground staff — served in the Polish air force in Britain at the time.

In the summer of 1940, General Wladyslaw Sikorski — the head of Poland’s Government in Exile in London — signed an agreement to form a Polish Air Force in Britain.

After training on Hurricane fighter aircraft, Sawicz was incorporated into RAF Polish squadron 303 and later into squadrons 316 and 315. 

On and off, he served as a commander of the Polish wing.

Sawicz was among the 145 Polish pilots who fought in the Battle of Britain, 31 of whom died in action, and is credited with shooting down three German aircraft.

He was awarded Poland’s highest military order – the Virtuti Military medal – and was also given the Distinguished Flying Cross by Britain, the United States and the Netherlands.

Other foreign pilots — from New Zealand, Canada, Australia, Czechoslovakia, South Africa, the United States and Ireland — also flew with the RAF.

A few British pilots from the battle are still alive, but it is not known how many of the international aviators remain.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2054013/Last-Polish-pilot-Battle-Britain-dies-aged-97.html#ixzz1qOicqmLh

In thanks: The Polish War Memorial at Northolt in west London was dedicated in 1948

The Battle of Britain pilots became known collectively as ‘The Few’ after Winston Churchill said of them: ‘Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.’

Sawicz is survived by his wife Jadwiga. 

A service is planned for him at a later date in Warsaw.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2054013/Last-Polish-pilot-Battle-Britain-dies-aged-97.html#ixzz1qOhoyEwY

polish20emblem2.jpg Polish Flag image by PolishAmericans

polish20emblem2.jpg Polish Flag image by PolishAmericans

General Wladyslaw Sikorski Poland’s wartime leader described by Churchill as his “comrade in life and death”, is to be commemorated by a statue located on Portland Place in London UK. The Polish commander-in-chief and prime minister, who was appointed in Paris after the defeat of Poland, organised the evacuation to Britain of the Polish Government when France also fell. We should be grateful for his help and support.

A Statue has been put in place in London of  General Wladyslaw Sikorski ON JULY 4, 1943,  a converted Liberator bomber from RAF Transport Command took off from Gibraltar for England. On board was General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Prime Minister of Poland’s London-based government in exile and Commander-in-Chief of her armed forces, returning from visiting Polish troops in the Middle East.

General Sikorski giving out award to his men

FRIENDS OF NEWARK CEMETERY

Stowarzyszenie o nazwie Friends of Newark Cemetery powstało w listopadzie 2005 z myślą o niesieniu pomocy służbom odpowiedzialnym za opiekę nad cmentarzem, a także promowaniu go jako jednego z najbardziej urokliwych i ważnych ze względu na wartości historyczne zakątków miasta. Mając to na uwadze, wzięliśmy udział m. in.  w obchodach 150 rocznicy założenia Cmentarza, mających miejsce 7 października 2007, a prowadzonych przez Burmistrza miasta. Friends of Newark Cemetery przygotowują i prowadzą też odbywające się co roku Dni Otwarte cmentarza w the Interpretation Centre (budynek dawnej kaplicy).

DZIAŁALNOŚĆ

Na przestrzeni kilku ostatnich lat zasadziliśmy ponad 2000 roślin w pobliżu kaplicy, czyściliśmy pomniki i malowaliśmy ławki. Członkowie stowarzyszenia cały czas instalują budki dla ptaków, a także wytyczają obszary porośnięte dziką roślinnością i oprowadzają zorganizowane wycieczki po cmentarzu skupiając się na zagadnieniach zarówno historycznych, jak też przyrodniczych.

Pomagamy w walce z wandalizmem, a także inną, szkodliwą dla cmentarza, działalnością, ponadto we współpracy z Town Council dążymy do rozwiązania tego typu problemów. Jednym z naszych podstawowych celów jest udzielanie pomocy oraz informacji wszystkim odwiedzającym cmentarz oraz the Chapel Interpretation Centre, w związku z czym dążymy do zintensyfikowania dyżurów.

Jedną z ciekawszych inicjatyw Friends of Newark Cemetery stało się wydanie tzw. Comfort Book – zbioru wierszy, cytatów i ustępów z Pisma Świętego, przygotowanej z myślą o rodzinach zmarłych. W trakcie pracy nad książką poprosiliśmy o pomoc mieszkańców Newark pytając o to, jakie teksty i wiersze chcieliby w niej zobaczyć.

CHCESZ POMÓC?

Zapraszamy wszystkich chętnych. Prosimy o kontakt mailowy, listowny lub telefoniczny.

E-mail: friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

Telefon: 07526950194

Adres do korespondencji:

Friends of Newark Cemetery

Mr Laurence Goff

Newark Town Hall, Market Place

NG24 1DU, Newark, Nottinghamshire

Uwaga: możliwy kontakt w języku polskim

General Sikorski giving out award to his men for bravery General Sikorski took the time to award medals

 

General Sikorski

http://pism.co.uk/history/index.html

Squadron No:
300 - 301 – 302 303 – 304 – 305 306 – 307 – 308 309 – 315 – 316 317 – 318 – 663

Polish Fighting Team Fighter pilots scores Bibliography Their aicraft Records Movies Links

Newark-On-Trent Cemetery, tribute to Courage from The British Commonwealth and Polish Sacrifice 70 years ago

MoD approves exhumation of Polish soldiers to solve mystery of General Sikorski’s death – Telegraph

Lieutenant Jozef Ponikiewski Naval A.D.C. Major General Tadeusz Klimecki Chief of the Polish General Staff 4.Colonel Andrzej Marecki Chief of Operations Staff

15th July 1941

General Wladyslaw Sikorski visited Newark Cemetery to unveil a Memorial Cross dedicated to Polish servicemen who had died fighting alongside the British. He was so impressed with the care of the War graves and requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark Cemetery UK until his Country was free once again.

General Sikorski unveils Memorial Cross in Newark Cemetery 15th July 1941

Sikorski Lying in state

General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Former Prime Minister of Poland London-based government in exile. His Grave which was located at Newark-On-Trent Cemetery from 1943-1993 has been removed

Former Polish President Raczkiewicz buried in Newark-On-Trent Cemetery

Former President Zaleski buried in Newark-On-Trent Cemetery

Former President Ostrowski buried in Newark-On-Trent Cemetery

Remember the people who resting place is Newark Cemetery

Najlepiej oceniane - Gen. Sikorski - Naczelny Wódz Polskich Sił Zbrojnych i premier rządu RP na uchodźstwie - zginął 4 lipca 1943 r. w katastrofie lotniczej w Gibraltarze, powracając z inspekcji wojsk na Środkowym Wschodzie. Przyczyn katastrofy samolotu Liberator, należącego do brytyjskich Królewskich Sił Powietrznych, nie wyjaśniono do dziś. Niektórzy badacze uważają, że Sikorski zginął w wyniku spisku; inni uważają, że był to wypadek.

General Wladyslaw Sikorski 1881-1943

Poland’s former Prime Minister and Minister of Defence, set up the Polish Provisional Government in London. When the Soviet Union took over Poland he tried to persuade Stalin to release the thousands of Polish officers captured by the Soviets in 1939. (their bodies were later found at Katyn) Stalin remained silent on their fate and broke off all dealings with Sikorski. The Soviets then set up their own government in Poland.

On the news of his death on 4th July 1943 this being a sad Loss to Poland, and for the UK when the news came in.

AL523.jpg AL523 image by liberator_2008

Latest – Polish officers’ bodies to be exhumed

Thursday Dec 02, 2010

The bodies of three Polish Army officers who died in the plane crash that killed their country’s wartime leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski, are to be exhumed from Newark Cemetery. Ministry of Defence (MoD) has approved exhumation of three Polish officers remains that were killed with General Sikorski on 4th July 1941. All three were buried next to each other in Newark Cemetery, and will return home to Poland with full military honours and for a post mortem. It was decide to bring back the remains of Colonel Andrzej Marecki Chief of operation Staff, Major General Tadeusz Klimecki Chief of the Polish General Staff and Lieutenant Jozef Ponikiewski Naval ADC. On July 4, 1943, a converted Liberator bomber from RAF Transport Command took off from Gibraltar for England. On board was General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Prime Minister of Poland’s London-based government in exile and Commander-in-Chief of her armed forces, returning from visiting Polish troops in the Middle East. After tours of Gibraltar and festivities, General Sikorski departs for London at 11:00pm. After reaching only 100 feet, the plane began a slow dive into the sea. Only the pilot survived. All others died or were presumed dead on impact at 11:06pm. B-24C Liberator AL523. A British inquiry deemed the crash an accident, General Sikorski’s death has long been the subject of enduring conspiracy theories. In an attempt to get to the bottom of the mystery, let’s solve this once and for all.

Newark-on-Trent is important internationally, as it is home to the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves where there are over 400 graves of Polish airmen who died during the second world war. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for Polish burials and this is now the war graves for people to see across the UK and the World. Former Polish Airmen choosing to be buried since staying in England after the 2nd World War.

A Memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and unveiled on 14th July 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander in Chief of the Polish Forces and war-time Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski (aged 62) in 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s It contains a memorial to Poland’s exiled war leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski, who died when the aeroplane he was travelling in crashed over Gibraltar on the 4th July 1943.

He was so impressed with the care of the War graves and requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark Cemetery UK until Poland was once again a free Country.

On July 4, 1943, a converted Liberator bomber from RAF Transport Command took off from Gibraltar for England. On board was General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Prime Minister of Poland’s London-based government in exile and Commander-in-Chief of her armed forces, returning from visiting Polish troops in the Middle East. After tours of Gibraltar and festivities, General Sikorski departs for London at 11:00pm. After reaching only 100 feet, the plane began a slow dive into the sea. Only the pilot survived. All others died or were presumed dead on impact at 11:06pm.

B-24C Liberator AL523.

Passengers 17 in total

1. General Wladyslaw Sikorski Prime Minister and Commander-in-Chief of Poland

2. Zofia Lesniowska Chief of the Polish Women’s Auxiliary

3. Major General Tadeusz Klimecki Chief of the Polish General Staff

4. Colonel Andrzej MareckiChief of Operations Staff

5. Lieutenant Jozef Ponikiewski Naval A.D.C.

6.Adam KulakowskiPersonal secretary to Sikorski

7. Colonel Victor Cazalet M.P., British Liason Officer

8. Brigadier J.P. Whitely M.P.

9.Mr. W.H. Lock (Never found, presumed dead)

10. Mr. PinderHead of British Intelligence Service in the Middle East (his position was never revealed to General Sikorski)

11. Bombardier Gralewski (Joined the party at Gibraltar)

Crew:

1. 1Lt Edward Maks Prchal Captain/1st Pilot 2. Squadron Leader W.S. Herring 2nd Pilot (never found) 3. Warrant Officer L. Zalsberg Navigator 4. Sergeant F. Kelly Flight Engineer 5. Flight Sergeant C.B. Gerrie Radio Operator/Air Gunner 6. Flight Sergeant D. Hunder Radio Operator/Air Gunner (never found)

General Wladyslaw Sikorski remains was exhumed from Newark Cemetery after 50 years on 13th September 1993.

During the Second World War there were a number of R.A.F. stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery. We must not forget the polish Airman and the Commonwealth they fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch. They fought to the end and then carried on the fight, we should be grateful. We certainly owe them a great deal of credit that they so rightly deserve.

Laurence Goff Friends of Newark Cemetery Chairman

General Sikorski and number of his staff, including his daughter, were killed when their plane, a Liberator, crashed seconds after take off from Gibraltar, en-route to England, on July 4, 1943.

On that sad day returning to England

  • 4th July 1943: After tours of Gibraltar and festivities, General Sikorski departs for London at 11:00pm. After reaching only 100 feet, the plane began a slow dive into the sea. Only the pilot survived. All others died or were presumed dead on impact at 11:06pm.

B-24C Liberator AL523

General Sikorski and number of his staff, including his daughter, were killed when their plane, a Liberator, crashed seconds after take off from Gi…

Passengers 17 in total

1.

General Władysław Sikorski

Prime Minister and Commander-in-Chief of Poland

2.

Zofia Leśniowska

Chief of the Polish Women’s Auxiliary

3.

Major General Tadeusz Klimecki

Chief of the Polish General Staff

4.

Colonel Andrzej Marecki

Chief of Operations Staff

5.

Lieutenant Jozef Ponikiewski

Naval A.D.C.

6.

Adam Kulakowski

Personal secretary to Sikorski

7.

Colonel Victor Cazalet

M.P., British Liason Officer

8.

Brigadier J.P. Whitely

M.P.

9.

Mr. W.H. Lock

(Never found, presumed dead)

10.

Mr. Pinder

Head of British Intelligence Service in the Middle East (his position was never revealed to General Sikorski)

11.

Bombardier Gralewski

(Joined the party at Gibraltar)

Crew:

1.

1Lt Edward Maks Prchal

Captain/1st Pilot

2.

Squadron Leader W.S. Herring

2nd Pilot (never found)

3.

Warrant Officer L. Zalsberg

Navigator

4.

Sergeant F. Kelly

Flight Engineer

5.

Flight Sergeant C.B. Gerrie

Radio Operator/Air Gunner

6.

Flight Sergeant D. Hunder

Radio Operator/Air Gunner (never found)

General Wladyslaw Sikorski body was exhumed on 13th September 1993 and taken over night to Newark Parish Church, he was returned home to Poland on 14th September 1993.

General Sikorski Grave Stone at Newark Cemetery July 1943

50 years ago Stayed over night,  on  15th July 1943 Holy Trinity RC Church on Parliament Street, Newark a Requiem Mass {Funeral Service} took place and was buried at Newark Cemetery on 16th July 1943. He rested for Fifty years until his remains where exhumed on 13th Sept 1993, and was taken  over night at Newark Parish Church for a farewell Mass the next day, after the service on 14th Sept 1993 the General was on his way home to Poland.

 

Poland’s former Prime Minister and Minister of Defence, set up the Polish Provisional Government in London.

On 15th Sept 1993 his remains left Newark and after a high Mass at Newark Parish Church on his way home to Poland.

The body of the General was laid to rest in the newly established Polish Cemetery at Newark, Nottinghamshire.  The pilot, Flt. Lt. Edward Prchal of the Czechoslovakian Air Force, was the only survivor. The body of General Sikorski’s daughter, Zofia, Chief of the Polish Women’s Auxiliary, was never found.

His cap and uniform, recovered from the sea at the site of the crash, is displayed in the Sikorski Museum, in the Polish Institute at 20, Princess Gate, London.

General Wladyslaw Sikorski 1881-1943, 13th Sept 1993 his remains was exhumed from Newark Cemetery. On the same day his coffin stay overnight, at Newark Parish Church.

14th September 1993 The next day had a farewell high Mass.

These took place at Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene.

On 13-14 September 1993, at Newark Parish Church,

St Mary Magdalene. These being a farewell High Mass before he left Newark for the last time after the service, on his a home to Poland. He was buried in Newark Cemetery from 1943-1993.

Poland Are The First To Fight

In 1918, when Poland regained freedom, the crowned White Eagle became once again the Coat of Arms of the Republic of Poland. Before the 2nd world war it had two officially accepted forms – the one from 1919 and the other from 1927 (the latter designed by Professor Zygmunt Kamiñski). Apart from the official designs, several stylistic forms of the White Eagle were in use at that time.

After the defeat in 1939 and during the German and Soviet occupation of the country the White Eagle, as Poland’s coat of arms, was strictly forbidden. Once again it became the symbol of fight for free Poland. It was used by the underground army at home and by the regular Polish army abroad. The left-oriented armed forces, however, as well as the Polish army created in the Soviet Union, adopted the White Eagle without the crown. And such became the official Coat of Arms of Poland after 1945. Removing the crown from above the Eagle’s head meant a change of the State’s political system, from now on based on the principle of “people’s democracy.” That form of the White Eagle, though officially used till the end of 1989, was not commonly accepted by the Polish nation, so much attached to their previous, centuries-old national emblem.

Newark Cemetery Main Gate, London Road, Newark Nottinghamshire

Newark-on-Trent is important internationally, as it is home to the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves where there are many graves of Polish airmen who died during the second world war. Many Poles remained in the UK after the war, married and started families. Their resting place is also at Newark Cemetery.

We should remember the many Polish airmen who were flying Spitfires with the Royal Air Force, and Commonwealth pilots, during the Battle of Britain and pay tribute to them for their contribution. During Britain’s darkest hour, Polish pilots came to the UK and formed fighter squadrons that would operate during the Battle of Britain 70 years ago.

SAM_4423

RAF Winthorpe near Newark was established in 1940. It was a satellite station for RAF Swinderby over the border in Lincolnshire. Two Polish squadrons, 300 and 301, were based at Winthorpe. After the Battle of Britain more Polish squadrons were formed. By the end of 1943, a total of 14 Polish squadrons, including ten fighter squadrons, and a complete infrastructure was in existence, making the Polish Air Force the fourth largest Allied air force, numbering, on December 1, 1943, 11,638 personnel. We must not forget the Polish airmen and those of the Commonwealth. They fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch. We certainly owe them a debt of gratitude.

A Grateful Sacrifice

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2010/09/06/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

Leader General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Commnder-in-Chief until his death on 4th July 1943, 50 years later was taken back to Poland in September  1993.

Prior to lst World War I he participated in several underground organizations that were preparing the ground for Polish independence. He fought with distinction in the Polish Legions during World War I, and later in the Polish Army during the Polish-Soviet War (1919 to 1921).

Following the German occupation of Poland in 1939 moved to England, he was Prime Minister of Poland’s London-based government in exile and Commander-in-Chief of her armed forces. General Sikorski took command of the Polish Army which was formed in France in late September 1939. On 30 September he was summoned by the Polish government in exile, which then had its headquarters in Paris. The government was recognised by the majority of European countries except Germany, with which Poland was at war, and the USSR, which had invaded Poland on 17th  September 1939. None the less, Sikorski supported the idea of normalising Polish-Soviet relations and began negotiations with Russia in the summer of 1941. On the grounds of an agreement signed in June by Sikorski and Ambassador Mayski for the Soviet Union, the one and a half million Poles who had been deported to the Soviet Union (mostly to Siberia) as a result of Soviet annexation of Polish territories in September 1939, were to be freed and both countries were to support each other in the fight against Hitler’s Germany. This agreement resulted in the creation of a Polish army on Soviet territory under the command of General Anders. Most of the men in this force were freed deportees to Siberia. In August 1942 this 70 thousand-strong Army left Soviet territory for Iran.

In 14th July 1941

General Wladyslaw Sikorski visited Newark Cemetery to unveil a Memorial Cross dedicated to Polish servicemen who had died fighting alongside the British. He was so impressed with the care of the War graves and requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark Cemetery UK until Poland was once again a free Country.

In June 1943, General Władysław Sikorski, the polish wartime leader, went to the Middle East to inspect the Polish units. July 4th 1943, On  his return  trip to England when a Royal Air Force aircraft he was travelling aboard plunged into the sea after take-off from Gibraltar. His daughter Zofia, Chief of Staff General Klimecki, an English liaison officer and all the other passengers on board died with him. Only the Czech pilot survived the crash.

 

General Wladyslaw Sikorski wishes were remembered and on Thursday 15, July 1943, his body arrived  at

Holy Trinity RC Church onParliament Street Newark, Nottinghamshire, England. He stayed and was guarded overnight

at the Catholic Church. The next day Friday 16th July 1943 his funeral and Requiem Mass.

General Wladyslaw Sikorski buried at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire  in the Polish pilots on Friday 16th July 1943. On 14th September 1993,  50 years later after a high Mass at Newark Parish Church fly out of England on his way home to Poland.

Late on 17th September 1993, his ashes were brought to Poland and laid to rest in Wawel Cathedral, the burial place for the most distinguished men and women of Poland.

 

Annual Air Bridge at Newark Cemetery

Held on Sunday (28th September 2014)

1.45pm Guests and Standard Bearers assemble at Newark Cemetery Main Gates

2pm Procession to the Air Bridge Memorial

2.15pm Remembrance Ceremony

Polish EagleSikorski 2024

SAM_7290SAM_0327 4ebf7-ukandpolishSAM_03274ebf7-ukandpolish

The polish Airman They fought  for freedom against the enemy and didn’t  flinch. They fought to the end and then carried on the fight, we should be grateful. We certainly owe them a great deal of credit that they so rightly deserve.

4ebf7-ukandpolishSAM_0309

Polish Air Force Memorial At Newark Cemetery in Nottinghamshire

General Wladyslaw Sikorski Newark Cemetery

Memorial At Newark Cemetery in Nottinghamshire.

Inscription

(ON PLINTH) ZA WOLNOSC – FOR FREEDOM 1940 – 1945/ (ON FRONT OF CROSS) TO THE MEMORY OF FALLEN POLISH AIRMEN/ I HAVE FOUGHT A GOOD

FIGHT, I HAVE FINISHED MY COURSE,

I HAVE KEPT THE FAITH

Physical Description

THESE VERY TALL LATIN CROSS, DECORATED WITH 12 CROSS AND POLISH EAGLE DEVICES ON THE FRONT FACE. ON TWO STAGE PLINTH

Letter in our local Newark Advertiser by Councillor Laurence Goff Chairman Friends Of Newark Cemetery

http://newarkcemeteryuk.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/sam_6361.jpg

There are over 400 hundred graves of Polish airmen who perished during the 2nd World War, 1946 and 1947. These graves are under the care of the (CWGC) The Commonwealth War Graves Commission. It was from Newark cemetery that  General Sikorski, Poland’s Prime Minister and Commander in Chief of the Polish Forces unveiled this principal Memorial on 14th July 1941 together with President Raczkiewicz, ex President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London. Over 400  airmen of the Polish Air Force in Britain that died during the 2nd World War and are to be found in Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire England. Immediately  next to the Cross was the former grave of General Sikorski.

In 1918, when Poland regained freedom, the crowned White Eagle became once again the Coat of Arms of the Republic of Poland. Before the 2nd world war it had two officially accepted forms – the one from 1919 and the other from 1927 (the latter designed by Professor Zygmunt Kamiñski). Apart from the official designs, several stylistic forms of the White Eagle were in use at that time.

After the defeat in 1939 and during the German and Soviet occupation of the country the White Eagle, as Poland’s coat of arms, was strictly forbidden. Once again it became the symbol of fight for free Poland. It was used by the underground army at home and by the regular Polish army abroad. The left-oriented armed forces, however, as well as the Polish army created in the Soviet Union, adopted the White Eagle without the crown. And such became the official Coat of Arms of Poland after 1945. Removing the crown from above the Eagle’s head meant a change of the State’s political system, from now on based on the principle of “people’s democracy.” That form of the White Eagle, though officially used till the end of 1989, was not commonly accepted by the Polish nation, so much attached to their previous, centuries-old national emblem.

Polish Fighter Pilots

304 (POLISH) SQUADRON – RAF

MICHAL OMIELJASZKO He was a pilot, born on 18th April 1914 and known to be in service on 28th January 1942.  He was killed on the way to an anti-submarine sweep when HX384 was struck by ferocious cross winds on 12th August 1942.  It was blown over the cliffs by the runway at RAF Dale.  He is buried at Newark upon Trent Cemetery.  He won the Cross of Valour three times and the Silver Cross of the Order of Virtuti Militari.

Description

Polish Fighter Squadron badge on the left (white circle with red stripes). No. 303 Polish Fighter Squadron.Squadron is famous for claiming the highest number of enemy (German Luftwaffe) kills during the Battle of Britain of all fighter squadrons then in operation through September to October 1940.The squadron was disbanded in December 1946.

304 (POLISH) SQUADRON – RAF

MARIAN JERZY MODRZEWSKI He was an air gunner, born on 24th April 1916 and killed on the way to an anti-submarine sweep when HX384 was struck by ferocious cross winds on 12th August 1942.  It was blown over the cliffs by the runway at RAF Dale.  He is buried at Newark upon Trent Cemetery.  He was awarded the Krzyz Walechznych (Cross of Valour) by Air Vice Marshal Ujejski on 21st November 1941; he won this medal on two further occasions and also won the Silver Cross of the Order of Virtuti Militari.

MARIAN JERZY MODRZEWSKI

 

Annual All Souls which is held on the 4th Sunday in October at Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire

  2:45pm at Newark cemetery with a parade to the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves.

Annual Air Bridge  held on the 4th Sunday in September 1:45pm at Newark Cemetery starting with a parade from the Main Gate London Road, Newark to Memorial at the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves.

Giant flagGeneral Sikorski Polish Club - Perth, WAGiant flagGeneral Sikorski Polish Club - Perth, WAGiant flagGeneral Sikorski Polish Club - Perth, WAGiant flagGeneral Sikorski Polish Club - Perth, WAGiant flag

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Władysław_Sikorski

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

General Sikorski by Molecule Man.

clematis “general sikorski’

Newark cemetery Memorial, Let’s Remember The Warsaw Uprising (1944)  which needed the support of the allies to provide food and munitions to the Polish Partisans (AK, Home Army), resulting in the Polish Government in London, appealing to Winston Churchill for assistance. After many discussions with the Allied Command and getting no help from Russia, who refused even to grant permission for allied aircraft to land in Russia, he ordered relief to be flown to Warsaw from Italy, which was some 100 miles less than that from England, but was told by General Durrant, that an airlift of 2000 miles there and back, would have no hope of success, in that the loss of aircraft flying over occupied territory would be tremendous!

Although Churchill agreed with him, he nevertheless ordered the operation to be proceeded with. The task was allocated to 205 group, of which RAF Squadrons 148 and 178, SAAF 31 and 34 squadrons and Polish Special Services Flight 1586 were part. The losses were horrendous: for every ton of supplies delivered and recovered by the Polish insurgents one aircraft was lost (39 four-engine bombers total). The operation was called “Warsaw Concerto”.

The Suspicious Death of General Sikorski …

Prime Minister of the Polish Government in Exile, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Armed Forces, and a vigorous advocate of the  youtube.com – Related videos

  General Sikorski, Poland’s Prime Minister in WWII, stayed in the Rubens Hotel, round the corner from Buckingham Palace, until his plane crashed in somewhat mysterious circumstances, just off Gibraltar in summer 1943. Spotted this plaque walking by today. His death was suspicious in that he had just asked that the Red Cross investigate the murders of Polish POWs in 1940 in the Katyn Forest. Suspicious in that he was a clear obstacle to good relations between the Allies

The Polish White Eagle

THE WHITE EAGLE – 700 YEARS OF THE COAT OF ARMS OF THE POLISH STATE

The Crowned White Eagle has been the Coat of Arms of the Polish State for seven centuries now. It is one of the oldest State Coats of Arms in the world. There are very few other countries who have managed to maintain their coats of arms for such a long period of tim   General Sikorski by Molecule Man.

Memorial of Polish Squadrons (1918 -1945)
by BowBeforeTheTruth1 year ago14,099 views

img3.woopie.jp/getdata. php?pid=1103722qd191a

General Sikorski the wartime leader of the Polish Government in exile met his death in an air crash at Gibraltar on the evening of 4th July 1943. At the time General Sikorski and his party were returning to London after a tour of Polish Forces in the Middle East. The Liberator aircraft in which they were being transported crashed into the sea shortly after take off, the only survivor from the crash being the pilot.

Battle of Britain – “Repeat please!”

www.youtube.com

UPDATE: I have closed comments because I’m sick of the flaming going on between Polish and British members. My sincerest apologies to those who would just like to comment on how much they like the film, the scene, or any thing else productive. Blame those who can’t forgo their egos or just let sleep..

Polish pilots during II world war. First to fight

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JmO8Ku85RnY&feature=related12:01

Battle Of Britain-Poland’s Pilots Of 303 Squadr…

by church0Fnoise

 

Battle of Britain Heroes

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0jnZx6uCOJ4&feature=related

Battle of Britain Forgotten Heroes.2,944 pilots took part in the historic Battle of Britain, of whom 497 lost their lives. Amongst them there were 145 Polish pilots, of whom 32 were killed. The RAF and allied pilots shot down 1,733 German aircraft and the Luftwaffe shot down 915 British fighters. 203 German aircraft were shot by the Polish pilots. In September, during the highest intensity of German attacks, 13% of Polish pilots in frontline squadrons were Poles, and in October, because of the RAF loses, the proportion went up to 20%. According to Air Chief Marshall Hugh Dowding, AOC Fighter Command of RAF: () all (Polish) squadrons swung into the fight with a dash and enthusiasm which is beyond praise. () The first Polish squadron (303) () during the course of one month shot down more Germans than any other British unit in the same period. Other Poles () were used () in British squadrons, but () they were probably most efficient employed in their own national units.” The changed attitude of the British towards the Polish pilots The commander of the Northolt RAF station, W/Cdr Stanley Vincent, like many of the RAF high rank officers, doubted the scores reported by the Polish pilots from the 303 squadron. He did not believe that the Poles obeyed the regulations. He wanted to see personally what was true. One day he flew together with the 303 squadron and observed the fight against the German bombers. After the combat he said: Suddenly the sky became full of firing aircraft, parachutes and parts of broken wings”. Vincent tried to fight, but every time he wanted to attack the Germans, a Polish pilot anticipated him. So he did not manage to fight in this battle. After the landing he said to the Intelligence officer: My God, they are really doing it!”. After the Battle of Britain, new Polish squadrons were formed. The aircraft with the Polish Air Force signs were seen all over the occupied Europe, fighting against Luftwaffe and taking part in bombing raids over Germany. In North Africa, the famous Polish Fighting Team (the so-called Skalski’s Circus”) was formed. The Polish pilots entered the combat in Italy and covered the landing in Normandy. When the World War Two was over, the Polish Air Force numbered 15 squadrons: seven day fighter squadrons (302, 303, 306, 308, 315, 316 and 317), one night fighter squadron (307), four bomber ones (300, 301, 304 and 305), one army cooperation squadron (later fighter reconnaissance squadron, then bomber fighter, later fighter – 309), one fighter reconnaissance squadron (318) as well as one air observation post (663). Polish squadrons were used also as occupational forces in Germany. According to official documents “Battle of Britain” was the intensive preparations to defence and combat of Royal Air Force against Luftwaffe since September 10 till October 31, 1940. Main effort during this fight was taken by RAF Fighter Command. Contribution of fighter pilots to defence of Great Britain is the best illustrated by Sir Winston Churchill words: Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few”. We Polish, living in United Europe 68 years after “Battle of Britain”, are very proud of that among so few” were also ours compatriots pilots of two Polish fighter squadrons and detached to RAF units. We still remember about “the few” who reversed the course of history and prevented the conquest of Europe by Germany. Far away from Homeland, to which a lot of them never would come back, they showed the world the best features of a Polish soldier: bravery, toughness and perseverance. Because of that, the following words on the monument to Polish airmen fallen in Great Britain are engraved: “I have fought a good fight, I have finished the course, I have kept my faith”. “A Question of Honor”: The Kosciuszko Squadron: Forgotten Heroes of World War II LYNNE OLSON and STANLEY W. CLOUD

Laurencegoff

General Sikorski Cap

http://www.thenma.org.uk

Laurencegoff

Polish armoured Forces 

The National Memorial Arboretum honours the fallen, recognises service, sacrifice and pride in our country. It is a spiritually uplifting place and is emerging as a world-renowned centre for remembrance. There are nearly 300 memorials for the armed forces, civilian organisations and voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving their country around the world.

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

01283 792333

Laurencegoff

Polish armoured Forces, Staffordshire

100_0272

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

100_0280
Laurencegoff
 The National Memorial Arboretum

 Croxall Rd, Alrewas, Staffordshire DE13 7AR

100_0302
Laurencegoff
 Polish Memorial, we will Remember Them
100_0273

100_0299

Laurencegoff

The National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire

 100_0304

LaurencegoffThe National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire, Laurence Goff uplifting visit

http://www.raf-lincolnshire.info/index.htm

RAF-Lincolnshire.info - the home of Royal Air Force and airfield history in Lincolnshire, including allied and other air services.
home :: squadrons :: stations :: memorials :: aircraft :: forums :: books :: abbreviations :: search :: links :: about :: contact

Happy Birthday! RAF-Lincolnshire.info is ten years old in October 2013 Keep up to date with information on events and commemorations in Lincolnshire: follow RAF-Lincolnshire.info on Visit RAF-Lincolnshire.info's facebook page. Like our page and stay up to date with our posts on facebook! Follow us on twitter and stay up to date with our frequent news items
Updated: 6 Oct 2013 Site pages: 1075 Page views: 50 000+ per month Home RAF Stations & Bases Full list of locations Squadrons and Units  A brief history Aircraft types Forum Photographs Memorials Crashes Sqn & Stn Associations Museums Maps Oral History Books Search site Links Sitemap Abbreviations People Finder Family history & research About the site FAQs Contact us Copyright Updates A brief history of the RAF in Lincolnshire Fighter Command Bomber Command Coastal Command How to navigate the site Frequently asked questions Version 2.5
this is a clickable map! Simply click on any station name to be taken to the appropriate page on the site

View updates for recent changes. RAF-Lincolnshire.info is dedicated to preserving the memory of all those Lincolnshire locations associated with military aviation and those who served on them. We aim to honour the heritage and legacy of the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force units and squadrons based in Bomber County. You will find summary histories ofairfields and other locations, and ofsquadrons and other formations. Use the map to the left for quick navigation to stations. You can follow units as they move from station to station as these pages are all inter-linked. There are pages for thememorials to units based at Lincolnshire stations, photographs of stations and details of aviation museums. This site grows through visitors’ contributions – see the ‘thankyous‘ page for details of some of our helpers. Although we focus on World War II we span the history of the RAF and its military aviation precursors from the dawn of manned military aviation to the present day. See the history page for an overview. Follow RAF Lincolnshire: Visit RAF-Lincolnshire.info's facebook page. Like our page and stay up to date with our posts on facebook! Follow us on twitter and stay up to date with our frequent news items

Click here to find out about the Lincolnshire Bomber Command Memorial campaign

General W. Sikorski by sarflondonduncKosciuszko Fighters

General Sikorski was killed on July 4, 1943 when his RAF Liberator bomber crashed into the sea off Gibraltar

CLICK ON FOR ANOTHER PAGE

General SikorskiLaurence Goff, Newark Cemetery,Newark Cemetery UK, Newarkcemetery,friendsofnewarkcemetery,newark cemetery Nottinghamshire

The Polish Institute and Sikorski Museum

http://pism.co.uk/history/index.html

Laurencegoff

REPUBLIC OF POLAND

POLISH ANTHEM

Mazurek DąbrowskiegoJeszcze Polska nie zgineła, Kiedy my żyjemy. Co nam obca przemoc wzieła, Szablą odbierzemy. Marsz, marsz, Dąbrowski, Z ziemi włoskiej do Polski, Za twoim przewodem Złaczym się z narodem. Przejdziem Wisłe, przejdziem Warte, Będziem Polakami, Dał nam przykład Bonaparte, Jak zwyciężać mamy. Marsz, marsz, Dąbrowski… Jak Czarniecki do Poznania Po szwedzkim zaborze, Dla ojczyzny ratowania Wracał się przez morze. Marsz, marsz, Dąbrowski… Dabrowski MazurkaPoland has not yet succumbed. As long as we remain, What the foe by force has seized, Sword in hand we’ll gain. March! March, Dabrowski! March from Italy to Poland! Under your command We shall reach our land. Cross the Vistula and Warta And Poles we shall be; We’ve been shown by Bonaparte Ways to victory. March! March, Dabrowski! As Czarniecki Poznan town regains, Fighting with the Swede, To free our fatherland from chains. We shall return by sea. March! March, Dabrowski!
Author: Jozef Wybicki. Officially adopted in 1927.

Freedom

n.

Wolność

Peace n.

Pokój

 
 
These Website has been set up to Remember the people who resting place is at 
Newark Cemetery

Latest – Polish officers’ bodies to be exhumed

Thursday Dec 02, 2010

The bodies of three Polish Army officers who died in the plane crash that killed their country’s wartime leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski, are to be exhumed from Newark Cemetery. Ministry of Defence (MoD) has approved exhumation of three Polish officers remains that were killed with General Sikorski on 4th July 1941. All three were buried next to each other in Newark Cemetery, and will return home to Poland with full military honours and for a post mortem. It was decide to bring back the remains of Colonel Andrzej Marecki Chief of operation Staff, Major General Tadeusz Klimecki Chief of the Polish General Staff and Lieutenant Jozef Ponikiewski Naval ADC. On July 4, 1943, a converted Liberator bomber from RAF Transport Command took off from Gibraltar for England. On board was General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Prime Minister of Poland’s London-based government in exile and Commander-in-Chief of her armed forces, returning from visiting Polish troops in the Middle East. After tours of Gibraltar and festivities, General Sikorski departs for London at 11:00pm. After reaching only 100 feet, the plane began a slow dive into the sea. Only the pilot survived. All others died or were presumed dead on impact at 11:06pm. B-24C Liberator AL523. A British inquiry deemed the crash an accident, General Sikorski’s death has long been the subject of enduring conspiracy theories. In an attempt to get to the bottom of the mystery, let’s solve this once and for all.

Newark-on-Trent is important internationally, as it is home to the Commonwealth and Polish War Graves where there are over 400 graves of Polish airmen who died during the second world war. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for Polish burials and this is now the war graves for people to see across the UK and the World. Former Polish Airmen choosing to be buried since staying in England after the 2nd World War.

A Memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and unveiled on 14th July 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war-time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander in Chief of the Polish Forces and war-time Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski (aged 62) in 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s It contains a memorial to Poland’s exiled war leader, General Wladyslaw Sikorski, who died when the aeroplane he was travelling in crashed over Gibraltar on the 4th July 1943.

He was so impressed with the care of the War graves and requested that should he die while Poland was still occupied he would like to be buried in Newark Cemetery UK until Poland was once again a free Country.

On July 4, 1943, a converted Liberator bomber from RAF Transport Command took off from Gibraltar for England. On board was General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Prime Minister of Poland’s London-based government in exile and Commander-in-Chief of her armed forces, returning from visiting Polish troops in the Middle East. After tours of Gibraltar and festivities, General Sikorski departs for London at 11:00pm. After reaching only 100 feet, the plane began a slow dive into the sea. Only the pilot survived. All others died or were presumed dead on impact at 11:06pm.

B-24C Liberator AL523.

Passengers 17 in total

1. General Wladyslaw Sikorski Prime Minister and Commander-in-Chief of Poland

2. Zofia Lesniowska Chief of the Polish Women’s Auxiliary

3. Major General Tadeusz Klimecki Chief of the Polish General Staff

4. Colonel Andrzej MareckiChief of Operations Staff

5. Lieutenant Jozef Ponikiewski Naval A.D.C.

6. Adam KulakowskiPersonal secretary to Sikorski

7. Colonel Victor Cazalet M.P., British Liason Officer

8. Brigadier J.P. Whitely M.P.

9.Mr. W.H. Lock (Never found, presumed dead)

10. Mr. PinderHead of British Intelligence Service in the Middle East (his position was never revealed to General Sikorski)

11. Bombardier Gralewski (Joined the party at Gibraltar)

Crew:

1. 1Lt Edward Maks Prchal Captain/1st Pilot 2. Squadron Leader W.S. Herring 2nd Pilot (never found) 3. Warrant Officer L. Zalsberg Navigator 4. Sergeant F. Kelly Flight Engineer 5. Flight Sergeant C.B. Gerrie Radio Operator/Air Gunner 6. Flight Sergeant D. Hunder Radio Operator/Air Gunner (never found)

General Wladyslaw Sikorski remains was exhumed from Newark Cemetery after 50 years on 13th September 1993.

During the Second World War there were a number of R.A.F. stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery. We must not forget the polish Airman and the Commonwealth they fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch. They fought to the end and then carried on the fight, we should be grateful. We certainly owe them a great deal of credit that they so rightly deserve.

Newark-On-Trent Commonwealth and Polish War Graves – YouTube

13 Jul 2009  Newark On Trent Cemetery, Nottinghamshire War Graves General Sikorski the Polish war time leader was visiting Newark Cemetery in 1941  One of my ancestors found his eternal peace under one of those white stones.

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Newark Cemetery Commonwealth & Polish War 

5 min

Over 400 Polish Airmen and service men were killed during the 2nd World War and are buried 

youtube.com

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves Are Buried 

12 min

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves Newark-On-Trent Laurence Goff Until we meet again.

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Newark Cemetery Commonwealth and Polish War 

4 min

Newark Cemetery Commonwealth and Polish War Graves, Newark-On-Trent. https 

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Newark Cemetery located on London Road 

11 min

Newark Cemetery located on London Road, Newark-On-Trent. Commonwealth and Polish 

youtube.com

 
  1. Newark-On-Trent Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

    http://youtu.be/gKmfH4DUiec Newark On Trent Cemetery, Nottinghamshire War

  2. Thumbnail 2:37Watch Later

    Commonwealth & Polish War Graves at Newark Cemetery, Notts

    Commonwealth and Polish War Graves Newark, Nottinghamshire. Over 400

    • HD

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Newark-On-Trent Commonwealth & Polish War Graves Newark Cemetery NG24 1SQ

Over 400 Polish Airmen and service men were killed during the 2nd World War

  • HD

Please contact Chairman 01636-681878  Mobile 07794613879

 

Others forthcoming dates

 Newark Heritage   September 2014 

 

Sunday 28th 2014

 Annual Air Bridge 1.45pm parade will leave from London Road Main Gate

A fly past from The Battle of Britain Memorial Flight (BBMF) A Dakota  around 2pm three times over Newark Cemetery

 

Newark Heritage at Newark Cemetery

The Chapel Interpretation Centre will be open by appointment

There will be help on hand to locate any of your relative’s graves in

Newark cemetery going back since 1856. 

 

 Pete Stevens from The Commonwealth War Graves Commission 

A talk about his work will take place in the centre in 2014.

Also in attendance  will be James Radley from Newark Town Council to locate a graves since 1856.

A guided tour of graves going a hundred years or so of the Great and good of Victorian Newark.

The tours will last around 45 minutes.

 

Sunday 26th October 2014

Newark Cemetery Annual All Soul’s Day 3pm Parade from the Main Gate on London Road

To the Commonwealth and polish War graves

The Chapel Interpretation Centre will be open before this event

 

 

Tribute to British Commonwealth and Polish Sacrifice that are buried at Newark Cemetery

Link and Title of pages by Laurence Goff on Newark Cemetery UK Website, just click on page

Home page

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski, Prime Minister of Poland’s London-based government in exile

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We Remember Them not just on Remembrance Day at Newark-On-Trent, Nottinghamshire

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General Sikorski was Laid to Rest in Newark Cemetery From 1943-1993

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We must not forget those of the Commonwealth and Polish airmen, they fought for freedom against the enemy and didn’t flinch

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Newark, Nottinghamshire England is going back in time over the years since 1856

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Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire UK Those Who Lost Their Lives during the Second World War

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Thomas Earp who departed this life into the next, former Town Mayor and Newark MP, Died 100 years

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A time to pray for our loss friends at Newark Cemetery

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Ransome and Marles former factory workers Remembered with a Permanent Memorial in Newark-On-Trent on 7th March 2011

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FRIENDS OF NEWARK CEMETERY TRANSLATED INTO POLISH

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General Wladyslaw Sikorski

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Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom

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If any of you have ever been to a military funeral in which taps was played; this brings out a new meaning of it

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Newark Cemetery Nottinghamshire, memorial website

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Lasting Tribute to British Commonwealth, Polish Airmen and Workers of Ransome and Marles bombing

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Remember those who have given up their lives for Freedom

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Lasting Tribute to British Commonwealth, Polish Airmen and Workers of Ransome and Marles bombing

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If any of you have ever been to a military funeral in which taps was played; this brings out a new meaning of it

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Newark Cemetery, Nottinghamshire, England Since 1856

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48 BLATHERWICK’S THAT ARE BURIED IN NEWARK CEMETERY UK From 1858-2011

Chapel Interpretation Centre, Will Be Used By Friends Of Newark Cemetery

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Lance Sgt Nathan Cumberland completed the Newark-On-Trent Half Marathon in 2.5 hours

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hlXqe8SSbTY

Polish Pilots in Battle of Britain 308 Fighter Squadron

http://www.youtube.com

filmik zrobiłem pod wpływem książki “Blisko Nieba” Tadeusza Schiele 308 Dywizjon 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbKHewA19l0

Battle of Britain – Spitfires Defend British Warships

http://www.youtube.com

A fictional Battle of Britain engagement during the Summer of 1940. The game used for this film was Wings of Prey PC. It was quite a challenge and a lot of f…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdetBvnjSHA

 

Polish Flyboys over Britain 1940

http://www.youtube.com

On a June day, Churchill had risen to declare: ‘The battle of France is over. I expect that the battle of Britain is about to begin. We shall fight on the be…

 

https://www.facebook.com/pages/II-wojna-światowa/111009272282209

1 min – 27 Sep 2009 – Uploaded by laurencegoff Dakota DC3 Flying over Newark Cemetery twice in this video at start of the Airbridge service held near the British Commonwealth  youtube.com – Related videos NEWARK – ON – TRENT CEMETERY WAR GRAVES 9 min – Uploaded by laurencegoff NEWARK CEMETERY, NOTTINGHAMSHIRE UK During the 2nd Warld War there were a number of RAF stations within a few  youtube.com – Related videos Newark Cemetery at Airbridge Remembers 10 min – 27 Sep 2009 – Uploaded by laurencegoff Newark has had close links with Poland and the local Polish community, both here and in Nottingham for many years. Many Poles youtube.com – Related videos
Links to British Pathe wartime newsreel.
Clip showing Polish airmen of No. 304 and 305 Squadrons stationed at the RAF Syerstone in 1941. http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=12565
Battle Colours for Polish air men. Ceremony at RAF Swinderby on 16 July 1941. http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=12831
Reception in Polish Club in London in 1943.http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=12370
1940. Visit to the newly formed two Polish bomber squadrons. Close up of Jozef Wasiak. http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=25002
Dancing lessons – Poles teach WAAFs.http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=47266
The 303 squadron’s, Squadron Leader Forbes, SL Kent and SL Kellett receives Virtuti Militari. http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=12011
President Raczkiewicz visits the 303 Squadron in 1941. http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=12613
British And Polish Air Chiefs Meet. http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=26055
Poles gets 500th aerial victory – Pietrzak and Langhamer of No. 306 Sqdn. http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=12143
VS. of King George VI inspecting lines of Polish and Canadian air men. King shakes hands with Zumbach and Feric. Urbanowicz waving his hat in front of lined-up airmen. http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=25974

http://pism.co.uk/history/index.html

Chapel Interpretation Centre at Newark Cemetery  will open on weekend  and on Monday and Tuesday by appointment for groups.

Contact  Laurence Goff 01636-681878 or by email  friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk 

Please give me a weeks notice so I can make arrangements 

In the public interest 

Commonwealth War Graves Commission

 Information on the burial places of Commonwealth soldiers, sailors and air crew

www.cwgc.org/

 New volunteers are most welcome

I have put this Website  together as a fitting tribute to the people who resting place is Newark cemetery. The views expressed our solely my own and do not reflect  Newark Town Council. It reflects my interests for Newark-On-Trent Cemetery Nottinghamshire. Any comments about this website are most welcome.

Laurence Goff  Chairman Friends of Newark Cemetery

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/lasting-tribute-to-british-commonwealth-polish-airmen-and-workers-of-ransome-and-marles-bombing/

http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

 http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/friends-of-newark-cemetery-fonc/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BK3vuWnHKGQ

 

The Commonwealth and Polish war graves are looked after and maintained by 

 Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Polish Maked a large contribution to the war effort, the Polish military in the West was composed of army, air and naval forces.

We are grateful to them.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/2069700/NEWARK-UPON-TRENT%20CEMETERY

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

information

 

    Commonwealth War Graves Commission

2 Marlow Road, Maidenhead,SL6 7DX     01628 507200

 

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves

Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark-on-Trent

Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

 

Newark Cemetery is open all year round  

October – March 8am – 6pm – Spring – Summer  April – September 8am – 8pm

Commonwealth and Polish War Graves, Newark-On-Trent Cemetery Nottinghamshire

 

Tribute to British,, Commonwealth and Polish and  their Sacrifice 

 

 The dark days of the 2nd World War from the British, Commonwealth and Polish Air Force “PAF” who also join up with the RAF

 

 Many were killed who resting place is Newark Cemetery 4 RAAF – Australian, 44 British Servicemen, 17 RCAF – Canadian, 3 RNZAF – New Zealand and 397 Polish Serviceman and  PAF Airmen

 

Interested in Polish War Graves?

Newark-upon Trent Cemetery, can be found in Nottinghamshire in the UK. During the Second World War there were a number of RAF stations within a few miles of Newark, from many of which operated squadrons of the Polish Air Force. A special plot was set aside in Newark Cemetery for RAF burials and this is now the war graves plot, where all but ten of the 90 Commonwealth and all of the 397 Polish burials were made. 

 

A memorial cross to the Polish airmen buried here was erected in the plot and was unveiled in 1941 by President Raczkiewicz, ex-President of the Polish Republic and head of the war time Polish Government in London, supported by General Sikorski, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Forces and war time Polish Prime Minister. When both men subsequently died, General Sikorski in 1943 and President Raczkiewicz in 1947, they were buried at the foot of the Polish Memorial. General Sikorski’s remains were returned to Poland in 1993, but there is still a memorial to him at Newark.

 

The Friends of Newark Cemetery have turned the former East Side Chapel into an Interpretation Centre, which includes display boards and information about both the cemetery and the grounds. The Centre is open every weekend from 12.00 to 4.00 pm by appointment and the Newark cemetery is well worth a visit.

For further information, why not look at:

 

 information 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/newarkcemeteryuk/5061378426/in/photostream/

 

Foreign nationals in CWGC cemeteries – War Cemeteries & War …

ww2talk.com/forums/topic/45212-foreign-nationals-in-cwgc…   Cached

The war graves of “foreign nationals” in plots maintained by the CWGC in the UK, including those who were the enemy during the World Wars, are looked after with as ..

 

Petition | HM Government and Commonwealth War Graves …
www.change.org/en-GB/petitions/hm-government-and…   CachedHM Government and Commonwealth War Graves Commission: To start looking after all forces … They must be maintained as a mark of respect and to keep them sightly …

Sleepyhillock Cemetery | Home – Spanglefish
www.spanglefish.com/SleepyhillockCemetery/index.asp?…   Cached… Obituaries War Graves CWGC The War Graves Photographic Project Polish War Graves Australian War Graves Canadian War Graves Looking After Sleepyhillock Monumental …

How to find graves in Poland – Notes on Polish Genealogy and …
polishgenealogynotes.blogspot.com/…graves-in-poland.html   CachedI need a place to keep my notes about Polish genealogy and … How to find graves in Poland … After the war, their graves were allowed to disintegrate …

 

http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Battle-of-Britain-Memorial-Flight/347039464914

General Sikorski with King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, inspecting Polish Troops in Scotland

Newark Cemetery can boast of having lot’s of impressive people that are buried in our Cemetery since 1856.  You can found an array of famous inhabitants who resting place is in Newark

  1.  The next Friends Of Newark Cemetery meeting will be held  on Wednesday 9th July 2014 at Newark Town Hall at 2.00pm

    Chapel interpretation Centre  at Newark Cemetery will open

    Or by appointment for groups .

     by Contact the Chairman Laurence Goff  07794613879  Home 01636-681878 or leave a message at Newark Town Hall 01636-0333 or by Email: friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk  

    We  need to found more Volunteers to welcome visits to Newark Cemetery by  showing around our exhibition, serving refreshments giving tours or help locate a grave for visits Spring of 2014.

    http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/friends-of-newark-cemetery-fonc/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

    http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/04/17/on-14th-july-1941-general-wladyslaw-sikorski-visited-newark-on-trent-cemetery/

     http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

     http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/07/07/general-wladyslaw-sikorski-prime-minister-of-polands-london-based-government-in-exile/

     http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2013/09/10/remembering-the-2165-polish-airmen-and-their-sacrifice-during-the-2nd-world-war/

    http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2014/01/23/the-national-memorial-arboretum-staffordshire-laurence-goff-uplifting-visit/

      

    Amongst the many well-known local people that are buried in Newark Cemetery include among the many graves are Memorials to some of Newark’s greatest benefactors and people who have helped shape Newark

    Lieutenant-Colonel Sam Derry, of Newark-On-Trent and former POW died on 3rd December 1996 age 82, many he RIP

    http://newarkcemeteryuk.wordpress.com/2012/05/22/lieutenant-colonel-sam-derry-of-newark-on-trent/

     

    Newark cemetery

    For over 150 years since 1856

    Our beautiful and historic Newark Cemetery, London Road, Newark, Nottinghamshire

    Open all year round April – September 8am-8pm, October – March 8am-6pm 

    Chapel Interpretation Centre (East side turn left at the Main Arch and enter at the red door)

    Will open Weekend by contact me. 

    Needing help to found a graves [plus a tour}

    Organised by the Friends of Newark CemeteryThe Chapel Interpretation Centre, at Newark Cemetery, will open by appointment for groups on Monday and Tuesday am – pm and weekends afternoon and pm. Please give plenty of notice.

    If you would like to volunteers at Newark Cemetery, we will look forward to hearing from you.

      Friends of Newark Cemetery Volunteer and  Newark Town resident

    It Will Never Be The Same If You Become A Volunteer at Newark Cemetery. Perhaps the biggest difference that you will make is in you. Volunteering is a life-changing experience. It will provide you with a new outlook and lease on life. You will understand better than most people how you fit into the family history of who is buried in Newark Cemetery since 1856. Make no mistake about it, this is an experience that you won’t want to miss.

    “I had the most unbelievable experience for the last nine years. It not hard work but hugely rewarding for me. I met so many great people and learnt so much about the Cemetery environment. An experience I will never forget and recommend to everyone.”

    Laurence Goff

    http://friendsofnewarkcemeteryuk.weebly.com/

     

     Friends of Newark Cemetery

     Laurence Goff

    Friends Of Newark Cemetery

    C/o Newark Town Hall/Market Place

    Newark-on-Trent NG24 1DU

    Town Hall 01636-680333

    01636-681878 {My Home Phone}

    Mobile 07794613879

    friendsofnewarkcemetery@yahoo.co.uk

    Click on  for location of Cemetery Newark-on-Trent

    Nottinghamshire NG24 1SQ

    Giant flag

    Laurence Goff  Chairman Friends Of Newark Cemetery Visiting Newark Cemetery

    Disclaimer

     In the public interest

    I accept no responsibility for the accuracy of the information contained on this website, which is a non profit project designed soley by

     Laurence Goff.  

    The opinions expressed  are entirely my own, and do not represent the views of Newark Town Council who have possibility of Newark Cemetery.

    Newark Town Council, Town Hall/Market Place, Newark-on-Trent NG24 1DU

    Phone: 01636 680333

    http://newark.gov.uk

    post@newark.gov.uk

    SAM_0309 

    100_0204

    SAM_0071

By Laurencegoff

Polish War Memorial, Northolt

This commemorates the 2165 Polish airmen who lost their lives in World War 2 fighting alongside the Western Allies. RAF Northolt was the main base for the Polish fighter squadrons. The memorial is by the Western Avenue/West End Road roundabout 

 

16 thoughts on “General Wladyslaw Sikorski Our remembrance for Poland’s War hero, Lest We Forget 4th July 1943 marking the anniversary of his death

  1. Hello. I have been contacted by some polish friends who reside in the Lincoln Area who are interested in visiting the Polish Cemetery. There appears to be an Air Bridge Assn. Service on the 26.9.2010. Is there a date for each year for a service to commerate the Polish Airmen who died in the war? There is a brief mention of “the last Sunday” in October but I cannot trace any further information. Any help you can give would be appreciated. Bernard Hoult

  2. Malo znanym jest fakt, ze NASZEGO WODZA I PRAWDZIWEGO PATRIOTE/POLAKA ZABILI ANGLICY NA POLECENIE Churchilla. Churchill podiol bardzo duzo zobowiazan w stosunku do Sikorskiego i Polski z ktorych nie planowal sie wywiazac.
    Dlatego na polecenie Churchilla/Aniglikow CZESKI PILOT PO PROSTU WYSKOCZY; Z SAMOLOTU POZOSTAWIAJAC WSZYSTKICH NA POLLADZIE ZDANYCH NA SMIERC.Sikorskiego Churchill/ Anglicy mosieli zabic tez dlatego, ze Sikorski ZAWSZE MIAL LANCUCHEM PRZYPIETA DO REKI TECZKE Z DOKUMENTAMI (ZOBOWIAZANIAMI)Churchilla/Aniglikow w stosunku do Sikorskiego / Polski. Churchill/Aniglicy sa najwiekrzymi lajdakami/ zdrajcami/ mordercani Narodu Polskiego. to przez Churchilla/Aniglikow i Roswelta Polska zostala oddana Bolszewikom.
    TO JEST PRZYCZYNA DLACZEGO AKTA DOCHODZENIA SMIERCI SIKORSKIEGO PO TAK WIELU LATACH NIE ZOSTALY ODTAJNIONE PRZEZ ANGLIKOW A WRECZ PRZECIWNIE, ZOSTALY OBKETE TAJEMNICA NA NASTEPNE 50 LAT.
    Polska/Polacy powinni byc swiadomymi tego faktu!

  3. Churchill/English killed Sikorski because of Churchill’s/English’s commitments to Sikorski /Poland which they did not want to honor.
    Skiorski always did have a suitcase with all important documents chained to his hand.
    Churchill/English GOT CZEHISH PILOT TO JUMP OF THE PLAIN AND KILL ALL ON THE BOARD.
    That is the reason why all investigation to the death of Sikorski after so many years English keep under CONFIDENTIALITY FOR ANOTHER 50 YEARS.ALL SHOULD KNOW THAT Churchill AND US President – Roosevelt SOLD POLAND TO BOLSHEVICS!

  4. They this was a great website and showed the greatness that us Poles achieved. Believe it or not, but the Nazi’s are supposedly coming back to Germany! Did you know that 10% of Germans have Nazi beliefs! That’s a lot of people there’s i think 30,000+ nazi’s in the US and that’s like 0.1% Cool website though nice info.
    Thnx bye

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